Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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indicated on the posted plat.

3. There shall be posted in a conspicuous place in
each market a plat signed by the Superintendent of
Public Works and Collector of Revenues, showing the
sizes and rates of rental of the various stalls and other
divisions of space.

4. Application for assignment of space shall be made
to the market inspector. If approved, the inspector
will issue an assignment, indicating the space assigned,
the period of assignment, the purpose for which it is to
be used, and the amount of rental to be paid to the Dep-
uty Collectoi of Revenues. Upon return of the assign-
ment, with the exhibition of the Deputy Collector's
receipt, possession of the space will be given.

5. Not more than one stall or other division of space
in each market will be assigned to any one person, ex-
cept by special authority of the Superintendent or
Assistant Superintendent of Public Works.

6. Lessees of space will not be permitted to make any
changes in the arrangement of partitions, shelves, etc.
Requests for desired changes will be made of the market
inspector. If approved by him, he will secure an esti-
mate of the cost of the work, and upon deposit with him
by the lessee of the amount of the estimate, the work
will be done by the Isthmian Canal Commission. The
excess of the deposit, if any, over the cost of the work,
will be returned to the lessee.

7. All stalls and other divisions of space shall be



thoroughly swept at the close of each day. Special
attention shall be given to the spaces used for the sale
of meat and fish; the counters, blocks, etc., used in
them shall be scrubbed with soap and water as often as
necessary to keep them in good sanitary condition. All
decayed fruits and vegetables, and other dirt and refuse
shall be removed and deposited in the sanitary cans
provided for that purpose. All articles in bulk shall
be kept in bags, barrels, or boxes, so that they can be
moved in cleaning. Lessees shall be responsible for
the cleanly and sanitary condition of the space assigned
them and shall carry out such special instructions to
that end as may be given them by the market inspector
or his authorized assistant. Tne market inspector will
be responsible for the cleanly and sanitary condition of
the market outside of stalls and other space assigned
to lessees.

8. Lounging or loitering around the market will not
be permitted. Lessees are expected to enforce this
prohibition as to the space assigned them.

9. The hour for opening and closing each market
shall be fixed by the Superintendent of Public Works,
and posted in a conspicuous place in the market.

10. Any complaint respecting a market should be
addressed to the Superintendent of Public Works,
Ancon, C. Z.

11. Any violation of these regulations by a lessee
shall be considered sufficient cause for the cancellation
of his assignment, but such cancellation shall not re-
lieve the offending person from prosecution under any
penal law or ordinance he may violate.

12. These regulations shall be posted in a conspicuous
place in each market. J. J. Reidy,

Acting Superintendent of Public Works.
Approved: M. H. Thatcher,

Head of the Department of Civil Administration.



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.



Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth-
mian Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Cristo-
bal and Colon during the week ending December 17,
1910:

Prim Joachim, December 12, from New York, with
16 bales paper for stock.

Abangarez, December 15, from New Orleans, with
307.244 feet yellow pine lumber, 24 pieces gears and
pinions, 6 cases castings for Atlantic Division; 5 barrels
brake shoes, 950 pieces castings for Mechanical Divi-
sion; 284 bales straw, 2,416 bales hay, 16 crates slop
boxes, 83 rolls cotton duck, 2,000 crates fire brick for
stock.

Zacapa, December 15, from New York, with 36 tons
lock construction material for Pacific Division; 18
cases paper, 400 cases linseed oil for stock.

Panama, December 16, from New York, with 10
cases electrical machinery foi Atlantic Division; 32
carbon diamonds, 84 cases copper tubes, 60 pieces pipe
for Pacific Division; 26 pigs tin, 6 cases electrical ma-
terial for Mechanical Division; 65 cases drugs and sun-
dries for Sanitary Department; 5 cases insulating tape,
15 cases pump parts, 16 cases tackle blocks. 8S cases
caustic soda, 300 sacks wood plugs, 47 coils insulated
copper wire, 9 reels wire rope for stock; and a miscel-
laneous cargo, tne whole consisting of 1,553 packages,
weighing 137 tons.



Pacific Division Sand Service.

A report of sand cars loaded and shipped from Bal-
boa during the month of November, follows:



Destination.


Number
of Cars.


Cubic
Yards.




2.571

28

3

1

3


38 605




420
75




25
75






Total


2.606


39.200







Band Concert.

