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and their friends, arrived at Colon on the
Prinz August Wilhelm from New York on
November 1 for a visit of seven days on the
Isthmus. The ship called at Havana and
Kingston on the trip down and will call at
Port Limon, Kingston, and Fortune Island
on the return.



CONCRETE WORK IN PACIFIC DIVISION LOCKS.



The estimate of the amount of concrete to be laid in the locks at Pedro Miguel and Miraflores
during October was 82,500 cubic yards. At the close of work on October 30, all but 2,954
cubic yards of this amount had been placed. On Monday, October 31, 3,537 cubic yards were
laid in the two locks, bringing the combined total up to 83,083 cubic yards and exceeding the
estimate by 583 cubic yards. Both plants were operated on the last two Sundays of the month.
On Sunday, October 23, the two mixers in No. 1 berm crane at Pedro Miguel were operated for
a total of 6)4 mixer hours, and at Miraflores, two ^-cubic yard mixers were operated for a total
of 14 mixer hours. On Sunday, October 30, the construction and auxiliary plants at both locks
were operated on full time.

The concrete work in the Pedro Miguel Locks is a little over 44 per cent completed, 369,285
cubic yards out of a total of 837,400 having been laid at the close of work on October 29. The
quantity placed in both the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks during October — 83,083 cubic
yards — exceeds the previous best monthly record, that of September, 1910, by about 14,000
cubic yards.

The record of concrete placed during each of the six 8-hour working days of last week at the
Pedro Miguel Locks, as well as that of Sunday, October 23, is shown in the following statement:



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-Cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-Cubic yard mixers.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.
1.040
2.002
1.932
1.960
1,838
1,866
2,196


6:50

24:00
24:00
24:00
23:00
24:00
27:00


2
4
4
4
4
4
4


Cu Yds.






Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yd!.
1 040




184
390
332
250
300
378


5:00
10:00
9:00
5:00
7:50
9:00


2

2
2
2
2
2


25
31

2
10

6
10


2.211




2,853




2.294




2,098




2,172




2.584








12,834


152:50


3.71


1.834


45:50


2


84
3,414


14,752
354,533




















3.498


369,285



MIRAFLORES.



A total of 4,849 cubic yards of concrete was placed in the locks at Miraflores during the week
ending October 29, the record for each of the six 8-hour working days, as well as that of Sunday,
October 23, when part of the plant was in operation, being shown in the following table:





Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-Cubic yard mixers.


J-Cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.






Cu. Yds.
113
402
272
417
387
480
441


14:00
17:25
19:00
29:50
19:08
25:50
25:66


2
3
3
4
3
3
4


Cu. Yds.

35
32
15
55
50
20


Cu. Yds
113




236
346
250
500
464
334


9:00
6:50
7:00
9:00
8:50
7:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


673




650




682




942




994




795








2.130


47:00


2


2,512


149:99


3.14


207
963


4.849




44.776.5




















1.170


49.625.5



On Friday, October 28, No. 6, one of the new J^-cubic yard mixers in service at these locks
broke, it is believed, all local records of output for a mixer of this size in one day, by producing
190 cubic yards in 7 / 2 hours actual working time, an average of one batch of concrete every two
and one-half minutes. The same mixer nearly duplicated the performance on Sunday, October
30, when it turned out 186 cubic yards.



76



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV, No. 10.



P. R. R. RELOCATION.



Amount and Cost of Grading Between Gatun
and Gamboa.

A statement has been prepared showing
that the cost of grading on the relocation of
the Panama railroad in the fiscal year 1910
was 70.725 cents per cubic yard. Another
statement shows the cost in the months of
July and August by items, and indicates a
reduction. In the statement by months for
the fiscal year there is a considerable differ-
ence in the cost, due to the fact that the ma-
terial was charged against the work according
to the month in which it was ordered out
regardless of the fact of whether it was used
during that month. The monthly averages
are also affected by the yardage output.
This statement follows:



Month.



July

August. . . .
September.
October. . .
November.
December.



January. .
February .
March . . .

April

May

June



1910



Average cost per cubic yard .



Yardage.



165,706
184,955
180,524
192,314
168,294
169,513

214,957
226.251
255.344
225,624
223,248
243,165



Cost
per cu-
bic yard.



