Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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s 1.45

139

s 1.38

f 1.35

1.30

P. M.


P. M.

7.35
7.30
7.24

S7.17
S6.56
s 6.50
S6.44
6.43

6.41
S6.40
f 6.34
S6.2S
S6.2!
S6.19
>6.13
s6.0i

S6.03

6 00

5 52

s5.5"

s5 45

5.39

S5.33

f 5.35

5.30

P. M.


A. 11.

8.45
sR.41
f '.35
SS.30
sS.27
s s.os
sS.02
s7 56

S7.51
f 7.46
S7.41
S7 36
s7 31
S7.26
s7.21

s7 16

7 13

f 7.H5

S7.03


P. M.

12.00

s 11.56

11.50

s 11.44
s 11.25
s 11.19
s 11.13

s 11.08
f 11.02
s 10.57
s 10.52
s 10.47
s 10.42
s 10.37

s 10.32

10 30

f lo.:?

s 10.19


P. M.

3.00
S2.56

2 50

S2.44
S2.25
S2.19
S2.13

s 2. IK
f 2.02
s 1.57
s 1.52
s 1.47
s 1.42
s 1.37

s 1.32
1.30

f 1.2:

s 1.19

s 1.14

1.09

s 1 117

f 1.04

1.00

P. M.


P. M.

6.00

S5.56

5.50

S5.44
S5.25
S5.19
S5.13

S5.0S
f 5.02
S4.57
S4.52
S4 47
s 4.42
S4.37

S4 32
4.30

f 4.22
s 4.19
s4.ll

4.09
s 4.07
f 4.04

4.00
P. M.


P. M.

11.40
s 11.37
f 11.31
f 11.26
s 11.24
f 11.05
s in.59
s 10.53

s 10.48
f 10.42
s 10.37
s 10.32
f 10.27
s 10.22
s 10.17

s 10.12
10.10




















































s 5.30 s 2.30
5.32 2.32
f5.39 f2.39
s 5.41 s 2.41
s 5.46 s 2.46
5 52 ? 57










f 11.39 f 8.23

s 11.41 Is 8.25

s 11.46 s 8.30

11.52 >v;


.... tParaiso Jet


f 7 22 f 10.02

s 7.10 s 9.59

s 7.14 f 9.54

7.09 9.49






so .45 s ll.iiii

6 39 10.51

S6.38 s 10 51


5 6.5s s Hi.lJ
6.53 10.09

s 6.52 s 10.07

f 6.49 f 10.04
6.45 10.00

A. M. A. M.








s5.53

f 5 55

6.00

P. 11.


s 2.53

f 2 55

3.00

p. M


s 11.53

f 11.55

12.00

P. M.


s 8.37

f 8.39

8.45

A. M.




s 7.07 s 9.47


Arrive. tPan^ma. Leave.


s 6.35

6 30

A. M.


f 10 5"

1" 45

A. M.


f 7.04
7.00
P. M.


f 9.44

9.40

p. M.




29


27


25


23


91


7


5


3




tTelegraph station, f Flag station,
s Stoo.


2


4


6


S


211 22


34


26


28


30











GATUN SHUTTLE TF


JAIN.










DAILY EXC


EPT SUNDAY.


, STATIONS.


DAIL


Y EXC


EPT SUNDAY.




37


35


*33


31


32


34


36


38




P M P. M.

5.30 1 4.00
s 5.35 s 4.05
s 5.40 : s 4.10
s 5.45 s 4.15


P. M.

12.20
s 12.25
s 12.30
s 12.35


A. M.

10.00
S10 05
s 10.10
s 10.15

10 1R


Lei


ive.




Arrive.


A. M.

11.25
s 11.20
s 11.15
s 11.10

11.07


£


P. M.

3.20
3.15
3.10
3.05
3.02


P. M.

5.20
s 5,15
s 5.10
s 5.05

5.02


6.50
s 6.45
s -j40
s 6.35

6.32























































































* No. 33 will take siding at Gatun .



144



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 18.



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.



The hours during which commissaries are open are
as follows:

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.; 2 p. m.
to 7 p. m.

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 3 p. m. to
7 p. m.



Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning December 24.

FRESH MEATS.

Price.

