Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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a convenience to members, and not as a source
of profit, and are conducted on as close a mar-
gin as practicable.

The attendance was carefully estimated
each month during the year, and on several
occasions an actual count was taken for
periods ranging from ten days to two weeks.
As a result, the total attendance is placed at
over 600,000, or about 100,000 more than
during the fiscal year 1908-09.

The work of the year was carried out along
practically the same lines as "in the past,
especial attention being paid to the physical
and entertaining features. There was a
monthly average of 184 different men using
the gymnasiums during the year and 692 were
enrolled in systematic gymnasium work, with
a total of 10,475 in attendance, an increase



of 3,304 over the preceding twelvemonth.
Basketball and indoor baseball proved at-
tractive features, and men were trained for
participation in several outdoor athletic meets.

In the amusement field, local entertain-
ments, given by the members themselves, were
encouraged as far as practicable. These con-
sisted of dramatic entertainments, minstrel
shows, concerts, "smokers," debates and
lectures. Several professional entertainers were
brought to the Isthmus, and on three occa-
sions during the year, the people of the Zone
were given an opportunity, through the club-
house management, of attending grand opera
at the National Theatre in Panama. One
hundred and ninety-four entertainments were
held, with an attendance of over 38,000. In
addition, 119 functions outside the associa-
tion management were given in the club-
houses, with an attendance of nearly 17,000.

The clubhouse libraries were kept well
supplied with the latest publications. The
members availing themselves of this privilege
averaged 602 monthly, and a total of 17,821
books were withdrawn. The reading rooms
were well filled at leisure times, and on the
correspondence tables, which occupy a
space therein, 62,433 letters were written.

During the year there were 56,792 bowling
games, a monthly average of 4,732, and 179,-
949 games of pool and billiards, a monthly
average of 14,996. Seventy-six different
tournaments were conducted in which 1,184
players were enrolled. The average monthly
enrollment of chess and checker clubs was
46; glee clubs, 12; dramatic and minstrel
clubs, 28; camera clubs, 80; Bible clubs, 50.
In addition, 274 men were enrolled in educa-
tional classes, and 42 religious meetings were
held, with a total attendance of about 4,000.

The boys' department proved a successful
feature. The membership, which includes
boys between the ages of 10 and 16, averaged
65, and the attendance averaged 47. Forty-
two outings were planned and carried out for
them during the year. The plan of admitting
women to the privileges on two afternoons of
each week, as well as to evening functions,



OCCUPANTS OF COMMISSION QUARTERS.



The number of occupants of Commission quarters in September was 23,711, of whom
9,025 were white Americans, 7,697 negroes, and 6,282 Europeans. By comparison with
the statement of the labor force in September, published elsewhere in this issue, it will be
seen that practically all of the American and European employes and their families are
housed in Commission quarters, while only a small portion of the negro employes are so
housed. The majority of the negroes prefer living in lodging houses in the various villages,
or in small huts on the edge of the jungle. A statement showing the number of occupants
in the various villages follows:



Place.




Gold.


West Indian.


European.




Men


Women


Children. i Men


Women


Children


/

Men


Women


Children




242
365
174

15
252
155
384
577
226

83
753
134
812
930
172

47


86
260

59
2

73

86
220
309
104

32
194

54
168
272

22
8


113
107

77

71

83
195
264
117

35
212

86
159
2141-

16
6


152
311
113
208
177
149
433
297
190
141
310
409
1.169
1.037
610
274


20

17

3

11

40

115

144

116

115

48

104

57

20

290


30

18

2

12

44

113

150

156

115

55

144

67

32

386


269
15
124
417
380
194
488
190
233
247
184
579
1.473
281
206
370


23

2

2

3

10

10

48

51

47

34

16

5

34


31




3




2
11




13




56




91




47




34




15




10




34


































5,321


1.949


1.755
Grand t


15.980

jtal, 23.71


1,100
1. -


1.324


5.650


285


347







was continued, and in this manner the entire
community was served.

Although the clubhouses are not provided
with regularly equipped dormitories, 3,300
beds, improvised from cots and mattresses,
were furnished free of charge to members and
guests during 1909-10. More than 1,600
hospital visits were paid and magazines and
newspapers were distributed among the sick.
There was a monthly average of 14 commit-
tees and 79 committeemen cooperating with
the secretaries in conducting the work.