Cents.
70.70
59.40
74.70
78.40
72.30
69.80

78.40
59.30
81.00
81.50
64.60
58.60



70.725



It was estimated that on September 1 about
three million cubic yards of material would
have to be moved to complete the relocation
between Gatun and Gamboa to permanent
grade. Most of the temporary trestle, tem-
porary track, clearing, and right-of-way work
has been finished and will not be necessary
to any large extent in the future. From this
time on the material for the fill will be pro-
cured almost entirely from borrow pits, and
it is believed that there will be a considerable
reduction in cost of grading henceforth. The
itemized statements for July and August fol-
low:

COST OF EXCAVATION DURING JULY, 1910.



Total yardage, 197.000 cubic
yards.



Steam shovel crews

Dumping and doing temporary
track work

Drilling and blasting

Train crews handling excavation.

Clearing

Finishing ditching and perma-
nent track work

Supervision and other expenses. .

Ten per cent surcharge on labor.

Charge for engine service

Coal for steam shovels

Material



Total cost per cubic yard in

cents $0.6259



Cost per
Total cost | cubic
yard .



$7,010.80

26,640.95

8,969.80

10,246.15

842.15

8.148.25
5,167.00
6,702.51

14,545.00
2,748.56

32,309.40



S0.0356

.1352
.0455
.0520
.0043

.0414
.0262
.0340
.0738
.0139
.1640



COST OF EXCAVATION DURING AUGUST, 1910.





$7,247.45

22,530.95
8,827.00
1,209.15
9,882.25

5,284.75
4.001.70
5,829.33
1,740.37
13.031.25
28,698.48


$0.0303


Dumping and building tempo-


.0941




.0369


Clearing

Train crews handling excavation.
Finishing ditching and Monte


.0050
.0413

.0221


Supervision and other expenses. .
Ten per cent surcharge on labor.


.0166
.0246
.0073


Charge for engine service


.0544
.1198






Total cost per cubic yard in


$0.4524









The right-of-way along the operated line of
the Panama railroad is being cleared of trees
and undergrowth. This has involved the



cutting down of a number of trees of consid-
erable size along the railroad between Frijoles
and Mount Hope. One tree, however, the
largest on the railroad right-of-way, consti-
tuting a landmark near Ahorca Lagarto, has
been spared.

Traffic on Roads near Cristobal Schools.

Drays, carts, wagons, and all steel-tired
vehicles are prohibited from driving faster
than a walk along Columbus avenue from its
juncture with Fifth avenue to its juncture with
Broad street, and along Fourth avenue from
its juncture with Columbus avenue to house
No. 35 on Fourth avenue, Cristobal, between
the hours of 8 and 11.30 a. m., and 1 and 3.30
p. in., on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday of each week during the
school year.

Heads of departments and divisions have
been directed to instruct all teamsters accord-

' ingly.

Physician, Isthmian Canal Commission.

An examination will be held in the near
future for the position of physician in the
Isthmian Canal Service, for which qualified
persons are urged to apply. Applicants should
be between the ages of 20 and 40 years and
be graduates of recognized medical schools.
The entrance salary for this position is $1,800
per annum. The receipt of applications will
be closed on November 8.

John K. Baxter.
Secretary, Isthmian Civil Service Board.

Culebra, C. Z., October 29, 1910.



Clearing Zone Trails.

Two trails extending from the Panama rail-
road to the Canal Zone boundary line near
the native village of Arraijan are to be cleared
under the supervision of the Superintendent
of Public Works, in accordance with the notice
calling for bids published on another page of
this issue of The Canal Record. One of
the trails begins at Cartagenita, a Canal Zone
native settlement situated near the Panama
railroad where it turns to cross the trestle
over the Canal at Paraiso, and extends to
Arraijan in the Republic of Panama, a vil-
lage about one-fourth of a mile from the
Canal Zone boundary line.

Another trail in the direction of Arraijan
will be cleared, beginning at the native ham-
let known as "Hong Kong," situated in a
ravine just west of the Panama railroad and
about 600 feet south of the dam at the Rio
Grande reservoir. Before reaching the for-
mer site of Corocito village, the trail will be
changed to avoid crossing the Arraijancito
River.

The trail betvveen the Canal Zone boundary
and the native hamlet of Cochinito, situated
about half way between Arraijan and Balboa
will also be improved. It will follow the
route of the old trail through the land leased
by Dr. Rafael Neira, and its direction will be
changed slightly to avoid crossing the Caceras
River.

The trails are to be cut and cleared of all
brush, cane, grass, poles and trees not exceed-
ing one foot in diameter for a width of 20 feet,
and the material is to be removed and piled
or burned on the outside of the strip. The
total distance to be cleared is approximately
17 miles.