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 lbs. and

over) . per pound 9

Entire forequarter (not trimmed) 10

pounds and over, per pound

Leg, (S to 10 pounds), per pound. . .

Cutlets, per pound

Short cut chops, per pound

Lamb— Stewing, per pound

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off,

per pound

Leg (5 to 8 pounds) . per pound

Chops, per pound

Cutlets, per pound

Veal — Stewing, per pound

Shoulder for roasting (not under 4

pounds), per pound

Loin for roasting, per pound

Chops, per pound

Cutlets, per pound

Pork cuts, per pound '

Beef — Suet, per pound

Soup, per pound

Stew, per pound

Corned, per pound 1?. 14,

Chuck roast, (3 pounds and over), per

pound

Pot roast, per pound

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3 J

pounds) , per pound

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds),

per pound

Sirloin roast, per pound

Rump roast, per pound

Porterhouse roast, per pound

Steak, Chuck, per pound

Round, per pound

Rib. per pound

Sirloin, per pound

Porterhouse, per pound

Rump, per pound

Tenderloin, per pound



MISCELLANEOUS.



LiYera — Beef, per pound

Calf, each

Half, each

Sauiage — Pork, per pound

Bologna, per pound

Frankfurter, per pound

Lebenvurst, per pound

Sweet bread — Veal, per pound 1.20



10
60
30
17
12
14
13



Beef, per pound .

Eggs, fresh, dozen

§ dozen only

Bluefish, fresh, per pound

Cod, fresh, per pound

Halibut, fresh, per pound

Oysters, in 1-qt. kegs, keg



25
40
26
16
10
15
50



POULTRY AND GAME.



Chickens — Fancy roasting, large, each 1.50

medium, each 1.30

Fowls, each 70, 82, 93, 1.04, 1 15

Ducks, large, each 150

medium, each 1 30



Broilers, each .

Turkeys, per pound

Squabs, each

Capons, each

Geese, fatted, each

Pheasants, each 70,

Partridges, each

Grouse, each

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — English York Cut, per pound

German, Westphalia, per pound

Sugar cured, per pound

Sliced, per pound

Half, for boiling, per pound

Boiled, per pound

Hocks, per pound

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound

Breakfast, sliced, per pound

Beef, salt, family, per pound

Pork, salt, family, per pound

Ox tongues, each

Pigs' feet, per pound

Tongues, per pound

Mutton, mess, per pound

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound

Philadelphia Cream, cake

Young America, per pound

Swiss, per pound

Edam, each

Camembert, in large tins, tin . ,

Camembert, in small tins, tin .

Neufchatel, each

Gouda, per pound

Parmesan, per pound

Milk. Briarcliff. bottle

Buttermilk, bottle



75

30

35

2.60

2.75

1.00

50

85



30
36
20
23
21
25
108
27
28
9J
14
80
10
16
7



40

38

10

22

26

1.00

38

14

6

34

35

**25

**15



Price

Ice cream, quart J25

Ice cream, ^-gallon J50

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound 3

Celery , per head 6

Carrots, per pound 3

Cabbage, per pound 3

Cucumbers, per pound 10

Lettuce, per pound '. . . . 25

% pound 13

Onions, per pound 3

Potatoes, white, per pound 3

Sweet, per pound 2 \

Squash, per pound 4

Turnips, per pound 3

Yams, per pound 3$

Apples, per pound 5

Cranberries, per pound 10

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, per dozen 12

indicates reduction from last list.
**Indicates 5 cents allowed for return o f bottle,
tlndicates advance on last list.

ISold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z., December 23, 1910.
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi-
nating in the United States and its possessions, have
been received in the office of the Director of Posts and
may be secured upon request of the addressee.:

Abbott. Chester Langston. Chas. F.

Alexander, A. E. (pkg.) Langwardt, Niels

Anderson, Chas. H. Leutel. John (pkg.)

Arben. Millie (pkg) Lewis. Henry \V.

Austizabel. M. Lither. Richard

Banks, J. V. London. Herman P.

Bartlett, W. J. Loraine, David E.

Belragen. W. A. Lynch, Mrs. Frank

Bennick. T. G. Mccombs, Walter
Benninger. Miss Florence Malone Peter L.

Berdeau. R. W. Markham, Isaac S.

Bishop, R. A. Middleton. H.