The advisory committee, representing the
Commission's interests in the clubhouses,
consists of Col. W. C. Gorgas, W. W. Warwick,
Maj. H. A. Brown, chaplain, Joseph Bucklin
Bishop and F. C. Freeman. Messrs. H. L.
Stuntz and A. Bruce Minear, who were on
the 1908-09 committee, resigned, and their
places were filled by Maj. Brown and Mr.
Freeman. In addition, executive councils
are appointed for each clubhouse to cooper-
ate with the local secretary in managing its
affairs.

Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the weeks ending
October 15 and 22, respectively, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




v - .il
6:30
10:13
10:08
9:20
7:33


3,092




2,987




3.872




2 945




3,287




3,650






Total


53:34


19,833






Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
yards.




10:52
9:21
6:51
9:17
7:41

10:05


3,228*


October 18


3,703




2,835




2,872




2,614




2,253






Total


54:07


17,505



Revolver Match.

In the revolver match held at Culebra,
October 1 to 9 inclusive, the results were as
follows: First, a 38 calibre new army revol-
ver, value $25, donated by a Panama hard-
ware company, won by C. B. Larzelere, with
a score of 407 out of a possible 500; second,
a silver medal suitably inscribed, won by F. A.
Browne, with a score of 391 out of a possible
500; third, a bronze medal suitably inscribed,
won by T. E. L. Lipsey, with a score of 374
out of a possible 500. The other contestants
made scores as follows: Wm. Hadley, with a
score of 345 out of a possible 500; H. F. Tucker,
with a score of 341 out of a possible 500; C. S.
Boyd, with a score of 322 out of a possible 500.



Money Order Business.

The money order business in the Canal
Zone post-offices for September, as compared
with that of September in 1909 and 1908, was
as follows:





1910


1909


1908




17.973 1 16,331
$466,127 S41 7.803


14,822
$429,990


Payable in U. S

Payable in C. Z


354.692
110.833


311,734
105.795


317.617
112,373



♦Includes San Pablo and Bohio. flncludes Nombre de Dios. ^Includes 58 Asiatics.



LOST — At the National Theatre, Panama, or between
the Panama railroad station and theatre on October 14,
a crescent pin of pearls and enamel. Finder please re-
turn to Y. M. C. A. secretary. Empire, and receive
reward.



October 26, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



69



COLON BREAKWATER.



Village at Toro Point and the Work In Progress
There.

The double trestle at Toro Point, from which
the rock fill is made for the new breakwater in
Colon harbor, is being built seaward at the
rate of three bents, or about 40 feet each
working day, and now extends about 1,600
feet from the shore. The trestle leaves the
mainland just inside the point, only a few
yards from the lighthouse and extends in a
northeasterly direction. Two piledrivers are
employed at present, one working on each
track, but these will be replaced shortly by a
new machine ordered especially for the break-
water work. The parts for the piledriver,
which will be the largest in the Commission
service, have been received but not yet as-
sembled. The body part will be 45 feet long,
and the machine will be able to handle piles
100 feet in length, driving them anywhere
within^i radius of 28 feet off center.

The trestle has been filled in with material
f roni the quarry for a distance of about 600 feet,
and partly filled in for about 850 feet farther.
In this work four locomotives of the French
type and 24 Western dump cars are used, each
train consisting of frc m five to six cars. About
50 more cars will be added to the motive
equipment within a short time. The French
locomotives are able to haul ten full cars each,
as the grade of the track ru.ining up on the
breakwater trestle is very slig..t. The trestle
has reached a point where the water is 37 feet
deep and only 80-foot piles or longer can be
used. From here to the end of the break-
water, between 8,000 and 9,000 feet, the depth
of the water varies from 37 to 44 feet. So far
only hard bottom has been encountere 1 rid
there has been but little subsidence and prac-
tically no wash of the material after it has been
placed. From 1,800 to 2,000 cubic yards of
material mostly rock, are dumped from the
trestle each working day, the output being
supplied by two 70-ton steam shovels, work-
ing at quarry No. 1.

Two more steam shovels will probably be
added to the excavating equipment later on.
There are two quarries available, but only
one has been worked to date, although the
second has been blasted and can be opened
at any time. The rock mass is broken up in
large boulders and is transported to the
breakwater in sizes as large as can be loaded
on the cars. The rock is of a soft variety, but
does not decompose in sea water. Explora-
tions farther inland from the quarry site have
been and are being made with a view to ascer-
taining if harder rock can be obtained. About
500 men are now employed on the break-
water construction. In addition, about 160
men are working on the reservoir. The pile-
driving and clearing gangs are composed prin-
cipally of West Indians, but Spaniards are
employed at the quarry and other forms of
labor about the camp.

