Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 56 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

culty, by holding the cars together in case the
automatic coupler parts from any cause, such
as a worn knuckle, worn or broken lock,
broken knuckle tongue, broken jaw, or even
in case a drawbar carrier is down. By using
the bridle the cars are held in their original
position, even after the coupler has broken,
and the parting of the compressed air line is
thus obviated. Each train crew is supplied
with two of these bridles for emergencies, and
twelve hundred of them have been made for
the Canal and Panama railroad service. They
are especially serviceable in the coupling
between a Lidgerwood unloader reel car and
its locomotive, where the pipe which carries
the steam from the locomotive to the reel
engine formerly broke every time a coupling
gave way, subjecting anyone near the break
to a scalding. At one time it was difficult to
persuade men to work near the coupling be-



cause of the danger from this source, but now
the cars cannot part.

The machines used on the dumps have
undergone most improvement, and here the
greatest savings in time and labor have been
effected. They are the unloaders, spreaders,
and track shifters. They are handled by
transportation men, with the grade of "quali-
fied conductor," who have been especially
trained for this service. The spreader is the
most complicated machine, requiring long
continued practice on the part of the operator
before he becomes thoroughly efficient.

The unloading of flat cars is done by pulling
a steel plow from one end of the train to the
other by means of a cable attached to a power-
ful reel. When first used on the Canal work
the plow was a skeleton with a plate wing. It
was weighted down with from seven to twelve
tons of ballast in order to keep it on the bot-
tom of the cars and so prevent it from riding
over the spoil. Small rock was continually
working under the bottom and over the top
of the plow, and, as there was no way for it
to escape except by being ground out, it did
constant damage to the floor and was contin-
ually catching in the aprons. The plow has
been covered with sheet steel on the top and
bottom and thus the small rock has been ex-
cluded, while, by an adjustment of ballast
along the share 3| tons of weight have been
found sufficient to hold the plow on the floor,
entirely overcoming its tendency to rise.

It was necessary formerly to spend several
minutes in digging the end of the cable at-
tached to the plow out of the spoil along the
face. This waste of time has been eliminated
by forming grommets out of worn-out cable
and attaching them to the plows where they
are always in plain sight, so that the unloading
cable can be coupled to the grommet with-
out any of the work of digging rock and earth
away from the face. Another waste of time
was that formerly experienced in attaching
the cable to the stretching frame, and loosen-
ing it after it had been stretched over the train.
A slip link has been placed in the chain, which
holds the cable to the stretching frame, and a
blow from an iron rod opens this link, allowing
the cable to fall upon the car without the
train even stopping. In this chain there has
been placed a soft link with a breaking strain
of If tons, and if anything interferes with the
plow, which may place an unduly heavy
strain on the cable, this link will give way,
thus saving the cable stretcher from being
wrecked. Not infrequently it is desirable to
unload a train on a curve, and under such con-
ditions it is almost impossible to keep the
cable on the train, because under the great
strain of the unloading it naturally seeks the
shortest line. A block to hold the cable in
place has been devised. This block is fixed
to a 3 J-inch chain eight feet long, on the other
end of which is a hook that can be attached to
the arch bar of the car truck. The cable runs
through this block and is thus held in place.

On one day, about eight months ago, one
unloader at Tabernilla unloaded 18 trains of
19 cars to a train, in all 3 J miles of cars. In
August, an average of 40 cars a day was
unloaded at Balboa, or 13-J trains to an un-
loader; 19 cars of 20 cubic yards to each train.

In handling soft dirt in slides, and other
material, where it is necessary to uncouple
cars from a train and back them alongside
the shovels, the steel aprons that join the
cars are thrown back, in order that the coup-
lings may be broken. In the loading, these



aprons are frequently covered with a ton or so
of spoil, and when it becomes necessary to
throw them back into position, so that the
plow can pass over them considerable labor
is required to take the spoil off the top of the
apron. All this work has been obviated by
an apron thrower, which consists of a short
chain with a hook on one end and a cable
grip on the other. The hook is placed under
the apron and the grip fixed to the moving
unloading cable, and thus the apron is re-
turned to its correct position in advance of
the plow.

