Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 86 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

crane must be capable of lifting a load of
four tons a maximum distance of 90 feet at
a speed of 300 feet per minute, carrying it
along the boom at the rate of 600 feet per
minute, and depositing it on the wharf, the
whole operation to be completed in one min-
ute. In addition to the cargo handling
movement, the cranes will have a movement
along the front of the dock at a speed of 100
feet per minute.



Balboa Notes.

The ladder dredge Marmot, which has been
engaged in excavating the approach channel
to the new Panama railroad freight dock at
Balboa, has finished all the work it can do
there economically for the present, and has
been returned to the Canal prism. The suc-
tion dredge Culebra is being used to clean up
the channel.

An old hulk, the Panama, a passenger
steamer owned by the Pacific Steam Navi-
gation Company, which has been lying at



the Flamenco Island anchorage for the past
30 years, or more, used as a machine shop,
laundry, and for other purposes, was recently
towed to a position near the Union Oil
Company's anchorage near Balboa. The
change was made partly on account of the
shoaling of the water at the former anchorage,
and partly for better convenience.



Observation Platform at Culebra.
The erection of an observation platform
for tourists, and others, who visit Culebra for
the purpose of viewing the Cut, has been au-
thorized. It will occupy a position on the
west bank of the Cut almost directly back of
the new Church of the Holy Redeemer, about
100 feet distant from the old main line track
of the Panama Railroad, and will consist of a
plank floor raised about 10 feet from the
ground, surrounded by a railing. It will be
8 by 25 feet in size.



Medical Inspection of Schools.

Dr. A. J. Orenstein has been appointed
medical inspector for the Canal Zone schools
for a period of three months, during which he
will devote all hib time to a thorough exami-
nation of the physical condition of the pupils
in the scho' Is for white children.

Following an epidemic of follicular con-
junctivitis (an inflammation of the outer mem-
brane of the eye! in one of the schools in
December, 190S, the district physicians were
directed to make a monthly inspection of all
the pupils, and good results were immediately
noticeable. The work was incidental, how-
ever, to the regular work of the district phy-
sicians, no apparatus was available for eye
and ear tests, and when the district work
was heavy, the schools were neglected. Lack
of uniformity in results characterized the in-
spection work, and the children who were
backward in their studies, because of physical
defects not entirely patent, were given little
relief. In order to put the inspection on a
thorough and systematic basis, it was placed
under one physician on February 1. He had
previously made a study of the methods used
in the schools of Philadelphia, where a syste-
matic inspection has been in effect since 1904.

New Resolution Enforcing Sanitary Regulations.
Increased powers have been given the
health authorities in the city of Panama by
resolution No. 19, approved by Governor J.
A. Arango on February 3, 1911, which relates
to the provisions of decree No. 40 of November
14, 1907, placing in effect the Executive Order
of the Canal Zone Government amending
Article 5 of the rules and regulations for the
installation of water and sewers in the cities
of Panama and Colon. The decree pro-
vided that in case property owners failed, or
refused to make the proper installations upon
written order of the Superintendent of Public
Works within 30 days after receipt of notice,
he might cause the work to be done, in which
event, the expense would become a lien on the



property, to be collected in the same manner as
water rents.

The preamble to the resolution of February
3 sets forth that the provisions of the above
decree are not being complied with as their
nature requires, and, on this account, some
of the districts of the city of Panama are in a
condition detrimental to the public health.
The resolution provides:

That on and after February 3 no building
erected in a place accessible to a sewer and
water main shall be occupied until proper
connections have been made, and if such con-
nections are not made within 60 days from
February 3, the building shall be closed and
remain vacant until the proper connections
are made.



Freight by Panama Route.

Notice has been served on the Pacific. Mail
Steamship Company and the California-At-
lantic Steamship Company (Bates & Chese-
brough) that their traffic agreement with the
Panama Railroad Company will be termi-
nated 90 days after January' 19. This step
is taken, because experience under the new
agreement shows that the Panama Railroad
Company cannot handle freight, except at a
loss, on the basis of 30 per cent of the rate
between San Francisco and New York. No
agreement, has been reached as to the divi-
sion to be made after the expiration of the
present agreement, but it has been suggested
that 40 per cent of the rate would be accep-
table to the Panama railroad.

