Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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instrumentality more effective, more econom-



100



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 13.



ical, and better adapted to the purpose than
the Red Cross; and that every dollar that they
subscribe to that institution will be expended
for the aid of human kind, and will add to the
sum of human happiness.

I have referred to the endowment fund.
The only permanent fund that the association
has comes from the membership dues; from
what is left over from special donations, not all
used for the particular purpose for which they
were given, and the endowment fund. Of
course, whenever there is a great disaster the
association is in the habit of calling for special
contributions, and at such a time it is easy to
awaken the generosity of the American people,
and in time to secure ample funds. But what
the society needs is ability instantaneously to
send pecuniary aid to relieve such suffering.
The membership dues furnish some funds for
this purpose, and therefore everybody who
becomes a member and pays the yearly dues is
a contributor to this particular phase of the
cause. This is why it is important that the
membership of the association should be in-
creased in order that its usefulness should be
increased. Hence, the appeal for new mem-
bers.

And now may I digress from the chief pur-
pose of this meeting and from that which was
the occasion for calling it, for a few words
concerning the great work of construction in
which you are all engaged. This is the fifth
visit which I have made to the Isthmus since
the United States acquired title to the Canal
from the French canal company. The first I
made in April, or May, of 1904. Then, sub-
stantially no work had been done except a lit-
tle experimental excavation in Culebra Cut
under the shadow of Contractor's and Gold
Hills. It was not then settled whether the
Canal should be sea level or a lock canal.
Gatun and Miraflores and Pedro Miguel were
sleeping peacefully, with no knowledge of the
world-wide reputation that they were subse-
quently to acquire. The hills that the relocated
Panama railroad has cut through; the valleys
that have been crossed by its immense fills
were in the center of undisturbed forest and
jungle. Colon was reeking with filth and
disease. The city of Panama was picturesque,
but its condition was unsanitary and its
streets were so badly paved as to make a visit
to the city most uncomfortable. There was
a notch at Culebra between Gold Hill and
Contractor's Hill, and there was a cut in the
surface of the earth in that neighborhood to
show where the French intended the Canal
should be, but with that exception it was diffi-
cult from anything that appeared on the sur-
face to stir one's imagination and create in his
mind's eye a canal upon the bosom of which
should float the commercial and military
navies of the world.

Since that time there has been developed a
wonderful organization by which this greatest
modern work is being carried on to a success-
ful completion. Homes have been made for
40,000 strangers. Food has been furnished;
machinery has been set up; cars and locomo-
tives have been bought and placed upon the
railroad. The Zone, with the two cities at
either end, has been subjected to regulation
by sanitary scientists so that yellow fever
and malignant malaria, and the other diseases
that formed an insuperable obstacle in the
French construction have been driven off the
Isthmus. A plan for the Canal has been
adopted, which, by closing with dam and locks
the basi the corresponding month of
the previous year.

The total amount of material excavated
from the prism in the Culebra section of the
Central Division in October, 1910—1,320.314
cubic yards — was the greatest record in that
section for the month of October, the next
largest having been 1,302,901 cubic yards in
October, 1909.

The total estimated amount of material to
be removed in the Central Division was 97,-
125,018 cubic yards, and up to November 1,
1910, 64,913,538 cubic yards had been re-
moved, leaving 32,211,480 cubic yards yet to
be removed in order to complete all excavation
in the Central Division. From these figures
it will be seen that 66.84 per cent of all exca-
vation in the Central Division had been com-
pleted up to the close of the month of October,
and 33.16 per cent yet remained uncompleted.

Considering the two sections which com-
pose the Central Division, the excavation
completed and that yet to be completed at the
close of October operations was as follows:

CULEBRA SECTION.

Cubic Yards.

Completed 54,484,979

Yet to be completed 29,701.745

CHACRES SECTION.

Completed 10.428.559

Yet to be completed 2.509,735

From the above figures it will be seen that
the Culebra section is 64.72 percent comple-
ted, and 35.28 percent yet to be completed;
the Chagres section is 80.60 per cent com-
pleted, and 19.40 per cent yet to be completed.

During the month 510 cubic yards of ma-
lt rial were hauled from the Canal prism and
dumped into the embankment for the road-
bed of the relocated Panama railroad, in the
vicinity of Pedro Miguel. The total amount
of spoil from the Central Division used for
this purpose to date is 3,714,828 cubic yards.
The Central Division also delivered at Gatun
192,943 cubic yards of rock and earth for use
in the construction of the Dam. The total
delivered for this purpose to date is 2,178,542
cubic yards.