Fifty-one improvements have been made
on the machine used to spread material on the
dumps, and each one has added something to
efficiency or subtracted from the time spent
in operating. This spreader consists of a car
on which is erected a machine with steel wings,
which reach out 11J feet from the rails on
either side and level off the material dumped
from the spoil trains. Two thousand men
with shovels could not do so quickly and well
the work done by one of these machines when
it is operating at its best. The spreader is
operated by compressed air. The main reser-
voir in which the air is stored has been moved
from its original position, parallel with the
length of the car, and placed in a position
where it is less in the way, while all the piping
has been rearranged for pressure from this
reservoir, instead of from the train air line.
An operator's table, under cover, has been
erected at the rear of the car, and the operator
occupies an elevated position from which he
can witness all the movements of the machine.
Six air switches in front of him give him com-
plete control. When they arrived on the
Isthmus these machines were so constructed
that they could not clear one another on the
main line of the railroad, even when the
spreading wings were folded, and they have
been altered so that they now clear. A wheel
on the front wing, which ran along the track
and frequently caught in and split expansion
rails and switches, has been replaced by a
shoe which rests on the rail and takes the
weight off the wing without in any way inter-
fering with the rails. Shoes have been added
along the edge of the wings to take the wear,
thus saving the main ploughshare. Other
improvements are in minor parts, but each
one has added to the efficiency of the spreader.

The system of dumping flat cars by the use
of the plow necessitates the constant moving
of tracks in order that the dumps may be
kept in uniformly level condition. This is
done by a shifter devised for work on the Isth-
mus. It consists of a boom, extending from
a flat car out over the track in advance of the
car, and tackle, by means of which the track
is lifted from its bed. Another boom ex-
tending from the car at an angle with the main
boom is used for pulling the track to one side
or the other. The track shifter has been so
improved that track can be thrown nine feet
from its original position in one operation,
instead of only five feet, as formerly. A
change in all the shifters is now in progress
by which the engine for running the hoists
will take steam from the lcocomotive, and
thus make it possible to operate the track
shifter more economically, because of a saving
in wages and in the amount of fuel used. An
example of the work of one of these shifters
was that done at Tabernilla dump about eight
months ago, when \\ miles of track were
shifted 12 feet from the original position in
1 hour and 50 minutes.



142



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 18.



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Christmas Festivities.

It is estimated that nearly 2,000 American
children participated in the Christmas enter-
tainments held in the Canal Zone villages.
Several dances were held on Christmas Eve,
including those of the Tivoli Club at Ancon;
the Gatun Club at Gatun, and the Paraiso
Dancing Club at Paraiso. On New Year's
Eve, the Stranger's Club will hold a dance in
its club room in Colon, and the Pedro Miguel
Card Club will give a card party in the social
hall at Pedro Miguel.

The Christmas sale and card party held by
the Paraiso Woman's Club on December 14
was well attended. The proceeds amounted
to about $35. The next meeting of the club
will be held on Wednesday, January 4, when
there will be an election of officers for the
ensuing six months. Delegates to the January
meeting of the Canal Zone Federation will also
be elected.

On December 13, an entertainment of mov-
ing pictures, with a musical program, was given



under the auspices of the Pedro Miguel
Woman's Club. About $35 was made for the
Christmas fund.



Visit of Bishop Bristol.

Bishop Frank M. Bristol of Washington,
D. C, is expected to arrive at Colon on the
Tagits, on January 1, on his annual visit to the
Methodist work on the Isthmus. He will
preach at the Methodist Episcopal Church,
Panama, on Sunday evening, January 1, 1911.
The quarterly communion service will be held
at 10 a. m. All are most cordially invited to
attend these services.

William W. Gray,

District Superintendent.



Loving Cup for Archdeacon Bryan.

The meeting of the Woman's Altar Guild
of St. Luke's Church, Ancon, held at the Tiv-
oli Hotel on Tuesday, December 20, was in
the nature of a farewell reception to the Ven.
Archdeacon Henry B. Bryan who leaves the
Isthmus in January. The guild presented a
silver loving cup, the presentation being made



SCHEDULE OF BASEBALL GAMES FOR SEASON OF 1911.



