Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 3 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

^-Cubic

yard

mixers


K-Cubic
yard
mixer


Large
Stone


Total


August 22

August 23
August 24
August 25
August 26. . . .
August 27


152
201
203
163
143
165


47
51
30

47
40
57


14

14
20


199
266
233
210

197
24?


Total

Previously


1,027


272


48

205


1,347
9,120








Grand total.


253


10.467


1







the resident engineer at Balboa, and the work
which consisted of drilling, blasting, and oper-
ation of the rock breaker Vulcan and drill
barge Teredo, will continue to be in his charge
1 he suction dredge Culebra broke a blade
in its propeller on Saturday, August 20 by
staking a log in the channel. A new biade
was fitted, and the boat was ready for service
again the following tide.

Clapet No. 10 is on the gridiron at the ship-
ways where it is being equipped with a sand
excluding device designed to prevent sand
from cutting the propeller shaft and bushing
Work on the concrete barge, under erection
near the shipways, is advancing steadily
The frame work is in place and the laying of
concrete was begun last week. The barge will
be used for general purposes about the harbor
The construction of a dump scow of rein-
forced concrete, which will be larger than any
so far built, is contemplated.

Concrete in Gatun Locks.

A statement of the concrete placed in
Gatun Locks for the week ending August 27
and the total to that date, follows:



Balboa Notes.
Barge No. /, the first of the four dump
barges erected at the Balboa shipways over
two years ago, is receiving a general over-
hauling. These barges were built by the
Maryland Steel Company, and shipped to the
Isthmus in sections to be put together at
Balboa. They are giving good service, and
this is the first time No. 4 has been laid up
for repairs since it was placed in commission.
The steamer Cuzco from Puget Sound, laden
wuh 742,000 feet of mixed lumber, reached
the port of Balboa on Wednesday, August 24
with a heavy list to port, caused by the shift-
ing of its deck load. It was met in the chan-
nel and towed to the Panama railroad wharf
by one of the Pacific Division tugs.

The position of superintendent of suba-
queous excavation in the Pacific Division has
been abolished. The office was directly under





Cubic Yards.




Con- Auxil-
struction iary
plant. plant.


Large
stone.


Total,


Aug : 22

Augl jt 23

August 24

August 25

August 26

August 27


1.822
2,182
1,918
1.936
1,626
2,134


882
878
932
1.018
988
952


330

254

250

314JC

326

250^


3,034

3,314

3,100

3,268'J

2,940 '

3,336g


Total

Previously


11,618


5,650


1.725


18,993
555,083K










Grand total . .


>74,076J<


.






1



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN JULY.

rai^af'Lf of thisTumtf 2990li^C^ J"* °V^ *"* ^ ^ *™™
work, composed almost entirely of wh L A em P lo y es - ™e K°U force on the Canal
was necessary during the montt 1 Americans, was 4,380. No labor recruiting

terltcS by ^t^^^^Si^l ^ ^ ?"** ° f *"* ^~

pants numbered 5,103, an increase of 55 Of th l^l?? '" J une ' and ^ occu-

children. Bachelor quarters occupied h ? 'WH-" ,' J ' 775 were w °™n, and 1.659

occupants numbered 1,576, of who^ wL SLn'^L?? T^ 1 ' 925and the
European laborers numbered 303, an The Occupants 851 Z h ?"*"*"• ^^ by
the number of occupants, 5,417 The familv ml Z -a u ^'° r 1 uarters . 1", and

1,078, and the occupants 3,522 bactelo "uart'ers 258 ZZl ^ ^ i"**" 8 nUmbered



Best Week's Record at Pedro Miguel

A total of 12,118 cubic yards of concrete
was laid in the locks at Pedro Miguel during
the week ending August 27, which is 744 cubic
yards more than was laid during any one
previous week since concrete laying at this
point was begun. The record for the six
8-hour working days, and the total to August
August 28, follows: g



Date


Concrete
placed.


Large
stone.

51
50
20
29
112
»30


| Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Total.


August 22.
August 23.
August 24.
August 25.
August 26.
August 27.


1,886
2,076
1,916
1.878
2,042
2,028


28:00
31:00
28:50
28:50
29:00
28:00


4
4
4
4
4
4


1,937
2,126
1,936
1,907
2.154
2,058


Total . . .
Previou. ly


ll",8J


292
2,467


173:00


4


12,118
244,014








Grand
total.


2,759


256,132














Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
August 27, follows:



. ate.



