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location which will interfere with the navigation of all the
channels.

Rule 71. Vessels must not anchor on the range line of
any range lights.

Rule 72. All vessels are forbidden to moor to any
beacon, buoy, or other harbor mark or to make use of the
same for warping.

Rule 73. Pilots finding any buoy out of position, or
lights not working properly shall immediately report same
to captain of the port, and to the construction engineer.

Rule 74. Steamers while within a harbor must take all
precautions to avoid the issue of sparks. Vessels will be
liable for all damages resulting from neglect of this rule.

Rule 75. No pitch, tar, turpentine, or other combustible
shall be boiled on any wharf, or on board any vessel without
permission of the captain of the port.

Rule 76. In case of fire on board a vessel, all masters of
other vessels shall render such assistance as may be in
their power.

Rule 77. A vessel anchored or moored in the harbor or
lying at dock must at all times, night or day, have on board
a sufficient number of men to take care of such vessel.

Rule 78. No vessel shall unload lumber, timber or piles
in the waters of a harbor without permission from the
captain of the port, who shall designate where such lumber
shall be rafted, so as to avoid obstructing or hindering the
movement of vessels.

Rule 79. Lighters, barges, scows and other vessels be-
longing to persons or corporations of any and all descrip-
tions shall be anchored in such places as the captain of the
port may direct, and shall be at all times under his super-
vision and direction.

Rule 80. The captain of the port shall keep in his office
records of all his proceedings, with statements of the results
of all examinations and inquiries made by him, which
records may be inspected by interested parties.

Rule 81. All notifications and requests to the captain of
the port shall be made at his office in writing, and shall be
duly entered and filed by him.

Rule 82. No vessel shall leave the harbor until the payment
of all charges and fines imposed hereunder have been made.

Rule 83. It shall be unlawful for any person, without
first having secured a pilot's license from the government
of the Canal Zone, to navigate any steam vessel with a net
tonnage of more than 15 tons burden in Canal Zone waters.

Rule 84. It shall be the duty of the captain of the port
to enforce and superintend the execution of all rules and
regulations of the port for preventing nuisances at the
wharves, for regulating and stationing all ships or vessels
in the harbor; for removing from time to time ships and
vessels, in order to accomodate and make room for others
and for compelling the masters and captains of ships and
vessels to accomodate each other, so that ships and
vessels arriving from sea, shall, for a reasonable time, be
entitled to berths next to the wharf until they have landed
their cargoes.

Rule 85. All vessels moored to wharves, whether loading
or unloading cargo, or in the ordinary way of business,
shall be moored to the wharves with rope hawsers only, and
it shall be unlawful for chain or wire hawsers to be used on
any public wharf in the Canl Zone without the specific
permission of the port captain.

Rule 86. All vessels, whether commercial or otherwise,
moored to wharves in the Canal Zone, shall be compelled
to keep watch at night and to have suitable fire-fighting
apparatus on hand.

Rule 87. Whenever it shall become necessary to remove
any especially inflammable cargo from commercial ships,
or ships at public wharves of the Canal Zone, such as oils,
gasoline, naphtha, petroleum, etc., it shall be necessary for
notice to be given to the port captain at least two hours
before such cargo shall be discharged on the wharf, so that
proper means can be provided to dispose of this class of
material at the earliest possible moment.

Rule 88. The provisions in regard to wharves are to



apply to the public wharves of the Canal Zone and not'to
the construction wharves belonging to the Isthmian Canal
Commission under the control of the construction engineer,
who alone shall have charge of all construction wharves in
his respective district and all United States vessels em-
ployed in construction are exempt from the rules laid
down, as far as being under the direction and control
of the port captain is concerned, and are solely responsible
to the construction engineer in their respective districts;
Isthmian Canal Commission wharves, under the charge of
and operated by the Chief Quartermaster, are also exempt
from the operation of these rules, and are solely under the
direction of the Chief Quartermaster.

