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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Tanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1929.

During the month of July, 1929, 111 tank ships transited the Canal
with an aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of
585,977, on which tolls of $505,642.09 were collected. Cargo amounted
to 482,427 tons. In point of net tonnage, tanker traffic increased
15.7 per cent over the same traffic for the corresponding month a year
ago, while cargo tonnage increased 4.3 per cent over the cargo tonnage
of July, 1928.

Tanker traffic comprised 21 per cent of the total commercial transits
through the Canal during the month; made up 23.7 per cent of the
total Panama Canal net tonnage; were the source of 22.4 per cent of
the tolls collected; and carried 18.6 per cent of the total cargo in
transit through the Canal.

The number, aggregate net tonnage, tolls, and cargo of tank ships
transiting the Canal during the month of July, 1929, segregated by
direction of transit and nationality of vessels, are shown in the follow-
ing tabulations, with comparative totals, for the two preceding months
and for July, 1928:



Nationality.


No.

of

ships.


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons

of
cargo.


Atlantic to Pacific.
British


12

1
1

1
38


59,700
5,929
4,395

34,031

6.295

213,150


S42,988.32

4,268.88

3,164.40

24,502.32

4,532.40

158,220.89








Dutch












United States


■19,964






Totals, July, 1929


00


323,512


237,677.21


19,964






Totals, ,Iune, 1929


52


284,668


216,210.04


60,059






Totals, May, 1929


52


286,387


210,607.05


19,679






Totals, July, 1928


50

13
1

2
1
3
1
30


264,688


195,784.18


18,521






Pacific to Atlantic.
British . .


65,313
5,929
9,400
4,186

11,405

4,245

101,927


66,556.13
6,491.25
10.067.50

4,468.75

11,842.50

4,632.50

163,906.25


105,736




11,303


Dutch


16,850


German


8,519




17,677




8,366


United States -


=294,006






Totals, July, 1929


51


262,465


207,964.88


462,463


Totals, June, 1929. . . ."


47


255,980


261,993.75


465,875


Totals, May, 1929


49


252,053


261,846.40


453,684


Totals, July, 1928


4e


241,854


240.324.35


443,902







' Includes 8,659 tons of creosote. ' Includes 6,004 tons of coconut oil.

Of the total tanker traffic shown above, the following is a summary
of the vessels giving Los Angeles as their port of origin or destination,
together with the totals for the two preceding months, and for July,
1928:





No.

of

ships.


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons

of
cargo.


To Los .Angeles.
July, 1929


40
38
41
33


249,097
204,823
227,722
170,648


S184,098.41
150,105.87
105,842.76
129,040.42


19,904


June, 1929


10,212


May, 1929


1,277


July, 1928


5,831






From Los .Angeles.
July, 1929


36
40
35
39


190,089
215,723
181,003
209,472


194,298.90
218,943.75
186,020.50
212,735.30


347,537


June, 1929

May, 1929


384,793
322,997


July, 1928


384,358



8 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

North Pacific Coast Line Prepares for Heavy Apple Season.

Recent press reports indicate that in anticipation of a heavy export
movement of apples through Pacific ports of the United States and
Canada, the North Pacific Coast Line, operated jointly by the Royal
Mail Steam Packet Company and the Holland-American Line, has
scheduled eleven extra refrigerator sailings during the ensuing season.
During the period from September 30, 1929, to March 17, 1^930, the
line will have 28 sailings, constituting the heaviest apple season sched-
ule in the history of the line.

The North Pacific Coast Line plies between the Pacific coast of
North America and Europe (Great Britain, Germany, Holland, and
Belgium), operating normally a service "A" on fortnightly schedule
and a service "B" with sailings every three weeks. Both services
carry a limited number of passengers.



Scuppers.

The Panama Canal, Department of Operation and Maintenance,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August J, 192Q.

To all Steamship Owners and Agents — Recent amplification by the Commissioner of
Navigation of Article 21, 1925 edition of Measurement of Vessels, provides that,
if exemption from tonnage is claimed for such open, isolated erections as forecastles,
bridges, poops or houses, on the grounds of a single tonnage opening in either side or
center of bulkheads of same, the following conditions must prevail:

(1) A single opening of not less than the regulation 3' x 4' size in a
forecastle, poop or house of ordinary length requires in addition, freeing
ports and at least two scuppers, one on each side. Scuppers may drain
either overboard, into bilges or on deck.

