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BV THB

AUTHOR OF ^'ONLY A SERVANT/




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




HEART iMELODIES.



PRINTED BY

ANDREW BROWN, 42 HANOVER STKKKT,

EDINBURGH.



HEART MELODIES



OF



AN AGED PILGRIM.



BY THE



AUTHOR OF "ONLY A SERVANT."'



" Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual
songs, singing and ?naking melody in ymcr heart to the Lord.''''

Eph. v. 19.



;iE D i 11 b u r 9 b :

ANDREW STEVENSON,
1891.



35sq k



PREFACE.

"\"\ THAT the Author says in the note prefixed
to the verses entitled " The Ever Living
Saviour" {vide page 67), may be appHed to the
whole contents of this little book. He can "lay
no claim to originality either in the thought or
expression " of his verses, and would not presume
to call his simple rhymes poetry. He has but
gathered some precious pearls from the vast ocean
of God's revealed Word, in the shape of those truths
which are fitted to convey hope, comfort, and con-
solation to weary pilgrims on their journey Zion-
ward, and strung them together in a form which, it
may be, meets the apostolical injunction that we
should make melody in our hearts to the Lord.

Most of the pieces have been written after the
close of a busy business career of perhaps more
than ordinary length; the greater part of them in-
deed, during the "borrowed years" that succeed
the allotted threescore and ten ; and in those wake-
ful hours when impaired health interfered \\dth his






vi PREFACE.

enjoyment of "tired nature's sweet restorer — hahny
sleep."

At such seasons it was a calming and grateful
occupation to turn the thoughts of the unduly active
mind in the direction of the things that belong to
our everlasting peace; and he trusts his little volume
may be found useful in the case of others, as its
contents have often been in his own, in bringing a
peaceful quiet and refreshing into these oft-times
otherwise painful hours.

He regrets that he is unable to give any indica-
tion to the authorship of the lines given on page
132 — " To a Mother on the Death of her First-born
Son." They are of such a date as to make it
certain that he has not been infringing any one's
copyright; and their merit is such as cannot fail to
make them acceptable to the readers of what might
prove an otherwise disappointing volume. They
have been inserted here mainly as a specimen and
record of an unwonted feat of memory on the part
of an affectionate sister, such as he believes is
not often paralleled. B.

Bruntsfield Placi:,
Edinburgh.



CONTENTS.

PAOE

AGED pilgrim's SOLILOQUY, THE Ill

all-sufficient saviour, the, .... i5i

aspirations, 138

bairns' hymn, a, 146

bereaved, to the: a hymn of consolation, . 18

BEULAH 41

COMPASSIONATE SAVIOUR, THE I48

DEATH-BED EXPERIENCE, A, I42

DEATH ENCOUNTERED, S8

"did NOT I SEE THEE IN THE GARDEN WITH HIM?" 51

DISCIPLESHIP 64

"DO YOU LOVE GOD?" 90

EVER-LIVING SAVIOUR, THE, 67

FAINT AND WEARY, 154

FLIGHT OF TIME, THE, I18

GIFTS OF GRACE, THE, I07

god's house ON EARTH, I60

god in nature and in grace, .... 121

gospel feast, the, 45

"l have prayed for thee that thy faith fail

NOT," 33



vin



CONTENTS.



IN MEMORIAM— MARY H : ONLY A SERVANT, .

IN MEMORIAM — MARY J. NICHOL, SECRETARY OF THE

invalids' AUXILIARY TO THE EDINBURGH MEDI

CAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY,
"l WILL IN NO WISE CAST OUT,"
OLD BETTY, ....

OPENED KVE, THE, .
PARABLE, A, . . . .

PERFECT GOD AND PERFECT MAN,
POOR NELL, ....

PRAYER, A, . . . .

RELEASED, ....

REMINISCENCES,
RESPITED,

RESTORED, ....

RETROSPECTION,
REVIVED, . . . - .

.SABBATH, THE,
salvation's STORY, .
SUSTAINED, ....

TELL THE STORY FAR AND WIDE,
WILLING TO DEPART,



ICO



23
78

73
14

55
29

49

II

129

I

86

"3

5

38
89

8

26
76



RESPITED.

" Thou hast in love to my soul delivered it from the pit. . . .
For the grave cannot praise Thee, death can not celebrate
Thee. . . . The living, the living, he shall praise Thee, as I
do this day.''- — IsA. xxxviii. 17-19.

T T E has brought me back from the border land —

From the very gates of death —
Where I felt the touch of Death's clammy hand,
And the chill of his icy breath.

He has given me back to your earnest prayers,

O friends, most loved and true !
He has seen you were loath from me to part —

He has work for me still to do.

And I gladly stay, since such is His will,

For He knows what's best for me —
If He keeps me here — if He calls me hence —

It is still with Himself to be.