Boylan. Mrs. Mabelle' Montgomery. W. H.

Bradford. E. Moran, P. C.

Bryan, Clarence Morgan, C. D.

Bull, Chas. Moyer, Miss Maude

Bull. F. H. McAdam, Geo. M.

Butler, T. James McDewitte, Martin (pkg)

Carpenter. Moore McLean, James

Chase. Henry B. Neff. John R.

Cherrv. D. F. Neville, Mrs. Irene

Churchill & Co.. A. F. Nielson. George

Clark. Herbert F. Noland. C. Powell

Cooke. Miss Cecilia Nolan, Mrs. M. C.

Collins. M. J. O'Connell. H.

Collier, Jr.. Geo. W. Owen, Brady

Cramp, H. F. Padking. W.

Cutler. Mr. Ragon. Spiro. (Ceylon)

Dahl. Chester T. Raybura. J. L.

Davis. Geo. B. Redd. Win. F.
Dews, Mrs. S. S.fcare Wm. Rogers. Wm.

M. Morse.) Rosenquist, Fred

Dick. Mary, (pkg) Rosselot. W. J.

Ermentrout. Robert R. Schantz. Bert

Erickson. Wm. A. Scott, Jacob

Fetters. William Seward. J. Loyal

Fowle. John Shaughnessy. James

Fullerton. Alexander Slepp. Mrs. Norman

Geer, Wm. H. (pkg) Souder. Harry

Gorger, Ino. A. Smith. Miss Jessie G.

Gillman, R. G. Smith. Geo.

Goldberq. F Smith. A. O.

Gutierrez, Joseph (pkg) Smith. Russell

Halm. Chas. Salomon. A. Ricardo

Hammell, Otto Stanton. Mrs. Clara

Hanson. Chas. A. Stephen, Otto

Harfin, W. H. Stevenson. J. H.

Harrington. Edward Stiles, Albert I.

Hayden. Chas. Toland, Miss Alice (pkg)

Hersh. Sherbin J. Vreeland. Mrs. J.

Howell, O. Waite, Miss Cassie

Hillier. C. H. Wagner, C. B.

Howe. Chas. H. R. Walsh. John J.

James. Miss Winnie Waters. Mrs. S. E.

Janniere. M. E. Alexis Webster. William

Jecler, Jos. O. West. Chas. S.

Johnston. Miss Ida Whaler. John W.

Jones. Thos. White Alma

lordon. J. P. Willis. Mrs. A. S.

Kowalski. Max Wood. Stanley Willi8

La Fountain, Frank Yapp. Alhc (Fllic)

Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending January 4, 1911.
(75th meridian time):



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.



Date.



December 29.
December 30 .
December 3 1
January 1 . . . .
January 2 . . . .



January 3 .
January. 4 .



High.



A.M.

.MS

2.55
3.33
4.05
4.40

5.15

5.52



Low.



A. M.
8.33
9.13
9.52
10.27
11.00

11.38
P. M.
12.15



High.



P. M.
2.58
3.33
4.05
4.37
5.08

5.42

6.20



Low.



P. M.
8.52
9.33
10.10
10.45
11.20
MDT,
12.00



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company ; of the Royal Mail Steam
Packet Company: of the Hamburg-American Line, and
of the United Fruit Company's Line, the Panama Rail-
road Company's dates being subject to change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL

Advance P. R. R. . .Thursday... Dec.

Panama P. R. R. . .Wednesday .Jan.

Allianca P. R. R. . .Tuesday Jan.

Colon P. R. R. ..Monday Jan.

Advance P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .Jan.

Panama P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .Jan.

Allianca P. R. R

Colon P. R. R

Advance P. R. R

Panama P. R. R

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

, . .P. R. R. . .Tuesday



29
4
10
16
21
28
.Saturday. ...Feb. 4

.Friday Feb. 10

.Thursday... Feb. 16
.Thursday... Feb. 23



..Jan. 3

..Jan. 10

..Jan. 16

..Jan. 23

Jan. 29



. Tuesday
.Monday
. Monday
.Sunday.

.Friday Feb. 3

.Friday Feb. 10

.Thursday... Feb. 16
.Wednesday .Feb. 22
.Tuesday .... Feb. 28



Colon

Advance P. R. R.

