Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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give "Esmeralda".

PORTO BELLO.

The pool tournament closed February 25. E. S.
W. .Hen won eight out of eight games played and was
awarded the prize of a bath robe. M. J. Tuttle se-
cuied second place, winning six out of seven games
played .

The checker tournament resulted in a tie between
Messrs. Mcintosh and Arden for first place. Each
man lost one game, so a series of five games will be



arranged to decide the winner of the Y.M.C. A. pennant.

At the song service on February 19, there was an
attendance of 45. Mrs. Chas. Harris played the piano.
Mrs. Van Fleet, Miss Harris, Mr. Thomson, and Mr.
Bucklin led the singing.

The "Life problem" class on Thursday night was
led by Mr. Geer; subject, "Health."

There was a social assemblage at the Y.M. C. A. hall
on the night of Washington's Birthday. A musical
program was given by the Misses Harris ;.nd Day at
the piano, and by Chas. Ray on the banjo Mrs. Harris
furnished home made cake.



BASEBALL.



The league season with six clubs closed on Wednes-
day. February 22, with the game between the Ancon
and Commissary-Subsistence teams at the Colon park.
in which the visitors were defeated. In winning this
game, the Commissary-Subsistence team maintained
an unbroken record of victories, and was awarded the
pennant. The summary of the game played on Feb-
ruary 22, follows:



RESULTS OF GAMES. FEBRUARY 26.

At Empire — Empire, 3; Ancon. 2.

At Colon — Commissary-Subsistence. 9; Atlantics, 2.

STANDING OF CLUBS.

P. W. L. P.C. I P. W. L. P.C.

Com-Sub. 1 1 1.000 Ancon ... 1 1 .000

Empire ..1 10 1 .000 | Atlantics . 1 1 .000
SUMMARIES OF GAMES, FEBRUARY 26.

Empire AB.H.PO.A.E. I Ancon. AB.H.PO.A.E.

Bryan.3b .. 3 2 4 1 I RDren'n.cf. 3 110

" LDren'n.rf. 4 110

Pottei,2b. .4032 1

Smith, c. . . 4 7 2

Tinsley, If. 3 1

James.ss.. 3 13
Nygren.lb. 2 7
Pearman,3b 3 1 2
Hull, p. ... 3 1



4
1
2
5



Dough'ty.rfll 1

VanZandt.lf. 10 10

Murphy, cf. 3

Junger.p. . . 3



3

Moore, c. . . 3
Markley,2b 3
Dixon, ss . . 4
Barney. lb.. 3
Toone, rf . . 2




1
1




2
10 10



1
2




Totals. . 29 3*23 8 4



C.-S. AB.H.PO.A.E.


Ancon.


AB.H.PO.A.E.


Buch'an.cf. 5 4


RDren'n.cf


. 2


111


Breivogle.lf 4 10


LDren'n.rf


2


10


Curtis, 2b. .21111


Tinsley. 2b.


3


11


Mosher.lb. 4 2 10 1


R. Smith.c.


. 5


1 10 1 1


Ruth'ford.ss4 2 13


Potter. 3b.


. 5


2 10


Lacey,3b... 3 112


James.ss. .


. .1


3 3 2


Hodnett.rf. 2


Nvgren.lb.


. 1


8 10


Meegan.c. 4 2 12


Hunter, If.


. 4


2 10


Kellogg.p.. 4 2 4


Murray. p.


. 2


3


Totals... 32 13 27 11 1


Hull.p


3


3










Totals . .


.32


7 24 14 3


Com.-Subsistence.. . 1 2 i


1


x— 8




3





0—4



Totals... 26 4 27 13 3

Empire 2 10 x— 3

Ancon 2 0—2

♦Murphy out, attempted bunt on 3d strike.

: Batted for Toone in 8th inning.

Runs — Ancon: Nygren, Pearman; Empire: Bryan,
Moore, Toone. Runs earned — Empire, ]. Two base
hit — R. Drenner. Sarifice hits — Moore Markley.
Stolen bases — R. Drennan. Dixon. Barney, (2), Toone,
(2). Bases on balls — off Hull, 5; off Junger, 2. Struck
ont — by Hull. 6: by Junger. 8. Left on bases — Ancon.
2; Fmpire, 6. Double plays — James to Nygren; Bry-
an to Markley to Bainey; Bryan to Markley to Barney.
Umpire — Irwin. Time of game — 1.50. Scorer — Moel-
ler.