The official schedule of games to be played by the teams composing the Panama Canal Base-
ball League during the season of 1911 is published below. It provides for 20 games, the season
to open on Sunday, January 1, and to close on Sunday, April 2i. Ancon and Empire will each
play 16 games on the home grounds and four abroad. The Commissary-Subsistence and At-
lantic teams each have eleven games at home and nine abroad. Gorgona will play six games
at Ancon, six games at Empire, and eight games at Colon. The Marines will play six games at
Ancon, eight games at Empire and six games at Colon. There are three holiday dates — Jan-
uary 2, February 22, and April 14.



Date.


Ancon.


Empire.


Colon.


No. of

Games






Empire-Gorgona


Co -:.-3ub.-Atlantics

Com -Sub. -Mar.: -,s

Com. -Sub. -Mar is

Com.-Sub.-Gorsona

Gorgona-Mai ines

Com.-Sub.-Empire

Atlantics-Gorgona

Atlantics-Com.-Sub

Atlantics-Marines

Atlantics-Marines . . .

Atlantics-Gorgona

Atlantics-Gorgona

Marines-Gorgona

Atlantics-Empire

Com.-Sub.-Gorgona

Atlantics-Ancon


1














January 15












Marincs-Atlantics

Gorgona-Marines








7














Atlantics-Gorgona

Ancon-Marines


Empire-Marines

Empire-Corn. -Sub




February 26


11








March 19








Com. -Sub. -Marines
















April 14




April 16 .




April 23






20



The players under contract and on the
reserve lists of the clubs in the Panama Canal
Baseball League for the 1911 season, are as
follows :

Ancon— R. A. Caldwell, R. M. Smith, G.
A. Vingling, Victor Nvgren R. B. Tinslev,

F. E. Pearman, H. S. Hunter, G. W. Keller,
D. K. Steele, L. M. Drennan, R. P. Drennan,
W. D. Wrightson, Hulbcrt Potter, A. G. Sny-
der, S. C. Russell*.

Empire — G. W. Lyon, Zan Murphy, W. G.
Willis, W. F. Polk, C. A. Dixon, Wade H.
Moore, C. L. Bryan, W. J. Marshall, F. M.
Bell, G. C. McCullough, B. B. Toone, Geo. S,
Markley, Harry B. Bryan, J. L. Luttrell.

Gorgona — Wallace Wright, E. L. Emery,
Walter Clements, Chesty Herring, John
Ridge, Ernest Briggs, Thomas Bailey, H.
Massen, Fred Slaier, L. F. Fullerton, Chas.
Calvitt, Earl Berford, Louis Trotter, Tom
Ryan, D. Kenney, Wm. Barney.

Atlantics — R. S. Davis, J. P. Osborne, J.
C. Cushing, G. H. Morrell, I. H. Fleischman,

G. E. Herring, D. T. Edwards, Jr., S. C.
Russell*, T. T. Dougherty, O. S. Farrar.

Commissary-Subsistence — H. F. Hodnett,



Jr., Thos. A. Sullivan, Frank Breivogel, N. C.
Jones, Joe Curtis, W. H. McCusty, Daniel F.
Horrigan, Albert C. Kellogg, J. W. Coffin, Jr.,
R. S. Mosher.

Marines— R. L. Shepard, W. W. Buckley,
J. Cramer, E. Richards, C. H. Guskie, F. P.
Myers, J. C. McCabe, P. L. Burns, W. Q.
Sake, W. H. Fields, E. L. Maguire, F. H.
McKelvey, W. H. Ryan, W. P. Ken>on, A.
Munsen, W. F. Kennedy, F. F. Austin, O. E.
Jordan.

♦Claimed by both clubs.



The Ancon baseball club played a team
from the U. S. S. Princeton at the Ancon park
on Christmas morning, the game resulting in a
defeat for the visitors by the score of 14 to 2,
the home team scoring eight runs in the
second inning.

The Ancon second team played a game of
ball with a picked team from Corozal on
.Monday, December 26, which resulted in a
score of 12 to 5 in favor of Ancon.



by Col. W. C. Gorgas. The cup, a Tiffany
design, bears the inscription, "Presented to
Archdeacon and Mrs. Bryan as a token of
affection by the women of St. Luke's Guild,
Ancon, Christmas, 1910." Archdeacon Bryan
organized the guild in November, 1907, and
has been its advisor and honorary president
since that time. Both he and M r; . Bryan were
elected honorary members. Following the
business meeting, which was held in the sun
parlor, tea was served in the balcony tea room
overlooking the Pacific Ocean. There was an
attendance of 32, including a numberof guests.