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission Band at Culebra. C. Z.. on Sunday. December
25, 1910, at 5.45 p. m. The program follows:

1 March — Midshipman Laurendeau

2 Selection — The Chocolate Soldier Straus

3 Flower Song — Hearts and Flowers , Tobani

4 Overture — Poet and Peasant. Suppe

5 Waltz — Bad'ney Mad'ht Komzak

6 Medley Selection — Popular Hits Alford

7 Song — The Rosary Nevin

8 Intermezzo — Silver Bell Wenrich

9 March — Columbia Phonograph Co Burton

Chas. E. Jennings, Musical Director.
The next concert will be given at Gorgona on Sunday,
January 1, 1911, at 6 p. m.

LOST — On Sunday evening at Bas Obispo station,
or on forward first-class v passenger coach on train No.
28, a lady's silver card case containing cards. Reward
will be given. C. Nixon, Cristobal, C. Z.



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail Steam
Packet Company; of the Hamburg- American Line, and
of the United Fruit Company's Line, the Panama Rail-
road Company's dates being subject to change:



NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.



Allianca. .
Colon
Advance.
Panama . .
Allianca . .

Colon

Advance.
Panama. .
Allianca. .
Colon . . . .



..P. R. R.




.Dec.


16


..P. R. R.


.Thursday.


.Dec.


22


..P. R. R.


. Thursday .


.Dec.


1<>


..P. R. R.


. Wednesday . Jan.


4


..P. R. R.


.Tuesday. .


.Jan.


10


..P. R. R.


.Monday. .


• Jan.


16


..P. R. R.


.Saturday.


.Jan.


21


. . P. R. R .


.Saturday.


.Jan.


28


..P. R. R.


.Saturday.


■ Feb.


4


..P. R. R.


. Friday . . .


.Feb.


111



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.



Panama P. R. R. . .Thursday. ..Dec. 22

Allianca P. R. R. . .Wednesday. Dec. 28

Colon P. R. R. . .Tuesday.... Jan. 3

Advance P. R. R. . .Tuesday. .. .Jan. 10

Panama P. R. R. . .Monday Jan. 16

Allianca P. R. R. . .Monday Jan. 23

Colon P. R. R. ..Sunday Jan. 29

Advance P. R. R. ..Friday Feb. 3

Panama P. R. R . . . Friday Feb. 10

Allianca P. R. R. . .Thursday... Feb. 16

A fortnightly service of the Cristobal and Ancon will
be maintained as nearly as possible, leaving Cristobal
on or about the 11th and 28th of each month. Due
notice of the sailings of these ships from the Isthmus
will be given. On the outward voyage these ship? sail
from the pier at the foot of 12th street, Hoboken, N. J,

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Dec. 15

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm..H-A Saturday. . .Dec. 17

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Dec. 22

Sarnia H.-A Saturday. . .Dec. 24

Tagus R.-M Saturday.. .Dec. 24

Metapan U. F. C . . . Thursday . . .Dec. 29

Prinz Joachim H.-A. Saturday Dec. 31

Zacapa U. F. C . . . Thursday. . . Jan. 5

Oruba R.-M Saturday . . . Jan. 7

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Jan. 12

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday.. Jan. 19

Magdalena R.-M Saturday. . .Jan. 21

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Zacapa U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Dec. 22

Oruba R.-M Monday Dec. 26

Sibiria H.-A Tuesday Dec. 27

Almirante U. F. C . . . Saturday . . . Dec. 29

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. .H.-A Tuesday ... Jan. 3

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday. . Jan. 5

Magdalena R.-M Monday. . . . Jan. 9

Sarnia H.-A Tuesday. . ..Jan. 10

Metapan U. F. C. . .Thursday.. Jan. 12

Zacapa U. F C. . .Thursday.. Jan. 19

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Atenas U. F. C. . .Saturday. . .Dec. 17

Cartago U. F. C. . .Wednesday. Dec. 21

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Saturday. . .Dec. 24

Parismina U. F. C. . .Wednesday. Dec. 28

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Saturday Dec. 31

Heredia U. F. C. . .Wednesday Jan. 4

Atenas U. F. C . . . Saturday . . . Jan. 7

' COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Heredia U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Dec. 22

Abangarez TJ. F. C . . . Thursday . . .Dec. 22

Atenas U. F. C . . . Thursday. . . Dec. 29

Cartago U. F. C . . . Thursday. . . Dec. 29

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Thursday.. Jan. 5

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Thursday Jan. 12

Parismina U. F. C. . .Thursday.. Jan. 5

COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Tagua R.-M Tuesday Jan. 3

Oruba R.-M Tuesday Jan. 17

The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as fol-
lows: Jamaican, on or about December 28, for New Or-
leans, via Kingston, Ja.