(2) A bridge space, or extended forecastle 'or poop, covering the waist
of a ship, with a single opening of not less than the regulation 3' x 4' size, re-
quires freeing ports and a suitable number of scuppers (not less than two,
one on each side) the latter not to drain on deck.

(3) A single opening in a forcastle, poop or house of ordinary length at
least 4 feet wide with an area of not less than 20 square feet requires in
addition, two scuppers only, one on each side, which may drain to deck,
overboard or to bilges.

(4) A bridge space, or extended forecastle or poop, covering the waist of
a ship with a single opening as in (3), requires scuppers only. These must
be suitable in number (not less than two, one on each side), and 7iot drain
on deck.

(5) Scuppers draining on deck are practicable for forecastles or poops of
ordinary length on ships of usual deck sheer, but not for bridges in the waist
of the ship, where drainage must be overboard or to bilges.

(6) Where the regulations prescribe scuppers in exempted spaces, including
shelter decks, they are not to be less than 3j" in diameter, and must be kept
clear at all times. However, to prohibit ingress of the sea the use of
back (flapper) valves will be permitted.

(7) Regulations as to height of coaming not in excess of 2 feet, and
temporary means of closing tonnage openings with rough boards in channels,
or plates, are not affected.

In order to afford a reasonable opportunity for compliance with the preceding
requirements, enforcement at the Canal will not be made effective until September
1, 1929, except that any vessel transiting the Canal prior to that date, and subject
to change of tonnage under the foregoing regulations, will be given but one oppor-
tunity for compliance therewith.

I. C. KiDD,
Acting Chairman,
Board of Admeasurement.
Approved :

H. Burgess,

Governor.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 9

American-Hawaiian Steamship Company Appointed Operating Managers
of Williams Steamship Corporation.

Following recent reports to the effect that the American-Hawaiian
Line, one of the principal intercoastal 'lines operating through the
Panama Canal, had purchased the Williams Steamship Line (also an
intercoastal line), local representatives of the former company have
announced that the Williams Steamship Corporation, an entirely
separate organization from The American-Hawaiian Steamship
Company, by resolution and agreement has appointed the American-
Hawaiian Steamship Company its operating managers. The Williams
Line steamers Willhilo and Willsolo have been taken over by the
American-Hawaiian Line and renamed the Arv::onan and Georgian,
respectively, and are now engaged in the run between the tv/o coasts.
The old American-Hawaiian steamer Georgian, renamed the San
Gabriel, is now in the service of the Pacific-Atlantic Steamship Cor-
poration.

The following steamers are still in the service of the Williams
Steamship Corporation: Willboro, Willpolo, WiUfaro, Willkeno, and
WtUzipo.



Correction.

In The Panama Canal Record of July 24, 1929, an error in printing occurred in the
table on page 721, showing principal commodities from the Pacific to the Atlantic
in June, 1929, as compared with June, 1928. The figure for lumber in June, 1928,
shown as 248,643 tons, should have been 348,643 tons.



Traffic by Nationality for July, 1929.

The following tabulation shows the comm.ercial traffic through
the Canal during the month of July, 1929, classified according to
nationality of vessels by direction of transit, and the combined,
traffic in both directions, together with the corresponding totals for
July, 1928 and 1927:

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.





No.

of

ships.


TONNAGE.


ToUs.


Tons

of
cargo.


Nationality.


Panama
Canal
net.


United

States

equivalent.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.




60
2
4
2
1
6
3

13
1
8

20

4

5

142

2


312,951

9,377

1.074

10,624

5,929

25,884

13,528

4fi,978

6,035

42,587

85,947

2,695

23,664

696,965

7,590


234,778

6,S99

1,007

8,430

5,193

17,325

10,393

33,888

5,055

38,173

65,828

1,470.