Gatun Christian League.

The Gatun Christian League held a semi-
annual election of officers on Sunday evening,
December 25, following the evening service.
The league has a present membership of 100.



University Club Excursion.

An excursion over the Canal work will be
run by the University Club for its members
and women friends on January 1. The special
train will leave Empire at 8 a. m., Culebra at
8.10, Corozal at 8.25, arriving at Panama
at 8.35. It will leave Panama at 9.30, go
to the Naos Island breakwater, enter Culebra
Cut at Paraiso, leave the Cut at Gamboa, and
run o\er the relocated line to Barbacoas,
thence over the old line to Gatun.



Civil Engineers to Visit Canal.

Two parties made up of members of the
American Society of Civil Engineers will
visit the Isthmus from March 9 to March 16,
1911. One party will come by way of New
York, and the other by way of New Orleans.



Stop-over in Jamaica.

Canal employes purchasing tickets for
passage to New York via Kingston, Ja., by
the "Prinz" steamers of the Hamburg-Amer-
ican Line, sailing fortnightly on Tuesdays
from Colon, may, if they desire, stop over at
Kingston for four days and continue the trip
to New York on the Albingia and Allemannia,
of 5,000 tons, without additional charge.



Missing Men.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of Henry G. Higley, an American
civil engineer, who is supposed to have come
to Panama from Guayaquil, Ecuador, in 1904,
is requested to communicate with James C.
Kellogg, American Consul, Colon.

If Frank B. Dirveneck will communicate
with C. J. Dibowski, Empire, C. Z., he will
receive a packet of letters from his father.



I. O. O. F.

Pacific Lodge. No. 4,1.0. O. F., will hold a
semiannual election of officer^ at the Ancon
lodge hall on Thursday evening, December 29.



FOUND — A ring which can be had on proof of owner-
ship. R. S. Stiles, house 36-B, Corozal, C. Z.



Married.

MATHESON-MASON— On December 27, at St.
Luke's Church, Ancon, the Ven. H. B. Bryan officiating,
Ethel, daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs.
Charles Field Mason, to Lieutenant John Roy Douglas
Matheson. Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. Residence,
Washington, D. C.

BEAM-DRIVER — At Empire. Wednesday, Decem-
ber 21, Lela Mabel Driver, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John Benjamin Driver, to Walter Irvin Beam, Rev.
W. H. Decker officiating. Canal Zone residence, Em-
pire.

BURRELL-GREEX — At Ancon, Saturday. Decem-
ber 17, Avice Green of Pedro Miguel to Joseph Burrell
of Pedro Miguel, the Rev. W. W. Gray officiating.
Canal Zone residence, Pedro Miguel.

FINCH-GORHAM — On Christmas Eve, in Ancon
Hospital Chapel, Zola Gorham to Ernest V. L. Finch,
both of Empire. Rev. A. A. Nellis officiating. Canal
Zone residence, Empire.



December 28, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



143



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Asso-
ciation.

CULEBRA.

The standing in the billiard tournament is as follows:



Name.

Bayne. . .
Case. . . .
Clark....
Conlan . .
Dubois. .
French. .



Won. Lost.

1 4

2 2

1 2

2 2
3
4



Name.

Hall

Hepler. . . .

Silver

Soderberg .
Thomson. .



Won. Lost.



Empire won two games from Culebra at Culebra on
Thursday evening, December 22. by the following
score:



Empire.
Gustavson. . 158 19S 161

Potter 176 173 219

Bardelson.. . 164 159 181

Pearson 178 157 175

Huson 159 162 150



Culebra.

Cohen 159 168 165

Herrington 138 178 157

Fleischman 135

Case 182 211 163

Dougherty. 1S6 222 196

Mengel 169 192



Total 835 849 S86 Total. . . 800 948 873

EMPIRE.

About 300 children were present at the entertainment
on Christmas Eve. The Marine Band played during
the entire evening. After the children had rendered a
program of music and recitations, Santa Claus in the
person of Edward Keeling came down the chimney and
each child was presented with a present and a box of
candy. Following the program by the children, the
following entertainment was given for the older people:
Selections by the Marine Band; "Noel" by Mr. Dohr-
mann. orchestra and chorus; yodeling solo by Owen
King; impersonations by Harry Guerard; selections by
the Marine Band. Following this entertainment, the
ladies served refreshments in the reading room.

