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trains have been gradually diverted from
Tabernilla to the relocation of the Panama
railroad, where the material is utilized in filling
the trestles beween Frijoles and Gamboa.
The number of trainloads dumped there each
day was reduced from 60 in 1909, to 20 at the
time the dump was abandoned.



Canal Work In December.

The grand total of Canal excavation to
January 1 was 126,407,064 cubic yards, leav-
ing to be excavated 56,130,702 cubic yards.
The total for December was 2,946,404 cubic
yards, as compared with 2,811,681 cubic yards
in December, 1909, and 3,261,673 cubic yards
in December, 1908. Of the total, 2,448,097
cubic yards were "work excavation" and
498.307 cubic yarrlp xeere "plant- excavation



The dry excavation amounted to 1,514,552
cubic yards and was principally by steam
shovels. The dredges removed 1,431,852
cubic yards in addition to the amount pumped
into Gatun Dam by suction dredges. The
progress on the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel
and Miraflores is referred to elsewhere in this
issue.

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava-
tion was 852,912 cubic yards. Of this total,
97,702 cubic yards were dry excavation, and
the remainder was removed by the dredges
in the Atlantic entrance.

The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 1,408,881 cubic yards, and further
reference to this work is published elsewhere
in this issue.

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation
was 704,611 cubic yards, 606,829 cubic yards
of which were taken out by the dredges at
the Pacific entrance.

A detailed statement of the excavation and
a summary of the work on the locks and dams,
follow:

ATLANTIC DIVISION.



Locality.


"Work."
Excava-
tion.


"Plant."
Excava-
tion.


Total
excava-
tion


Dry excavation —
Locks, Dam and Spill-


Cu. Yds.
72,030


Cu. Yds.
25,672


Cu. yds.
97,702














Total


72.030


25.672


97,702












Atlantic entrance
Locks, Dam and Spill-


482,370


252,840


735,210










Total


4SJ.370


252.840


735 210






Total wet and dry


554,400


278.512


832.912


CENTRAL DIVISION.



Dry excavation —


1.211,400
176.349

21.132




1.211,400






176.349


H W excavation —




21.132








Total


1.408.881




1.408,881



PACIFIC DIVISION.



Dry excavation —
Locks, Dams and Spill-


29,101












Prism, south of Pedro
















Total


29.101




29.101


Wet excavation —
Miraflores Locks


387,034
68.681


219,795


6H6..29
68.681
















Total


455.715


219.795


675,510


Total wet and dry


484.816


219.795


704,611



TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION




Dry excavation [ 1.488.880

Wet excavation 959.217


25.672
472.635


1,514,552
1.431.852


Total ! 2.448,097


498.307


2,946,404



Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven stations) 14.43
inches.

By "Work" Excavation is meant excavation actu-
qltv tnadp forrmp of th*»/.onstifijpnt d«t^« of the Canal.



such as Prism, Diversions, or Locks etc.; that is. it
represent s material taken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Canal, and constitutes excavation useful
for the completed Canal.

By "Plant" Excavation is meant excavation outside
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as
Prism, Diversions, or Locks, etc. It includes mate-
rial necessary to be excavated for construction pur-
poses only and is chargeable against the particular
plant item for which it is performed, such as Prism.
Diversions. Locks, etc.

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.



Material.



Fill placed in dams

Concrete laid in locks.

Concrete laid in dams

and spillways



Atlantic. Pacific



Cu. Yds.

412.696

80,212

5,597



Cu. Yds.
107.905
64,367



Total.



Cu. Yds.
520,601
144.579



French Dredges to be Scrapped.