Rule 89. It shall not be lawful for any person or persons,
nav?gating a vessel or otherwise, to take possession of or
make use of for any purpose, or build upon, alter, deface,
destroy, move, injure, obstruct by fastening vessels thereto
or otherwise or in any manner whatever, impair the useful-
ness by delay or otherwise of any seawalk, bulkhead, jetty
dike, levee, wharf; pier or other work built by the Isthmian
Canal Commission, or any piece ol plant, floating or other-
wise, used in the construction of such work, under the con-
trol of the Isthmian Canal Commission, in whole or in
part, made or used for the preservation and improvement
of the Panama Canal or its channels, or approaches.

Rule 90. The board of local inspectors shall issue cer-
tificates of seaworthiness to any launch or boat of any
description, whether propelled by machinery, sail, or oars,
of less than 15 tons net, which is engaged in carrying pas
sengers in any parts of the waters ot the Canal Zone, and
shall state in such certificate the number of passengers
allowed to be carried. Any vessel over 15 tons net,
whether propelled by machinery or sail and carrying pas-
sengers on any parts of the waters of the Canal Zone, shall
be under the supervision of the board of local inspectors
as regards to her seaworthiness and equipment and the
number of passengers to be carried.

Rule 91. The territory over which these rules and sec-
tions are effective, are all waters in Limon Bay, and waters
entering it situated south of a line running due west from
the base of the statue of Christopher Columbus as now
standing on Cristobal Point, and such portion of the Carib-
bean terminus of the Isthmian Canal as may be used for
harbor purposes, and that portion of Panama Bay lying
west of a line running due north from the east end of Naos
Island and north of a line running due west from the same
point, also such portions of the Pacific terminus of the Isth-
mian Canal as may be used for harbor purposes, also any
portion of the Panama Canal that may be used by con-
struction boats or plant of the Isthmian Canal Commission,
or that may be opened to public use from time to time.
And any boat, vessel, scow, raft, or other craft, used or
employed in violating any of the provisions of Rules 33,
46, 49, 51, 60, and 89 shall be liable for all damages that
may be done to the plant of the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion, and said, boat, scow, raft, or other craft may be pro-
ceeded against summarily by way of libel in the Canal Zone
Circuit Courts.

Rule 92. These rules and sections hereinbefore named
shall become effective when approved by the proper author-
ities, and when they have been published by printing in a
newspaper of public circulation in the Canal Zone.

Rule 93. These rules shall apply to and govern the na-
vigation and use of the waters 6f the Panama Canal, as the
canal is now, or hereafter may be constituted, as well as
all Canal channels, lakes, harbors, and other auxiliary
waters as may now or hereafter be deeemed necessary for
Canal purposes or aids, or which may now or hereafter be
under the jurisdiction of the Isthmian Canal Commission
or the Canal Zone Government.

Rule 94. Any person who fails or refuses to comply with
any provision or requirement in these rules set forth, shall
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction
thereof shall be punished agreeably to the provisions of
Section 2 of the Executive Order of July 25, 1910; namely,
by a fine not to exceed $500 or by imprisonment in the
district jail of not more than six months, or by both such
fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

Approved: J. M. Dickinson, Secretary of War.
War Department, December 21, 1910.



CANAL




RECORD



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1911. No. 22.



Volume IV.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.



Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Chairman's Monthly Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of December
is published in full in other columns of this
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a
detailed account of the progress of Canal
work in all departments and divisions.

It will be noted that there is a difference of
343,198 cubic yards in the amount of material
excavated during the month of December
shown in the excavation table published in
The Canal Record of January 18, and the
monthly report to the Secretary of War,
which appears in this issue. This difference
arises from the fact that 123,403 cubic yards
of material removed by the Atlantic Division,
and 219,795 cubic yards removed by the Pa-
cific Division were improperly charged to
"plant" excavation.

The material removed by the Atlantic
Division consisted of 23,199 cubic yards
"dry" excavation for Gatun Dam, and 97,731
cubic yards "wet" excavation for the Colon
fill. The material removed by the Pacific
Division consisted of 219,795 cubic yards
"wet" excavation for the channel to the
Panama railroad lumber dock. The material
in question was removed by Commission
equipment, but should have been charged to
the items of work necessitating the excava-
tion.