16,386

540,143

6,506


384,099

14,620

1,750

13,288

8,745

29,930

16,800

55.153

7,061

54,618

106,374

3,795

37,153

875.245

10,153


234,369

7,952

1,011

8,482

5,026

17,223

10,425

33,445

4,460

37,486

63,926

2,686

20,081

537,333

6,589


S272,444.42

8,623.75

1,249.35

10,537.50

4,268.88

20,428.15

12,991.25

42,360.00

6,318.75

44,. 559. 35

70,783.82

1,827.20

17,033.02

597,938.21

8,132.50


232,990


Chilean


5,212




637




13,902






Dutch


16,263


French


9,565




44,494




1,930


Japanese


51,693




68,527




3,011


Swedish


9,275




438,902


Yugoslav


13,575






Totals, July, 1929


273


1,291,828


991,474


1,618,784


990,494


1,119,496.15


909,976


Totals, July, 1928


272


1,269,085


965,479


1,580,367


967,284


1,103,618.21


748,160


Totals, July, 1927


280


1,323 ,-649


1,032,027


1,686,511


1,031,069


1,149,465.16


739 ,-656



10



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.



COMBINED TRAFFIC.





No.

of

ships.


TOJiNAGE.


Tolls.




Nationality.


Panama
Caual
net.


United

States

equivalent.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


of
cargo.


A +•


1

1

54

2
1
8
6

21
4
6
1

21

2

1

3

117




2,536

4.142

216,007

6,0.33

390

5,062

5,193

33,073

22,775

51,825

17,463

25,407

1,569

45,988

1,431

4,338

10,327

464,801






SI, 268. 00

5,177.50

266,406.38

7,541.25

478.10

6,327.50

6,491.25

'41,341.25

28,335.80

64,249.79

21,828.75

31,591.25

1,961.25

■ 56,308.85

1,765.25

5,422.50

12,903.75

580,682.80






4,792
270,133

7,735
411

7,033

5,929
42,845
27,948
71,199
24,828
29,579

2,159
62,679

2,653

5,415

13 , 600

597,454


6,511

352.295

10,889

647

8,354

8,745

54,219

34,143

85,070

30,503

37,645

2,876

75,128

2,547

7,073

26,674

755,978


4,172
218,275

6,233
3S4

5,130

5,026
32,514
21,721
50,632
18.604
25,018

1,892
45,823

1,431

4,373

12,909

464.957


8,160


British


350,121




7,543




539




12,540




11,303


Dutch


63,612




41,161




90,771




25,966




41,792


Mexican


1,140
93,497




1,225




7,577




35,567




895,672






Totals, July, 1929


254


1,176,452


918,360


1,499,297


919,094


1,140,086.22


1,688,186


Totals, July, 1928


237


1,049,310


806,498


1,342,537


814,540


1,005,464.98


1,543,795


Totals, July, 1927


229


1,083,306


851,111


1,385,744


853.689


1,066,050.83


1,710,812





No.

of

ships.


TONNAGE.


Tolls


Tons


Nationality.


Panama
Canal
net.


United

States

equivalent.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


of
cargo.