Hamburg-American steamers leave for New York
every Tuesday at 10 a. m., and for Port Limon every
Tuesday or Wednesday via Bocas del Toro or Puerto
Colombia. Steamships Sarnia and Sibiria make con-
nections at Kingston with the Altai and Allegany of the
same line for Santiago and Havana.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Mondays at 5 p. m.; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursday at 3 p. m.; for New Orleans via Port
Limon and Puerto Barrios on Thursday at 6 p. m.,
and for New York on Thursday at 11 a. m.

Sailings of the French line (Cie Generate Transatlan-
tique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and Guad-
eloupe on the 3rd and 20th of each month.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1910.



No. 18.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isth?nian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention jiyiless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Slide at Las Cascadas.

The slide on the east bank of the Canal,
opposite Las Cascadas, which first began to
give trouble in April, 1908 and increased in
area in July, 1909, broke still further to the
south and east on December 4, 1910. Before
the material from the break of December 4
had been gotten out of the way, a much larger
break occurred on December 13. The moving
material, consisting of some hard rock, but
principally a layer of pure red clay, carried
away all tracks on the east half of the Canal
and extended slightly beyond the axis of the
Canal, blocking the pioneer drainage cut.
Up to the date when the slide of December 13
occurred, there had been excavated from the
three previous slides in this locality 179,148
cubic yards, and there still remained in motion
on December 14, due to slides of December 4
and 13th, 31 1,634 cubic yards. The area of the
slide of April, 1908, was 1.12 acres, which,
when augmented by the slide of July, 1909,
aggregated 1.38 acres The slide of December
4 increased this area to 2.70 acres, and that of
December 13, gave a total area of 7.6 acres.

From the configuration of the surface, it is
quite possible that there may be a further
break in the future, adding 150,000 cubic
yards to the quantity already mentioned, and
increasing the total area affected by 2j acres.
The slope of the surface upon which the clay
is sliding is about one vertical to six horizontal.
Four steam shovels are now at work on the
slide, which should be entirely removed by
about the end of March. Beyond the possible
future addition of 150,000 cubic yards, al-
ready mentioned, the configuration of the
ground indicates that with the removal of
the present slide and this possible addition,
no further trouble will be experienced in this
vicinity.

Earthquake Disturbances.

Two earthquake shocks were noticeable on
the Isthmus on December 20 and 21. The
record on the seismic instruments at Ancon
observatory shows that the shock of Decem-
ber 20 began at 6.09 a. m. and lasted 23 min-



utes, the direction registered being from the
north, and the distance calculated at about
225 miles. The disturbance of December 21
began at 5.25 a. m. and ended at 6.03 a m.;
the distance indicated was about 225 miles, and
the direction was also northerly. These are
the largest records of any made since the in-
struments were installed about two years
ago, not excepting even those of the Cartago
earthquake. The assistant manager of the
United Fruit Company at Bocas del Toro
reported a disturbance early in the morning
of December 21, lasting from 10 to 15 seconds,
but no damage was done, other than the shat-
tering of a few plates.

Closing of Relocated Line.

The relocated line of the Panama railroad
between Gatun and Gamboa, which was used
during the recent high water for main line
traffic, will be closed between January 1 and
July 1. This will make it possible to carry on
the filling without interference from main line
traffic and from excursions. The completion
of the fills at various points make a change of
track layout necessary.



Excavation in Culebra District.

On December 20th, 17 shovels working in
the Culebra construction district of the Central
Division, excavated 27,199 cubic yards of rock
and earth during the working day of eight
hours, an average per shovel of 1,600 cubic
yards. The shovels were under steam 136
hours and were actually at work 90 hours and
5 minutes, the principal delay being caused
by waiting for cars.

Building Operations.