C.-S. AB.H.PO.A. E.



Two base hit — Meegan.
Home run— Buchanan.



Runs — C.-S. 7-Ancon, 3.
Three base hit — Buchanan
Sacrifice hits — Brievogle, Hodnett, (2), L. Drennan
Nygren. Sacrifice fly — Curtis. Stolen bases — Curtis,
(?); Mosher, Rutherford, Tinsley, James, (2.. Bases
on balls— Off Kellogg, 5; Murray, 1. Struck out — By
Kellogg, 12; Murray, 5; Hull. 3. Hit by pitcher — By
Murray, 1; (Lacey) by Kellogg, 6 — R. Drennan, (2),
Hunter, Nygren, 2. Tinsley. Left on bases — C.-S.,
6; Ancon, 14. Umpire — Irwin. Time of game — 2.15.
Attendance, 450. Scorer, J. P. Mead. Wild pitch —
Murray, Kellogg, (2 l, Hull. Hull relieved Murray in
the fifth inning after five men had been at bat and no
outs.

The standing of the clubs at the close of the season
was, as follows:



Buch'an.cf. 4
Bieivogle.lf 4
Cnrtis,3b. . 4 1
Mosher.lb. 2
Ruth'ford,ss4 1
Lacey, 3b... 3 1
Meegan.c... 3
Hodnett.rf. 4
Kellogg.p. . 3



1 1
6



1
2

1 t4

2
1



1


1


1



Totals. .31 9 27 11 4



Atlantics AB.H.PO.A.E.

Hennessy.ss 2 3 12

Clements,2b 4 3 2

Edwards, lb 4 2 11 1

H'ring,C.O,c4 18 3

Emerson .If. . 4 2 10

Sullivan, cf.. 2 10

Osborne, rf.. 10

Gamble.rf... 2

H'ring.G.3b 4 10 5

Horrigan.p. 3 3

♦Yingling...



P.

Com-Sub. 9
Ancon. . . 10
Empire. . 7


W
9

6
4


L.


4
3


P.C.

1.000
.600
.571


Gorgona.
Atlantics
Marines.


I'.
8
9
7


W

3
3



L.
5
6

7


P.C.

.375
.334
.000











A new season, with four clubs, was begun on Sunday,
Februaiy 26, and the schedule, as adopted by the
league is, as follows:



Totals. ..30 4 24 17 5
Com.-Subsistence... 11110 5 x— 9
Atlantics 10 1 — 2

Runs — C.-S.. Buchanan (3), Curtis. Mosher. Ruther-
ford, Meegan, (2), Hodnett. Atlantics — Hennessy.
Clements. Runs earned — C.-S., 4. Two base hit —
Kellogg. Sacrifice hit — Breivogle. Stolen bases —
Meegan, Hennessy, Edwards. 2. First base on errors
— C.-S.. 2. Bases on balls — off Kellogg, 5; off
Horrigan. 6. Struckout — by Kellogg. 14; by Horrigan.
7. Hit by pitcher — by Horrigan, 2; (Meegan and
Kellogg.) Left on bases — C.-S.. 8; Atlantics, 6 Wild
pitch — Horrigan, 2. Umpire — Freel. Time of game —
1:50. Scorer — J. P. Mead. Attendance — 300.

*Batted for Gamble in the ninth inning.



Date.



Ancon.



February 26.
March i
March 12.
March 19
March 26. . .
April 2 .
April 9
April 14. .
April 16. .
April 13. . .
April 30. . . .
May 7



Ancon-Empire. .
Ancon-Atlantics.



Ancon-Com -Sub.
Ancon-Atlantics .



Ancon-Empire . .
Ancon-Atlantics.



Ancon-Com.
Ancon-Com.



Sub.
Sub.



Colon.



Atlantics-Com.-Sub. .
Com. -Sub. -Atlantics .



Ancon-Atlantics.



Com. -Sub. -Empire . .
Atlantics-Com.-Sub. .
Com. -Sub. -Atlantics .



Com. -Sub. -Ancon
Atlantics-Empire. .



Empire.



Empire-Ancon .



Empire-Corn. -Sub..
Empire-Corn. -Sub.
Empire-Atlantics. .