1

1

114

4

7

4

2

14

9

34

5

14

1

41

6

1

8

259

2




2,538

4,142

450,785

12,932

1,397
13,492
10,386
50,398
33,168
85,713
22,518
63,580

1,569
111,816

2,901

4,338

26,713

1,004,944

6,506






81,268.00

5,177.50

538,850.80

16,165.00

1,727.45

10,865.00

10,760.13

61,769.40

41,327.05

106,609.79

28,147.50

76,150.60

1,961.25

127,092.67

3,592.45

5,422.50

29,941.77

1,178,621.01

8, .132., 50






4,792

583,084

17.112

1,485

17,657

'11,858

68,729

41,476

118,177

30,863

72,166

2,159

148,626

5,348

5,415

37,324

1,294,419

7,590


6,511

736,394

25,509

2,397

21,642

17,490

84,149

50,943

140,223

37,564

92,263

2,876

181,502

6,342

7,073

63,827

1,631,223

10,153


4,172

4.52,644

14,185

1,395
13,612
10,052
49,737
32.146
84,077
23,004
62,504

1,892
109,749

4,117

4,373

32,990

1,002,290

6,589


8,160




583,111




12,755




1,176




26,442




11,303


Dutch


79,875




50,726




135,265




27,896


Japanese


93,485
1,140




: 162,024




. 4,236




7,577




44,842


United States

Yugoslav


1,334,574
13,575


Totals, July, 1929


527


■3,468,280


1,909,834


3,118,081


1,909,588


2,259,582.37


2,598,162


Totals, July, 1928


509


2,318,395


1,771,887


2,922,904


1,781.824


2,109,083.19


2,291.955


Totals, July, 1927


509


2,406,955


1,883,138


3,072,255


1,885,658


2,215,515.99


2,450,408



Establishment ol Bohio Station on Panama
Railroad.

Panama Railro.\d Company,
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 2, 1929.,

Circular 1317.

To all concerned — Effective Monday, August
5th, a new flag station will be established at
Track Span 18-3, and will be known as Bohio.
The following passenger trains will stop on flag
to discharge and receive passengers:
Southbound:

No. 1, leaving Colon 7.00 a. m., daily except
Sundays and holidays.

No. 5 leaving Colon 4.30 p. m., daily except
Sundays and holidays.



No. 103, leaving Colon 9.20 a. m., Sundays

and holidavs.
No. 105, leaving Colon 4.00 p. ni., Sundays

and holidays.
Northbound:

No. 2, leaving Panama 7.05 a. m., daily except

Sundays and holidays.
No. <i, leaving Panama 4.35 p. m., daily except

Sundays and holidays
No. 102. leaving Panama 7.0S a. m., Sundays

and holidays.
No. 106. leaving Panama 6.15 p. m., Sundays

and holidays.

E. F. Orr,
Acting Master of Transportation.

Approved :

S. W. He.\ld,

.Superintendent.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



11



Provisions Required by Ships.

The Panajna Canal Commissary Division, with facih'ties at Balboa
and Cristobal for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete
line of provisions, such as meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter,
canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco, etc., which are sold to ships
at the prices which are in effect for employees, no surcharge being
•added. Beef especially is available at low prices, hindquarters selling
at I4h cents per pound' and forequarters at 11 cents per pound.

Orders may be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival,
-or at either terminal for prompt delivery or for delivery at the other
terminal after transit. All vessels are boarded on arrival by a repre-
sentative of the Comniissary Division.



Sailings of Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

Folowing are proposed dates of sailings for the remainrler of 1929, of passenger
vessels in the New York- Cristobal service of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line,
in which the passenger ships Ancon and Cristobal are engaged, sailing alternately.



Steamer.


Leave

New York

4 P.M.


Leave

Port au Prince

P.M.


.Arrive

Cristobal

A.M.


Leave
Cristobal
3 P.M.


Leave

Port au Prince

P.M.


Arrive

New York

A.M.




August 6

Aug'jst 20 ... .
September 4 . .
September 17.

October 1

October 1.5.. . .
October 29. . . .
November 12 .
November 26 ,
December 10..
December 24..


August 11 ... .
Augi-St 25 ... .
September 9 . .
September 22 .

October 6

October 20. . . .
November 3 . .
November 17.
December 1.. .
December 15. .
December 29. .


August 14 ... .

August 28

September 12 .
September 25 .

October 9

October 23. . . .
November 6 . .
November 20 .
December 4.. .
December 18..
January 1 . . .


August 18 ... .
September 1 . .
September 16.
September 29 .
October 13...
October 27...
November 10.
November 24 .
December 8.. .
December 23. .
January 5 . . . .


August 21

September 4 . .
September 19 .

October 2

October 16... .
October SQ. . .
November 13 .
November 27.
December 11.,
December 26.
January 8 . . . .


August 26


■Cristobal


September 9
September 24


Cristobal


October 7
October 21


Cristobal


November 4
November 18


Cristobal

Ancon

Cristobal


December 2
December 16
December 31
.January 13.







Efifecti\e April 30, steamers sail on daylight saving time.

Due to discontinuance of the daylight saving time, departures after S. S. Cristcbal, Sept 17tb, will be at 4. p. m.
standard time.

Steamers sail at 4 p. m, from pier 65, North River, Foot of West 25th St., New York.



Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shipping.

