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the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the sold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.



Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



2,240 pounds), which at the present price of
dynamite, amounts to $115,939. To this
should be added the cost of handling, loading,
shooting, etc., estimated at $30 per ton, or
$12,930 additional saving. The total saving,
therefore, exclusive of drilling and blasting or
of exploders and connecting wire, which are
assumed to have remained constant, is S128,-
869 for the period of three months, an average
of $42,956 per month. This is the result of
efforts made for some time past to reduce the
consumption of dynamite, and the reduction
has been especially marked since July 1, 1910.



Chairman's Monthly Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of October
is published in full in other columns of this
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a
detailed account of the progress of Canal work
in all departments and divisions.

Excavation in Chagres District.

On November 17, nine steam shovels of the
100-class, working in the Chagres district
of the Central Division, excavated 12,654
cubic yards of material, or an average of 1,406
cubic yards per shovel for the 8-hour working
day. The shovels were under steam 72 hours;
were actually at work 54 hours and 25 minutes,
and were delayed 10 hours and 35 minutes
waiting for cars. Other delays were experi-
enced on account of cleaning track, cleaning
dipper, and repairing shovel.



Economy in Use of Dynamite.

The amount of dynamite in tons of 2,240
pounds, used in the Central Division for the
months of August, September and October for
the years 1908, 1909 and 1910, is as follows:



Year.


August.


Sep-
tember.


October.


Total.


1908


Tons.
322.21
297.90
191.30


Tons.
324.65
360.20
199.05


Tons.
327.75
295.20
153.23


Tons.
974.61


1909


953.30


1910


543.58







The amount of rock excavated during the
period in question was as follows:



Year. August. September., October. Total.



1908.
1909.
1910.



Cu. Yds. I Cu. Yds. ! Cu. Yds. Cu. Yds.

907,746 1.054.526 1,015,143 2,977.415

1.043.355 1.107.649 1.196.297 j 3.347,301

1,177.621 1.114.765 1,076,678 ! 3,369,064



From this it will be seen that only 55.77 per
cent as much dynamite was used during
August, September and October of 1910 as
was used for the same months in 1908, and
57.02 per cent as much as was used in the
corresponding months in 1909.

The total saving for August, September and
October, 1910, as compared with the corre-
sponding months of 1908, is 431.03 tons (of



Hydraulic Fill of Gatun Dam.

The hydraulic fill of the east section of
Gatun Dam, which was suspended late in
August will be resumed and two 20-inch suc-
tion dredges which have been pumping into
the west section will be set at work on the east
section. The filling of the east section was
suspended, in order that the material already
pumped in, which had reached an elevation of
about 57i feet above sea level, might consol-
idate and dry out, and that the filling of the
west section on which little had been done
might be advanced to a stage secure against
the November floods of the Chagres. The
fill of the west section has actually advanced
more rapidly in proportion than the building
of the toes, and the temporary suspension will,
therefore, give an opportunity for increasing
the proportion of dry fill. Little chance will
be given during the months of November
and December for the drying out of the east
section, and the dredges will, therefore, con-
tinue to pump into that section until the be-
ginning of the dry season, when they will
again be transferred to the west section, and
the eastern half will be allowed to consolidate
and dry out during the whole of the dry season.
The fill in the western section is now at 31.7
feet above sea level, and that in the east
section at 50 feet above sea level, which is
about lj feet lower than when the hydraulic
work was suspended in August, the subsi-
dence being due to consolidation and drying
out of the material.



level and about eight feet above the normal
level of Gatun Lake. The present river level
is at about elevation 60 feet.

It is estimated that the approaches to the
bridge will require approximately 12,000
cubic yards of fill. The heaviest fill will be on
the Gorgona side where the bank has a grad-
ual slope, and there, an embankment 300 feet
long must be made. Less than 100 feet of
fill will be required on the Bas Obispo side
where the bank descends more abruptly.
There will be used in the construction of the
bridge, according to the estimate, 409 cubic
yards of concrete and 16J tons of old French
rail. About 200 cubic yards of excavation
will be necessary in preparing for the pier
foundations.