Empire-Ancon.



Empire-Corn. -Sub..
Empire-Atlantics. .
Empire-Atlantics. .



The Corozal baseball team defeated Balboa. by
the score of 19 to 6. on February 19, at Corozal. At
Colon, on February 22. Corozal defeated a picked
team by a score of 12 to 3.



An exhibition game was played at the Empire park
on Wednesday. February 22. between the Empire team,
and the Atlantics, the former winning by a score of 6
to 4.



Commission Tug In Pursuit of Bank Robbers.

The Commission tug La Boca was placed
at the service of the Panama police authorities
on Monday, February 27, to pursue four
burglars who, after robbing the safe of the
Panama Banking Company in Panama, on
the previous night, made their escape on a
launch. The tug steamed as far as the Pearl
Islands, but returned at nightfall after a vain
search. On Tuesday morning, February 28,
the tug was provisioned for a three days' trip
and was again started out to hunt the robl u



The seagoing suction dredge Caribbean went
into dry dock at Mount Hope on February 1 7
for extensive repairs, among which will be the
placing of new doors and door frames of cast
steel in the hoppers.



Missing Men.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of Thomas Murray McLaughlin,
who left the service of the Commission on
October 4, 1910, is requested to communicate
with The Canal Record.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of R. M. Henry, who left the
States on March 2, 1909, and is supposed to
have come to the Isthmus, is requested to
communicate with the American Legation,
Panama.

Any one having information regarding the
present whereabouts of Staunton A. White,
who resigned from the service of the Commis-
sion on December 20, 1909, is requested to
communicate with The Canal Record.



March 1, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



215



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



Inspection of Floating Equipment.

Culebra, C. Z. January 28, 1911.
Circular No. 371:

The duties of the Board of Local Inspectors are
hereby extended to include an inspection of all floating
plant belonging to the Isthmian Canal C->mmision and
the Panama Railroad Company, at least once every
six months, except as to the steamships of the latter
company, which are regularly inspected and licensed
by the inspectors at the home port of the steamers in
the United States.

1. The inspection shall cover the hulls and equip-
ment of same, of any character or description, used in
the work of the Isthmian Canal Commission or the
Panama Railroad Company, except as noted in the
preceding paragraph, with a special view to the pre-
servation of life and property, under all conditions; and
the Board shall make a report of its findings, as soon as
possible after the inspection, to the Chairman and
Chief Engineer, through the Head of Department of
Civil Administration, and shall specifically recommend
such changes in hull, equipment, etc.. as in its opinion
may be necessary for proper care of life and property.

2. Copies of reports shall be forwarded direct to the
division heads in the case of Commission property, and
to the General Superintendent of the Panama Railroad
Company in the case of Panama Railroad property.

3. No general repairs shall be undertaken on any
piece of marine plant of over fifteen (15) tons burden
until same has been inspected and reported on by the
Board of Local Inspectors, which report should be
taken as a guide as to the work to be done; and to ex-
pedite this inspection, it is required that the Board
shall receive notice of retirement from service of any
piece of plant, as above stated, at least ten d&ys before
the time of undertaking the repairs; and at the time
the Board receives notice of said retirement, *a list
of required repairs, prepared by the marine engi-
neer, master, or supervisor, in immediate charge of the
plant to be repaired, approved by the supervising
engineer and officer in charge of the work, shall be
filed in the office of the Board for their information
and guidance in making the above inspection.

4. The term "general repairs*' is intended to cover
the periodic replacing of worn equipment, and such
other repairs as may be authorized and made at such
time, and do not cover the emergency repairs necessary
at any time for the renewal of broken parts, or the
running repairs made from day to day.

Compliance with recommendations of the Board is
not obligatory on the part of the officials operating the
floating equipment until approved by me. This is not
intended, however, to prevent such action as may be
considered necessary on the Board's recommendations
without specific approval.

The Board of Local Inspectors, in addition to the
report submitted immediately after inspection, shall
prepare a monthly report of work done by them under
the terms of this circular, which report shall be filed
with the proper authorities by the tenth day of the
month succeeding. Geo. W. Goethals.

Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission.
President, Panama Railroad Company.
Approved:

J. M. Dickinson, Secretary of War.



Baggage on Trip Passes.
Culebra, C. Z., February 25, 1911.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

It is reported that in several instances recently em-
ployes, to whom trip passes have been issued, have
noted on the pass "With full baggage," without -proper
authority.