B



I would sit, like Mary, at His feet,
Or, like John, lean on His breast ;

I would take up my cross and follow Him,
And would seek no other rest

Than the rest that is found in working for Him-

It may be a soul to win —
A word to speak to some sorrowing one,

Or a sinner to guide to Him ;

Or it may be only to suffer awhile.

To show what His grace can do,
And that what you see of His work in me

May strengthen and comfort you.

I would never forget His love to me,
But would tell it again and again —

How He filled my soul with cloudless peace.
When my body was racked with pain ;

How I fed on His precious promises,

And was kept in perfect peace.
When I thought of my own unworthiness.

And of His abundant grace.



I scarce could claim to be counted His child,
For I knew how wayward I'd been,

And aught as His servant I'd sought to do
Had always been tainted with sin.

So I felt that only the sinner's place

Was the place to be taken by me ;
And that was enough for me, dear Lord !

For the sinner is welcomed by Thee.

As such it is that we come to Thee,
Having nought of our own to plead ;

But Thy perfect life and Thy precious blood
Are made ours by the Father's deed.

For He loved the lost with a boundless love,

When He saw them dead in sin ;
And He gave His Son to take our place.

And made us complete in Him.

And now having nought of our own to boast,

We look for our all to Thee ;
We cling to Thy cross, and we trust in Thy word.

And we find Thou hast made us free ;



Free from the love and the guilt of sin,
I">oni the law's condemning power,

From the pride of life, from the fear of death,
And from him who seeks to devour.

And so we go on in our pilgrim way,

Committing our all to Thee,
And we find Thy grace is enough for us here.

And enough for Eternity !



REVIVED.



"Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of
death, I will fear no evil : for Thou art with me ; Thy rod and
Thy staff they comfort me." — Ps. xxiii. 4.



THRUST Thee, Saviour ! yes, I'll trust Thee,

Trust Thee, though I cannot see —
Thine it is to choose my pathway —
Mine is but to follow Thee.



Let the way be bright or dreary,
Smooth or rough the path I tread,

All is well when Thou art near me.
Telling me by whom I'm led.

Though I know not what's before me,
All the way is plain to Thee,

Every turning, every winding,
Few or many as they be.



Let me but enjoy Thy presence,
Tliat will brighten all the way ;

And the morning, gilt with promise,
Will bring in the perfect day.

For I know at least the ending —
That my faith reveals to me —

Rest and peace and joy eternal.
Given and made sure by Thee.

Rest and peace and joy, what blessing !

Rest from travail, toil, and pain ;
Peace from fear and doubt and fighting.

Every foe o'ercome and slain.

And such joy, so pure and holy.
As in heaven alone could be.

That same joy, O precious Saviour !
Which is in and flows from Thee.

So I press on in my journey.
Casting on Thee all my care.

Sure Thou never wilt forsake mc.
But will still my burdens bear.



Yes, Thy grace will still support me,

Fit for glory day by day.
Till made perfect in Thine image,

Thou wilt call me hence away ;

Away from time and all its sorrow.
Sin and suffering, shame and pain ;

Away from earth and imperfection.
Heaven and all its bliss to gain.



SUSTAINED.

" Thou shall call His name Jesus : for He shall save Mis
people from their sins." — Matt. i. 21.

"Thy name is as ointment poured forth." — Cant. i. 3.

T STOOD by the bed of the dying one,

And sought to uphold her hope and faith ;
Her pilgrim race was nearly run,

And she lay there, face to face with death.

I spoke of the names of our blessed Lord,
So fitted to comfort, to cheer, and sustain.

And I thought that " Immanuel — God with.us,"
Would soothe her, lying there racked with pain.

I said that in each of His glorious names

Some trait of His wondrous grace is expressed ;

" Oh, yes," she replied, with a happy smile,
" But I like His name of 'Jesus' best."



Yes, Jesus, Thy name to the sinner is dear,
For it speaks of the ransom fully paid,

Of the stains washed out, of the sin subdued,
And the filthy one all comely made.

Of our sins it speaks and Thy righteousness,

Of the shame and the pain which Thou didst bear,

And the glorious robe, so pure and white.
Wrought out by Thee for Thine own to wear.

It tells of life to the dead in sin,

Of strength to the weak and feeble one.

Of refuge from wrath and escape from hell,
And of heaven with all its joys begun.

It tells of Satan o'erthrown and foiled,

Of Jehovah honoured and glorified.
Of mercy in copious streams outpoured.

And justice appeased and satisfied ;

Of the Father's love and the Spirit's aid,
Of all we need laid up in the Son —

The Three combined to give grace while here,
And glory at last when time is gone.



lO



Do we wonder then she rejoiced in this name,
And prized it when passing on to her rest ?

No, we feel we would rather with her say,
We, too, like His name of "Jesus" best !



