Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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U. F. C. . .Wednesday. Mar. 22

U. F. C . . . Saturday . . . Mar. 25

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Mar. 23

U. F. C. . .Thursday... Mar. 23

U. F. C. ..Thursday. ..Mar. 30

U.F. C. . .Thursday... Mar. 30

COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Trent R. M Tuesday Mar. 28

Oruba R. M Tuesday April 11

Magdalena R. M Tuesday April 25

Hamburg-American steamers leave for New York
every Tuesday at 10 a.m.; for Jamaica every fortnight,
connecting there with steamers for all points in Cuba;
for Port Limon every Tuesday, direct, or by way of
Bocas del Toro.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursday at 3 p. m.; for New Orleans via
Port Limon and Puerto Barrios on Thursday at 4 p .m.,
and for New York on Thursday at 1 1 a. m.



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the weekending March 29, 1911,
(75th meridian time) :



A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission Band at'Enipire'. C. Z., on Sunday, March 26,
1911. at 6 p m.



Date.


High.


Low.


High.


Low.


High.




A. M.


A. M.
3.20
4.20
5.32

6.42
7.38
8.25

9.08


A. M.

9.15

10.20

11.45

P. M.

12.55

1 50

2.33

3.10


P. M.
3.45
5.00
6.15

7.15
8.05
8.50
9.30


P. M.
9.30


March 24.. .




10.40








March 26

March 27

March 28

March 29


12.10

1.17
2.10
2.53





CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 1911.



No. 31.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision oj
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for Jive
cents each.

Address all Communuations

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Gatun Locks.

The construction of the operating tunnel in
the center wall of the locks at Gatun has been
begun in the upper locks.

The steamshovel working in the soft mud
of the slide in the lower locks excavated 2,367
cubic yards on March 27.



Concrete Dock at Pacific Entrance.

Work has been begun on the reinforced
concrete dock, which is to be the first con-
structed of the series of docks proposed for
the anchorage basin at Balboa, near the Pacific
entrance to the Canal. The dock will be
based on 55 concrete piers nine feet in diameter
which will rest on rock. Excavation for four
of these piers has been begun, the lowest
point reached so far being 25 feet below mean
tide, while the average depth to rock is minus
65 feet. The excavation is in soft mud com-
posed of decaying vegetable matter and fish
of low order. Caissons of concrete formed
around collapsible steel forms are used.
A gas resulting from the decaying matter
overcame one of the workmen in a caisson on
March 25, and precautions are now being
taken to supply fresh air to the men in the
pits.

Borings are being made immediately north
and east of the site of the new dock, to deter-
mine the character of foundation that will be
met in the construction of another dock.



Sale and Delivery of Fuel Oil.

The agreement between the Isthmian Canal
Commission and the Union Oil Company of
California for the sale and delivery of fuel oil,
made on April 1, 1909, has been amended as
follows:

First. That the standard of quality of fuel oil to be
furnished by the party of the second part shall not be
heavier than 14 degrees nor lighter than 26 degrees
Baum£ at 60 degrees Fahrenheit, and shall be equal in
efficiency, under the same conditions, to the oil f urnisned
heretofore by the party of the second part to the party
of the first part, for consumption on the Canal Zone.

Second. If said fuel oil shall contain water and sand
in excess of two per rent then said nartv rif thp 6rqf



part shall be entitled to a rebate on such excess at the
agreed price of one dollar and ten cents per barrel,
provided claim therefor is made within 15 days after
delivery thereof, and provided further, that the final
test of the water content of the oil shall be based upon
distillation. The party of the second part further
agrees to furnish not to exceed one hundred thousand
barrels of fuel oil monthly, if required, at the agreed
price of St. 10 per barrel; and it is mutually agreed that
the basis of measurement for payment shall be a barrel
of 42 gallons, U. S. standard, at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Third. The seventh paragraph of said agreement of
April !. 1909, shall not be construed to require the pay-
ment by the party of the second part during the exis-
tence of this contract of the monthly license fee of S500
therein referred to for the sale by the party of the second
part to others than the Isthmian Canal Commission
and the Panama Railroad Company of oil at the end of
its pipe line at Balboa. C. Z-. from its storage tanks,
provided that sales to such others shall not at any time
deprive the said Commission and railroad company of
the amount needed to supply their requirements under
this agreement.