There were formerly fairly good trails be-
tween Pedro Miguel and Arraijan, and Mira-
flores and Arraijan, but these have been
abandoned to a large extent on account of the



lock work at Pedro Miguel, and because of the
patrol of the Cocoli Lake watershed, near
Miraflores. In 1906, the Pedro Miguel-
Arraijan trail was cleared and opened up for
the greater part of the distance. In March
and April, 1908, the Pedro Miguel-Arraijan
and the Rio Grande-Arraijan trails were
cleared by contract, and in April and May,
1909 the Miraflores-Arraijan trail was also
cleared by contract. In 1909, part of the
Arraijan- Rio Grande trail was cleared by
the residents of that district who worked out
their poll tax, and this year about three
miles of the trail was cleared in the same
manner. The trails above mentioned, to-
gether with the Empire-Chorrera trail, all
converge at a point a little east of Arraijan.
From there into the village the trail is well
traveled and in fair condition.



Changes in United Fruit Company's Steamship
Services.

Beginning with the steamer Metapan, which
is scheduled to sail from Colon for New York
on Thursday, November 17, the weekly sail-
ings of the United Fruit Company's vessels
for New York will be on Thursday at 11 a. m.,
instead of Friday at 10 a. m., as at present.
Beginning with the sailing of the steamer
Parismina from New Orleans on November
2, there will be a double weekly service of
this company between Colon and New Orleans.
There will be no change in the direct sailings
on Thursday of each week to New Orleans;
but a new service will be added with stops at
Bocas del Toro, Limon, and Puerto Barrios,
Guatemala. The steamers on this run will
leave New Orleans every Wednesday, arriving
at Colon Thursday of the following week at
about 9 a. m. Returning, the vessels will
leave Colon at 6 p. m., Thursday, arriving
in New Orleans Friday of the following week
at 4 p. m.



Missing Men.

Any one having information regarding the
present whereabouts of W. T. Coburn, who
was at one time in the employ of the Panama
Railroad Company, is requested to communi-
cate with The Canal Record.

Mrs. Laura Lester of 609 Davis street,
Evanston, III., wishes to hear from her hus-
band, who is supposed to be working on the
Isthmus, as she is in a destitute condition and
needs his help.

James Graham left New Orleans two years
ago with a string of race horses with which he
proposed to open a racing establishment on
the Isthmus; a few weeks later Mrs. Graham
joined him. Nothing has been heard from
either of them since that time. Information
concerning them should be addressed to The
Canal Record.



Obituary.

Mrs. Rose Sapusnik, wife of Leon Sapusnik
of Empire, died at Ancon Hospital on August
13, 1910. She was thirty-three years of age,
had been on the Isthmus two and one-half
years, and is survived by her husband and
four children. Her body was sent to the
States for interment in Washington cemetery,
New York City, on the S. S. Panama, which
sailed from Cristobal on August 23.



The contractors who have in hand the
work of making and erecting the gates for the
locks expect to have a force on the Isthmus
early in December to begin the preliminary
work.



November 2, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



NAOS ISLAND BREAKWATER.



A Gap of Less than 5,000 Feet Remaining to be
Closed.

The breakwater which extends from the
shore at Balboa, parallel with the channel of
the Canal at the Pacific entrance, has been
completed about two-thirds of the distance to
Naos Island, and the gap between the end of
the dump and the island is less than 5,000
feet long.

The method of construction is to drive a
trestle out into the water and make a fill by
dumping rock and earth dug from Culebra
Cut, and when this fill is completed to drive
another section of trestle. Dumping of spoil
was begun in October, 1907, and the progress
was rapid in proportion to the amount of
material deposited until the channel, made
by the French as an entrance into the basin
at Balboa docks, was reached. Then slide
after slide occurred to retard the filling. Time
and again a whole section of trestle with its
half made embankment would disappear over
night; then new trestle would be made and
the dumping continued. Since August, 1909,
in fourteen months of continuous dumping,
the breakwater has been extended toward
the island only 2,500 feet, but it has been
broadened and made stable almost its en-
tire length of 2 miles. In several places
on the dike the sum of the daily vertical settle-
ments of the roadbed amounted to over 60
feet in three months. In the fiscal year 1910
there were dumped on the breakwater 182,000
cubic yards of rock and earth. Not one foot
of the last mile of track now rests on the
trestle on which it was originally built.