Const'ct'n and Eng'r'ng.
Civil Administration.

Sanitation

Quartermaster's

Subsistence

Disbursements "['

Kxaminat'n of Accounts



August 22.
August 23 .
August 24.
August 25.
August 26.
August 27.

Total . . .



Total » 6,701 2134 366



75:01



Hours




worked.


Yards.


11:41


3,690


3:52


1.080


13:38


4,018


16:57


4,527


15:10


3.149


13:43


2.845



19,309



303 I 25.512 4.380 29.901



^ri^iir'^^



An additional track shifter for use on the
dry fill of Gatun Dam has been ordered at
ijorgona shops.



August 31, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



3



LAND SURVEY.



Work Preparatory to Opening Government Lands
to Farmers.

Field work on the survey of the land area
of the Canal Zone as it will be after the com-
pletion of the Canal has been begun. The
survey will be prosecuted for the Canal Zone
government by the Third Division of the
office of the Chief Engineer, and the expenses
will be paid from an appropriation of $75,000
made for this purpose by the Congress at its
last session.

It will be based on the triangulation sur-
vey of the Zone, which is nearly completed,
with the initial point of the system of rect-
angular coordinates on Balboa Hill, the top
of which is visible from hills in all parts of the
Zone. A standard meridian and base line will
intersect in the triangulation station on that
hill, and boundary lines, run parallel with
this meridian and base line respectively, will
divide the line into quadrilaterals with
sides measuring two kilometers, about (1.24
statute miles), and containing 4 square kilo-
meters, equivalent to 400 hectares (988.42
acres). Certain of the boundary lines at a
distance of not more than 10 kilometers (6.21
miles) from one another will be run with the
utmost care and will be known as "standard
guide lines," and all intermediate bou-4ary
lines will be carefully adjusted with refe^nce
to these guide lines. Field measurements
on the guide lines will be as infrequent as pos-
sible, intersections from triangulation sta-
tions, with short spurs carefully measured and
checked, being used to control direction.

It is planned to prosecute the work in the
following order, starting from the initial point
on Balboa Hill: (1) Southeast quadrant,
which includes all Zone lands approximately
south and east of Las Cascadas. (2) North-
east quadrant, including all Zone lands approx-
imately north of Las Cascadas and east of
Gorgona. (3) Northwest quadrant, includ-
ing all Zone lands north and west of Balboa
Hill. (4) The remaining lands.

During the progress of work on the bound-
ary lines the topographer, in addition to
his other work, will carefully note all existing
property lines, clearings, trails, streams, and
other natural or artificial features. He will
also make notes regarding the character of
the country passed over, stating fully whether
it be swampy or hilly, roc'^v or fertile, and,
where possible, will get in nation from the
natives as to the charactt 'f «-he crops to
which the soil is best adapt a. FuH notes
will be made regarding the character and
amount of vegetation, whether the trees be
of hard or soft wood, and the probable com-
position of the rocks and soil. Notes will
also be made as to the best location for trails
for opening up the country.

The purpose of the land survey is to get
accurate data on which a system of land
leasing may be built up, in accordance with
the Act of Congress of February' 27, 1909,
which provides for 25-year renewable leases
of tracts of not over 50 hectares, to persons
2 1 years of age or over, who satisfy the Govern-
ment that they expect to settle upon and culti-
vate the land. This data will be placed on
three maps or plans, as follows:

(1) Large scale record plans, 56 by 48
inches, scale 1 to 2,000, or approximately one
inch to 167 feet. Each of these plans will
cover 4 square kilometers of territory, will be
used as a record plan of the allotments in that



quadrilateral, and will contain all information
regarding the location in detail. It would
require 500 of these sheets to cover the Zone,
land and water.

(2) Medium scale district plans, scale 1 to
20,000, or approximately one inch to one-third
of a mile. These plans will cover the entire
Zone, their boundaries being limited by the
drainage basins of the principal streams. They
will show the general lay of the land, its
topography and availability for general devel-
opment. The principal use of these plans will
be in the comprehensive laying out of roads
and trails; and the interrelation of villages
and plantations, the character of the country
and its adaptability for farming, grazing or
plantation work will be shown.

(3) Small scale general map of the Zone,
including Gatun Lake.scale 1 to 40,000 approx-
imately five-eighths of an inch per mile. This
will be the general map of the entire territory
and will contain some information in regard
to the territory immediately contiguous on
either side of the Zone lines.