All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulars of
interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are publishe.i in The Panama Canal Rex:ord. For
this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus
of such notices and circulars to those receiving The Panama Canal Record. Shipping interests
are advised to look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge.



Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal, for SI 50 per barrel of 42 gallons.

Diesel oil is sold by The Panama Canal at
Cristobal at SI. 80 per barrel.

Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. Tlie prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil, $1.25 per barrel at Balboa
and Cristobal, Diesel oil, Balboa oniy, $1.80 per
barrel.

Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
bunkers at S8.00 per ton of 2,240 pounds at Cris-
tobal, and SI 1.00 at Balboa. For ships in transit
tlirough the Canal, which are directed to take
coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The
Panama Canal, S8.00 per ton at Balboa. When
coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50



tons or more, the price is $9.00 per ton at Cris-
tobal, S12.00 at Balboa. If less tlian 50 tons is
taken from lighters, prices are SHOO dlt ton at
Cristobal and SI 4.00 per ton at Balboa with
minimum charge for 20 tons and maximum
charge not to e.-cceed that for 50 tons at S9.00
Cristobal and $12.00 Balboa. For furnishing
lump coal for galley use, or run of mine coal, in
sacks, $6.00 additional per ton; but if vessel fur-
nishes sacks S3. 00 additional per ton.

Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
tion.

For trimming on deck, between decks, or
special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
vessel, when requested, an additional charge of
90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.

Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1,500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5.500 barrels per hour, rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and sliip's facilities for handlitig.



12 THE PANAMA CAKAL RECOTOT

Merchandise Shipped to Canal Zone for Orders.

The Panama Railroad Company, a New York corporation, of whj<:^)
the stock is now owned by the United States Government, will ware-
house "for orders" at its piers and warehouses at Balboa and Cristobal'.
Canal Zone, nonperishable and nondangerous merchandise, excepting
alcoholic liquors. An illustrated pamphlet explaining in detail the
arrangement may be had upon application to the Panama Railroac?
Co., Balboa Heights, C. Z., or 24 State Street, New York City.

On general merchandise the rates are as follows:

(a) For handling cargo from ship's side to stork'ge place, the customary tnwarr>
local charge of $1 per ton.

(b) For delivery or reforwarding, customary outward local charge of SI per ton.
(Total of 20 cents per ton more than regular transfer charge.)

(c) For storage, 3 cents per ton per day, except that no charge will be made for
the first 35 days.

The Panama Railroad Company stores this cargo in four fireproof warehouses, 160
feet by 850 feet, at Cristobal, and in one of the same dimensions at Balboa.

Cargo stored for orders can be reforwarded from the Isthmus — each carrier to col-
lect its proportion of the through rate instead of the local. This means that should a
shipment move from New York to the Canal Zone, it will of course pay regular loca?
rate to Balboa or Colon, as the ca?ie may be — but should owner wish to reforward to,
say, "Guayaquil," he can do so by paying the oncarrier's proportion of the through
rate. Upon evidence that the shipment or any part of it moved beyond the Cana?
Zone, the initial carrier will refund the difference between the through and local rate.

Cargo intended for warehousing at Cristobal or Balboa should be so indicated on
the bill of lading, thus "Cristobal for orders" or "Balboa for orders." When so con-
signed it is not necessary for shippers to secure consular papers at original point of
shipment, nor to have bills of lading consulated. Cargo consigned to Canal Zone for
orders may be delivered in the Republic of Panama in which case it is necessary to
prepare an invoice on which duties can be paid. When evidence of payment of duty
is presented to the Canal Zone customs officers they will issue the necessary release
and delivery can be taken in the usual way. For those on the Canal Zone who are
allowed to import goods duty free the Panama Canal customs release is all that is
necessary. For reshipment from storage to a foreign country the shipper takes out
bill of lading, consular invoice and sobordo if necessary and cargo is forwarded as
regular outward local.

There are no special forms for use in shipping except the warehouseman's order to
release the cargo for shipment ("Authority to Deliver Cargo from Storage on Piers)".
Shipper takes out his bill of lading and consular invoice and the cargo moves as regular
outward local.

Samples of the forms used, "Negotiable Warehouse Receipt," and "Authority to



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