Fourth. The supplementary agreement between the
parties hereto made on April 1 , 1 909, is hereby cancelled
and held to be of no further effect, and the provisions
of the original agreement of April 1. 1909. between the
parties hereto which are in conflict or inconsistent with
the terms of this supplementary agreement are hereby
substituted and superseded; otherwise this agreement
shall be held to form a part of the said original agree-
ment of April 1, 1909.

A revocable license was granted on January
10,1906, under which the Union Oil Company
was to deliver oil at 90 cents a barrel at any
point along the Canal, pay a fee of S500 a
month to the Canal Zone treasury for the
support of schools, and the regular taxes.
Under this license an 8-inch pipe was laid
across the Isthmus, a distance of 48 miles and
oil was delivered in August, 1907, although
delivery along the entire length of the line
was not made until November 14, 1907.

The oil company found that it was actually
costing SI. 10 a barrel to deliver oil on the
Isthmus, and after an effort had been made to
procure oil at a less price, the Commission
entered into a contract for one year, extend-
ible for three years, on April 1, 1909, provid-
ing for the remission of the monthly payment
of $500, so long as oil was sold only to the
Commission or Panama Railroad Company,
and for a price of SI. 10 a barrel for not less
than 30,000 nor more than 60,000 barrels of
oil a month. This agreement was made
because oil at SI. 10 a barrel is more economical
than coal, and because it was desired to make
a thorough test of oil fuel as compared with
coal. The contract provided a standard for
the oil, for the operation of the pipe line in
case the oil company should refuse to operate
it, and secured the Commission against loss
from failure of the company to carry out its
contract. On October 11, 1910, permission
was granted the company to sell oil at Balboa
to others than the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company. In July, 1910, the
monthly consumption of oil was 56,149 bar-
rels, and steps were at once taken to increase
the maximum amount that could be used.
The new contract increases the amount of
oil that ma\ hp tispd monthly tn 100.000. and



provides the distillation test to determine the
water content.

The annual consumption of oil and the
monthly average, have been as follows:





Annual
barrels.


Monthly
average,
barrels.


1907*


6,919
154,817
534,958
652.022


1 384


1908


12.901


1909


44.5S0


1910


54.335


1911 —


62.637




72.939







♦Five months.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 51 per cent completed, 128,314
cubic yards out of a total of 250,000 having
been placed up to the close of work on March
25. A statement of the amount laid each day
last week and of the total in place, follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.




Cu. Yds.
332
324
412
364
336
268


17:00
17:00
17:00
17:00
17:00
17:00




March 21. .




March 22


2


March 23


2


March 24


2


March 25


2


Total

Previously reported . . .


2.036
126.278


102:00


2




128.314





Meals for Negro Laborers.
Reductions in the prices of foodstuffs and
economies in the methods of preparing and
serving meals to negro laborers have made it
possible to reduce the price per ration of
three meals from 30 to 27 cents, until further
notice, as indicated in an official circular
published elsewhere in this issue. The num-
ber of rations served and the cost of food and
service during the past four months, are as
follows:



Month.


Number
rations
served.


Cost
Cents.




30.071
38.201
37.010


26.55




2 7 03






26 04



February 31.260 25.64

Meals for negro and European laborers
have been served in the past at separate places,
necessitating separate kitchens for the cook-
ing. Except at Gatun and Ancon the food
is now prepared in one kitchen and served on
opposite sides, so that, although one kitchen
organization does the cooking, the food is
still served separately to the two classes of
laborers. Under this system the cost of
service has been steadily reduced, although
the average daily number of rations served
to negro laborers decreased from 5,900 in
July. 1908, to 1,116 in February', 1911. Of
thp negro lahnrpr< as viewed from the *tand-



242



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 31.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.)



point of subsistence, the Subsistence Officer
says:

"The negro is gradually changing his
status from that of a laborer to that of an
inhabitant, and instead of getting his meals
from the Subsistence Department he now buys
food at the Commissary or from the local
markets. Apparently a great deal of yams,
yuccas, and sweet potatoes consumed by the
negroes are actually grown on the Isthmus, as
our importations of yams and sweet potatoes
at the present time are very light, the yams
not over one-fourth of the quantity imported
two years ago. The present laborers in the
common labor kitchens are not "floaters,"
or people who work irregularly, or new arrivals
on the Isthmus, but they are in fact old
employes and men generally who work every
day; generally speaking the most reliable and
most industrious of the negro workmen."