Owing to the activity of the transcontinen-
tal railways, and the Hawaiian-American
Steamship Company, the freight traffic by
way of the Panama route reached such a low
stage prior to -1909 that merchants on the
Pacific coast demanded a lower rate on
eastbound freight. In January, 1909, an
agreement was made by which the eastbound
rate was fixed at SS per net ton, and the
westbound at $9. The working agreement
between the Pacific Mail Company and the
Panama Railroad Company called for a divi-
sion of 50 per cent of the rate to each com-
pany, the Pacific Mail Company to pay 80
cents per ton wharfage at Balboa, and 10
cents craneage, when the cranes were used.
The Pacific Mail Company served notice
that it could not continue under this con-
tract, and on November 15, 1909, a new
contract was entered into which fixed a basic
rate of S8 per net ton on eastbound, and $9
on westbound cargo; gave the Pacific carrier
70 per cent of the rate, and waived all charges
for craneage and wharfage at Balboa, and
furnished coal at cost. On October 1, 1910,
a similar agreement with the California-
Atlantic Steamship Company became effec-
tive. The eastbound freight business between
Pacific coast ports and Atlantic coast ports of
the United States, in the four months ending
October 31, increased 5,761 tons over the
same period in 1909, when the amount was



210



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 27.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.

(.Continued.)

30,046 tons, while the receipts from this
traffic decreased $7,629.27.

With the beginning of the service by the
California-Atlantic Company, the Pacific Mail
Company improved its service, and the ships
of both lines came into Balboa with all the
freight they could carry. The California-
Atlantic Company began with three ships on
the Pacific side and one on the Atlantic side,
and has increased that number to eight
ships on the Pacific side and three on the
Atlantic. Both companies were notified at
the beginning of the agreement that the Pan-
ama railroad could not handle more than
30,000 tons a monch eastbound cargo on
account of the limited handling facilities at
Balboa and Cristobal-Colon. The coastwise
freight eastbound, handled in the quarter
ending January 31, 1909, and 1910. was:



Month.



1910



November.. . .
December. . . .

January

Total



Tons.



3.950


12.378


2.390


11.015


1910


1911


1,758


10,609



8.098



34.002



Both the handling facilities on the docks,
and the freight carrying capacity of the rail-
road have been taxed by this increased bus-
iness. The indications all point to a contin-
ued increase if the present agreement were to
be maintained, because a shipment recently
made of oranges and lemons from California
to New York as ordinary freight, without
cold storage, proved successful, the fruit
arriving at its destination in good condition
23 days after leaving California. If fruit can
be shipped in this way the possibilities of
the trade are unlimited. For such service,
the transcontinental railways charge from S28
to $30 per ton, whereas the basic rate of S8
per ton applies by the Panama route.

On November 23, 1910, the Hawaiian-
American Steamship Company, which uses
theTehuantepec route, has 17 cargo steamers,
with a total tonnage capacity of 170,000 in
the Pacific coast, Hawaiian., and Atlantic
coast trade, and is the largest line of steamers
under the American flag, protested to the
President that the rate made by the Panama
railroad for Pacific carriers, via the Panama
route, was not sufficient to pay actual cost
of handling the cargo, and amounted to a
discrimination against the Hawaiian-Ameri-
can Company.

Gatun Dam Spillway.

Concrete was placed in the spillway of
Gatun Dam during the week ending February
25, as follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.

Mixers.


February 21


316
336

Holiday

368

358

316


17:00
14:00


2

2


February 23

February 25


17:00
16:00
17:00


2
2
2


Total


1.694


81:30


2



A committee, consisting of Mr. S. B. Wil
liamson, Lieut.-Col. John L. Phillips, and Mr.
I R. Dnwnps. has been appointed roronslrW



the question of supplementing the present
water supply from Rio Grande and Cocoli
Lake.



Extradition to Canal Zone.

At the request of the Secretary of War, the
Attorney General has rendered an opinion
on the applicability of the United States
extradition laws to the Canal Zone. The
Attorney General is of the opinion, although
holding that the matter is one for judicial



determination, that none of the laws now in
effect in the United States applies to the ren-
dition of fugitives from justice from the Canal
Zone. It is recommended that sections 1014
and 5278 of the Revised Statutes be extended
by Congressional action to the Canal Zone, as
was done in the case of the Philippines.