The four old French dredges in the Canal
prism at Gorgona and Mamei will be broken
up and sold as scrap iron. Three of them are
of the Belgian ladder type, and they have been
stripped of their engines, chains, brasses,
ladders, davits, and other repair parts, which
are in use, or will be used, for repairs on the
Pacific Division ladder dredges. One of them
is a suction dredge, and such parts of it as can
be utilized elsewhere will be saved in the
scrapping. The excavation in the Canal
prism has been carried on around the old
hulls, and it was intended at one time to
repair such holes as might be found below the
water line, and float the dredges afterthe water
in the lake had reached sufficient depth. It
has been found that the repairs would be ex-
pensive, and, on this account, and, because
there will probably be no market for the hulls
after the completion of the Canal, when a
large part of the present floating equipment
will be on the market, it has been decided to
break up and remove them from the prism
while the construction tracks used in the
excavation are still available. The work will
be done during the present dry season.



Work Resumed on Colon Storm Sewer.

Work on the D street storm sewer in Colon,
which was suspended during the months of
November and December on account of the
heavy rains, was resumed shortly after Jan-
uary 1. At the time the work was shut down,
construction of the sewer had been completed
from its north outlet to a point midway be-
tween 13th and 14th streets, a distance of
4,800 feet. Excavation of the trench had been
advanced as far as 14th street, but in making
the hydraulic fill by suction dredge in this
part of the city, it was entirely filled in. The
total length of the sewer, when completed,
will be 6,800 feet, and there remain 2,000 feet
to be built, which will probably be accom-
plished before the end of the dry season. It
is a little over seven feet in size from the beach
outlet to 3d street; six feet four inches from
3d to 6th streets, the summit elevation; five
feet three inches from 6th to 11th streets, and
q lirtlp nvpr seven fpet from 14th street to its



162



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 21.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.)



south outlet in Folks River. The sea outlet
has been practically finished, and during the
November rains, that part of the sewer from
6th street to the beach, where a 6-foot head
is developed, carried off the water rapidly
from sections of the streets in that locality,
formerly subject to inundation. Most of the
excavation for the sewer has been in a coral
rock formation, but between 13th and 14th
streets, it was entirely in soft mud, making
the digging unusually difficult. This part of
the street was at one time under water, and
was filled in when the city began to extend
in this direction.



Drainage of Culebra Cut.

The central drainage ditch, which carries
water from the north side of the summit of
Culebra Cut at Empire into the sump at the
Gamboa pumping plant, will be deepened
during the present dry season sufficiently to
take care of the drainage until next year. At
Gamboa, the ditch will be at 26 feet above sea
level, which is 14 feet below the bottom of the
Canal, and the plan is eventually to deepen
it to 36 feet above sea level at the summit,
near Empire bridge. Only so much of the
work as will be necessary to take care of the
drainage during the coming wet season will
be done this year.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

was placed in the spillway of



Concrete
Gatun Dam during the weeks ending January
7 and 14, as follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.




Cu. Yds.








180
162
90
168
158


7:30
5:30
4:00
7:00
7:30


























758
112.626


31:30




Previously reported . . .






113.384






148
90
60

24
80
76


5:00
3:30
6:00
1:00
4:30
5:00






























478 ' 25.00


Previously reported ....


113,384






113.862









New Train Schedule on Balboa Branch.

A new schedule for the operation of trains
on the Balboa branch of the Panama railroad
went into effect on January 2, 1911. Three
trains have been added to the daily service
each way. These leave Panama at 10.40
a. m., 1.50 p. m., and 6.45 p. m., respectively;
and Balboa at 10.20 a.m., 1.15 p. m., and 7.25
p. m., respectively. In addition, a train
leaves Panama at 10.50 p. m., and returning,
leaves Balboa at 11.25 p. m., on working
days. On Sundays and holidays, a train
leaves Panama at 9.30 p. m., and returning,
leaves Balboa at 9.50 p. m. The new sched-
ule makes a change of a few minutes in the
time of the arrival and departure of trains at
Panama and Balboa, which will be noted in
the time table published on another page of
this issue of The Canal Record.



CONCRETE WORK IN T HE LOCKS.

GATUN LOCKS.