Each ration consists of three meals so
that the price of a meal served to a negro
laborer is nine cents.



Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
March 25, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic

Yards.




7:00
6:00
7:23
7:14
7:3 3
7:26


3,001




2,802




3.451




3.3X6




3,453




3.051








42:36


19,144







Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending March 25.
follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




9:50
10:10
8:55

7:55
7:40


3,364


March 'I


3.609




3.175




2,470




1,571




*276








44:50


14,465







♦Crusher shut down, putting shaft in No. 12 crusher.



Models of Locks and Dam.

A model of the locks is being constructed at
Gorgona shops, and a model of Gatun Dam
is being made in the States, both for exhi-
bition at the International Exposition to be
held at Turin, Italy, during the present year.



Losses Caused by the Sinking of the Finance.

A compromise agreement has been reached
between the proctors for the various interests
in the ligitation arising out of the collision
between the steamship Finance of the Panama
railroad line and the steamship Georgic of the
White Star Line on November 26, 1908,
which resulted in the sinking of the former
vessel and a total loss of the effects of the
passengers, as well as a total loss of the cargo.
The agreement provides for the payment of
eighty (80) per cent of the amount of the
proved claims of the shippers of cargo and
seventy (70) per rent of the passengers' claims



as filed by them without further proof. The
settlement is in process of adjustment and
by the end of March the entire funds
should be paid over tb the proctors for
the claimants. Mr. Evan Shelby, of No. 60
Wall street, New York, who represents
nearly all the passengers, has requested that
the passengers send him their present ad-



dresses, and advice as to whether he shall
send them a New York check in settlement of
their claims.



The cost of repairs to steam shovels in the
■ Central Division during January and Feb-
ruary averaged two cents per cubic yard of
material excavated.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

Over 58 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the exact amount in place at the close of work on March 25, being 1,219,573 cubic yards,
out of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
March 25, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours No. of
worked, mixers


Concrete Hours No. of
placed, worked, mixers.






Cu. Yds.
2.43S
2.252
2.454
2.654
2.266
2,434


41:45 6
40:18 6
41:10 6


I
694 8:40 2
648 8:40 1 2


Cu. Yds.
175J
153!
205}
155 j
186 1
221


Cu. Yds.
3.307J


March 21


3,053!




606 i 8:40
476 1 7:40
662 1 8:40
624 | 8:40
576!


2

2
2
2


3.265!




47:42
40:52

43:42


6
6
6


3.285}




3.114!


March 25


3.279




576J


















14.498


255:39


6


4,286 5 51:00


2


1.098


19,882}




1.199.691




















r.219,5731



*The 576! yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
March 20th, 48 yards; March 21, 71 J yards; March 22. 1051 yards; /March 23. 94 yards; March 24, 122! yards;
March 25th, 135 yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Migue' is over 70 per cent completed, 596,678 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on March 25. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:







Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.






2-Cubic yard mixers


2-cubic yard mixers. ! i-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete Hours No. of Concrete
placed. I worked, mixers Placed.


Hours
worked


No. of
mixers




March 2"
March 21

Man h 22

March 24.

March 25 .


Cu. Yds.
1.216
1.184"
1,022
1,048
962
1,056


18:67
18:50
16:67
18:00
16:00
16:00


2

2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds
646
720
750
613
530
6S6


15:50
17:33
15:82

15:00
15:00
16:00


3
3
3
3
3
3


Cu. Yds.

14S
137
160
79
127
140


9:00
8:33
9:17
5:00
7:50
7:50


1
1
1
1
1
1


Cu. Yds.
1


Cu. Yds.