The sections will be designated or indexed
by numbers, beginning with the origin of the
system on Balboa Hill and progressing north,
south, east, and west, along the axes, the
quadrant in which the section is located being
shown by the initial letters of the direction
words. Thus, a section situated in the south-
east quadrant at a point 8 kilometers south
and 11 kilometers east of Balboa Hill would
be indicated "S. 8; E. 11."



Promotions in Engineering Positions.
In accordance with recommendations of a
committee appointed for that purpose, the
following rules have been adopted for exami-
nations to procure eligibles for promotion
among rodmen and levelmen employed on the
Canal or the Panama railroad:

1. First examination to be held on the last
Sunday in October and first Sunday in Novem-
ber, 1910. All rodmen and levelmen in the
service of the Commission and Panama Rail-
road Company to be notified that they are
expected to enter the examination on one of
these dates, provided however, that if possi-
ble, arrangements should be made to examine
all applicants at the same time, and if this is
not practicable, and examinations are held
on different dates the problems and engi-
neering questions be changed for the second
Sunday's examination.

2. Subject to further consideration, exam-
inations will be held every six months and all
rodmen and levelmen who have not been pre-
viously examined be required to enter.

3. No employe shall be considered eligible
for promotion from rodman to levelman and
from levelman to transitman until he has
submitted to and passed the required exami-
nation. All employes who have passed the
examination will be considered equally eligi-
ble for promotion under such regulations re-
garding selection of employes for promotion
from the eligible list by the heads of depart-
ments and divisions as may be decided upon
later.

4. A rodman will be permitted to take the
examination for transitman in preference to
the examination for levelman if he shall so
elect, and in case he passes the examination
for transitman he shall be considered eligible
for promotion to levelman and from levelman
to transitman without further test.

5. No levelman or transitman shall be
selected in the United States for service on



the Isthmus as long as there are already on
the Isthmus men in the lower grades who have
passed the requisite examination and are
available for promotion or transfer to the
vacancies which it is proposed to fill.

6. Examinations will be divided into three
parts:

(a) Written examination, as per sample
submitted with committee's report. Relative
weight, 40 per cent.

(i) Education, experience and testimonials.
Relative weight, 40 per cent. For testimo-
nials applicants will be permitted to submit
original, or certified copies of letters from
previous employers, which will be returned to
them. A blank form should be prepared to
be submitted to the head of department or
division immediately employing the applicant,
who will fill same out and return to the Board
stating his opinion of the applicant's conduct,
ability and efficiency while under his super-
vision, using certain specified terms such as
"excellent," "very good," "average," "poor."

(t) Oral examination. Relative weight, 20
per cent.

PERSONAL.



Mr. H. H. Rousseau, with Mrs. Rousseau,
sailed for the States on his annual leave, on
the Ancon from Cristobal, on August 26.

Mr. W. G. Comber sailed on the United
Fruit Company's steamer Atenas for New
Orleans on Thursday, August 25, on his
annual leave of absence.



Building Gatun Spillway.

The amount of concrete placed in the spill-
way of Gatun Dam in the week ending
August 27, with the total to that date, follows:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large

rock.


Total.




100




















74
114
120


15
















Total


408


l.S


423












90 352











Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry for the week ending August 27, follows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



August 22
August 23
August 24
August 25
August 26
August 27

Total




University Club Dance.

The special train for the dance of the Uni-
versity Club in Panama on the night of Sep-
tember 3 will leave Empire at eight o'clock
for Panama, and returning, will leave Panama
at one o'clock the following morning. The
train will run only between Panama and Em-
pire. _^

Authority has been granted for the con-
struction of a rifle range at Corozal between
the Commission clubhouse and the foothills
The expense is to be borne by the rifle club
asking permission to build the range.



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., Mo. 1.



BASEBALL.



Free Transportation Conditionally Granted to
Players — A Six-Team League.