All the buildings called for in the original



plans for the Toro Point settlement are
practically completed. The last of these, a
combination storehouse and office building,
and a machine shop and engine =hed, are
erected but not occupied. The superinten-
dent of the works has been using r^oms tem-
porarily in building No. 4, bachelor quarters,
for office purposes, but will be able to move
in a few days. The new- office is divided into
three rooms, one for the superintendent's use,
one for drafting purposes, and a third for the
timekeeping force. The new telephone ex-
change will also be located in this building.
The engine house and machine shop occupies
a site near the end of the point. None of the
machine.-y has yet been installed, but most of
it is on the ground. In one corner will be an
office and tool room 10 by 15 feet in size, and
the rest of the space will be utilized by the
engine and boilers, and the plant machinery,
consisting of a shaper, drill, planer, blower,
and all the equipment necessary to do ordinary
repairs, the most of which was taken from
stock already on the Isthmus. Two boilers,
type not yet known, will furnish steam for
driving the machinery mentioned above, and
also for operating a 50-kilowatt generator for
supplying the settlement with electric lights.

Nearly all the safeguards and conveniences
found in the settlements of the Zone have been
or will be duplicated at Toro Point. A large
number of ditches and drains have been dug
and low places oiled. The sick rate of the
camp has shown a steady diminution. On
October 22, only two of the 67 white employes
were in the hospital, and one of the cases was
the result of an accident. The quarters all
skirt the beach, face the east, and occupy
fully as favorable a location in respect to
ocean breezes as the quarters on Roosevelt
avenue, Cristobal, while the rainfall is be-
lieved to be less than across the bay, although
no accurate observations have yet been made.
The stretch of beach in front of the quarters
is being leveled to prevent water from collect-
ing in low spots, and when the work is com-
pleted there will be an excellent palm walk.
The road to reach the American quarters, and
those of the silver laborers beyond, will be
laid off behind them, instead of in front.
Half a mile or more south along the shore is
a bathing beach, equal, if not superior to any
found near the Canal Zone. It is reached from
the settlement by a path which winds among
the cocoanut palms all the way. On Sundays,
from 50 to 75 people from Cristobal and towns
in the Zone visit Toro Point and the bathing
beach, one of the Atlantic Division clapets
awaiting the morning train from Panama on
that day to earn- passengers over. On week
days, the clapet leaves dock No. 13 at 6.30
a. m., or as soon thereafter as possible, and
in the afternoons of week days and Sundays
at 4.30 o'clock, returning at 5.30. The Dis-
trict Quartermaster's launch also makes a
trip daily, leaving dock No. 11 at 9.30 a. m.

Work is still in progress on the 50,000,000



STATEMENT OF CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES TO AUGUST 31, 1910.





Department
of Civil Admin-
istration.


Department
of Sanitation.


Department of

Construction

and Engineering.


General Items.


Total.


Total to June 30. 1910..
Total, fiscal vear 1910. .
July, 1910


S3. 427.090.29

709.351.37

58.474.88

63.887.0S


$9,673,539.28 ! $69,622,561.42

1,803,040.95 j 26.300,167.05

156.006.64 1 2.216.849.78


$78,022,606.10

2,863,088.83

'80 015.85


$160,745,797.09

31.675,648.20

2.711.347.15










Total


$4,258,803.59


S11796S07 52 $100 488 355 32 $81502 672.13 $198,046,638.56







gallon reservoir on the Sweetwater River,
which is to furnish the breakwater camp with
a reserve water supply. The construction is
well advanced and will probably be completed
in time to impound sufficient water to last the
settlement* through the dry season. Water
is at present piped to the camp direct from the
headwaters of the river, and the gauge reading,
except when the engines are taking water,
shows from 70 to 80 pounds pressure.



PERSONAL.



Col. Geo. W. Goethals sailed from New
Orleans on October 22 on the United Fruit
Company's ship scheduled to arrive at Colon
on October 27.



Spanish War and Philippine Veterans.

All veterans of the Spanish and Philippine
campaigns residing in the Canal Zone are
requested to send their names and addresses
to John H. Lloyd, member of the Richard J.
Hardin Camp, Washington, D. C, at Gatun.
It is proposed to organize a camp of the
Spanish War Veterans' Association in the
Canal Zone, and all those eligible for member-
ship are invited to cooperate to this end.