The new Zone schoolhouse at Cruces, the
native town on the Chagres River above Gam-
boa, will be framed at Bas Obispo, transported
from there on a car to the dynamite store-
house near the Gamboa bridge, thence moved
for a distance of about 150 feet to the river
edge, where it will be loaded on a raft, built
for the purpose, and towed up the stream to
the settlement. It will be 24 by 36 feet in
size, will have accommodations for over 50
pupils, and will be located near the village
church, now the only frame building in the
place. The original church, erected in the
early days of the settlement, was constructed
of stone and part of its walls still stand, prac-
tically enclosing the wooden structure built
subsequently. As the only available building
in town, the church has also been used for
school purposes.

The breakwater settlement at Toro Point
will be provided with postal facilities, and a
post-office building, containing two rooms,
one for the postmaster's use, and the other for
the public, has been about completed by the
Constructing Quartermaster's forces. It will
be 16 by 16 feet in size and will be situated
near the dispensary.

A building has been erected at Gorgona
shops to house the oxy-acetylene welding



plant recently received. It is of frame con-
struction, 20 by 30 feet in size, one story high,
and contains one room. It will be completed
about January 1, 1911.

Plans have been prepared in the Construct-
ing Quartermaster's office for a small corral
building at Miraflores. It will be situated on
the side of the hill, convenient to the railroad,
and also to the wagon road extending from the
station to the commissary. Besides three
stalls, there will be room for storing feed, and
sleeping quarters for the man in charge.



Steel Barges for Atlantic Division.

Four 600-cubic yard sea going steel barges
have recently been added to the transportation
fleet of the Atlantic Division, completing an
order placed some months ago with the Elli-
cott Machinery Company of Baltimore. They
were towed through Chesapeake Bay to New-
port News, Va., where they were loaded with
coal and started on their sea voyage, two at a
time, in tow of the tug M. E. Luckenbach.
The first two barges arrived at Cristobal on
November 15, and the remaining two on
December 7. They will be known as barges
Nos. 15, 16, 17 and IS, and will be placed in
service transporting rock and sand from Porto
Bello and Nombre de Dios to Gatun docks,
although it is intended to use them later in
carrying large rock from the Porto Bello
quarry to the Colon breakwaters.

The barges have a length over all of 168
feet, which make them 12 feet longer than
the other 600-cubic yard barges in the Atlantic
Division service. Their other dimensions,
however — breadth, 35 feet; height amidship,
12 feet — are practically the same. Each barge
contains five watertight tranverse bulkheads,
and two watertight longitudinal bulkheads,
the latter forming the sides of the cargo
enclosure. The deck house in the after part
is made of 15-pound steel plates, and is fitted
with watertight doors and heavy glass side-
lights. The quarters for the crews are fur-
nished with standee bunks, clothes lockers
and other conveniences; and are kept supplied
with fresh air by means of funnel ventilators
extending above deck in the same manner as
the furnace room ventilators on steamships,
which is a new feature in connection with the
barges in the Isthmian service.

Each barge is equipped with a boiler of the
single Scotch marine type, with an outside
diameter of eight feet, and a working pressure
of 110 pounds to the square inch, containing
a Morrison corrugated iron suspension furnace,
42 inches in diameter, fitted for burning oil.
The engines are of the double cylinder
type, 10 inches in diameter, and have a 10-
inch stroke. They are used solely for oper-
ating the towing machines, one of which is
installed on each barge. These machines,
manufactured by the American Ship Windlass
Company, are similar in most respects to
those now in use on other barges in the Isth-
mian service, and have an automatic winding



138



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 18.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



{Continued.)



device with sufficient capacity to stow 1,500
feet of lj-inch steel wire hawser. Each barge
is also provided with two 1,600-pound and one
500-pound stockless anchors, and a 16-foot
metallic life boat.

Experience has shown that there is a great
deal of wear to the bottom plates in the cargo
enclosures on barges in the rock and sand
service, due to the operation of the excavating
buckets, and to minimize the repair cost, the
floor of the cargo bin in each barge will be
covered with a layer of concrete three inches in
thickness. Sounding wells for water and oil
tanks, and filling pipes for water tanks will
also be added.

Gatun Dam Spillway.
Concrete was placed in the spillway of
Gatun Dam during the week ending Decem-
ber 24, as follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.

Mixers.




