Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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2.978


69:30


2.67


95
3,942


10,899








460,095




















4,037


470,994



















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

The record of concrete placed in the upper lock at Miraflores, during the six 8-hour working
days of the week ending December 24, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.




Datb.


2-cubic yard mixers.


J-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours

worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours No. of
placed. 1 worked. 1 mixers


Concrete

1>1. iced.


Hours No. of
worked, mixers


Large
stone.




Dec. 19...

Dec. 20...
Dec. 21...
Dec. 22...
Dec. 23...
Dec. 24...


Cu. Yds.
616
648
618
412
350
440


10:00

10:50

10:00

7:50

6:00

6:25


2
2
2
2

2
2


Cu.' Yds.
"271
229
139
78
259
196


15:50
13:50
9:00
6:50
13:50
18:00


2
3

1
1
2
2


Cm. Yds.
56
136

54


7:00
7:50
4:50


1
1
1


Cm. Yds.
21

5
15
10
25

5


Cm. Yds.

964

1,018

826

500


52


4:00


1


686
641










Total
Previously


3,084


50:25


2


1,172


76:00


1.83


298


23:00


.67


81

2,161


4,635
88,541


Grand




















2,242


93.176

























December 28, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



139



PETITION IS DENIED.



Isthmian Clerical Employes Cannot Be Granted
Special Privileges in Classified Service.

A petition was presented to President Taft,
during his recent visit to the Isthmus, by a
number of clerical employes in the Canal force
asking: That employes occupying positions
in the classified service under the Isthmian
Canal Commission be preferred above all
other applicants for positions in the classified
sen-ice in the United States or the insular
possessions; that the age limit on appoint-
ments and the year limit on reinstatements
be waived in the case of such persons; and
that an employe appointed to the position of
clerk with knowledge of typewriting, who per-
forms the work of a stenographer, shall be
eligible to appointment to positions requiring
a knowledge of stenography and typewriting.

The President referred the petition to the
United States Civil Service Commission, and
the recommendations made by that Commis-
sion have been approved by the President.
The first request is denied on the ground that
the law will not permit such a preferential
list, and, because it would be bad policy to give
such preference to the detriment of classes
of employes now eligible for transfer. The
other requests made in the petition are based
upon the first request, and they, likewise, are
denied. Attention is called to the fact that
the Civil Service Commission gave careful
consideration to a petition in 1909, that em-
ployes, who had served on the Canal force for
a period of three years and had passed a non-
competitive examination, should be made
eligible for transfer to the classified service in
the United States, and that the petition was
not granted. Petitioners were advised to
enter competitive examinations held on the
Isthmus for the purpose of securing eligibles
for the classified service in the States. This
decision was published in full in The Canal
Record of July 28. 1909. In conclusion, the
decision of the Civil Service Commission says:
"Employes appointed through competitive
examination and those appointed prior to the
classification of the service to positions which
became classified by extension of the rules
thereto, and which have remained competitive,
are eligible for transfer under existing rules, and,
by an amendment of September 16, 1910,
were made eligible for transfer for a period of
one year from the date of their separation
from the Isthmian Canal service. This
amendment was recommended in recognition
of the difficulty of arranging transfers at a
distance and for the purpose of giving to em-
ployes in the Canal Service, who are otherwise
eligible, the same consideration as is accorded
to employes in the classified Philippine service
who have rendered at least three years of meri-
torious service in the tropics. The Commis-
sion is, therefore, of the opinion that the re-
quest of the petitioners should not be granted,
and that no amendment to the rules applying
to transfers is necessary for the benefit of em-
ployes of the Isthmian Canal Commission at
this time."



Extension to Gorgona Foundry.

An extension of 150 by 70 feet will be made
to the iron foundry at Gorgona, and material
taken from one of the old shop buildings at
Paraiso will be used for this purpose. A
traveling crane of 25 tons capacity, purchased
for use in the permanent shops, will be in-
stalled, and there will be a cleaning gallery
with sand blast rigging and other equipment.



A track for shipping castings from the foundry,
and one for handling pig iron and scrap will
be installed.

The United Fruit Company's ships for
Xew Orleans, via Port Limon and Puerto
Barrios ceased calling at Bocas del Toro on
December 22.

Rates for Coach Hire.
The following ordinance enacted by the
Isthmian Canal Commission at its 158th
meeting on August 25, 1910, was approved by
the Secretary of War on December 3, 1910:

Ordinance
Providing for the fixing of rates of charges to be made
for the transportation of passengers over the streets
and roads of the Canal Zone.