The daily average number of laborers at
work on the whole division during the month
was 8,179, and the daily average number of
gold employes, 895.

Pacific Division.

DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS AND DAMS.
The total excavation during the month
amounted to 18,183 cubic yards. Nothing



was added to the dry fill in the west dam at
Pedro Miguel, the total material in place at
the close of the month remaining at 260,852
cubic yards. The back fill at Pedro Miguel
was increased by 1,755 cubic yards, the total
in place at the end of the month amounting
to 18,276 cubic'.yards.

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON-
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT PEDRO MIGUEL.





Permanent Auxiliary
Plant. ! Plant.


Length of working day, hours. .

Average number of hours per day
worked laying concrete and
large stone (actual working


8.00

6.34

3.93

Cu. Yds.

78.70

77.07


8.00
*9.76


Average number of mixers per


1.31


Average hourly output per mixer
(actual working time)

Average amount of concrete and
large stone laid per hour per
chamber crane (actual work-


Cu. Yds
43.34








133.00
54.624.00


106.00




6.559.00






Total'concrete laid


54,757.00


6.665.00



Auxiliary plant consists of two 2-cubic yard mixers,
and locomotive cranes and derricks as placing plant.



continuously after that time, furnishing con-
crete for the east head wall and the east fore-
bay wall. There was no concrete mixed by
the mixing plant at the south end of the west
storage trestle, as the excavation in the south-
west forebay was not completed. The con-
crete work at Pedro Miguel for October
showed an increase of 10,158 cubic yards over
the figures for September. The total amount
placed was 61,422 cubic yards, including 239
cubic yards of large stone.

MIRAFLORES HANDLING PLANT.

Work at Miraflores was continued during
October with the same plant which had been
used during September. Work on the west
storage trestle was continued and is 50 per
cent completed. The total of concrete and
large stone laid was 22,159 cubic yards, as
compared with 18,133 cubic yards during
September.

DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING.

The following is a statement of the output
of the five dredges which were in operation
during the month, and of the amount of mate-
rial excavated hydraulically:





Type.


WORK.


PLANT


Total.




Dredge.


Earth.


Rock.


Earth.


Rock.


Remarks.




Dipper

Ladder...

Ladder

Ladder. . . .
Suction... .


Cu. Yds.
61.240
16.968
29.327
19.600
279,'! 88


Cu. Yds.

700

36.400

20.135

3,915


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
61.940
53,368
73.S12
23,515
279.588














24.350






























Total


406,723
*40.000


61,150


24,350




492.223
40,000




Hydraulic excavation ....


















446.723


61,150


24.350




532.223















* Excavated from lower lock site at Miraflores.



*This is the total number of hours of all plant units,
divided by 26 — the numbei of working days.

At Miraflores, 14,370cubic yards wereadded
to the dry fill in the toes, and 40,000 cubic
yards to the hydraulic fill in the core of the
west dam, making the total at the end of the
month 561,679 cubic yards and 178,587 cubic
yards, respectively. No material was added
to the back fill, leaving the total amount in
place at the end of the month 133,545 cubic
yards.

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON-
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT MIRAFLORES.



Length of working day. hours. . .

Average number of hours per day
worked laying concrete and
large stone (actual working
time)

Average number of mixers per
day

Average hourly output per mixer
(actual working time)

Average amount of concrete and
large stone laid per hour, per
crane (actual working time)



Large rock laid .
Concrete laid . .



Permanent
Plant.



Total concrete laid 6.351.00



8.00



6.35



Cu. Yds.



246.00
6,105.00



Auxiliary
Plant.



5.77

Cu. Yds.

25.17



351.00
15.457.00



15,808.00



Permanent plant is one berm crane, placing concrete
supplied from two 2-cubic yard auxiliary mixers in-
stalled in storage trestle.

Auxiliary plant is two 2-cubic yard and five *-cubic
yard mixers; concrete was dumped directly into forms
from mixers, or taken to forms in dump cars.

PEDRO MIGUEL HANDLING PLANT.

The temporary mixer at the south end of the
east storage trestle was completed about the
middle of the month and was in use almost



CHAMK SAND EXCAVATION.

Approximately 44,800 cubic yards of sand
were excavated at Punta Chameand delivered
at Balboa.

BALBOA TERMINAL HARBOR.