The old French channel has been crossed,
and there are indications of firmer bottom as
the trestle nears the island. Even now the
70-foot piles sink through 30 feet of soft mud
before they find firm ground, and one day last
week the outermost end of the fill sank several
feet, making it necessary to suspend filling
until the tracks could be bolstered up to the
proper level. It is hoped the time has passed
when sections of the trestle and embankment
will sink below the surface of the water,
because the sinkings are becoming less mark-
ed as the work advances. At low tide the
nature of these sinkings may be seen, be-
cause on either side of the breakwater a
beach of mud has been formed by material
pushed out and up by the rock fill. On
August 9, 1909, a clapet ran into the trestle
carrying away several hundred feet of track
which sank into the mud of the bottom. Some
of the rail was fished out, but much of it was
not recovered. Recently this lost rail has
been forced to the surface on top of the mud
which the rock fill is displacing.

After each sinking of the trestle the tracks
are bolstered up and the dumping is renewed.
The amount that can be dumped is limited
onlybytheconditionofthe trestle. From 35 to
40 trains consisting of 20 cars of 20 cubic yards
capacity each are dumped at Balboa every
day, and in the fiscal year 1910 the amount
dumped there and in the breakwater dike was
3,835,091 cubic yards. The filling can be
done more rapidly than the piles can be driven
and the limitation on the breakwater con-
struction is therefore that of the trestle stand-
ing and allowing the fill to be completed.



the Pacora valley in the province of Panama
to make an investigation into the nature and
origin of a disease that is causing great mor-
tality among the horses on the stock breeding
farms.

Americans Injured in Panama.

Arrangements have been made between
the Canal Zone Government and the Republic
of Panama whereby Americans who are in any
way injured in the city of Panama will be
taken to Ancon Hospital for treatment, instead
of to Santo Tomas Hospital as heretofore.
It frequently happens that injuries to Ameri-
cans in the city of Panama are the result of
personal violence following a violation of the
law, and in such a case the Canal Zone Govern-
ment guarantees the return of the person to
the authorities of Panama to answer whatever
charges are lodged against him.



EXECUTIVE ORDER.



Notice to Rodmen and Levelmen.

In the notice sent out to rodmen and level-
men relative to the examinations for promo-
tion, it was stated that the second squad of
competitors should report for examination on
Sunday, November 5. This should have read
Sunday, November 6. It should also have
been stated in the notice that competitors in
the examination should provide themselves
with tables of sines, cosines, etc. Those who
were listed for the examination which took
place October 30, and were unable to attend
because of sickness or other unforseen circum-
stances, may attend the examination on
November 6. A. B. Nichols,

Chairman, Examining Board.

Culebra, C. Z., October 31, 1910.

Empire School Consolidation.

The addition to the Empire schoolhouse
has been completed, and the consolidation of
the Las Cascadas- school with that of Empire
was effected on Monday, October 31.

Improved Order of Red Men.

The regular monthly meeting of the inter-
tribal committee of the Improved Order of
Red Men will be held at Empire, Sunday,
November 6, at 2 p. m. All the members
of this committee from the various tribes,
and as many more as can make it convenient,
are requested to attend this meeting.

Codes Tribe, No. 3, of Empire has sent out
notices and invitations to the tribes to attend
their meeting next Saturday night, November

5, at 7.30 o'clock. They have three "pale-
faces" to adopt, and are arranging for a" big
smoker" after the meeting.

The committee on uniform by-laws is to
have a meeting on Sunday morning, November

6, at 9.30 o'clock in the wigwam of Codes
Tribe at Empire.

W. H. Kromer, D. G. I.
Colon, R. P., October 31, 1910.



At the request of the Government of Pana-
ma, the pathologist of the Commission,
Dr. S. T. Darling, has been directed to visit



Change in Sailings of Hamburg-American Line.

The Hamburg-American Line has an-
nounced a change in its sailings for New
York from Colon, which, however, do not
affect those of the steamers Prinz August
Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim. These vessels
will continue to leave on alternate Tuesdays
at 10 a.m. from Colon, via Kingston, to New
York. In addition, the steamships Sarnia
and Sibiria will leave every other Tuesday
from Colon to New York direct, carrying
second class passengers only. The change in
the service became effective with the sailing
of the Sibiria from Colon on Tuesday, No-
vember 1.



To Prescribe the Manner of Leasing Public Lands
in the Canal Zone.