The baggage allowance on first-class I. C. C. trans-
portation on the Panama railroad is 250 pounds, and.
hereafter, ticket agents will not honor requests for
excess baggage unless a notation to that effect appears
on the pass over the signature of a Head of Depart-
ment or Division. H. F. Hodges,

Acting Chairman.



Injury Leave for Borrowed Mechanics.

Culebra, C. Z., February 24, 1911.
Circular No. 357-a:

Whenever an employe temporarily obtained from
the Mechanical Division under the provisions of Cir-
cular No. 357 is injured, the cost of all injury leave
incident thereto will be borne by the division in which
and for which he was working at the time the injury
was sustained. H. F. Hodges,

Acting Chairman. Iithmian Canal Commission.
Second Vice-President, Panama Railroad Company.



Transfer of Equipment.

Culebra. C. Z., February 24. 1911.
i [RCULAR No. 370:

Whenever it is desired to transfer equipment from
one division or department to anv division or depart-



ment of the Isthmian Canal Commission, or from the
Isthmian Canal Commission to the Panama Railroad
Company, or from the Panama Railroad Company to
the Isthmian Canal Commission, request will be for-
warded to the Surveying Officer, who will submit his
recommendation to the Chairman and Chief Engineer,
and if approved , the necessary instructions pertaining to
the transfer will be issued, by direction of the Chair-
man, from the office of the Chief Quartermaster.
H. F. Hodges,
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Reservations on Colon, March 19.

Culebra, C. Z-, February 24, 1911.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

Practically the entire stateroom accommodations of
the Colon, scheduled to sail from Cristobal on Sunday,
March 19, 1911. having been reserved for members of
the Congressional party on their return trip, no fur-
ther requests will be issued for this sailing. Sufficient
accommodations remain to provide for the limited
number of requests already issued.
By direction of the Acting Chairman.
Respectfully,

C. A. McIlvaine, Chief Clerk.

Stop-over Privileges on 24 Trip Tickets.

Office of the Master of Transportation,

Colon. R. P., February 20, 1911.
Passenger Conductors and Collectors:
Transportation Bulletin No 39.

On account of the evident abuse of the stop-over
privilege on the 24-trip tickets, it is now ordered that
those tickets must be made out in either indelible pen-
cil, or ink, and clearly and distinctly dated. They will
be honored for transportation on the date of issue only,
and stop-overs, when allowed, will be noted on the back
by conductors or collectors with indelible pencil, with
the following notation:

"Off No (at) (date) "

(Initials.)
The succeeding conductor or collector to whom this
transportation is presented, will be careful to note that
the date is for the day transportation is presented,
otherwise it will not be honored.

Report of particulars in any violation of the above
should be made in writing to this office.

A. K. Stone,
Master of Transportation.



Central Division; 11 packages iron covers, 2 barrels
snatch blocks, 3 barrels sheaves for Mechanical Divi-
sion; 17 cases drill parts. 10 cases varnish, 12 cases
electrical goods, 12 cases seamless tubes. 6 coils rope
for stock; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole con-
sisting of 262 packages, weighing 104 tons.

Atenas, February 23. from New Orleans, with 200
bundles rods and straps for Mechanical Division; 138
bales alfalfa hay, 46 rolls cotton duck for stock.

Santa Marta, February 23, from New York, with 25
bundles brooms, 230 crates wooden handles for stock.

Antillian, February 24, from Liverpool, with 15
dredge buckets for Pacific Division.



Rainfall from February 1 to 25, 1911


Inclusive.


Stations,


.5

.5 9J

K C

CO O

s


V

Q




Pacific Section —


Ins.
.32
.71
1.01
1.30
.78
.35

.37
.36
.21
.19
.90
1.57
1.13
.65
.29
.23
.24
.22

.41
.40

.25

4.00

.84


14
15
11
11
11
11

11
12
11
12
12
12
12
6
19
**
24
24

14
5

13
12
1?


Ins.
.32


















Central Section —










.54




.70






*E1 Vigia






1.34




1 12




.87




1.49




1 67


Atlantic Section —


2.13


Porto Bello


1.94

1.74

t6.65

3.13



*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m.,
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations-
midnight to midnight.

tTo 5 p. m.. February 24.