Be it enacted, by the Isthmian Canal Commission,
as follows:

Section 1. The Head of the Department of Civil
Administration is hereby empowered and directed to
fix rates of charges which may be made and collected
by persons engaged in the transportation of passen-
gers for hire over the streets and roads of the Canal
Zone by means of any automobile, or other motor
vehicle of similar construction or operation, or by
means of any carriage, surrey, wagon, cart, or other
conveyance drawn by horses or mules. He is also
empowered and directed, at any time when circum-
stances may appear to warrant, to revise or change
such rates as may have been theretofore fixed by him.
Said rates shall be reasonable.

Section 2. Immediately upon fixing such rates of
charges, or upon any revision or change thereof being
made by him, the Head of the Department of Civil
Administration shall promulgate said rates or charges,
or any revision thereof, in the following manner, to
wit:

(a) By publication thereof in two consecutive
issues of The Canal Record;

(6) By publication thereof by printed posters
posted conspicuously in each of the following places:
At the various police stations of the Canal Zone; at
the various passenger stations of the Panama railroad
in the Canal Zone and in the Republic of Panama;
at the post-office buildings in the Canal Zone, and at
any other points as may seem to him proper, in order
that due notice thereof to the public may be given.

Section 3. The Head of the Department of Civil
Administration shall also cause to be printed a suffi-
cient number of cards or pamphlets containing such
rates of charges so fixed, or revised by him, as may be
necessary' to furnish a copy thereof to each person
driving or operating any conveyance of the herein-
before indicated character for the transportation of
passengers for hire in the Canal Zone; and it is hereby
made the dutv of all such persons to secure from the
Head of the" Department of Civil Administration
such copy, and to keep same at all times conspicu-
ously posted or displayed in each such conveyance so
used or operated: and a failure so to do will consti-
tute a violation of this ordinance.

Section 4. When rates for such transportation
shall have been fixed and promulgated, as by this



ordinance directed, any person who shall charge and
collect for the transportation of any person over the
streets or roads of the Canal Zone in either of the
hereinbefore indicated conveyances any sum in ex-
cess of such prescribed and promulgated rates, shall
be held to have committed a violation of this ordi-
nance; and any person who has received for himself
or others such transportation in the Canal Zone, and
who fails or refuses to pay therefor the rate thus pre-
scribed and promulgated, shall, likewise, be held to
have committed a violation of this ordinance. Pro-
vided, however, a rate different from that promulgated
hereunder may be charged and paid if the parties to
the transaction may agree thereon, but if there be
any dispute as to such agreement the duly prescribed
rate shall prevail.

Section 5. Any person, firm, or corporation who
fails to comply with any requirement or provision of
this ordinance, or who charges and receives any rate
in excess of that prescribed by the Head of the De-
partment of Civil Administration, or who refuses to
pay any rate prescribed by the Head of the Depart-
ment of Civil Administration agreeably to the pro-
visions of this ordinance, shall be held to be guilty
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, shall be fined
for each offense a sum not exceeding twenty-five dol-
lars (S25).

The rates to be charged under this ordinance

will be published as soon as they are decided

upon.



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



1910.



Pay of Lidgerwood Engineers.
Culebra, C. Z., December 20,
Circular No. 299-j:

The rate of pay of Lidgerwood engineers, who have
served satisfactorily for a period of one year, may be
increased to S137.50 a month.

Geo. W. Goethals.
Chairman and Chief Engineer .



Monthly Report of Lubricants.

Culebra, C. Z., December 19. 1910.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

Circulars No. 314 and 314-A direct that a record of
oil issued to various pieces of equipment shall be kept
by each division and a statement of same compiled
monthly, copies of which shall be sent to those directly
concerned and to me. So far as the plant and equip-
ment covered by the circulars above mentioned are
concerned, copies of such- statements have, in most
cases, been received.

By January' 1. 1911. all plant and equipment of the
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad
Company, including stationary plants, etc., will have
been given approved monthly allowances of oils, greases
and waste, and, subsequent to that date, it is desired
that two copies of monthly report of lubricants used on
each item of plant, equipment, etc., be forwarded
promptly at the close of each month to me.

Geo. \V. Goethals.
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission.
President, Panama Railroad Company.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN NOVEMBER.



On November 30, there were 35,641 employes actually at work on the Canal and the Pan-
ama railroad, and of that number, 29,690 were Canal employes. The gold force on the Canal
work, composed almost entirely of white Americans, was 4,646.