The sailing date of the Ancon from pier
No. 11, Cristobal, has been set for Monday,
March 6, 1911, at 3 p. m.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.



About 55 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the exact amount in place at the close of work on February 25, being 1,141,830 cubic yards,
out of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
February 25, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.



Date.



February 20

February 21

February 22

February 23

February 24

February 25

♦Portable mixers.



Total

Previously reported .



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers-



Concrete Hours
placed, worked.



No. of
mixers



Concrete Hours
placed, worked.



No. of
mixers



Large
stone.



Total.



Cu. Yds.
2.207
2.356

Holiday
2,578
2,606
2.528



12,275



37:41
38:30



Cu. Yds.
428
464



7:40
7:40



Cu. Yds.
2 172$

2 215



Cu. Yds.
2.839J
3,077



59:07
45:19
42:26



222:23



Grand total 1.141.830



440
476
516

229$



2.553}



7:40
7:40
8:40



268 §
3131
240



1,209$



3.360S
3.420}
3.340



16.037J
1,125.792}



*The 229} yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
February 20th, 32 yards; February 21st, 42 yards; February 23d, 74 yards; February 24th, 25} yards; February
25th, 56 yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 66 per cent completed, 555,827 cubic
yards, out of a total of S37.400, having been placed at the close of work on February 25. The
record for each of the five 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Construction Plant.


Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


2-cubic


yard mixers. }-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of Concrete
mixers Placed.


Hours
worked.


No of

mixers.




Feb. 20...
Feb. 21...
Feb. 22. . .


Cu. Yds.
864
1.170


13:33 2
16:00 2


Cu. Yds.
656
806


15:00
18:83


3


Cu. Yds.
28
26


3:00
1:50


1

1


Cu. Yds.
4


Cu. Yds.
1.552
2.002


Fet. 23...
Feb. 24...
Feb. 25...


978

1.016

840


14:00 2
15:00 2
13:00 2


566
714
730


14:50
16:50
17:00


3

3

3


26
29
23


2:50
2:50
2:50


1

1

1


1,570
1.759
1.593


Total

Previously


4.868 71:33 2


3,472


81:83


3


132


12:00


1


4
4,174


8.476

547,351
















Grand


4,178


555,827



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 10 per cent of the concrete for the system of locks at Miraflores was in place on Feb-
ruary 25, the total amount on that date being 140,162 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the five 8-hour working days of last week, follows:









Auxiliary


Plant.








Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixers.


J-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of Concrete
mixers placed.


Hours

w. i, Iced


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.




Feb. 20...
Feb. 21...
Feb. 22


Cu. Yds.

468
320
Holiday
406
436 1
482


S:67
4:67


2

2


Cu. Yds.

499
559


31:00
35:50


5
5


Cu. Yds.
85

82


7:50
7:50


1
1


Cu. Yds.
60
42


Cu. Yds.
1,112
1.003


Feb. 23...
Feb. 24. . .
Feb. 25...


8:50
8:50
9:33


2

2
2


564
549
605


28:50
30:50
33:00


5
5
5


6S

81
78


6:00
6:50
6:50


1
1
1


12
38
47


1.047
1.104
1,212


Total ... .
Previously
reported .


2.112


39:67


2


2,776


158:50


5


391


34:00


1


199
3,198


5,478
134.684




















Grand






3.397


140.162



March 1, 1911.



THE CANAL RE'CORD



211



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs.

The annua! meeting of the Canal Zone
Federation of Women's Clubs will be held in
Gatun on Friday, April 21. It will mark the
close of the fourth year of club work among
the women in the Canal Zone.

A meeting of the art and literature depart-
ment of the Cristobal Woman's Club was held
on Thursday, February 23, the program con-
sisting of papers on the chateaus of France.
At the March meeting of the department
there will be papers on the Napoleonic period,
and the year's study on French art and history
will conclude on April 30, with papers on the
French Republic and its presidents.

The program of the Gatun Woman's Club
on Friday, February 1 7, was in charge of the
literature department. Papers on Washing-
ton and Lincoln were read by the members.
The monthly business meeting was held on
Friday, February 24.

The meetings of the Gorgona Woman's
Club are held at the homes of the members.
Papers on various topics are discussed.
Beginning March 22, the club will hold a
three days' exhibit of the Federation pictures,
and at the meeting on March 23, a paper on
art will be read.