A total area of 97,150 square feet on the
site of the proposed terminal harbor at Balboa
was cleared of brush and mangrove trees, and
6,375 square feet were grubbed.

HYDRAULIC EXCAVATION PLANT.

The plant as a whole has been in operation
during the greater portion of the month, and
the material pumped has been deposited in
the west dam at Miraflores. The coffer-dams,
which are to form a pool for the suctions at
the central pumping station, are under con-
struction and about 50 per cent completed.

DISTRICT NO. 3 — MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY
IMPROVEMENTS.

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, and
oil pipe lines have been maintained, and work
has been continued on the municipal improve-
ments in the city of Panama.

DISTRICT NO. 4 ANCON QUARRY.

The quarry operations for the month were
retarded on account of the placing of the dust
screen, which was almost completed on Octo-
ber 31, and expected to be in operation early
in November.

PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT.

Hours.

Length of working day 9:00

Average number of hours per day (actual

working time) 7 :35

Cu. Yds.
Average amount crushed per hour of working

day 286.60

Average amount crushed per working hour. . . 350.90

Total output for the month 67.065

Relocation of Panama Railroad.
During the month 241,089 cubic yards of



November 23, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



103



material were excavated, making the total
excavation at the close of the month 4,7S6,642
cubic yards, and 296,780 cubic yards of mate-
rial were placed in embankments, making a
total of 10,042,638 cubic yards of material
used for this purpose.

There are now 156,547 lineal feet of 70-
pound rail, and 18,997 lineal feet of 90-pound
rail in the permanent track, 1,131 lineal feet
of 70-pound rail having been taken up during
the month. The total force averaged 1,501
men.

Quartermaster's Department.

Labor — There is a surplus of all classes of
unskilled labor.

Quarters — There has been a further increase
in the number of bachelors at Gorgona, who
have been taken care of by the removal of
families to other towns, and by making use of
the upper floor of the hotel and the upper
floor of the court-house.

Building — The work at Toro Point was
completed. A fire-proof storehouse was con-
structed at Colon Hospital, and a storehouse
for obsolete material at Mount Hope.

Material and Supplies- A considerable quan-
tity of material condemned on survey re-
quest has been shipped to the Mount Hope
depot and placed in the storehouse for obso-
lete material. Such articles as can be made
use of are repaired for reissue, and the balance
will be sold. The Quartermaster's Depart-
ment assumed the responsibility for the store-
house at Pedro Miguel.

Supplies during the month were received in
28 vessels, with cargo aggregating 40,658 tons.
In addition, 662.986 feet B. M. of lumber,
252,920 lineal feet of piling, and 60,000 cross-
ties were received. The value of all material
received was 8960,675.99.

Subsistence Department.

There was a net profit on the messes, kitch-
ens and line hotels of $4,381.18, a net profit
on the restaurants and penitentiary of S234.49,
and a net loss of S223.18 on the Hotel Tivoli.
All subsistence operations taken together
showed a net profit of 84,392.49.

Department of Civil Administration.
COURTS

Eleven civil and 30 criminal cases were
disposed of in the Supreme and Circuit Courts;
and 41 civil and 457 criminal cases in the
District Courts.

DIVISION OF POSTS, CUSTOMS AND REVENUES.

Money order sales for October amounted to
S429, 211.70, and the fees to 81.862.05. Re-
ceipts from stamp and card sales, and news-
paper postage, aggregated S6, 170.48. The
total collection of revenues made by the divi-
sion was S15.991.98, and the collection on ac-
count of court fines, costs and fees, S3, 233. 60.

Seventeen vessels entered at, and the same
number cleared from the port of Ancon;and 19
entered at and 17 vessels cleared from the port
of Cristobal.

DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS.

The total number of persons arrested was
474, which is 26 less than in September, and
144 less than in August. Eight convicts were
committed to the penitentiary and nine were
discharged, leaving 144 in confinement at the
close of the month. The cost of guarding
and subsisting the convicts was $2,500.09, and
the value of their work on the Canal Zone
roads 82,078.05.

DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION.

Three fires were reported, the total loss
amounting to S303.00.



DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS.

In the city of Panama the average daily
consumption of water was 1,117,299 gallons,
and in Colon 978,497 gallons.

DIVISION OF SCHOOLS.

The Canal Zone schools were reopened on
October 3. The teaching force consisted of
37 American and 24 West Indian teachers, as
compared with 35 American and 21 West
Indian teachers at the opening of the schools
in October of last year. A comparison of the
enrollment and average daily attendance in
the schools during the month of October in
1908, 1909, and 1910 is as follows:

1908. 1909. 1910.