The report of the Chief Quartermaster for November shows that the number of family quarters
occupied by "gold" employes was 1,737, which is 6 more than in October, and the occupants
numbered 5,430, an increase of 68. Of this number, 1.S46 were women, and 1,797 children.
Bachelor quarters occupied by "gold" employes numbered 1,930, and the occupants numbered
3,472, of whom 199 were women. The family quarters occupied by European laborers num-
bered 271, and the occupants, 873; bachelor quarters, 108, and the number of occupants, 5,159;
The family quarters occupied by West Indians numbered 1,070, and the occupants, 5,554.
bachelor quarters, 230, and the number of occupants, 4.86S. A statement of the force actually
at work on November 30, follows:





>>



S


SILVER EMPLOYES.


Total
Silver.


2


c

a






Artisans.


European
laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


I

t-
■0

a

E
O


DEPARTMENT.


2
a
u

z

16
"l


DO

c

■V

u

CM

24

"z


C

1/

u

m

CM


i2

s
u

o

CM


3

a

V

o


tri
Z

u

o

CM


IB

a

Of

o


c

U

G

CM


a


•ji

s

V


2
a
o

o


en

=
o


Const'ct'n andEng'r'ng.
Civil Administration


4,453
184
675
968
627
7
5


161

2

3

92

1


658
4
5

169

1


2.702

18

3

110


3,083


1,494


116


596


3,345


3.460

6

382

996


273
"9'


20.482

214

1.083

2. 6 .'4

629

7

5


3.470
354
39S
239
57
24
104


23,952
568


213


I
30


34




5
8


1.481
2.863




686




















31


Examinat'n of Accounts.


























109




26




















Total


6,919 18


360


<-37 2.833


3.29;>


1.525


150


596


3.35S 4^44


282


.'5,H44


4.646


29.690



Panama railroad force. 3,484: Panama railroad relocation force 1.437: Panama railroad commissary force.
1.030. Total, 5.951. I. C. C. force. 29.690. Grand total. 35.641.



140



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV.; No. 18.



CULEBRA CUT EXCAVATION.



Sizes of Steam Shovel Dippers and Classes of Cars
by which Material is Removed.

Two classes of steam shovels are excavating
in Culebra Cut, one class equipped with a
dipper of 2 1 cubic yards capacity, and the other
with a 5-yard dipper. These dippers seldom
dig to their full capacity, and a car which is
loaded in eight operations of the shovel con-
tains about 19 cubic yards of material, the
rated capacity of the flat cars used with Lid-
gerwood unloaders. A cubic yard of material
weighs roughly two tons, and, for sake of
familiarcomparison, is said to represent a two-
horse load of earth.

Three classes of cars are used in hauling
spoil from the Cut. The wooden flat cars
with one high side, so constructed that they
may be unloaded by an unloading plow, have
a rated capacity of 19 cubic yards. Twenty
of these cars are ordinarily hauled in a train,
and the spoil on a train would, therefore, be
about 380 cubic yards. The next largest cars
are the Western and Oliver air dump cars
which have a rated capacity of 17 cubic yards,
and are used almost exclusively in hauling
rock to Gatun Dam. Twenty-seven of these
cars compose a train, and the amount of spoil
on each train is, therefore, about 459 cubic
yards. The small Western and Oliver dump
cars, known as the "12-yard dumps" are rated
at 10 yards capacity each, and 35 of these
cars ordinarily compose a train, the amount of
spoil in each train being, therefore, 350 cubic
yards.

The capacity of the dump cars is based upon
cross section measurements covering a long
period. Careful track is kept of the excava-
tion by cars, and each month this is compared
with the excavation as determined by cross
section measurement. The difference between
the two methods of measurement is never
great.

The time taken for loading each car varies
according to the material in which a shovel is
excavating, and to innumerable small delays
incident to the excavation and transporting
of the spoil. An illustration is the work done
by 20 steam shovels in the Culebra construc-
tion district on November 11, when 30,077
cubic yards of rock and earth, an average of
1,503 cubic yards per shovel for the 8-hour
working day. were excavated. The shovels
were under steam 160 hours, were actually
digging 109 hours, were waiting for cars 38
hours and 40 minutes, and were delayed the
remainder of the time by mining, cleaning
track, repairs to shovel, track repairing, and
moving the shovels forward. With all con-
ditions favorable a shovel can complete a
digging operation in one minute and thus load
a 19-yard car in about eight minutes.