Free transportation will be granted to
Isthmian baseball players in the regularly-
organized league during the 1910-11 season,
providing certain stipulations are agreed to.
These are embodied in the following report
recently submitted by Commissioner H. H.
Rousseau, President of the Isthmian League:

Referring to the joint report of June 1 submitting
certain recommendations regarding the future conduct
of baseball on the Isthmus in which it is stated that
definite information in regard to obtaining free trans-
portation for the ball teams was necessaiy before arri-
ving at a decision, I beg to state for your information and
such other action as you may consider proper that the
following proposition has been tentatively approved by
the Chairman of the Isthmian Canal Commission,
which should result in securing the free transportation
desired and without expense to the Commission:

The Commission pays the Panama railroad for all
free transportation granted Commission employes, a
monthly sum agreed upon in advance as measuring the
value of services rendered. This contract price is an
even thousand dollars, and it is understood that the
value of transportation may vary $500 either way from
this $1,000, without affecting the contract price. Thus,
in other words, it is an average price. It can very well
happen then that the Commission could afford to offer
to include in its transportation, the ball players, without
affecting its contract with the Panama railroad. It is
assumed that baseball transportation would never exceed
$200 per month, and it will probably be nearer $150 per
month. If. however, by including baseball transporta-
tion, the Commission would become liable to an increase
in its contract price to the Panama railroad — $11,000
per month — it would expect to deduct the cost of base-
ball transportation from its transportation expense for
that month. In such cases the baseball league will
have to assume this expense itself for that month, and
for every month in which this occurs.

The Commission in granting free transportation on
these terms would expect to have the payment of base-
ball transportation guaranteed, which might be done by
the various clubs concerned authorizing any expense
for transportation on request of the Commission, to
be paid from the $100 cash forfeit put up at the begin-
ning of the season. 1 have looked over the monthly
transportation expenses during the past year, and it
does not appear to me that a contingency under these
terms, by which the baseball clubs would become liable
for passenger transportation, is very certain. I believe
that this arrangement is the most favorable one that
can be made with the Commission at the present time
regarding free transportation for ball players and if the
baseball league desires to make a final proposition to the
Chairman and Chief Engineer of the Commission along
these lines, he has indicated that it will receive his
approval.

The above arrangement is looked upon
favorably by the officials of both of the old
leagues, and a meeting will be called within
the next few weeks to act upon the report.

The plans for the coming season contem-
plate the organization of a six-team league
to take the place of the two former leagues,
to be composed of clubs from Colon, Cristobal,
Gorgona, Camp Elliott, Empire and Ancon.
This plan eliminates two of the four teams
that composed the Atlantic League last year,
but leaves the present Isthmian League cir-
cuit intact. There will be three ball parks
available, one each at Colon, Empire, and
Ancon, the Gorgona grounds having been
abandoned last season.



Labor Day Athletic Meet.

A total of 165 entries, representing 70 differ-
ent individuals, has been received for the ath-
letic meet to be held at the Empire baseball
park in the forenoon of Labor Day, September
5. Arrangements for the event are being per-
fected, and a special train will be run from
Colon to Empire leaving Colon at 6.45 a. m.,
and returning, leave Empire at 5 p. m.

The committee on management consists of
W. E. Burrell, chairman; Geo. R. D. Kramer,
secretary-treasurer; E. C. Freeman, Culebra,
in charge of transportation; W. H. Warr,



Gatun, in charge of advertising; A. O. Ludwig,
Empire, in charge of equipment; J. T. Hop-
kins, Gorgona; Wm. H. Geer, Porto Bello.

The officials in charge of the contests are:
Referee — J. T. Hopkins. Clerk of Course —
W. E. Burrell. Assistant Clerks of Course —
James A. Jamison, Martin Schwallenberg,
J. P. Mead. Track Judges— W. H. Warr,
chairman; W. P. Juley, A. Richards, W. J.
Wright. Field Judges — A. O. Ludwig, chair-
man; H. R. Seaton, G. C. McCullough, F.
Summers. Timekeepers — J. T. Hopkins,
Everest Dauphine, D. T. Edwards, C. H.
Ourand. Scorer — W. E. Burrell, chairman;
R. W. Hart. Inspectors — W. H. Warr, chair-
man; H. O. Hostetter, W. G. Ross. Announ-
cer — E. L. Emery. Marshals — Lieut. W. A.
Vickery, Sergts. E. C. Galloway, John Johan-



Wesleyan Church Missions.

The Wesleyan Methodist church in Pana-
ma, referred to in The Canal Record of
August 17, cost 2,000 pounds Sterling, about
$10,000, not $2,000, as stated in that issue.

A series of meetings termed the "annual
missionary campaign" has just been con-
cluded. Sermons were preached on Sunday,
August 14, at Colon, Empire, and Paraiso.
The preachers at Colon were the Rev. Carl
H. Elliott of the Union Church, Cristobal, and
the Rev. Mr. Jarrett of "The Regions Beyond"
mission, whose field of work for several years
past has been Peru. At Empire, J. T. Barton
preached, and at Paraiso the Rev. M. Britton
King. On Sunday, August 21, a public
meeting was held in Panama at which the
Hon. Maurice H. Thatcher of the Isthmian
Canal Commission presided, and the preach-
ers were the Revs. C. H. Elliott and E. G.
Cooke. Public meetings were held also on
week-day evenings. Besides the circuit min-
isters the following took part: The Revs. Mr.
Jarrett, C. H. Elliott, A. A. Nellis, T. H.
Thorburne, and E. G. Cooke, and Mr. Kent.