J.nio
2.041
1.932
1.740
1.62D
1..SS2


Total
Previously


6,488


103:84


2 3,945


94:65


3


791


46:50


1


1

4.178


11,225
585,453






















Grand






4.179 1 596.678



MIRAFLORE3 LOCKS.

Over 12 percent of the concrete for the system of locks at Miraflores was in place on
March 25, the total amount on that date being 166,007 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


2-cubic yard mixers.


i-cubic yard mixei




Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours No. of Concrete
placed. 1 worked. 1 mixersl placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.






Cu. Yds.






Cu. Yds.
296
304
224
216
256
280


6:00
6:00
5:00
5:00
6:00
6:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
677
821
940
849
851
609
*438


35:25
45:00
48:00
46:50
44:75
25:50
35:00


5
6
6
6
6
5
1


Cu. Yds.
5
5
5


Cu. Yds.
1,040










1,211


March 22.
March 23.
March 24.
March 25,


132
336
332
240


3:67
8:67
8:00
8:50


2
2
2
2


1.359

1,478
1.516
1,212




















Total ...
Previously


1,040


28:84


1.33


1,576


34:00


2


5,185


2S0:00


5


IS
3.675


7.816
158.191
























Grand


3,690


166,007



*This 138 yards was mixed by a ', -yard mixer, theamountsforcachday being: March20th. 62yards; March 21st.
Rl yards: March 22d. 58 yards: March 23rd. 77 yards: March 24th. 77 yards: March 25th. 83 yards.



March 29, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



243



THE COLON FIRE.



Extent of Loss, an J Measures for Relief.

A fire, said to have originated in a frame
building at the northwest corner of 13th and
Cash streets in Colon shortly after 3 o clock
on the afternoon of March 23, destroyed 10
city blocks and several buildings situated on
the Mount Hope road. The remains of a
child and a man have been recovered from
the debris. No official estimate has yet been
made of the loss in Colon.

Under the terms of an agreement with
Panama, published elsewhere in this issue,
the Cristobal fire department confined its
work to the property of the Isthmian
Canal Commission and the Panama rail-
road. Sailors from the U. S. S. Paducah,
which was at anchor in the harbor, work-
ing under the direction of their officers,
assisted the Colon firemen and volunteers in
checking the fire by cutting down buildings
in its path. The buildings in Colon are
principally wooden frames and they burned
very rapidly. The heat drove the firemen
away from the nearest hydrants, and eight
2 5 inch pipes were left open. Because of
this the water pressure was low although
3,000 gallons a minute were being pumped
into the 20 inch main from Alt. Hope to
Colon all during the fire.

The following Isthmian Canal Commission
buildings situated on the Mount Hope road
were burned: -Building No. 240, Salvation
Army Headquarters; No. 217, school for
colored children; Nos. 93, 94, 95, and 96, of
Folks River labor camp; No. 118, public
convenience house; No. 2S4, wash house.
Houses No. 97 and 99 were pulled down in
checking the fire. Houses in Cristobal, facing
the boundary line, were blistered by the heat,
but only slightly damaged. No insurance
is carried on Commission property. The loss
is estimated at S14.394.



Red Cross and Relief Work.

It is estimated that 2,000 people in Colon
were without homes on the night of March 23.
All who asked for food were given it at the
Camp Bierd labor camp of the Commission
at Cristobal. Beginning March 25, the subsis-
tence was undertaken by the Canal Zone
Branch of the American Red Cross, and this
will be continued until the need has passed.
A terit village was started by the Red Cross
in an open field near the baseball park, where
35 tents were ready for use by the night of the
24th. Water mains were laid through the
camp by noon of the 24th. There are now
66 tents in the village, capable of accomodating
800 people, and between 450 and 500 are being
cared for. The Health Officer of Colon has
charge of the sanitary arrangements, and a
nurse from Colon Hospital cares for the sick.