Nearly 50 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been
laid, the exact amount in place at the close of work on January 14 being 1,033,708 cubic yards,
out of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
January 14, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this_issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours: ~



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours No. of
placed, worked, mixers






Cu. Yds.
2.148
2,036
2.350
2.260
1.932
1,772


36:36
32:16
38:10
40:35
32:12
29:10


6
6
6
6
6
6


Cu. Yds.
ill
368
464
416
522
468
239


8:40
6:40
9:40
8:40
8:40
8:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
284
250*
138
145*
140}
161*


Cu. Yds.
2,854




2,654*




2,952




2,821*




2.594}




2,401*




239




















12,498


208:59




2,899


51:00




1,120}


16,517}




1,017,191






















1,033.708}



*The 239 yards shown for the portable *-yard mixer were placed as follows: January 9th, 45 yards; January
10th, 52 yards; January 11th, 10 yards; January 12th, 32 yards; January 13th, 44 yards: January 14th. 56 yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 60 per cent completed, 497,804 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on January 14. Opera-
tions have reached the point where the maximum output of all four of the berm crane mixers
cannot be utilized, and, therefore, only two of them are kept at work continuously. On the
other hand, the installation of the steel work for the lock machinery is assuming greater pro-
portions as the work advances towards the ends of the lock. In the upper part of the lock, the
construction of the west wall is being continued to the point of junction with the wing wall, and
excavation for the center wall extension has been resumed. Work on the east wall extension is
temporarily suspended. At the south end, construction is proceeding on all three walls, and,
in addition, one chamber crane is engaged in placing concrete in the extension of the guide wall
to its farthest point north. The placing of the steel castings for the two sluice gates at the
south end of the center wall is about completed. These castings form the division and side
walls of the gates, the division wall employing three and the side walls two. Each casting
occupies a vertical position, is 22 feet high, and weighs a little over 24,000 pounds. In addition,
two smaller castings are placed a few feet away, one in front and the other in the"rear of the
gates, which will serve as a cutwater in the flow from'the culvert. Work is also in progress on
the installation of two of the Stoney gate valves.

The record of concrete laid during each of the six S-hour working days of last week, follows:



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours I No. of
worked, mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.
1,632
1,522
1.494
934
1.628
1,362


21:00
21:00
19:00
14:50
16:00
14:00


3

4
3
3
2
2


Cu. Yds.
178
130
208
364
292
266


7:00
5:00
8:00
10:50
7:00
8:00


2
1
1
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.

12

14
5


Cu. Yds.
1,810




1,652




1,702




1.310




1.934




1.633










8,572


105:50


2.83


1,438 45:50


1.67


31
4,050


10.041




487.763























4,081


497.804



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

The record of concrete laid during the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


*-cubic yard mixers.


J-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


1 |
Concrete Hours No. of
placed, worked, mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large

stone.




Jan. 9 . . . .
Jan. 10. ..
Jan. 11...
Jan. 12...
Jan. 13. ..
Jan. 14. ..


Cu. Yds.
430
454
400
432
502
440


11:33
11:33
11:33
11:33
11:33
16:50


2
2

2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
512
339
361
223
248
402


33:25
23:00
25:50
17:00
16:50
29:50


4
4
4
3
3
4


Cu. Yds.
13
71
122
73
14
75


.75
7:00
9:00
7:00
1:00
7:00


1
1
1
1
1
1


Cu. Yds.
30
25
40
47
8
8


Cu. Yds.

*990

t896

**926

tt779

772

925


Total .
Previously


2,658


73:15


2


2,085


144:75


3.67


368


31:75


1


158
2,461


5,288
100.669
























Grand
total.


2,619


105,957



♦Includes 5 cubic yards by hand,
ttlncludes 5 cubic yards by hand.



•(■Includes 7 cubic yards by hand. **Includes 3 cubic yards by hand.