Concrete Wagon Bridge Over Mandingo River.

The Las Cascadas-Gorgona section of the
Canal Zone highway is completed, with the
exception of three-quarters of a mile of metal-
ing, and a bridge over the Mandingo River
between Bas Obispo and Gorgona. Plans for
a bridge, which will span the stream at the site
of the present ford, have been prepared in the
office of the resident engineer at Empire.
They provide for a reinforced concrete struc-
ture, with a floor supported by two 50-foot
piers resting on concrete footings 5 feet 6
inches by 16 feet. Each pier will be 4 by 16
feet at the base and 3 by 12 feet at the top,
and the distance between piers of 23 feet 6
inches from center to center. The length
will be about 130 feet. The road surface at
this point will be 93 feet 6 inches above sea



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The amount of concrete and large rock
laid in the spillway of Gatun Dam during
two weeks ending November 19, is shown in
the following statement:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large
rock.


Total.




202
246
242
204
192
282


4
12

6
10
11
10


206




258




248




214




203




292








1,368


53


1,421




103.535












104.956




180

202
540
240
218
184


8


188




202




540




240




218




184








1,564


8


1.572




104.956












106.528



Petition of Hourly Employes.

During the visit of President Taft, on No-
vember 16, he listened to petitions from the
Americans on the Canal work, who are em-
ployed by the hour, in which an increase in
pay and annual leave of six weeks, instead of
two weeks, were requested. The employes
were informed that an answer would be given
them as soon as the President arrived in the
States. That night a meeting of theboilerma-
kers employed at Gorgona shops was held, and
a notice of five days was given, at the end of
which the resignations of the boilermakers
would become effective, unless their demands
were acceded to. On November 22, practi-
cally all of the first grade boilermakers at
Gorgona had quit work. There are 122 in this
grade, and up to quitting time on November
22, only two of them had expressed a desire to
withdraw their resignations. About 75 of
the men have applied for, and have been
granted transportation to the States; others



9S



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 13.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



{.Continued.' 1 !



express an intention of leaving for New
Orleans by the next ship, and still others say
they will remain on the Isthmus at other work
until the matter is settled.

The petition of the hourly men had been
considered and refused by the Commission,
prior to the arrival of the President. On
Sunday, November 20, the machinists held a
meeting in Colon, at which it was decided to
take no further action until the decision of
the President had been received.



Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during two weeks ending November
19, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
yards.




7:50
6:50
5:25
5:45
7:40
7:55


2,920




2.710




2.040






2.635






2.632






2.730










41:25


15,667






Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




8:00
4:50
7:20
7:20
8:00
8:10
7:30


3,087






1.700






2,555






2,811






2,516






2,976






3,249










51:10


18,894







Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for two weeks ending
November 19. follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
yards.




7:47
9:40
6:33
7:45
8:24
7:26


2.586




3.007




1.973




2,499




3.505




2.966








47:35


16.536







Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




9:01
7:28
5:43
5:57
7:46
8:25


3,773




3,432




2,362




2,282




3.058




3.574



18,481



Spanish War Veterans.

The Canal Record:

Sir: I am heartily in favor of the movement
of organizing a camp of the United Spanish
War Veterans Association on the Isthmus.
Anything I can do to forward this movement
I will be glad to do. Yours truly,

J. Warren Keifer, M. C.
Past Com mander-in-Ch ief.
Spanish War Veterans Association.

All those eligible to membership in the
United Spanish War Veterans Association
please send their names to Mr. Charles Cam-
eron, Culebra, C. Z. This applies to all
eligibles, other than those living in Gatun or
Cristobal.