**12th and 14th.



daily,
values



Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth-
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cristo-
bal and Colon during the week ending February 25,

.911:

Norman. February 21, from Brunswick, with 28,505
cypress ties for stock.

Ancon, February 22, from New York, with 23,540
barrels cement for Atlantic Division; 1 14 040 bags ce-
ment for Pacific Division.

Advance, Febiuary 23, from New York, with 14 au-
tomatic buckets, 25 pieces propeller blades, 1 crank
shaft for Atlantic Division; 76 packages castings for



The following vessels arrived at and departed from
the port of Balboa during the week ending February
25. 1911:

Arrivals — February 19. Venelia, from San Francisco;
Olson and Mahoney, from San Francisco; February 20,
Vicltsburg. from Corinto; Mexico, from Callao; Febru-
ary 23, Arica, from Guayaquil; Peru, from San Fran-
cisco.

Departures — February 19, Newport, to San "Fran-
cisco; February* 20, Ucayali, to Callao; February 21,
Huasco, to Valparaiso; February 22. City of Para, to
San Francisco; Quito, to Buenaventura; Venetia, to
San Francisco.



RAINFALL IN 1910.

There was less rainfall in the Canal Zone during the year 1910 than during the preceding
year, but an excess, as compared with 190S. The rainiest month of 1910 at Cristobal was
November; at Empire, July; and at Ancon, August. The month of least rain at Cristobal and
Empire was January, and at Ancon, February. The rainfall at Porto Bello, situated on the
Atlantic coast 16 miles from Colon, for 1910, was 67.16 inches less than during 1909, when the
total for the year was 237.28 inches. 103.20 inches of which fell during the months of November
and December. The rainiest month at Porto Bello in 1910 was November, with 23.08 inches,
and the driest month, February, with 5.89 inches. The rainfall at that point was greater for
each month in 1909 than for the corresponding month in 1910, with three exceptions, those of
March, August and October. The following table shows the rainfall for the past three years at
three principal points in the Canal Zone, and at Porto Bello for 1909, and 1910, by monihs:



Month.



Cristobal.



190S



January
February . .

March

April

May

June

July

August
September
October.
November. .
December. .

Total



3.K4

1.08

3.53

1.27

22.49

10.53

14.76

16.89

11.57

10.96

31.72

9.07



1909



1910



10.61

1.92

1.85

3.56

7.21

1 7 49

12.83

15.42

16.33

19.31

42.50

34.38



2.94

3.58

5 46

3.30

12.09

13.63

21.07

14.93

12.05

15.65

30.04

15.20



Empire.



1908



.75

.00

.41

1.36

12.91

8.21

11.79

8.11

9.76

8.87

4.46

5.09



1909



2. 28

1.50

.21

3.33

7.73

7.84

8.27

7.20

7.22

21.14

20.99

9.44



1910



190S 1909



.70

.75

1.60

4.24

11.08

10.14

12.60

10.08

8.99

12.57

8.85

9.06



.12
.24
.03
1.37
7.64
4.28
6.83
11.48
5.93
8.79
9.12
4.16



2.90
2.90
.18
2.92
9.10
9.90
9.01
6.84
3.86
8.77
15.14
12.39



1910



1.22

.43
1.83
3.71
9.89
8.S2
9.26

12.00
4.84
8.86
4.29

10.63



Porto Bello.*



1909



1910



20.90

6.82

3.56

12.56

9.69

17.70

26.33

13.83

13.99

8.70

45.03

58.17



137.71 183.41 149.94 71.72 97.15 90.66 I 59.99 I 83.91 I 75.78 237.28



14 115
5.89
6.32
7.14
9.30
15.25
22.80
20.71
13.15
9.54
23.08
22.89



170.12



* Porto Rello station established in September. 1908.



216



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. H.



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.



The hours during which commissaries are open are
as follows:

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. • 2 p. to.
to 7 p. m.

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 3 p. m. to
7 p. m.



Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning March 1.

FRESH MEATS.

Price.

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds

and over) , per pound 9

Entire forequarter (not trimmed) 10.

pounds and over, per pound

Leg, (8 to 10 pounds), per pound ....