Over 100,000 cubic yards of concrete have
been placed in the upper lock at Miraflnres.



and the most of it has been used in the floor
and floor culvprts. and in f-he east wall The



January 18, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



163



steel work for the sluice gates in the east wall
is in position, and has been partly concreted
in. Sections of this wall have been completed,
and the foundation has been extended to
within 20 feet of the lower end. Two station-
ary mixers set up on the east bank, and the
two 2-cubic yard trestle mixers, furnish the
concrete for the east wall construction. The
batter section of the center wall has been ex-
tended about half the length of the lock, and
the excavation for the remaining distance is
well advanced. Excavation by steam shovel
for the west wall continues, but no concrete
has been laid as yet. Work on the west stor-
age trestle is also in progress.

Teachers of the Colored Schools.

On Friday and Saturday of last week, Jan-
uary 13 and 14, an institute for the teachers
of the Canal Zone colored schools was held.
On the first day nearly all of the schools for
colored children were closed in order to allow
the teachers an opportunity to visit, in com-
pany with the supervisors, the schools for
white children. The schools at Ancon, Cule-
bra, Empire, Balboa, and Cristobal were
visited to allow the teachers to observe
methods and receive general instruction in
classroom work. On Saturday, two all-day
sessions were held in Ancon. A morning
meeting beginning at S.30 was held in Ancon
hall, when there was a program consisting of
papers and informal talks. The superintend-
ent of schools, Mr. Frank A. Gause, spoke
on schoolroom problems; Miss Anna Irvin
on the ethical value of literature in the school;
Mr. C. C. Carr, principal of the Canal Zone
high school, on Panama in history; Miss
Alice Alexander, supervisor of primary grades,
on composition writing. The program ended
with a practical talk on sanitation by Col.
W. C. Gorgas.

The afternoon session was held in the Ancon
schoolbuilding, when papers were read by the
colored teachers, some of the subjects being
the methods of teaching reading, the prepara-
tion of the reading lesson, and some difficulties
in English grammar. A discussion was con-
ducted by the superintendent of schools, and
an address on the opportunity and respon-
sibility of the teacher was delivered by the
Hon. Maurice H. Thatcher. The sessions
were attended by 24 men.

The organization of the schools for colored
children is the same as that of the primary
schools for American children. There are
15 schools, the largest of these being at
Cristobal, Empire, and Culebra. The entire
enrollment is approximately 1,500. There is
a staff of 25 negro teachers, and a supervisor
visits each school frequently. During the
summer vacation, the superintendent paid a
visit to Mr. J. R. Williams, inspector of
schools in Kingston, Jamaica, and through his



cooperation, the appointment of first-class
teachers for these schools was possible. It is
the policy of the department of schools to
assist and raise the standard of these teachers
by every means possible. To that end,
arrangements are made for them to visit the
schools of the white teachers, and frequent
conferences are held, in addition to the month-
ly teachers' meetings.

Careful attention has been paid to the
equipment of the schools; steel desks are
furnished, and the entire working apparatus
is considered up to the standard of the average
school in the United States. New school-
buildings are being constructed at Cruces, and
at Pedro Miguel.

Ancon Rock Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending January 7,
follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.


January 2-


-Holiday


9:15
9:20
9:40
8:20
11:05


2.585




2,684




2.652




2.353




4,133








Total .


47:40


14,407















Red Cross Finances.

A statement of the financial condition of
the Canal Zone Chapter, American National
Red Cross, follows:

RECEIPTS.

December 1. Balance on hand .. . $1,948.80
December 1 to 31. Membership

dues 31.00

— $1,979.80

DISBURSEMENTS.

December 1. Relief of man at

LasCascadas $5.00

December 2. Notices of election

of officers, printing 2.49

December 2. Coach hire .20

December 5. Relief of man at

Ancon, deported to the States. 50.00

December 13. Relief of man at

Ancon Hospital, deported to

the States 40.00

December 15. Ballots for election

of officers, printing 7.10

December 17. Deportation of

young lady to England 120.00

December 19. Coach hire .20

December 20. Relief of lady at

Pedro Miguel 50.00

December 29. Stationery, printing 6.49

Total disbursements $281.48

December 31. Balance on hand $1,698.32

John L. Phillips, Treasurer.
Approved:

C. A. Devol, Chairman.

During the year 1910, the Canal Zone
Chapter paid to beneficiaries $1,925.82, in-
cluding $1,200 furnished for relief of Cartago
earthquake sufferers.