The highest record to date of concrete laying in the locks was made by the Pacific Division
on November 21, when a total of 5,564 cubic yards was placed in the locks at Pedro Miguel
and Miraflores. This exceeds all previous records by 1,133| cubic yards. The next highest
record was made at Gatun on November 16, when 4.443J cubic yards were placed in the locks.
On November 21, when 5,564 cubic yards of concrete were placed in the Pacific Division
locks, the operated plant consisted of six 2-yard mixers at Pedro Miguel, and of two 2-yard,
four J-yard, and one 3-yard mixers at Miraflores, representing in all 9| two-yard mixers. A
total of 78.46 mixer hours was worked, an average of 8.55 hours per mixer, the output repre-
senting 70.92 cubic yards per hour per 2-yard mixer. »

At Gatun, on November 16, the operated plant consisted of eight 2-yard mixers and they
worked a total of 65 mixer hours, an average of 8.1 hours per mixer, and the output averaged
68.3 cubic yards per hour per 2-yard mixer.

GATUN LOCKS.

Concrete work in Gatun Locks is about 43 per cent completed, 898,196 cubic yards out of
a total of 2,085,000 having been placed at the close of work on November 19. The output for
the auxiliary plant has been reduced for several days past on account of the necessity of using
the narrow gage equipment in taking out the slide, which occurred at the south end of the locks
on November 9. It is hoped that the removal of this slide will be completed in a few days,
when the output from the auxiliary plant will be restored to its normal figure.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 12-hour day for the week
ending November 19, and of the total follows; and a similar statement for the work in the
Spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue:



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-Cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-Cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers






Cu. Yds.
2.084
2.118
2.642
1.811
1.931
2,198


36:30
35:08
43:08
29:18
32:20
35:37


6
6
6
6
6
6


Cu. Yds.
576
712
1.552
538
584
622
69


8:40
11:40
22:00
10:10
10:40
10:40


2

I
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
291
231i
236i
201}
202J
299}


Cu. Yds.
2.975




3.06H




4,443}




2.559}




2,717}




3,142}




















Total


12.784




6


4.653




2


1.461 J


18.898}




879.297}








1










898.196



The 69 cubic yards shown for the portable \ -yard mixer are included in the totals for each day and were placed
as follows: November 14, 24; November 16. 13; November 17, 9; November 19, 23.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is nearly 50 per cent completed, 415,711 cubic
yards out of a total of 837,400 having been laid at the close of work on November 19. The
record of concrete placed during each of the 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-Cub:c yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-Cubic yard mixers.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of Concrete
mixers' placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.
2.230
1.910
1.812


27:50
25:00
24:33


4

4
4
4
4
4


Cu. Yds.
664
616
516
496
528
458


14:50
13:00
12:00
12:50
11:50
11:17


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
10

25
10


Cu. Yds
2,904




2,526




2.328




1.750 20:67


2.271




1.950
1,788


26:00
26:67


2,488




2,246










1 1 ,440


150:17


4


3,278


74:67


2


45
3.692


14,763




400,948


















3,737


415.711















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

The record of concrete placed in the upper lock at Miraflores during the six 8-hour working
days of the week ending November 19, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-Cubic yard mixers.


}-Cubic yard mixers. }-Cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of Concrete
mixers placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.




Nov. 14...
Nov. 15...
Nov. 16. ..
Nov. 17...
Nov. 18. ..
Nov. 19...


Cu. Yds.
486
572
488
400
484
450


8:67
8:50
8:50
7:00
8:33
8:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
258
413
516
450
470
394


14:25
27:50
31:50
31:41
31:75
24:50


2
4
4
4
4
4


Cu. Yds.
92
59
99
96
84
139


8:00
8:00
9:00
8:00
7:58
9:00


1

1
1

1


Cu. Yds.
12
1

7
43
31


Cu. Yds.

848
1,051
1.110

953
1.081
1,014


Total
Previously


2.880


50:00


2


2.501


160:91


3.67


569


49:58


1


107
1.515

1.622


T6.057
60.706}


Grand




















66.763}



November 23, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



99



PRESIDENT TAFT'S VISIT.



His Speeches and Impressions While Here.