Cu. Yds.
248
328
206
280
246
278


8:00
9:00
8:00
9:00
7:00
6:00


1




2




2




i




1




1








1.586
111.984


47:00




Previously reported . . .






113,570





The concrete figures for the spillway, for the week
ending December 17, have been corrected to read as
follows: December 12th, 300 cubic yards; December
13th, 278 cubic yards; December 14th, 294 cubic yards;
December 15th, 210 cubic yards; December 16th, 160
cubic yards; December 17th, 222 cubic yards. Total.
1.464 cubic yards.



Pacific Entrance Dredges.

Two of the Pacific Division dredges, the
Marmot and the Mole, are to be equipped with
new ladders, one of which has been received.
They were manufactured by Lobnitz and
Company of Renfrew, Scotland, the builders
of the dredges, and are about five feet longer
and of a much heavier type of construction
than the ones with which the vessels are now
fitted. With the new ladders, which are 82
feet long from the center of the hanging shaft
to the center of the tumbler shaft, it will be
possible to excavate to a depth of 45 feet be-
low low tide.

The dredge Marmot is still at work widening
and deepening the channel to the proposed
new Panama railroad docks. It is excavating
as it proceeds to a depth of 31 feet at low tide,
and to the required bottom width of 450 feet.
The required depth is 40 feet, and the suction
dredge Culebra will be set at work to complete
the channel after the Marmot has finished the
primary cut. The bank in which the ladder
dredge is working is composed wholly of mud
and sand, with a total absence of rock even at
the required bottom depth. At the rate of
progress it has made so far during the month
of December, it is expected that the Marmot
will break all records for the output of a ladder
dredge on the Isthmus for one month.

The new tug Miraflores has taken the place
of the tug La Boca in the sand towing service
between Punta Chame 1 and the Balboa sand
dock. The latter vessel has been given a
thorough overhauling, and was ready for serv-
ice again on Friday, December 23. It will
relieve the tug Cocoli in hauling the mud
barges out to sea, and the Cocoli, in turn, will



go on the shipways to receive a general over-
hauling, the first in two or three years.

The dipper dredge Cardenas is on the ship-
ways and is being fitted with a new boom and
"A" frame. The work will be concluded early
in January.

Of the various units of floating equipment
placed'in service in the Canal work in the
Pacific entrance since the beginning of oper-
ations under the American engineers, all are
still in commission with the single exception of
an old French clapet, which was condemned a
short time ago." and beached in the marine
"graveyard" on the mainland opposite the



Canal entrance. The vessel required exten-
sive repairs, and to place it in condition would
cost more than it was worth.

Information has been received that the
strike of the boilermakers in Scotland, and
other parts of the United Kingdom, has been
adjusted, and that the men have returned to
work. This will enable resumption of the
manufacture of the boilers for the new ladder
dredge Corozal, now under construction at
Renfrew, Scotland. It is not believed that
the temporary interruption will cause any
delay in completing the dredge within the
contract period.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

Concrete work in Gatun Locks is over 48 per cent completed, 987,218 cubic yards, out of
a total of 2,085,000, having been placed at the close of work on December 24.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
December 24, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of 1 Concrete Hours No. of
mixers placed. ! worked, mixers






Cm. Yds.
1.978
1.764
1,853
1,657
1.990
1.692


32:50
30:55
31:35
29:14
29:30
28:07


6
6
6
6
6
7


Cu. Yds.
818
942
832
948
816
802


11:40
11:40
11:40
11:40
11:40
10:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
353
358}
248}
293}
312}
281}


Cu. Yds.
3.149




3,064}




2,933}




' 2,898}




3,1185




2,775}








10,934


182:11




5.158


69:00




1,846}


17.938}




969,279






















987,217}





















PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is 56 per cent completed, 470,994 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on Saturday, December
24. The record of concrete laid during each of the six 8-hour working days of last week,
follows:





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.
1.108
1.200
1,376
1,298
1,532
1,312


14:00
16:00
17:00
16:83


2
2

2
3


Cm. Yds.
678
584
506
452


15:50
13:30
10:67
10:00
11:83
8:00


3

3
3
' 2
3
2


Cm. Yds.
48

39
8


Cm. Yds.
1.834




1,784




1.882




1.750




23:00 4 478


2,049




20:00 4


280


1,600








7,826


106:83 2.84