At its meeting on March 8, the Paraiso
Woman's Club will have as guest of honor,
the president of the Canal Zone Federation.
Mrs. C. G. Hennigh has been appointed
chairman of the current events committee.
A dance will be given toward the end of
March.

The Gatun Sunshine Society held a tea and
sale at the clubhouse the first week in Feb-
ruary for the benefit of the Blind Babies'
Home in New York, the institution in which
the societv is interested.



Church Notes.

One hundred and ten dollars was made at
the entertainment given at Ancon hall by
the Ladies' Aid Society of the Methodist
Episcopal Church on February 21. The
society will maintain two scholarships in the
Methodist College in Panama, and will com-
plete the interior decorations of the church.

At the election of officers for the Altar
Society of St. Ferdinand's Church, Empire,
held on February 21, Mrs. L. Ergenzinger was
chosen president, Mrs. H. I. McGillicuddy
vice-president, and Mrs. J. H. Westberg
secretary.

During Lent, the meetings of the Woman's
Guild of St. Luke's Church, Ancon, will be
held in the Tivoli Hotel every Tuesday morn-
ing at 9.30 o'clock. Business meetings will
be held on the first and third Tuesdays, and
the alternate meetings will be for sewing.
The chaplain will give an informal course of
instruction on the doctrines, forms, and cere-
monies of the church. No afternoon meetings
will be held during the six weeks between
March 1 and April 16.



Red Cross Ball.

The first annual ball of the Canal Zone
Branch of the American National Red Cross
Society was held at the Hotel Tivoli on Feb-
ruary 18. Tickets were sold at $1.50 each
to nonmembers, entitling the holders to
admission to the ball and membership until
November 1, 1911. To members, tickets
were sold for 50 cents each. Seven hundred
and sixty-eight new members were added to



the local organization, making a total mem-
bership of about 1,000; and about $1,116
have been added to the treasury, of which sum
about $384 will be sent to the treasurer of the
national organization at Washington, D. C.

Through the courtesy of the Isthmian
Canal Commission, the Hotel Tivoli, and the
services of the Commission Band were made
available; the Marine Band played by cour-
tesy of the command at Camp Elliott; and
special trains were furnished by the Panama
Railroad Company.

The officers of the local organization wish
to thank all committees and individuals \vh< >
assisted in making the ball a success.



PERSONAL.



Colonel Geo. W. Goethals sailed from New-
Orleans on Saturday, and is due to arrive at
Colon on March 2. During his visit to the
United States, in addition to speaking before
both houses of Congress, Justices of the Su-
preme Court, members of the Cabinet, and
invited guests in the hall of the House of
Representatives at Washington, Colonel Goe-
thals gave illustrated addresses, or lectures,
before the National Geographic Society of
Washington; the Geographic Society of Phil-
adelphia, at whose annual dinner he was the
guest of honor; the University of Pennsyl-
vania; the Engineers' Club of Philadelphia;
the University of Virginia; the Ohio State
University at Columbus, Ohio, and at New
Orleans on the evening before he sailed. He
was compelled, through lack of time, to de-
cline invitations to deliver addresses before
the Military Academy at West Point, the
City Club of Boston, and the Western Re-
serve University at Cleveland, Ohio. He was
also invited to visit San Francisco and de-
liver an address there.

Associate Justice Wesley M. Owen, accom-
panied by his family, sailed for the States on
the Advance on February 28. On the ex-
piration of his leave of absence his resigna-
tion as a justice of the Canal Zone Supreme
Court will become effective. His residence
will be at Le Roy, 111.

Mr. T. B. Monniche, accompanied by Mrs.
Monniche, sailed for the States on February
28, on the Advance, to be present in Washing-
ton to give information to bidders on the
materials for the emergency dams.



Visit of Congressmen.

A large party of Congressmen, with their
friends, will visit the Canal work immediately
after the adjournment of Congress on March
3. They will spend about a week on the
Isthmus, returning to New York on the Colon,
which sails from Cristobal on March 19.