White children 622 492.7 745 638.3 931 802.0
Col. children.. ..1.073 695.5 1.067 672.2 906 611.0

Total 1.695 1,188.2 1.812 1,310.5 1,837 1.413.0

Department of Sanitation.
The total number of deaths from all causes
among employes was 42. These were divided
as follows: From disease, 23; from exter-
nal causes, 19, giving the annual average per
thousand of 10.19 for all causes. Dividing
the causes of death into diseases and external
causes, we would have an annual average per
thousand of 5.58 and 4.61, respectively.

Among employes for October of previous
years the annual average death rate per thou-
sand is as follows:

1904 20.31

1905 32.85

1906 46.68

1907 25.97

1908 12.93

1909 9.95

The annual average per thousand of deaths
in the cities of Panama. Colon, and the Canal
Zone, including both employes and civil
population, was 23.61.

The annual average per thousand among
the same class of population for previous
years was as follows:

1905 56.62

1906 46.40

1907 30.19

1908 27.91

1909 16.62

The increase in the death rate of October,
1910, over 1909, is due to the increase of infant
mortality in the city of Panama due to intes-
tinal disorders, the total of such deaths being
46 out of a total of 152 deaths charged to
Panama.

Segregating the whites from the blacks, the
annual average death rate per thousand from
disease for employes was: For whites 4.51;
blacks, 5.98, giving the general average of
5.58. For the same month in 1909, the
annual average death rate per thousand from
disease was: For whites, 3.16; blacks, 8.56,
giving a general average of 7.35.

Among employes during October, 1910,
deaths from the principal diseases were as
follows: Malarial fever, 1; haemoglobinuric
fever, 1; pneumonia, 7; tuberculosis, 3; dys-
entery, 2, leaving a balance of nine from
other diseases, there being no deaths during
the month from typhoid fever.

Xo cases of yellow fever, smallpox, or
plague were brought to or originated on the
Isthmus during the month.

Respectfully.

Geo. W. Goethals.
Chairman and Chief Engineer.



tiary, McNeil Island, Wash., at 85 a day.
Subjects: Architectural construction and
details, 50 per cent; training and experience,
50 per cent. Applicants should have had not
less than three years' experience in architec-
tural work as draftsman, superintendent, or
supervisor of construction of buildings, and
should possess a good practical acquaintance
with details of construction and with shop or
working drawings of planing mill work. Only
those who comply with the specifications re-
garding training and experience will be ad-
mitted to the examination. Age limit. 20
years or over on the date of examination;
applicants must be citizens of the United
States. The above is all the information to
be had on this examination. Applicants
should apply for form 1312 and mention the
kind of examination. John K. Baxter.

Secretary, Isthmian Civil Service Board.
Culebra, C. ~Z., November 19, 1910.



Personal.

Maj. G. M. Hoffman, with Mrs. Hoffman
and their children, returned from his leave in
the States on the Colon, which arrived at
Cristobal on November 11.

Capt. Courtland N'ixon, accompanied by
Mrs. Nixon, returned from his leave of absence
on the Panama, on Tuesday, November 22.



Examination for Colored Teachers.

There will be held at the Ancon school-
building on Saturday, November 26, an exam-
ination for colored teachers. This examina-
tion is open to all. Time, 8 to 12 a. m., and
1 to 4 p. m. F. A. Gause,

Superintendent of Schools.



Order of Isthmian Conductors.

The next regular meeting of the Order of
Isthmian Conductors will be held at Pedro
Miguel at 1.30 p. m., Sunday, November 27.
F. H. Anderson. Secretary and Treasurer.
Pedro Miguel, C. Z., November 21, 1910.



Examination for Superintendent of Construction.

Applications will be received up to the close
of business on December 6 for an examination
to be held shortly thereafter for the position
of superintendent of construction, a vacancy
having occurred at the United States Peniten-



Yisit of Congressmen.

A party of Congressmen and their guests
arrived on the Isthmus, on the Ancon, on
November 20, and will leave for the States on
the same ship, scheduled to sail on November
28. In the party are: James A. Tawney and
his son; A. S. Burleson, W. M. Calder and
Mr-. Calder, J. J. Fitzgerald and Mrs. Fitz-
gerald, Washington Gardner, J. Warren
Keiferand his son, J. M. Miller and Mrs. Mil-
ler, W. H. Stafford, and Swager Sherley.
Messrs. Tawney, Gardner, Keifer, Fitzgerald,
Burleson and Sherley are members of the
House Committee on Appropriations, and
Messrs. Calder, Miller and Stafford, of the
House Committee on Interstate and Foreign
Commerce.