The Cristobal V. M. C. A. gave a benefit
entertainment at the clubhouse on the night
of March 24, in which the Caveney Company,
the Cristob.d Vaui leville Company, and others
assisted. One hundred and seventy-five dol-
lars was added to the relief fund. The Y. M.
C. A. has also assisted by receiving and dis-
tributing clothing.

A baseball game between the second nine
of the Commissary-Subsistence Department
and Porto Bello was played at Colon on
March 26 under the auspices of the Colon
Humane Society, at which SI 67 was realized.



Commissary-Subsistence Department and
Empire will be played on the grounds of the
Atlantic Athletic Association at Colon on
Sunday, April 2, at 3 p. m. Both teams have
volunteered their services and a close and
exciting game is anticipated. Tickets at SI
each, including free transportation on special
train leaving Panama at 12 o'clock and re-
turning leaving Colon at 6.30 p. m., are on
sale at the offices of the district quartermas-
ters, at V. M. C. A. clubhouses and at the
offices of the Panama Banking Company,
Panama and Colon. The receipts will be
turned over to the Canal Zone Branch of the
American National Red Cross Society, which
is in charge of the relief work in Colon.
M usic will be furnished. Box seats, at $1 each
are on sale at the office of the Subsistence
Officer in Cristobal.



New Regulations for Canal Zone Fire Department
A new set of rules and regulations governing
the Division of Fire Protection of the Canal
Zone has been approved, and will become
effective on April 1, 1911. The regulations
regarding the use of apparatus in the cities
of Panama and Colon are extensively defined
in Articles 210 to 220, which read, as follows:
Article 210. In addition to property of any descrip-
tion whatsoever situated within the limits ol the Canal
Zone, all property oi the isthmian Canal Commission
and Panama railroad,' and other property owned or
leased in the cities of Panama oi Culon are included in
the fire protection districts of the Ancon and Cristobal
companies, respectively.

Article 211. The Ancon or Cristobal companies shall
respond to all alarms received from alarm boxes of this
division located in the cities of Panama or Colon,
respectively.

Article 212. If the Ancon or Cristobal companies are
definitely advised by telephone, or otherwise, ot tire, or
imminent danger of fire in property described in Article
2 lu, they shall immediately proceed to the scene ot the
fire.

Article 213. The Ancon or Cristobal companies will
not respond, except as provided in the two preceding
paragraphs, unless requested to respond by the chief,
or acting chief, of the Panama or Colon lire departments.
Article 214. Upon arrival at a tire, it it is found that
the fire is in property described in Article 2 ill. the Ancon
or Cristobal companies will take charge of fighting the
fire.

Article 215. If upon arrival, it isjfound that the prop-
erty described in Article 210, might be endangered by
fire in adjacent property, the Ancon or Cristobal com-
panies shall remain at the fire and protect property
described in said article, but shall not assist in fighting
the fire if it does not endanger such property, unless
requested to do so by the proper official.

Article 216. If the hre endangers property described
in Article 210. the Ancon or Cristobal companies will
protect such property, and take part in lighting the
fire, if necessary.

Article 217. If upon arrival, it is found that property
described in Article 210 is not in danger, the Ancon or
Cristobal companies will immediately return to quar-
ters, unless tequested by the chief, or acting chief, of
the Panama or Colon fire departments to remain and
assist in fighting the fire.

Article 21S. If the Ancon or Cristobal companies are
requested by the chief of the Panama or Colon fire
departments to assist in fighting fire in Panama or
Colon, in property other than described in Article 210,
these companies will go into these cities and assist under
the direction of the chief ol the Panama or Colon
departments.

Article 219. If the Ancon or Cristobal companies
arrive first at a lire described in Article 210. the Panama
or Colon fire departments will not take part in lighting
such fire, unless requested by the officer in charge of
the Canal Zone companies.

Article 220. All three-way hydrants in the city of
Colon installed by the Isthmian Canal Commission or
the Panama railroad for the protection of property
described in Article 210 shall be reserved for use of
the fire engine of Cristobal company.



Colon, recently celebrated its first anniversary.
The club was organized to meet the needs of
the educated class of negroes on the Isthmus
and in the Canal Zone. Its membership in-
cludes ministers, lawyers, doctors, dentists,