By virtue of the authority vested in me I
hereby establish the following Order for the
Canal Zone:

Section 1. The Isthmian Canal Commission
is hereby authorized and empowered to es-
tablish rules and regulations, from time to
time, for the leasing of public lands in the
Canal Zone, in accordance with the provisions
of the Act of Congress, approved February 27,
1909, and entitled: "An Act relating to the
use, control and ownership of lands in the
Canal Zone, Isthmus of Panama."

Section 2. The leases for public lands
authorized to be made under said Act of
Congress shall be executed by the officer in
charge of the Land Office of the Canal Zone
Government, with the approval of the Head
of the Department of Civil Administration,
but the Isthmian Canal Commission, with
the approval of the Secretary of War, may
designate some other officers to execute or
approve such leases, when, in the opinion of
the Commission it is necessary or convenient
to do so. Wm. H. Taft.

The White House,
October 7, 1910.

[No. 1253.]



PERSONAL.



Maj. Chester Harding, with Mrs. Harding
and daughter, returned from annual leave
in the States on the,Turrialba, which arrived
at Colon on October 27.

Chief Justice H. A. Gudger, with Mrs.
Gudger, and Mr. E. J. Williams returned from
leave in the States on the Panama, which
arrived at Cristobal on October 28.

Maj. Edgar Jadwin and family, Mr. A. S.
Zinn and family, and Mr. and Mrs. C. M.
Saville returned to the Isthmus on the Cris-
tobal, which arrived on November 2.



Ancon Rock Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending October 29,
follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.


October 24


7:05
6:50
8:10
7:10
8:25
8:20


2.680
2.677
2,635
2,530
2,395
2,690


October 25


October 26


October 27


October 28


October 29




Total


46:00


15,607





Porto Bello Crusher.
A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
October 29, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.


October 24


9:40
9:54
9:49
11:28
10:45
8:23


3,400
2,942
3,046
2,536
2,455
3,194


October 25


October 26


October 27


October 28


October 29






59:59


17,573





Lock City Lodge, No. 5, Knights of Pythias,
at a meeting on October 4, adopted resolutions
of sympathy on the death of John J. Coit on
September 1.



;s



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV. , No. 10.



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs.
There will be a meeting of the executive
board of the Canal Zone Federation of
Women's Clubs and conference of presidents
at the Tivoli Hotel, Ancon, on Tuesday
afternoon, November 8.

At the first general meeting of the Cristobal
Woman's Club, in October, Dr. C. C. Pierce
read a paper on sanitation. The first meeting
of the art and literary department was held
in the clubhouse on Wednesday, October 26,
Mrs. C. C. Pierce, chairman of the depart-
ment, presiding. The subject for the after-
noon was "Famous Women in French His-
tory." Mrs. P. T. Murphy read a paper on
Joan d'Arc, Mrs. I. P. Eppelsheimer on
Catherine de Medici, Mrs. Pierce on Marie
Antoinette, Mrs. A. O. Herman on the Em-
press Josephine, Mrs. H. Grant on Charlotte
Corday, and Mrs. Charles H. Carter on
Madame de Stael and the Empress Eugenie.
The November program of the department
meeting will be "A Trip to Paris," and in
addition to the principal paper there will be
short discourses on French life in town and
country- In January, the annual compli-
mentarv concert of the department will be
held.

The Christmas bazaar under the auspices
of the home department, as announced in
last week's issue of The Canal Record, will
be held on Thursday, December 1, instead of
November 30. The sale will be opened in
the afternoon at 2 o'clock.

The Gatun Woman's Club held a Hallow-
e'en party at the residence of Mrs. C. H.
Stoddard on Friday, October 29. There were
25 present. On the same evening, the Union
Sunday school of Gatun held a Hallowe'en
party in the lodge building, and on Saturday
evening, a dance was held by the Kangaroos
in the Commission clubhouse.

The Daughters of Rebekah entertained
about 300 Gorgona residents at a Hallowe'en
party at the lodge hall on Friday evening,
October 28. There was a program consisting
of vocal and instrumental music and recita-
tions, while fortune telling and ducking for
apples were features of the entertainment.
The evening closed with an informal dance,
refreshments being served in the intermission.

The Las Cascadas Sunday school held a
, Hallowe'en entertainment in the lodge build-
ing on Friday evening, October 28.

The Canal Zone Pythian Sisters celebrated
the twenty-first anniversary of the founding
of their order on Wednesday evening, October
26, the meeting being held in the lodge hall
at Las Cascadas. The business meeting was
followed by a social session, refreshments be-
ing served.

On Saturday evening, October 29, a