Resolution of Sympathy.

Paradise Lodge, No. 6, Knights of Pythias,
at a meeting held at Paraiso. passed a resolu-
tion of sympathy on the death of Mrs. Smith,
the wife of Richard C. Smith, a member of

that lodge.

Barge No. 7 Floated.

Atlantic Division barge No. 7, which was
driven ashore in front of the Washington
Hotel at Colon during the gale of December 2,
was pulled off on Monday, December 19, and
is now at the Cristobal dry dock undergoing
repairs. It was found that in addition to the
washing away of the boiler house and living
quarters for the crew, some of the hull plates



required reriveting, and the after peak tank
bulkhead was broken. There were no holes in
any of the hull plates. In rebuilding the boiler
house and living quarters, it is contemplated
making them of steel and to fasten the steel
work firmly to the deck of the barge, in order
to lessen the liability of their being washed
away in case heavy seas sweep over % them.
It is also probable that a steel house will be
constructed over the towing machine, to pro-
tect it, as well as the man who is stationed
there, following the precedent established on
the four new barges recently purchased.



Hines Found Guilty.

The trial of Henry J. Hines, charged with
the embezzlement of Government property,
was held in the Circuit Court of the First
Judicial Circuit on Saturday, December 24.
Judge Gudger found the defendant guilty on
all six charges preferred against him. Upon
the announcement of the verdict, the defen-
dant's attorneys made a motion for a new
trial, and the arguments on the motion were
heard on Wednesday, December 28. The
motion was overruled and Judge Gudger
sentenced the defendant to a term of five
years in the penitentiary at Culebra.

The trial of F. P. Peter/en and Charles
Silvers, against whom embezzlement charges
have been preferred in connection with the
same matter, will be held on January 4.



Porto Belli, Crusher.
A statement of the work done at the Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the weeks ending
December 17 and 24, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




9:49
10:15
10:21

9:04
10:12
10:19


2,869




3,270




3,334




3,372




2.700


December 17


2,844




60:00


18,389


Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




9:00
8.32
6:42
9:42
9:40
10:16


3,639




3,507




2,912




3,637




3,765


December 24


3,877




53:52


21.337



Obituary.

W. H. H. Brady, sanitary inspector at
Gatun, died at Colon Hospital on December
25, as the result of an accidental fall from the
veranda of his house on the evening of Decem-
ber 24. He was born at Bladensburg, Md.,
was 35 years of age, and had been on the
Isthmus since 1905. He is survived by a
wife and three children. The funeral services
will be held at Ancon chapel, Sunday, January

1, at 2 p. m.

Heavy Rainfall at Monte Lirio.

The rainfall at Monte Lirio during the 24
hours from 8 a. m., December 21, to 8 a. m.,
December 22, was 6.12 inches, of which 4.84
inches fell between the hours of 8 a. m. and
5 p. m. on December 21.

Post-Office Business.

The report of the Director of Posts for the
month of November shows that 17,82S money
orders, amounting to $434,905.55, were issued,
an increase of S5.693.85 over October. Of the
$434,905.55 issued in November, the sum of
$337,127.27 was drawn in orders payable in the



United States, $97,230.2S in orders payable
in the Canal Zone, and $548 in orders payable
in -Martinique. The fees collected amounted to
$1,938.85, and the amount paid and repaid
was $99,005.76.

Postal sales for the month amounted to
$6,535.05, and newspaper postage amounted
to $2.67.

Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Colon, Cristo-
bal and Balboa during the week ending December 24,
1910:

Ancon, December 18, from New York, with 23,463
barrels cement for Atlantic Division; 121,876 bags
cement for Pacific Division.

Sibiria, December 19, from New York, with 9 cases
tubes, 200 barrels carbolic acid, 30 drums engine oil for
stock.

Hornelen, December 19. from Eagle Harbor, with
331 pieces piling for Atlantic Division; 13 cases blasting
caps for stock.

Allianr.a, December 22, from New York, with 8 cases
electrical supplies, 41 reels wire rope for Atlantic Divi-
sion; 7 cases electrical machinery and supplies for
Pacific Division; 370 pieces castings for Mechanical
Division; 71 drums lubricating oil, 300 cases sapolio,
92 kegs nuts, 223 kegs bolts, 31 cases bolts, 81 pieces
steel bars, 16 cases rubber packing, 37 coils copper wire,
417 bundles shovels for stock; and a miscellaneous car-
go, the whole consisting of 1,944 packages, weighing
161 tons.