Obituary.

Edwin E. Frank of Memphis, Tenn., mate
on pipe line dredge No. <?2, working at Gatun,



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES.



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to November 30,
1910, follows:



Period.


Department
of Civil Admin-
istration.


Department
of Sanitation.


Department of

Construction

and Engineering.


General Items.


Total.


Total to June 30. 1909..
Total, fiscal year 1910. .
July. 1910


$3,427,090.29
709,351.37
58.474.88
63.887.05
60,586.46
37,250.26
71,981.80


$9,673,539.28
1,803,040.95
156,006.64
164.220.65
153,433.27
146.587.47
137.912.89


S69, 622,561.42
26,300.167.05
2.216,849.78
2.348.777.07
2.516.814.41
2,565,042.28
2.356.292.01


$78,022,606.10
2,863.088.83
280.015.85
336,961.35
236.170.76
295,537.33
233,587.25


$160,745,797.09

31.675.648.20

2,711.347.15




2,913.846.12


September. 1910


2.967,004.90
3.044,417.34




2,799,773.95




$4,428,622.11


$12,234,741.15


$107,926,504.02


$82,267,967.47 | $206,857,834.75



was drowned in Gatun Lake on January 12,
and it is believed he committed suicide. He
was 28 years of age, a native of Louisville,
Ky., and had been at work in the United
States dredging fleet at Memphis prior to
coming to the Isthmus. He had been in the
employ of the Canal Commission since March,
1910. His brother, William Frank, a dredge
captain in the Atlantic fleet, and his wife
living in Memphis, survive him.



Spanish War Veterans.

A communication has been received from
the National Commander-in-Chief of the
Spanish War Veterans stating that a delega-
tion of national officers, headed by Past
Commander-in-Chief Col. E. J. Gihon, will
come to the Canal Zone after attending the
memorial services to be held over the battle-
ship Maine in Havana Harbor. They will
arrive on the Isthmus about February 20, for
the purpose of establishing four camps of
Spanish War Veterans. All who are interested
in this movement should communicate with
Charles C. Cameron, Culebra, C. Z.



Army and Navy Union.
The officers and comrades of Garrison No.
106 of the Army and Navy Union , U. S. A.,
will hold a reception at Kangaroo hall,
Empire, on Saturday, January 21, at 8 p. m.
All members are requested to be present in
uniform. A cordial invitation is extended to all
veterans of the Civil War, Indian campaigns,
and the Spanish-American War, who reside
on the Isthmus. There will be a musical pro-
gram, dancing, and light refreshments.



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending January 25, 1911
(75th meridian time):



Date.



January 19
January 20
January 21
January 22
January 23
January 24

January^25



Low.


High.


Low.


A.M.


A. M.


P. M.


12.45


6.45


1.05


1.30


7.33


1.50


2.20


8.20


2.40


3.13


9.12


3.32


4.10


10.10


4.30


5.10


11.20
P. M.


5.30


6.10


12.35


6.40



High.



P. M.
7.15
8.00
8.45
9.35
10.30
11.40



Rainfall from January 1 to


14, Inclusive.


Stations.




K C

« O


Q




Pacific Section —


Ins.
.29
.28
.04
.03
.01

.01


.03
.04
.02
.03
.20
.14
.04
.16
.42

.15
.19
.14
.11
.20


1
1

1

11

1-12

1-12

....

12

t
12

1

1

1
11
12

3

12

t

5
14


Ins.
.33




.28




.04




.03




.02


Central Section —


.02














.05




.04




.04




.03




.20




.17




.04




.23




.60


Atlantic Section —


.S8




.37




.55




t.24




.36







*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily.
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values mid-
night to midnight.

tTo 5 p. m., January 13. J 11th and 12th.



164



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 21.



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