Panama P. R. R.

Allianca P. R. R.

Colon P. R. R.

Advance P. R. R.

Panama P. R. R.

Allianca P. R. R.

Colon P. R. R .

Advance P. R. R.

A fortnightly service of the Cristobal and Ancon will
be maintained as nearly as possible, leaving Ciistobal
on or about the 11th and 28th of each month. Due
notice of the sailings of these ships from the Isthmus
will be given. On the outward voyage these ships sail
from the pier at the foot of 12th street, Hoboken, N. J.

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Santa Marta U. F. C . . .Thursday.

Sarnia H.-A Saturday.

Tagus R. M Saturday.

Metapan U. F. C . . . Thursday .



. H.-A Saturday .

.U. F. C. . .Thursday..
.R. M Saturday. ,



.Dec. 22
.Dec. 24
.Dec. 24
.Dec. 29
.Dec. 31
. Jan. 5
Jan. 7
Jan. 7
Jan. 12
Jan. 14
Jan. 19
Jan. 21



Prinz Joachim.

Zacapa

Oruba

Sibiria H.-A Saturday.

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday..

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Saturday.

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday.

Magdalena R. M Saturday. .

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday. ..Dec.

Prinz Aug. Whiielm . . H.-A Tuesday . . . Jan.

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday. . Jan.

Magdalena R. M Monday Jan.

Sarnia H.-A Tuesday. ...Jan,

Metapan U. F. C . . . Thursday.

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. .

Zacapa U. F C . . . Thursday.

Clyde R. M Monday . .

Sibiria H.-A Tuesday..

Almirante



2<J

3

5 '

9
10
12
17
19
23
24
26



Turrialba..
Parismina.
Abangarez .
Heredia . . .
Atenas ....
Cartago . . .
Turrialba. .



. Jan.
. Jan.
. Jan.

Jan.

Jan.
. U. F. C. . .Thursday.. Jan.

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

U. F. C. ..Saturday. ..Dec. 24

U.F.C... Wednesday . Dec. 28

U. F. C. . .Saturday. . .Dec. 31

U. F. C. . .Wednesday. Jan. 4

U. F. C. . .Saturday. . .Jan. 7

U. F. C... Wednesday Jan. 11

U. F. C. . .Saturday. .Jan. 14

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

U. F. C. . .Thursday... Dec. 29

.Thursday.. .Dec. 29

.Thursday.. Jan. 5

.Thursday.. Jan. 5

.Thursday. ..Jan. 12

.Thursday . ..Jan. 12

.. Thursday. . Jan. 19

. .Thursday.. Jan. 19



Atenas

Cartago U. F. C . .

Turrialba U. F. C . .

Parismina U. F. C . .

Abangarez U. F. C. .

Heredia U. F. C.

Atenas U. F. C .

Cartago U. F. C.

COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Tagus R. M Tuesday Jan. 3

Oruba R. M Tuesday Jan. 17

The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as fol-
lows: Jamaican, on or about December 28, lor New Or-
leans, via Kingston, Ja.

Hamburg-American steamers leave for New York
every Tuesday at 10 a. m.; for Jamaica every fortnight,
connecting there with steamers for all points in Cuba,
for Port Limon every Tuesday, direct, or by way of
Bocas del Toro.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Mondays at 5 p. m. ; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursday at 3 p. m.; for New Orleans via Port
Limon and Puerto Barrios on Thursday at 6 p. m.,
and for New York on Thursday at 11 a. m.

Sailings of the French line (Cie Generate Transatlan-
tique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and Guad-
eloupe on the 3rd and 20th.of each month.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1911.



No. 19.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Pa?iama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Removal of Cranes from Pedro Miguel to Mira-
flores.

A contract will be made with the McClin-
tic-Marshall Company of Pittsburg to dis-
mantle two berm and four chamber cranes,
now in use in the concrete operations at the
Pedro Miguel Locks, and reerect them at the
Miraflores Locks. About 2,000 tons of steel
will be dismantled, and 2,100 tons erected;
and the price to be paid, SS0.532 is, therefore,
about $19 a ton. The McClintic-Marshall
Company have the contract for building and
erecting the lock gates, and this additional
work will be carried on in connection with the
gate work. The dismantling will be begun
in February, and the contractor agrees to
have the cranes reerected at Miraflores in
three months from that date.