Ateuas, December 22. from New Orleans, with 53
reels wire rope, 197,453 feet yellow pine lumber for
Atlantic Division; 374 bales hay, 2,500 crates fire brick,
100 bundles timber carriers and hooks, 71 barrels sea
coal facing for stock.

Almirante, December 22, from New York, with 56
tons lock construction material for Pacific Division;
10 bundles brooms, 50 cases paint for stock.



Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday, December 24, 1910. All
heights are in feet above mean sea level.





Station.


Day and Date




£

n


ci








Vigia.




s


o


c: .










«j






<


6


pq


<2 «


Sun. Dec. 18. ..


12S.S


94.9


48.8


20.5


19.9


Mon. Dec. 19 . .


129.0


95.1


48.5


19.6


19.1


Tues. Dec. 20 . :


128.3


94.5


48.3


18.9


18.4


Wed. Dec. 21. .


132.3


96.8


50.3


20.2


19.0


Thurs. Dec. 22 .


134 3


98.6


52.3


22.1


20.5


Fri. Dec. 23


129.2


95.2


48.8


21.6


20.4


Sat. Dec. 24. ...


128.6


94.7


48.1


20.5


20.1


Height of low












water


125.0


92.02


46.0







Rainfall from December 1 to 24, Inclusive.

midnight to midnight.



•fiS

n o



Pacific Section —

Ancon

Balboa

*Miraflores

Pedro Miguel

Rio Grande

Central Section —

Culebra

*Camacho

Empire

Gamboa

Alhajuela

*E1 Vigia

*Gorgona

San Pablo

Tabernilla

Bohio

*Monte Lirio

Atlantic Section —

Gatun . .

*Brazos Brook. . . .

Cristobal

Porto Bello

*Nombre de Dios.



Ins.
1.86
2.00
2.03
2.54
2.41

2.95
3.48
1.71
2.57
2.63
3.55
3.40
3.24
2.47
3.02
4.84

4.24

4.72
2.51
6.01
3.72



Ins.

10.20
9.21
8.67
9.58

10.89

11.84

11.58
9.01
12.89
15.39
15.89
15.47
IS. 02
16.94
20.5S
23.05

17.68
19.17
14.05
f21.Sl
20.66



*Standard rain gage. Readings at 5 p. m. daily.
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations. Values
midnight to midnight.

tTo 5 p. m., December 23.



December 28, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



141



MECHANICAL IMPROVEMENTS.



Economies Effected by Alterations and Additions
to Cars and Dump Machines.

The output of a steam shovel is limited
more by the rate at which material it digs can
be carried away than by any other factor, and
the improvements that have been made in
the transportation and disposal of spoil
have been, therefore, of prime importance in
the excavation of the Canal. Many such
improvements have been made since the dig-
ging in Culebra Cut was begun, and some of
them have a permanent value both for the
work on the Isthmus and elsewhere. Work-
ing conditions suggested most of these, in
fact, the need of overcoming obstacles pointed
out the remedy. From the time spoil leaves
the shovels until the empty trains return from
the dumps the work is in charge of the trans-
portation men, who run the trains, unloaders,
spreaders, and track shifters.

Flat cars with one high side and the other
side open are used for hauling most of the
spoil from Culebra Cut. The high side, per-
mitting of a heavier load on that side of the
car than on the other, was found to be the
cause of an unequal distribution of weight,
and to overcome this the floor has been ex-
tended 11 inches on the low side, making it
possible to distribute the weight of the load
nearer the center line of the trucks, and also
enabling the unloading plows to throw the
spoil farther away from the tracks when the
material is ploughed off. It was found early
in the use of these cars that the unloading
plow was causing a lot of damage to the high
sides by running into them, in passing from
one car to another. This cause of trouble
and expense has been eliminated by binding
the high side of the car with an iron ferrule,
known as the "bull nose," which presents a
beveled edge to the plow and thus steers it
into position as it passes from car to car.
These cars were provided with a sheet steel
apron so fastened to the end of one car that it
could lap over the coupling mechanism and
thus make the train continuous. The aprons
were so set that the unloading plows fre-
quently tore them off, in fact there is a record
of 130 aprons having been torn from the cars
in one day. The means of fastening these
aprons has been so changed that now they are
seldom torn off, half a dozen such accidents
in a day being the average.

Trouble was also experienced in the first
days of the heavy trains by the coupling
breaking and the trains separating. ' A bridle
has been devised which overcomes this diffi-