During his visit of four days on the Isthmus,
November 14 to November 17, President
Taft made two public addresses, the first at a
meeting of the employes of the Commission
at Paraiso on November 15, and the second
at the banquet in his honor given by the Presi-
dent of the Republic of Panama in the city of
Panama on November 16. On the eve of his
departure on November 17, he handed to the
representatives of the press who accompanied
him a formal statement of his impressions.
The authorized text of these deliverances is
appended.

I.
HIS IMPRESSIONS.

This is the fifth time that I have visited the
Isthmus and have gone over the whole line
and looked into every part of the improve-
ment. It is about 22 months since I was here
the last time and the progress which has been
made is most satisfactory; indeed, it is re-
markable. The first thing that strikes one is
the fact that work is being done apparently
on every foot of the fifty miles of the Canal,
and is being done under an organization of
men, plants and materials that operates as
economically and effectively as if it were a
machine with Colonel Goethals in control of
the lever, which sets and keeps the whole
machine in operation. In my visits prior to
and including 1907 the question of houses for
employes; of commissary and conveniences of
life; of the securing of adequate labor, pre-
sented serious obstacles to overcome. Now
all those questions have largely disappeared
and are mere matters of smoothly working
routine.

When I was here 22 months ago, the main
question was the confirmation of the judg-
ment of Congress in having adopted the lock
type of canal instead of the sea level type. As
to the question of the lock type of the Canal,
the construction of the Gatun Dam and the
Locks to the extent to which they are com-
pleted has removed from every impartial ob-
server the slightest doubt as to the wisdom of
the decision made and the feasibility of the
plan adopted, and this conclusion has been fur-
ther confirmed and clinched by the difficulty
of slides in the Culebra Cut, which, while for
a canal of an 85-foot level, make only addi-
tional excavation that can be readily taken
care of, show that an attempt to sink the
Canal in the Culebra Cut of nine miles to a
depth 80 feet below the present proposed level
would lengthen the time of construction so as
to weary the patience of the American people,
would make the cost almost prohibitory, and
would leave exceedingly doubtful the question
whether, with the difficulty of the Chagres
River, such a canal was possible at all.

The Gatun Dam and Locks, with the lake
now 18 feet deep and slowly increasing to a
depth of 85 feet, which constitute the key of
the whole plan of the Canal, are so far ad-
vanced that taken with the Culebra Cut and
the locks at Pedro Miguel on the Pacific side,
they give a definite picture of what the Canal
is to be and inspire one with an eagerness for
completion that makes itself manifest through-
out the entire human organization created and
maintained under Colonel Goethals and his
assistants.

The reports of slides and caving in of the
banks in the Culebra Cut already referred to,
that come from time to time through the



press, grow out of a peculiar geological forma-
tion in which igneous rock and sedimentary
rock lie in juxtaposition, and the sedimentary
rock loses its supporting quality through its
exposure to the air, or is of such weak structure
as to collapse when the balanced support
given in its natural position is withdrawn.
Such slides, however, can be easily removed
by further excavation and a widening of the
slope where they occur, and they merely add
something to the amount of excavation here-
tofore calculated to be necessary and to the
cost, but the percentage thus added, both in
time of excavation and cost, is very small, and
not enough to increase the estimates made by
Colonel Goethals as to either the time of com-
pletion or the total cost.

The work is so far advanced that the time
has come for the discussion of plans for the
management and maintenance of the Canal;
for the tolls to be charged; for conveniences
at terminals; for economical disposition of the
vast plant; for arrangements of peculiar im-
portance to the United States Navy, and the
proper means of policing and defending this
greatest constructive work of many centuries.

The esprit that one finds among the Canal
employes and the enthusiastic, intelligent and
patriotic leadership that Colonel Goethals and
his assistants show at every turn and under
every emergency, leave no doubt that the
Canal will be fully completed within the time
guaranteed, to wit, the first of January, 1915,
and within the estimate made by Colonel
Goethals in 1908 of $375,000,000.

During this wet season we have been favored
with clear weather free from rain during our
stay of four days.