There arrived from New Orleans, on the
Tnrrialba. on November 17, Congressmen F.
B. Woods of Iowa, and Robert C. Wickliffe
of Louisiana, who are visiting the Isthmus as
guests of the World's Panama Exposition
Company of New Orleans. Congressman
A. J. Barchfield of Pennsylvania and his fam-
ily are also on the Isthmus.

The members of the Committee on Appro-
priations and other Congressmen viewed the
Canal work on Monday, Tuesday and Wednes-
day, and hearings on the estimates of appro-
priations for Canal work, conducted by the
Committee, will begin at Culebra on Thursday.

The presentation of "Young Mrs. Winthrop" at the
National Theatre in Panama by the Ancon Dramatic
Club, which was set for .Novemher 18. has. been post-
poned until November 25-



104



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 13.



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



Thanksgiving Day, a Holiday.

Culebra, C. Z., November 21, 1910.
Circular No. 360:

Thanksgiving Day, Thursday. November 24. 1910,
will be observed as a holiday in the Canal Zone, and as
far as practicable all public business will be suspended
on that day. Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman.



Forms for Importations Free of Customs Duty.

Culebra. C. Z. t November 14, 1910.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

The following is quoted from a letter received from
the General Superintendent of the Panama railroad,
under date of November 12 :

"In connection with making out of forms 164-C. E.
covering importation of employes' shipments and their
entry at Colon free of customs duties, it would greatly
facilitate matters if the applicants' names were type-
written thereon, as our New York office advises in a
great many instances they are having difficulty in
deciphering signatures, in fact, some of them being so
illegible that they have to guess at the "names, the result
being that at times shipments are billed at tariff rates,
whereas reduced rates should be applied."

It is desired that employes be instructed to have
these forms made on the typewriter where possible, or
at least write their names plainly.

Geo. W. Goethals,
Chairman and Chief Engineer.



cellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 3,108 packages
weighing 381 tons.

Turrialba, November 17, from New Orleans, with
77,101 feet yellow pine lumber, 32 bundles cypress
shingles, 22 bundles car parts, 48 pieces castings, 11
pieces steel cable for Atlantic Division; 38.656 feet
yellow pine lumber for Central Division; 741 bales
prairie hay, 8.219 feet oak lumber, 10 crates gate valves,
40 bales rice straw for stock.

Zacapa, November 17, from New York, with 54 tons
lock construction material for Pacific Division; 167
cases candles, 54 crates range parts, 83 drums car oil,
36 drums calcium carbide, 9 barrels bolts, 80 crates
handles for stock.

Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the
week ending midnight, Saturday, November 19. All
heights are in feet above mean sea level :



Time Served on Committees of Employes' Organi-
zations.
Culebra,, C. Z., November 16. 1910.
Circular No. 132-1:

In the future when official committees representing
organizations of employes visit the Chairman and Chief
Engineer, the division engineers, or other officials in
authority, on business connected with the organization
to which they belong, no pay will be allowed for time
lost from work, but the time so lost will neither be
deducted from their regular leaves nor be charged
against them in computing the dates when their vaca-
tions fall due. Geo. W. Goethals,

Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Conductor on Track Shifters.

Culebra, C. Z.. November 16, 1910.
Circular No. 299-H :

When track shifters are not required to move over
the main line, but are used on inside tracks only, the
engineer in charge may act as conductor. If this addi-
tional responsibility is imposed, the pay of the position
may be increased to SI 50 a month.

Geo. W. Goethals,
Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending November 30,
1910 (75th meridian time):



Date.



November 24 .
November 25 .

November 26.

November 27 .
November 28.
November 29 .
November 30.



High.



A. M.



12.25

i 1.22

2.09

2.48



Low.



A. M.
3.20
4.30

5.41

6.45
7.38
8.22
9.03



High.



A. M.

9.24

10.40

Noon

12.00

P. M.

1.08

2.02

2.47

3.23



Low.



P. M.
3.48
4.57

6.03

7.05
7.56
8.40
9.20



High.



P. M.
10.07
11.18



Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Cristobal,
Colon and Balboa during the week ending November
19. 1910.

Print Joachim. November 13, from New York, with