Case of Matthew H. Lough.
The Supreme Court handed down a deci-
sion on February 21, confirming the decision
of the District Court, which found Matthew
H. Lough guilty of involuntary manslaughter,
and sentenced him to serve one year in Cule-
bra penitentiary. On the night of August
15, 1910, Lough was engineer of locomotive
No. 657, hauling a special freight train on the
Panama railroad. At Bohio, his train ran into
the rear end of another special freight, and
the conductor, Elias C. Tinsley, was killed.
Lough was charged with involuntary man-
slaughter, and was tried at Cristobal on Sep-
tember 15 and 16, before Justice Lorin C.
Collins, who found that he had been criminal-
ly negligent in not heeding a double torpedo



signal to slow down. Lough began serving
his sentence at the penitentiary immediately
after the Supreme Court made its decision.
A number of employes, among them fellow
transportation men, have signed a petition
which will be presented to the Chairman on
his return from the States, asking that Lough
be pardoned.



Spanish War Veterans.

A camp of Spanish War Veterans is to be
instituted at Gatun, in the lodge hall, on
Sunday, March 5, at 2 p. m.

A large delegation of veterans have signi-
fied their intention of joining this move-
ment, and those who have not done so, are
requested to be present at that time, or com-
municate with Charles C. Cameron.

Culebra, C. Z. February 24, 1911.



The first meeting of the United Spanish-
American War Veterans was held in the
Gatun lodge hall last Sunday. A temporary
camp was established and temporary officers
elected to arrange for the coming of the Com-
mander-in-Chief, Col. Jacoby, who will install
a permanent camp. The next meeting will
be held in Gatun lodge hall on Sunday, March
5. All Spanish-American war veterans are
invited to be present, bringing their creden-
tials. A. O. Ludwig,

Temporarv Adjutant.

Gatun, C. Z. February 26, 191 L



Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at the Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
February 25, follows:



Date.



Hours Cubic
worked. Yards.



February 20
February 21
February 22
February 23
February 24
February 25

Total ....



6:48
7:12
Holiday
7:09
7:44
7:49



2,982
3,140



3.301
3,380
3.389



36:42 16.192



Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during tfcie two weeks ending Febru-
ary 25, follows:



February 13

February 14

Februaiy 15

February 16

February 17

February' 18

Total

Date.

February' 20

February 21

February 22

February 23

February 24

February 25

Total



Hours Cubic
worked. Yards.



S:00


2,211


8:05


2.503


9:05


2,567


9:10


2.132


9:35


3.057


9:05


2.528



53:00



Cubic
Yards.




2,818
2.718



Obituary.

Mrs. Lavinia Strobridge. wife of F. C. Stro-
bridge, an employe of the Panama Railroad
Company at Colon, died at Colon Hospital
on February 25. She was 45 years of age,
was born in Shelbyville, Ky., and had been on
the Isthmus three and one-half years.



212



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 27.



EXECUTIVE ORDER



W



To Provide a Method of Executing and Recording

Deeds, and to Repeal the Executive Order Dated

March 12. 1907, Effective April 15, 1907. Relating

to the Same Subject.

Article 1. No conveyance of immovable property or
of an interest therein, or a mortgage thereon, shall be
effective, except by an instrument in writing, executed
and delivered between parties competent to contract,
and sufficiently describing the property conveyed, or
mortgaged, and signed by the person executing thesame,
or if he is not able to write he shall affix his mark thereto,
— and duly acknowledge in accordance with the pro-
visions of this Order, before some officer authorized to
take acknowledgments, provided, however, that a copy
of any instrument in writing, affecting immovable
property in the Canal Zone, duly executed before a
Notary Public in the Republic of Colombia prior to
November 3, 1903, or in the Republic of Panama after
said date, and authenticated by the Notary Public
charged with the custody of the protocol containing
the original deed from which the copy was taken, shall
be valid and effective as a conveyance of the lands or
interests in the lands therein described.

Article 2. The acknowledgments provided for in
this Order shall be made in the manner and form pro-
vided for the husband's acknowledgment in the Ex-
ecutive Order of August 20. 1910. entitled '*Executive
Order. — Conveyance of Real Estate by Married
Women."

Article 3. If for any reason the grantor in the in-
strument cannot appear before the officer authorized
to take acknowledgments, the execution of such instru-
ment must be attested by not less than two subscribing
witnesses, and may be proven by the oath of one of the
subscribing witnesses to such instrument, taken before
any of the officers authorized to take acknowledgments,
to the effect that he subscribed such instrument as a