The Government of Panama is peacefully
pursuing its course and enjoying the prosper-
ity that the investment of $28,000,000 or
$30,000,000 a year upon the Isthmus neces-
sarily involves for such close neighbors as the
people ~of Panama, and there is a political
calm in the Republic. The authorities in
charge manifest every disposition to assist
the United States in its construction of the
Canal and to conform in every detail to the
obligations of the Treaty between the United
States and Panama, which makes such gen-
erous provision for the successful carrying
through of the great enterprise so far as local
conditions affect it.

II.
ADDRESS AT PARAISO.

Ladies and Gentlemen — I have come here
tonight at the instance of Colonel ' Devol,
who is at the head of the Zone branch
of the Red Cross, to say a word in behalf
of that institution; to encourage those who
are its members to continue their support,
and to urge others who are not members to
become so, because of its usefulness, not only
to this community itself, but also to your
international neighbors.

I need hardly rehearse the history of the
Red Cross. Those of you who are members
have had occasion to read it in the Red Cross
Bulletin, and know that it originated in the
charitable inspiration of a Swiss gentleman
named Dunant, who was present on the field
of battle of Solferino in the French, Italian
and Austrian War in 1859. Through his in-
tercession the governments of Europe were in-
duced to send delegates to a conference to see
if societies devoted to the aid of the wounded
and suffering from the violence of battle might
be encouraged by the combatants and made



immune from attack by either party. The
efforts of this gentleman continued during the
period of our Civil War, in which the United
States Sanitary Commission was organized
to assist the Medical Corps of the Army in
the service to the dying and wounded. The
United States Sanitary Commission expended
$5,000,000 in this assistance and received the
thanks and the lasting gratitude of all the
men connected with the armies on both sides.
Growing out of the efforts of Mr. Dunant, and
the lesson of the United States Sanitary Com-
mission, the Red Cross Association assumed
a definite form, and in 1882 the United States
became one of the national signatories to a
treaty to recognize the Red Cross in war as
entitled to immunity from attack, because of
its use to all combatants. A branch of the
Red Cross was incorporated in this country in
1893, but did not live to successful and pros-
perous growth. In 1903 it w-as reorganized
on its present basis. Miss Mabel Boardman
of Washington, procured the reincorporation
by Congress and the dissolution of the old
association, and under her inspiring leadership
it has come to very world-wide usefulness. It
does not compare in numbers or in endow-
ment fund to similar associations in foreign
countries, but it is growing. There is a plan
now on foot to raise an endowment fund of
$2,000,000, and portions of this fund have
been assigned to various cities in the ratio of
their population, and the interest of the lead-
ing citizens of the country has been enlisted to
secure the proper amount. The amount as-
signed to New York, for instance, is half a
million dollars. We have already raised
$418,000, and the prospect of making the
$500,000 is exceedingly promising. Similar
steps have been taken with respect to all the
large cities, and I think we may reasonably
hope that in the course of a year or more we
shall have a fund of $2,000,000, the income of
which can be used to form an emergency fund
from which, without inviting special aid, effec-
tive assistance can be offered by the associa-
tion to every people in the world who may be
suffering from any calamity.

Of course, the primary cause and origin of
the Red Cross was the suffering in the time
of war in battle, and the lack of suitable
medical and nursing assistance, and that is
its primary purpose now. But as the world
grows older, as intercommunication between
peoples becomes closer, as the destructive
freaks of nature work hardship and suffering
and death to a people, the fact is soon known
the world over, and the closer brotherhood of
man prompts the tendering of assistance
across international lines.

You have organized on the Isthmus. You
have a membership that comprises ten per
cent of American adult whites on the Isthmus,
which is a far higher percentage than is shown
in any state in the union; and you have already
contributed $1,500 to the assistance of your
brethren in Costa Rica, who suffered from the
late earthquake. I am not here, therefore,
to teach you your duty in this regard. You
know it, and, knowing it, have acted. I am
here to congratulate you on what you have
done, and to say to you only, "Do not weary
of well doing." I observe that the members of
the Red Cross are seated together, and then
that there are others who are not members.
I urge these others, if they would spend some
of their hard earned money for the benefit of
their fellowmen, that they cannot find an