Another Break in Culebra Slide.

The west bank of the Canal, at a point
opposite the Culebra hotel, began to move into
the Cut between 8 and 9 p.m., on Wednesday,
January 18, involving from 200,000 to 250,000
cubic yards of material, and completely cover-
ing the 35-foot berm on the 135-foot level,
which was secured only a short time previously.
The movement did not encroach on the lower
tracks in the Cut to any extent, and the
regular operations there were not interfered
with. A break in the bank was expected at
this point during the present year, but came
a little sooner than was anticipated. All of
the material, however, is included in previ-



ous estimates,, and, therefore, does not affect
excavation figures.

The break extended back and included a part
of the street known as "Steam shovel row."
A number of houses on this street situated
nearest the danger zone, have been removed
from time to time during the past year, and
those remaining were not involved in the
recent slide, although the bank broke sharply
within 15 feet of one of the buildings. In
view of a possible future break in this locality,
however, a force of men were set at work
immediately dismantling eight type-15 quar-
ters, four of which will be reerected in another
part of the village; two will be taken to
Pedro Miguel, and the remaining two to
Gorgona.

The break in the west bank at Culebra
extends for a distance of about a mile. The
first important break occurred on November
16, 1909, and since that time, a number of
movements have taken place. In view of the
fact that another slip may be expected at any
time in a section of the bank, south of the
recent break, and to diminish any further
annoyance therefrom, the Chief Engineer has
authorized immediate excavation along the
upper level from Culebra to Rio Grande.
A steam shovel began this work on Mon-
day, January 23, utilizing the old Panama
railroad track which runs along this level in
making the pioneer cut, and another shovel
commenced work on January 24. The spoil
will be wasted on the old dump in the vicin-
ity of the Culebra railroad station, and dirt
trains will be run over the old Panama rail-
road track, through Rio Grande and Enter-
prise and the old Rio Grande quarry to this
dump. It is estimated that over 200,000
cubic yards of material will be removed at
this point.

Closing of Gatun River.

The closing of the Gatun River, near
Mitchellville on the Panama railroad reloca-
tion, made necessary by the construction of
the railroad embankment over the valley,
was authorized by the Chief Engineer on
January 23. The building of a bridge
where the old bed of the stream crosses the
relocation was found to be impracticable for
lack of a suitable foundation, and a new site
was selected a short distance south, but on
a higher level. The damming' of the old
channel will cause the water to rise to the
45-foot level, and will submerge a considerable
area east of the railroad track. The Counsel
of the Commission has been authorized to
adjust the claims of occupants for the value
of their improvements.



Temporary Use of French Dump Cars.

In Order to obtain a supply of gravel from
the Chagres River during the present dry
season, and because no other cars were avail-
able, President Taft on January 16 granted
permission to the Panama railroad to use 25
of the old French 6-meter dump cars for the



short haul from the gravel bed to the storage
pile. The President's consent was necessary
for the use of these cars, as they are not
equipped with safety appliances, and their
operation would have been contrary to Exec-
utive Orders Nos. 1002 of January 6, 1909.
and 1085 of June 11, 1909, making the pro-
visions of the safety appliance act effective
in the Canal Zone. Permission to use the
cars is accorded only to July 1, 1911.



Economy in Use of Dynamite.

Less than two-thirds of the quantity of
dynamite used in blasting in the Central
Division during the months of October,
November, and December, 1909, were used
during the same months of 1910, although the
quantity of rock excavated during these
months, in 1910 was almost identical with
1909. A statement showing the amounts by
months, and the cubic yards of material exca-
vated per pound of dynamite, follows:



a

H

ยง

S


Dynamite used.


Rock excavated.


1909 1910


1909


1910


Oct...

Nov. .
Dec...


Pounds. '. Pounds.
806.700 1 481.750
659,600 391,500
439,350 427.800


Cu. Yds.