Cutlets, per pound

Short cut chops, per pound

Lamb — Stewing, per pound

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off,

per pound

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound

Chops, per pound

Cutlets, per pound

Veal — Stewing, per pound

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4

pounds) , per pound

Chops — Shoulder, per pound

Chops, per pound

Loin for roasting, per pound

Cutlets, per pound

Pork, loin chops or roast, per pound

Beef — Suet, per pound

Soup, per pound

Stew, per pound

Corned, per pound 12,

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per

pound

Pot roast, per pound

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3J

pounds) , per pound

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds),

per pound

Sirloin roast, per pound

Rump roast, per pound

Porterhouse roast, per pound

Steak, chuck, per pound

Round, per pound

Rib, per pound

Sirloin, per pound

Rump, per pound

Porterhouse (not less than 1J

pounds) , per pound

Tenderloin (Western) per pound. .
Tenderloin (Native), per pound...



8
17
18
20

6

9

20
24
24
10

12*
16

24

24

28

14

2

5

8

4. 16

12
12*



18
19
19
20
12*
13
18
19
19

20

24
30



MISCELLANEOUS.



Livers — Beef, per pound 7

Calf, each 60

Half, each 30

Sausage — Pork, per pound 15

Bologna, per pound 10

Frankfurter, per pound 12

Lieberwurst, per pound 10

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1.20

Beef, per pound 25

Eggs, fresh, dozen *24



$ -dozen, only.
Bluefish, fresh, per pound.
Cod, fresh, per pound. . . .
Halibut, fresh, per pound .
Oysteia.in 1-quart kegs, keg.



13
16
10
15
50
Oysters in i-gallon kegs, keg 1 .00

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens— Fancy roasting, large, eacn 1.25

medium, each 1.00

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90, 1.00

Ducks, large, each i 1.30

medium, each 1.10

Broilers, each 60

Turkeys, per pound 28

Squabs, each 35

Capons 2.10

Rabbits, dressed, each 40

Pheasants, each 70, 1.00

Partridges, ea«h 50

Grouse, each 85

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound

Sugar cured, per pound

Sliced, per pound

Half, for boiling, per pound

Boiled, per pound

Hocks, per pound

Picnic, Winchester, per pound

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pourd

Breakfast, sliced, per pound

Beef, salt, family, per pound

Pork.salt, family, per pound

Oi tongues, each

PImV feet, per pound

Tongues, per pound

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin

In 1-pound jars, per jar

DAIRY PRODUCTS

Butter — Creamery special, per pound

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound

Philadelphia cream, cake

Young America, per pound

Swiss, per pound

Edam, each



36
18
20
19
25
18
15
23
24

14

75
9
14
30
30



32
38
10
20
26
1.00



Price.

Cheese — Camembert, in large tins, tin 38

Camembert, in small tins, tin 14

Neufchatel, cake 6

Gouda, per pound 34

Milk (Inspected or certified), per bottle **25

(Pasteurized), bottle **18

Buttermilk, bottle **15

Ice cream, quart 125

i-gallon 150

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound 3

Celery, per head 6

Carrots, per pound 3

Cabbage, per pound 3

Cucumbers, per pound 10

Kale, per pound 6

Lettuce, per pound *10

Onions, per pound 3$

Potatoes, white, per pound 2\

sweet, per pound 2

Parsnips, per pound . .• 3

Romaine, per pound 14

Squash, per pound 4

Spinach, per pound 10

Turnips, per pound 3

Yams, per pound 3

Apples, per pound 6

Cranberries, per pound 10

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges , per dozen 12

Tangerines, each 2

♦Indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle,
tlndicates advance on last list.

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery. ____

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon. C. Z., February 28. 1911.
The following insufficiently addressed letters origina-
ting in the United States and possessions, have been
received in the office of Director of Posts and may be
had upon the request of the addressees:
Baird. J. W. Neff , John R.

Biggstaff, Miss Ethel Oleson, John

Blanch, T. Russell Pearson. Mrs. J. M.

Chambers, John Peiry, E. W.

Curry. Rishard Phipps, John H.

Drury, George F. Poole. Victor

Fernandez. Mrs. Federico(r) Powders. William G.
Fischer, Arthur Reynolds. Joseph P.

Graham, George J. Rice, Miss Eva C.

Hawkins. George Sayland, Louis

Hubley, Mrs. Dora Shigley, L. M.