Civil Service Examinations.

Civil service examinations will be held at
Culebra as follows:

Cleric September 18.

Physician September 18.

Typewriter. September 18.

Civil Engineer and Super-
intendent of Construc-
tion September 18-19.

Draftsman October 16.

Postal cleric October 16.

Trained nurse October 16.

Stenographer and type-
writer October 30.

All the above are for appointment in the
Isthmian Canal Service, with the exception
of the examination for civil engineer and super-
intendent of construction, which is for ap-
pointment in the Quartermaster's Depart-
ment at large.

Applicants should write for information and
application blanks as early as practicable to
the undersigned. John K. Baxter,

Secretary, Isthmian Civil Service Board.
Culebra, C. Z., August 29, 1910.

Isthmus to New York via. Cuba.

The Hamburg-American line has put two
ships in the service between New York and
Jamaica, with calls at Santiago, Cienfuegos,
Manzanillo, and Havana in Cuba. Passen-
gers from the Isthmus can connect with these
steamers at Kingston, taking the ship that
leaves Colon fortnightly on Tuesday and
arrives at Kingston on Thursday. Expenses



in Kingston during the one-day wait for the
Cuba and New York ship must be borne by
the passenger.

The regular rate from Colon to New York,
via. Cuba is $115; to Santiago, $40; to Cien-
fuegos, $45; Manzanillo, $55; Havana, $70;
and the usual discount will be made to em-
ployes of the Commission or Panama railroad.

Premature Explosion at Ancon Quarry.

Four laborers, one Spaniard and three
negroes, were killed in a premature blast at
Ancon quarry early in the afternoon of Au-
gust 30. They were Leon Alonzo, Spaniard,
check No. 94458; Peter J. O'Gara, Montser-
rat, check No. 64567; Henry Jerrel, Mont-
serrat, check No. 75797; Nelson Dangloss,
St. Vincent, check No. 27638. The men were
tamping dynamite in holes at the toe or foot
of a mass of rock above the top ledge or
bench of the quarry when the explosion oc-
curred. The rock was thrown out of the hill
upon the bench where the men were at work
burying them. All the force in the quarry
was immediately set at relief work and the
last body was recovered about midnight

Tuesday.

Accident and Suicide.

John Jackson, an American boy, 13 years
of age, son of Henry Jackson residing at San
Pablo, was run over and killed by a train be-
tween Mamei and Juan Grande on Thursday
afternoon, August 25. He was employed as
a telephone operator in the transportation
department of the Central Division. He
stepped out of a signal tower in front of a
train of empty cars, evidently not hearing its
approach on account of the noise made by the
passing of a loaded train on the other track.
He was born in Plant City, Fla., and had been
on the Isthmus about 19 months.

Harry Tafel, an American, residing at
Cristobal, employed in the local freight de-
partment of the Panama railroad up to August
16, committed suicide in Colon on Wednesday,
August 24, by taking hydrocyanic acid. He
was about 24 years of age, had been on the
Isthmus since March, 1910, and was a native
of Pittsburg, Pa., where his father, William
Tafel of 472 New York avenue, resides. The
body was buried in Mount Hope cemetery.

Central Division Unloaders.

A statement of the Lidgerwood cars un-
loaded in the Central Division during the
months of June and July, 1910 follows:

JUNE.



Location.


No. of
unloaders.


No. of
trains.


No. of
cars.




3

3
2
3


895
836
475
724


17,005




15,884




8,825




13.756








11


2.930


55,470


JULY.




3
3
2

2


864
760
492

522


16,416




14,440




9,348




9,918








10


2,638


50,122





Bids will be called for within the next few
weeks for furnishing return tracks for the
electric towing mules for the locks at Gatun
and Pedro Miguel. The plan for towing
provides for one return track for the towing
machine on each of the side walls, and one
track on the middle wall. Only the return
tracks are needed immediately, in order that
work on the locks may not be retarded.



August 31, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Asso-
ciation.

CULEBRA.
The bowling game between Gorgona and Culebra on