1.196.297

968,246

1,005,088


Cu. Yds.
1.076,678
1,053.077
1.008.998


Total .


1.905,650 1,301,050


3.169,631


3,138.753



Cubic yards of material per pound
of dynamite

Pounds of dynamite per cubic yard
of material




Dredging in Pacific Entrance.

The dredged channel at the Pacific entrance
to the Canal will extend over a distance of
seven and one-half miles, or from the end of
the cut out at sea, to a point nearly opposite
Corozal, beyond which it is proposed to
accomplish the excavation by hydraulic plant,
and by steam shovels. The channel has been
entirely excavated for over four and one-half
miles of the distance, and at the present time,
the operations of the dredging fleet are prin-
cipally confined to that part north of the
Panama railroad wharf. A few days ago the
cut at the farthest limit north had been
sufficiently widened and deepened by ladder
dredges to permit the suction dredge Culebra
to operate there, but this is only possible at
high tide, as a water pipe line extends across
the Canal a short distance below, which would
obstruct the passage of the dredge at mean or
low tides.

There is an open channel of an average
width of about 720 feet top and 500 feet bot-
tom, except in three instances, and an average
depth of over 30 feet, up the Canal from Balboa.
In places the excavation is down to the bottom
depth of 45 feet. The above water excavation
along the east bank is nearly completed, only
one rock projection remaining to be removed
on which drillers are now at work. On the



170



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 22.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.)



west bank there are two projections composed
of rock and clay, with rock preponderant, to
be taken out, and the ladder dredge Badger
and dipper dredge Cardenas are engaged in
excavating one of these, the former digging
to a depth of 42 feet, and the latter to the full
depth of 45 feet. The other point, situated one-
fourth of a mile south, is being drilled and
mined. It will be broken up into two sections,
with 40 holes drilled to a depth of 60 feet to
each section, each hole containing a charge of
250 pounds of dynamite. The one blasting oper-
ation will involve the use of 10,000 pounds of
dynamite. When this point has been broken
up, practically all of the above water drilling
and blasting from Corozal to the sea will have
been completed.

The ladder dredge Mole, which has recently
been fitted with a new and longer ladder, was
set at work on Monday, January 23, cleaning
the last breaking of rock on shoal 2285; this
shoal before the last breaking showed a
depth of 41.1. The Marmot is continuing
the excavation for the approach channel to
the new freight dock, and at present is
making an angle cut across this channel,
heading for the east bank, which it will
enter. As much material as possible in
this bank will be excavated by the dredge,
without interfering with the track leading from
the sand dock.



Gatun Dam Spillway.
Concrete was placed in the spillway of
Gatun Dam during the week ending January
21, as follows:



Date,


Concrete
laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
M ixers.




Cu. Yds.
56
80
48
40


3:30
6:30
3:00
3:30


1




1




1




1
























224
113,862


16:30




Previously reported . . .




Grand total


114,086





Ancon Rock Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending January 14,
follows:



Date.



January 9.
January 10
January 1 1
January 12
January 13
January 14

Total . . .



Hours
worked.



9:45
9:55
6:45
9:30
6:35
10:30



Cubic
Yards.



3,368
3.198
2.678
2,771
2,432
3,623



53:00



18,070



Interlocking Plant at Mount Hope.

An interlocking plant will be installed by
the Panama railroad at Mount Hope to oper-
ate the cross-over from the yard track of the
Depot Quartermaster's material stores to the
main line. The outfit will consist of a 6-lever
machine, with accessories, and its method of
operation will be the same as the other inter-
locking plants of the railroad company. It is
designed to insure the safe passing of trains
at this point, where two accidents have
occurred, one recently. The plant will be



attended by the Mount Hope operator. The
old cabin is too small, and the waiting pavilion
for first-class passengers close by is being ex-
tended and partially enclosed, which will pro-
vide space for a ticket office, and also for the
lever mechanism.



foundry 48,350 pounds of brass castings. The
output was twice that of December, 1909.