A school for white children will be opened
at Bas Obispo as soon as repairs to building
No. 54 in that village can be completed. < >ne
teacher will be employed and there will be
about 20 children in attendance.



Contract for Clearing Trails.

Mount HopeC.Z., October 25, 1910.
Bids will be received at the office of the Purchasing
Agent on the Isthmus, Isthmian Canal Commission,
Mount Hope. C.Z. up to 2.30 p. m.. Monday. November
14, 1910, at which time they will be opened in public,
for clearing the Arraijan-Rio Grande trail from the
Canal Zone boundary to a point on the Panama
railroad, 600 feet below the Rio Grande dam, a distance
of about seven (7) miles; and for clearing the Arrai-
jan-Paraiso trail from the Canal Zone boundary line
to the Panama railroad, a distance of about six (6)
miles; and also for clearing the Arraijan-Cochinito trail
from the Canal Zone boundary line, south of Arraijan,
to the village of Cochinito, in the Canal Zone. The
work shall be done in accordance with specifications to
be had upon application to the Superintendent of
Public Works, I. C. C. Administration Building, Pan-
ama. Proposals may be made for the clearing of each
trail separately, or for the three. The successful biddei
wilt be required to furnish bond or cash deposit in the
amount of S25 for each trail as a guarantee that the
work will be carried out. Proposals should be enclosed
in sealed envelopes, marked "Proposals for clearing
Arraijan-Rio Grande, Arrai jan-Paraiso and Arraijan-
Cochinito trails." The Commission reserves the right
to reject any and all bids, to accept any bid as may be
deemed to its interest, and to waive defects and in-
formalities in proposals.

Charles L. Parker,
Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus.



Proposal for 86,000 Feet Guayacan (Lignum
Vitae) Lumber.
Mount Hope, C. Z., October 15, 1910.
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the
Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus, Mount Hope. C. Z.,
until 2 o'clock p. m., November 2. 1910, at which time
they will be opened in public, for furnishing 32.000 feet,
board measure, of guayacan lumber, of sizes 6"x6",
6"x8", 6"xl0", and 6"xl2", in 8-foot lengths, and
54,000 feet, board measure, of guayacan lumber, sizes
6"x6", 6"x8", 6"xl0", and 6"xl2". in 10-foot lengths.
Bidders will be required to indicate time necessary for
delivery of material, and submit sample of same.
Delivery will be accepted on board cars at any point
along the Panama railroad. The right is reserved to
reject any or all bids. Bids should be addressed to
Charles L. Parker, Purchasing Agent on the Isth-
mus, Mount Hope, C. Z.



Public Sale of Carpenter's Tools, Etc.

There will be sold at public auction, at the Quarter-
master's Depot at Mount Hope, at 2 p. m., October 29,
1910. a full line of carpenter's tools, such as awls, bits,
chisels, gimlets, mortise gauges, draw knives, planes,
saws, shaves, squares; also items of beds, chalk, surrey,
corn knives, etc. Purchasers will be required to pay-
in cash before removal of articles, and all articles sold
must be removed within 48 hours from date of sale.
These articles may be seen on any week day upon appli-
cation at the office of the Depot Quartermaster.
Catalogue wUl be furnished upon request. The right is
reserved to reject any or all bids.

Charles L. Parker,
Acting Depot Quartermaster.



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 9.



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs and Other Features.

The meeting of the Paraiso Woman's Club
was held in the lodge hall on Wednesday after-
noon, October 19, when reports of. the dele-
gates to the Gorgona convention, and papers
on current events were read. Arrangements
for the benefit dance to be held on Saturday
evening, October 29, are about completed.
There will be special trains from Gorgona and
Balboa. The hall will be decorated with the
club colors, and the club flag, bearing the name
of the organization, will be used for the first
time. The music will be furnished by the
Tivoli orchestra.

Much of the interest manifested in this
dance is due to the cause for which it is given
— the establishment of a playground for the
American children of the village. Paraiso
has over thirty white children of school age
and under, and the need of some provision for
their diversion is felt. To this end, a tenta-
tive movement has been started in the
Woman's club to organize the boys under a
captain for sports and scout activities. They
will be formed into a regular club and will
hold meetings under the supervision of one of
the club women. A similar organization for
the girls is projected, which will include sew-
ing classes and possibly gymnastics.