The semiannual election of officers of the literary
society will be held on Friday evening, January 6.

Members of the musical and dramatic society fur-
nished Christmas music at the chapel on Christmas



morning, and at St. Mary's Episcopal Church in the
evening.

The following high scores were rolled during the week
on the bowling alleys: Snyder, 212; Pearson, 224, 223;
Gorham, 210, 204; L. Giavelli, 208.

An informal song service was held at 9 o'clock on
Sunday evening, December 25. Most of the lights were
turned out. and in the dim light of the Christmas tree,
favorite songs and hymns were sung.

GORGONA.

The Christmas cantata "Sleepy Santa Claus." by the
children, who were trained by Mrs. Loughery, Mrs.
Booz and Melville Booz, attracted a large audience.
The Brotherhood of Railway Carmen. Knights of
Pythias, Redmen, and the citizens of the town raised a
fund to purchase candy, nuts, and fruit for the children.
Christmas trees imported from the States were beauti-
fully decorated by the electrical department. The
woman's club made, and filled the stockings.

The pool tournament just closed was won by L. P.
Robitoy, followed by R. A. Montgomery, L. E. Clarke,
and G. H. Pierson.

The following games were rolled on the bowling alleys
on Monday, December 19:



Culebra.

Cohen 131 148 169

Mengel 159 172 141

Fleischman.. 131 150 149

Case 214 167 182

Dougherty*. 201 183 145



Gorgona.

Roper 190 196 182

Otis 200 140 171

White 201 174 210

Bordt 176 197 153

M. Var'k'p 194 169 158



Total 836 820 786 Total... 961 876 874

On Monday, January 2, at 8 p. m., a musical and
literary entertainment will be given to the general
public, for which there will be no charge. Refresh-
ments will be served.

CRISTOBAL.

A special train was run to Gatun for the benefit of
those wishing to see the closing basketball game in the
league series between Gatun and Cristobal on Thursday
night. Over 100 people went from Cristobal. The
score was 35 to 24 in favor of Cristobal, which gave them



the eighth straight game and the championship of the
Isthmus. The line-up during the league games was as
follows: R. H. Sartor, r. f. A. L. Prather, 1. f.; R. M.
Vifquain, c; J. H. Weller, (capt.) r. g.; R. H. Luce,
I.E.; M. A. Schwallenberg, sub. g.; W. A. Morton,
sub. c; C. E. Pring, sub. g.

The Cristobal intermediate basketball team won from
the Gatun intermediates by a score of 15 to 6. The
league bowling team lost to Gatun two out of three
games. The second bowling team won three straight
games from Gatun. A splendid program was given in
the clubhouse hall by the children of Cristobal on
Saturday evening. Following the program, the distribu-
tion of presents took place, and every child present re-
ceived a gift. Home made cake, ice cream and punch
were served by the ladies.

PORTO EELLO.

"Christmas at the Cross Roads," a short comedy
sketch with 12 characters, was "put on" by local talent
at the Christmas entertainment held on Saturday. The
different characters were played by Mrs. Pflueger, Mr.
and Mrs. Van Fleet, Mrs. Werner, Miss Moon; Messrs.
W. S. Thomson, Nemec. Everett. Lynch, MacDougal,
Washburn, and Geer. Mr. Humburg sang two solos.
Walter Thomson acted as Santa Claus and delivered a
present to every one in the house. After the distribu-
tion of presents, Thomas Lynch played the piano for an
informal' dance.

Band Concert.

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission Band at Gorgona, C. Z., on Sunday, January 1,
1910, at 6 p. m. The program follows:

1 March — Monstrat Viam Joy

2 Selection — The Chocolate Soldier Straus

3 Procrastination Rag Cobb

4 Overture — Slradella Flotow

5 Waltz— Tres Jolie Waldteufel

6 Medley Selection — Popular Hits Alford

7 Intermezzo — Silver Bell Wenrich

8 Humoresque — What's the Ma'.tcr With

Father? Lampe

9 March— .4 ny Little Girl Tha^' a Nice

Little Girl Fischer

Chas. E. Jennings, Musical Din-dor.
The next concert will be given at the Hotel Tivoli on
Sunday, January 8, at 7. 30 p. m.



PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY.















PASSENGER TRAIN


TIME TABLE No. 8-IN EFFECT JANUARY


1, 19


11.
















SOUTHWARD.


e



" o
■-

SO


STATIONS.


NORTHWARD.




SUNDAY ONLY.


DAILY EXCEPT SUN-
DAY.


DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY.


SUNDAY ONLY.




29


27


25


23


21


7


5


3


2


4


6


8


20


22


24


2«;


28

p. li.

9.00

sS.56

8.50

s S.14
S8.25
SS.19
sS.13

SS.08
f 8.0!
S7.57
S7.52
S7.47
S7.42
S7.37

S7.32
7.30


30




P.M.

7.00
S7.05
f 7.10
f 7.15
S7.1S
S7.36
s7 42
5 7.48

S7.53
f 7.59
s s.n4
SS.09
sS.14
s S.20
s B.2S

S8.30

8.32

f 8.39

sS.41

s 8.46

B.52

s S.53

f S.55

9.00

I'. M.


P. M.

4.00

S4.05

4.10

S4.18
f 4.36
S4.42
s 4.48

S4.53

f 4.59
s 5.04
S5.09
S5.14
S5.20


P. M.

1.00

sl.05

1.10

sl.18
f 1.36
sl.42
S 1.48

sl.53
f 1.59
s 2.04
s 2.09
s 2.14
S2.20
s a 25


A. M.

10.00
s 10.05
f 10.10
f 10 15
s 10.18
f 10.36
s 10.42
s 10.48

s 10 53
f 10.59
s 11.04
s 11.09
s 11.14
s 11.20
s 11.25

sll 30
11.32


A. M.

6.45

S6.50

6.55

S7.01
f 7.19
f 7.25
S7.31

S7.36
f 7.42
S7.4S
S7.53
S7.5S
sS.04
s 8.09

S8.14
S.16


P. M.

4.35
4.39
4.45

s4 51
S5.ll
5 5.17
5 5.23
5.24

5.26
« 5.27
f 5.33
S5.40
s 5.45
s 5.49
s 5.55
s6.00

5 6.05

6.08

6.16

5 6.18

5 6.24

6.30

s6.31

f 6 33

6.40

P. M.


A. M.

10.30
10.34
1".40

s 10.46
s 11.07
f 11.13
s 11.19
11.20

11.22
s 11.23
f 11.29
s 11.36
s 11.41
s 11.45
s 11.51
s 11.56
P. M.
s 12.01

12.03

12 11
s 12.13
s 12.19

12.25
s 12.26
f 12.28

12.35
P. M.


A.M.

5.25
S5.30
s 5.36
S5.41
S5.14
s6.03
S6.09
S6.15

6 16

6 IS
S6.19
f 6.25
S6 32
S6 37
S6.42
S6.49
S6.54

s 6.59

7 01
7.09

s 7.11
s 7.16

7.2'
s7 22
f 7.21

7.30
A M.


0.00

1.77

4.37

5.94

6.79

15.26

18 51

21.37

21.61

22 87
23.30
25 74
28.27
29 68
31.01
32.62
34.91

35.90
36 5?
39.77
40.15
41 66
43.86
44.16
44.84
47.07


Leave. fColon. Arrive.


A. M.

8.35
sS.30
S8.24
S8.19
S8.17
s7 58
s 7.52
S7.46

7.45

7.43
S7.42
f 7.36
sl.H
S7.24
S7.20
S7.14
S7.09

S7.04
7.01
6.5:

S6.50


P. M.

1 2.5H

12.47
12.42

- 12.38
f 12.16
s 12.10
s 12.04
12.02

P. M.

12.00

s 11.59
f 11.53
s 11.46
s 11.41
s 11.37
s 11.30
s 11.25

s 11.20
11.17
11.09

s 11.05


P. M.

3.35

3. ii
3.24

S3.19
f 2.59
f 2.53
S2.47
2.46

2.44
S2.43
f 2.37
S2.30
S2.25
S2.21
S2.15
S2.10

s 2.04

2.00

1.52

- 1.50