Record Output at Gorgona Foundry.

The output of the foundries at Gorgona
during December was the largest in their
history. The iron foundry turned out 795,-
958 pounds of iron castings, and the brass



Lights at Toro Point.

Notice has been sent to the Government of
Panama, and the interested bureaus of the
United States Government, that one red and
one white light have been placed at the end of
the trestle that is being built in Limon Bay
from Toro Point for the construction of the
breakwater. The position of the lights will
change as the building of the trestle advances.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

Over 50 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the exact amount in place at the close of work on January 21, being 1, 051, 723 j cubic yards, out
of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
January 21, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours:



Date.


Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete ; Hours
placed, i worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours , No. of
placed. I worked, mixers






Cm. Yds.
1,748
2,390
2,238
2,226
2,172
2.330


29:59 7


Cu. Yds.,

698 | 8:40
592 1 9:40
580 8:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
149
123}
227}
221
178
196}


Cm. Yds.
2,595




40:35
35:43
35:51
36:37
38:09


6
6
6
6
6


3,105}
3,045}
2,907






460


6:10




476
562

447 J


8:40
8:40


2,826




3,088}
447}




















13,104


216:54




3,815}


50:30




1,095}


, 18,015}
1.033,708}






















1,051,723*













*The 447} yards shown for the portable mixers were placed on the following days: January 16th, 19} yards;
January 17th, 21} yards; January 18th, 86 yards; January 19th, 98 yards; January 20th, 103 yards; January
21st, 119} yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 60 per cent completed, 507,361 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on January 21. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



Date.



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete
placed.



January 16.
January 17.
January 18.
January 19.
January 20.
January 21 .



Totals

Previously reported.



Grand total.



Cm. Yds.
1.666
1,276
1,282
1,144
1.452
1,334



8,154



Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of
worked, mixers placed, worked, mixers



16:00
14:00
14:00
13:00
16:00
16:00



89:00



Cm. Yds.
316
230
284
270
140
126



1,366



7:00
5:00
8:00
7:25
3:50
4:50



35:25



1.33



Large
stone.



Cm. Yds.
7
5
3



37
4,081



4,118



Total.



Cm.



Yds.
1.989
1,511
1.569
1,414
1.606
1,468



9,557
497,804



507,361



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over eight per cent of the concrete for the system of locks at Miraflores has been laid, the
amount in place at the close of work on January 21, aggregating 113,091 cubic yards, out of a
total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last
week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete | Hours No. of
placed. 1 worked, mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.




Jan. 16. ..

Jan. 17. ..
Jan. 18. . .
Jan. 19. . .
Jan. 20. . .
Jan. 21. . .


Cm. Yds.
470
440
512
508
596
516


15:10
16:00
16:00
16:00
15:50
16:07


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
512
519
724
543
563
45 1


27:50
31:50
41:50
33:00
36:50
27:00


4
5
5

5
5
4


Cm. Yds.
104
83
97
47
98
98


9:00
5:50
8:50
4:50
9:00
9:00


1

1

1

1
1


Cm. Yds.
55
52
35
46
35
30


Cu. Yds.
1.141
1.094
1,368
1,144
1,292
1,095


Total
Previously
reported


3,042


94:67


2


3.312


197:00


4:67


527


45:50


1


253
2,619


7,134
105.957






















Grand
total.


2,872


113,091



January 25, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



171



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs.

The meeting of the Canal Zone Federation
of Women's Clubs will be held at the Hotel
Tivoli on Tuesday, January 31. Delegates
and alternates accredited from the federated
clubs are expected to arrive at Ancon on the
morning train and be present at the business
meeting which will convene in the ballroom
of the hotel at 9 o'clock. Through the courtesy
of the officials of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany, a special car will be placed at the rear of
the morning train for the clubwomen, and also
on the train leaving Colon at 10.30. Return-
ing, the two cars will be added to the train
leaving Panama at 5.30. Cards for trans-
portation will be issued to all club members.