The cantilever cranes at Pedro Miguel con-
sist of two berm cranes, erected in the f orebay
of the locks, which convey materials from stor-
age piles and mix them into concrete, and de-
liver the concrete into cars; and four cantile-
ver cranes in the lock chambers, which lift the
buckets of concrete from the cars and deliver
the material at the points desired. The con-
tractor will dismantle all structural parts and
machinery, including concrete mixers, load
them on the cars and unload and reerect at
Miraflores, placing all machinery in its proper
position, without allowing the performance of
this work to intefere with the erection of the
lock gates.

In detail, the contract provides for: (1)
The removal of two cantilever arms and the
accompanying machinery from berm crane
"G" at Pedro Miguel, and the erection of one
each of these on berm cranes "F" and "E",
now partly erected at Miraflores; (2) The dis-
mantling of the balance of berm crane "G" at
Pedro Miguel and reerecting it at Miraflores
with the additional boom provided, at the
same time dismantling one cantilever arm of
berm crane "E" at Pedro Miguel and attach-
ing it to berm crane "G" at Miraflores, so as
to form a complete crane; (3) Dismantling
the remainder of berm crane "E" and reerect-
injt it at Miraflores. together with an addi-



tional boom and all machinery, so as to make a
complete machine; (1) Dismantling two cham-
ber cranes at Pedro Miguel and erecting them
complete, one in each chamber of the upper
locks at Miraflores; (5) Dismantling the two
remaining chamber cranes and reerecting
them complete, one in each chamber of the
lower locks at Miraflores.

The concrete work at the Pedro Miguel
Locks, as shown elsewhere in this issue, was
57 per cent completed on December 31, and
it is advancing at the rate of from 10,000
to 12,000 cubic yards a week. The dismant-
ling of the cranes at Pedro Miguel will be done,
as indicated above, in order that each unit
may be utilized up to the last moment in the
concrete work.



Biological Survey.
Prof. H. A. Pittier of the Bureau of Plant
Industry, E. A. Goldman of the Biological
Survey, and S. F. Hildebrand of the Bureau
of Fisheries, all of Washington, and S. E.
Meek of the Field Museum of Natural History
of Chicago, arrived on the Colon, on December
28, to take up the work of making a biological
survey of the Isthmus.

Sale of Scrap Iron in 1910.

More scrap iron was sent from the Isthmus
to the States during the year 1910 than dur-
ing all the previous years, as will be seen by
the following table:

Pounds.

1906 2,591,000

1907 3,414.185

1908 302,600

1909 10,638,684

1910 41,673,840

Of the amount shipped in 1910, all was sent
to New York, excepting 1,112,540 pounds,
which went to San Francisco. Of the amount
sent to New York, 15,708,300 pounds consisted
of American scrap, and 24,524,000 pounds
of French, 329,000 pounds not being segre-
gated. It was sent in 24 shipments, and the
average net price received for 16 shipments
up to October 10, was $7.27 per ton. The
price received for the scrap sold in San Fran-
cisco was $7.15 per ton. In 1909, the aver-
age net price received per ton was $10.14.

Concrete Flume in Obispo Diversion.

As soon as the dry season is far enough
advanced, the wooden flume in the Obispo
Diversion at La Pita, a point immediately
north of Empire, on the east side of Culebra
Cut, will be replaced by a reinforced con-
crete flume. This is the point at which the
diversion broke through its banks early in
the rainy season of 1910, and at which a fur-
ther break occurred during the heavy rains
of December. It is planned to excavate from
the toe of the slope all the loose material in the
slide that caused the break, and to build the
new flume on such foundation as may remain,
moving the line eastward a short distance, if
necessary, in order tn avoid the slide. The



highest measured flow in the diversion since
the American occupation is 2,325 cubic feet
per second, and under the French regime, 2,700
cubic feet per second. The capacity of the
flume will be over 3,000 cubic feet per second.



Record for Ladder Dredges.