The meeting of the club on November 2,
will be "cup and saucer day," each member
presenting a cup and saucer, and tea will be
served thereafter at the close of each business
meeting. The Christmas bazaar will be held
the third week in December.

The Pedro Miguel Woman's Club held a
social meeting at the home of Mrs. L. M.
Vacher, Paraiso, on Wednesday afternoon,
October 19. The club presented the hostess
with a gold embroidered pillow top.

The meetings of the Empire club have been
suspended for three weeks owing to the illness
of the president and the absence from the
Isthmus of the vice-president.

The annual Christmas bazaar of the Cristo-
bal Woman's Club will be held in the Com-
mission clubhouse on Wednesday afternoon,
November 30. There will be a sale of fancy
work, cakes and sweets. A Japanese tea
room, and a toy booth will be special features.
As a result of the bazaar last year, the Cristo-
bal club was able to expend the sum of over
$100 toward the Christmas entertainments
in Colon and Cristobal.

As a result of the recent performance
given by the Ancon Dramatic Club at the
National Theatre, Panama, the sum of $228
has been donated to the Canal Zone Humane
Society.

The friends of Chaplain and Mrs. Brown are
invited to attend a reception given to them
by the Woman's Guild of Trinity Church,
at the Commission clubhouse in Culebra, at
8.15 o'clock on Tuesday night, November 1.



Church Notices.



The annual meeting of the Woman's Guild
of St. Luke's Church, Ancon, will be held at
l he resideni e of Mrs. \Y. C. Gorgason Novem-
ber 1. This will also be the seventieth meet-
ing of the organization, and will mark the
closing of the third year of its existence. An
election of officers for the ensuing year will
be held. The day v. ill be further observed
by a spec -ial service in St. Luke's Church at
9 a. m., at which time the corporate commu-
nion of the Guild will be made. The church



will be suitably decorated and memorial
hymns will be sung.

At a recent evening "social" held by the
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the
Methodist church, Panama, the proceeds
amounted to approximately $75. A part of
this money will be used to complete the pay-
ment on the scholarship in the Methodist
college maintained by the society, ten dollars
will be donated to the Christmas entertain-
ment, and the remainder will be kept in the
treasury to form the nucleus of a working fund
or missionary purposes.



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



Notice to Red Cross Members.

The general secretary of the American
National Red Cross has requested the Canal
Zone Chapter to elect delegates to represent
that organization at the general annual meet-
ing to be held in Washington, D. C, on the
first Tuesday after the first Monday in Decem-
ber. Members of the chapter who are ex-
pecting to be in the States on annual leave at
that time and who could conveniently arrange
to be present at the meeting, are requested to
send their names to the chairman of the chap-
ter, Lieut-Col. C. A. Devol at Culebra, as
soon as possible in order that a selection may
be made. Section 25 of the rules and regu-
lations for branch societies provides that
delegates to the annual meeting may be either
elected, or designated by the chapter chair-
man.

During the absence on annual leave of the
treasurer, Lieut. -Col. John L. Phillips, the
business of the treasury will be conducted by
the chairman of the chapter, and communi-
cations regarding the same should be addressed
to him at Culebra.

Preliminary to arranging for the annual
meeting, a meeting of delegates from the
local districts will be held in the office of the
District Quartermaster, Ancon, on Sunday
afternoon, October 30, at 3 o'clock. These
delegates will place in nomination candi-
dates for office for the ensuing year.



Dance at Corozal.
A dance will be given by the young men of
Corozal at the recreation hall on the night of
November 2. A special train will be run
leaving Ancon at 7.30 p. m.; Balboa, 8.40;
Paraiso, 8.10; and Pedro Miguel, 8.20. Re-
turning, the train will leave Corozal at 12,
midnight.

Masonic Banquet at Colon.

A banquet of Masons for the Masons re-
siding on the Isthmus was held at the Wash-
ington Hotel, Colon, on Saturday night,
October 15. Two hundred and forty mem-
bers of the craft were present, a special train
bringing the guests from Panama and the
villages in the Canal Zone, returning at 1.15
a. m. The dining room was appropriately
decorated in honor of the event, and music
was furnished by an orchestra. William H.
Decker officiated as toastmaster.



Ancon Club Declared Winner.

A decision in favor of the Ancon Athletic
Club has been rendered by the Amateur
Athletic Union on the question of the relay
race at the Y, M. C. A. field meet held at
Empire on Labor Day. The race was won by
Ancon under protest. This decision makes
the Ancon club winner of the meet, and the