The Marmot of the Pacific Division dredg-
ing fleet broke all records for the daily, weekly
and monthly output of ladder dredges in the
Canal service during December. The output
for the month was 219,795 cubic yards; for
the best week of 6 working days, 47,693 cubic
yards, and for the best day — December 14 —
8,569 cubic yards. The output for the best
10-day period during the month was 77,838
cubic yards, or an average of 7,783.8 cubic
yards a day; for a 25-day period, 183,163
cubic yards. The average per working day
over the whole month was 7,326 cubic
yards. The above figures are based upon
place measurement. The dredge was work-
ing the entire month in the approach
channel to the site of the new docks at the
Pacific entrance to the Canal, excavating
earth to a depth of 31 feet below low
tide. The crew set deliberately to work on
December 1 to exceed all previous records,
and by request of the men themselves, the
dredge was kept at work every day in the
month, excepting Christmas Day. All the
dredges work night and day.

The best previous record for old French
ladder dredges was made by the Atlantic
Division dredge, No. 5, in July, 1909, which
excavated 176,082 cubic yards.



Forged Letters of Recommendation.

Information has been received from the
Washington office of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission that, during the past few months,
quite a large number of applicants for employ-
ment on the Isthmus have filed with the em-
ployment agent at New York fraudulent
letters of recommendation. In one case, an
applicant counterfeited the letter heads of two
different companies and filed letters of recom-
mendation written on such letter heads pur-
porting to be signed by foremen of such com-
panies. In another case, eight applicants for
positions as steel car repairers filed letters of
recommendation purporting to be signed by
master mechanics of two or more railroad
companies. It was found upon writing to
the companies involved that the men had
never been in the employ of such companies,
and that the letters were not authentic.

These papers were transmitted to the
Attorney-General with the request that the
men filing the same be prosecuted under Sec-
tion 28 of the Penal Code. Three of the men
involved could not be found, including the
one who counterfeited the letterheads. One
of the others pleaded guilty to the charge of
forgery, under Section 28, and was sentenced
to six months in the Elmira Reformatory-
The others were indicted for conspiracy under



146



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 19.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.}



Sections 37 and 28, and all except one pleaded
guilty, but the sentence was suspended in
view of the fact that they were all young fel-
lows and apparently had not been engaged in
any wrong-doing theretofore. The other man
refused to plead guilty and his counsel argued
for the dismissal of the indictment on the
ground that the recommendation in the case
was not such a writing as could defraud the
United States. Judge Hough, before whom
the case was tried, held that the writing came
within the provisions of Section 28 of the
Penal Code, and the man, having been found
guilty by the jury, was sentenced to 40 days
in Xew York County prison.

This appears to be the first time the Gov-
ernment has ever instituted prosecutions in
cases of this kind. It is, therefore, believed
that as wide circulation as possible be given
the fact that the filing with the Isthmian
Canal Commission of fraudulent letters of
recommendation, for the purpose of obtaining
employment under the Commission, consti-
tutes a criminal offense against the United
States.

Gatun Dam Spillway.
Concrete was placed in the spillway of
Gatun Dam during the week ending Decem-
ber 31, as follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.

Mixers.




Cu. Yds.








60
192
138
114
138


5:30
7:30
6:00
4:30
5:30


1




1




2




1




1






Total


642
111.984


29:00




Previously reported . . .




Grand total


112,626





Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at the Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
December 31, follows:



Date.



December 26.
December 27.
December 28.
D -rember 29
December 30.
December 31 .



Hours
worked.



8:11


3.005


8:19


3,437


8:41


3.400


8:33


3,561


8:36


2,473



Cubic
Yards.



Total .



15.876



Further Prohibition on Labor Recruiting.

The Government of Panama has made a
decree providing:

(1) That any person who shall contract or
engage skilled or unskilled laborers in the Ca-
nal works shall be punishable by deportation
for from two to six years, and that accomplices
shall undergo two-thirds of the penalty. The
penalty shall be imposed after trial by a judge
of the Panama Circuit Court, and an appeal
may be taken to the Supreme Court. (2)
The agent of a steamship company who sells
a ticket for passage to any laborer contracted
with, contrary to the law, shall be considered
an accomplice. (3) Skilled or unskilled labor-
ers of the Canal works may not be sold a
passage ticket unless they present a permit
issued by the chief political authority of the
port of embarkation, which shall be issued
only upon presentation of a proper clearance
from the Canal authorities. (4) Every per-



son who shall entice and employ laborers to