II



RELEASED.

" Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. . . . And when he had said
this, he fell asleep. "—Acts vii. 59, 60.



O HE is passing away,

For her call has come
And the Master now
Is leading her home.



The road may seem rough —
'Tis the same that He trod —

And she feels it enough
That she be as her Lord.

His presence is with her,
To uphold and to cheer ;

With His arms underneath her
She has nothing to fear.



12



She is kept on the Rock,
Still trusting His word, —

For langour and pain

Soon the joy of her Lord.

Her dark night of weeping

Will ere long be o'er,
For the morning of joy

Casts its bright beams before.

The gates stand ajar
At the end of the way :

Even now she sees gleams
Of eternal day.

The angels are waiting

To usher her in, —
One more of His ransomed

From death and from sin.

Her loved ones are round her,
Her passing to cheer ;

So bright is her prospect.
They can't keep her here.



13

Oh, no, though the parting
Brings sorrow and pain,

They're cheered by the hope
Of soon meeting again.

Where the loved gone before
In expectancy stand,

To welcome her home
To Immanuel's land.

'Tis enough, righteous Father !

Let Thy will be done !
Farewell now to earth,

Heaven's bliss is begun !



14



A PARABLE.

"All these things are against me." — Gen. xlii. 36.

"We know that all things work together for good to them
that love God." — Rom. viii. 28.

" 'T'HE journey is so very long, and so weary is

the way,
Oh, when will ever we get home ? " we're often heard

to say.
" They stop at every station, thus losing so much

time;
When will we reach the terminus of this tiresome

railway line ?

" We're shut up here so cramped for room, and so

comfortless the seat.
We've got no cushions to our backs, nor warmers

for our feet,



15



These broken windows have no screens, and to make

the thing complete,
How rude and disagreeable are the passengers we

meet ! "



Alas ! how many passengers are found in every

train
Who constantly thus grumble, and do nothing but

complain ;
While if they'd only think a bit, examining their

pass,
They'd find they'd got, by their own fault, into

another class



Of carriage than they should be in, and they're

alone to blame ;
The Master came to see them off, and booked them

in His name,
He bought the tickets at the bar, all cost to them

to save,
And had they only looked they'd seen 'twas a first

class one He gave.



i6



O Christian ! does this parable no lesson bear for

thee?
Do not you in this passenger your own true i)icture

see?
Your Father has provided you all blessings for the

A\ay,
But, oh, how oft you walk by sense, and let unbelief

have sway !
Need you wonder then if comfort leaves, and your

peace is ta'en away ?

You should not go with downcast look, complaining
of your lot,

Nor harbour thoughts of discontent, as if your Lord
had not

Remembered all He undertook, when first He
rescued you

From fearful pit and miry clay. Is not His promise
true?

Be sure the work His grace began shall be accom-
plished too.

And has He not, oft in times past, such blessings
on you poured.



17



That well He merits at your hands to be for aye

adored,
As your bountiful Provider, Protector, Leader,

Guide ?
He gave His Son to save your soul, can there be

aught beside.
In earth below or heaven above, that He will not

provide ?

You must not think you will not meet some trials

by the way,
'Twont do to have the sun aye shine and keep the

clouds away ;
We need the rain, the wind, the frost, to fertilise

the ground,
Without these in their seasons due no autumn

fruit is found.

And if the Christian, too, would grow, and be at last

complete,
He seeks the footsteps of his Lord, and there he

plants his feet
In the prints the Man of Sorrows left in the painful

path He trod.
And in fellowship in suffering gets closer to his God.
c



i8



TO THE BEREAVED.

A HYMN OF CONSOLATION.

These verses have already been published and circulated as a

leaflet.

" Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus
Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort,
who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may he able
to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort
wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God." — 2 Cor. i.
3.4-

"Wherefore comfort one another with these words." —
I Thess. iv. 18.

'T^HEY are gathering fast in the home above —

The friends we have known and loved below;
We shall miss them here, but they're welcomed
there,
Then why should we grieve to let them go ?

We shall miss them here ? Nay, Memory still
Will ofttimes bring them back to our view ;



19



We'll hear them speak, and we'll speak to them,
And we'll live all our happy past anew.

We will find them again when we meet with their
friends —

And again when we kneel at the throne of grace,
We will meet them there at our Saviour's feet,

And rejoice with them at that Resting place.

They'll be here when we look on the scenes they
loved —

When we read their favourite books once more ;
And the words they spake and the things they did

Will seem more real than they did before.

We'll hear their voice in the household psalm,
When we gather together to praise the Lord,

And to drink again of the healing springs
From the rich deep well of His Holy word.

They'll go with us again to the house of God,
And we'll take sweet counsel as we go,

And our hearts will burn as we talk by the way.
And bring back the bright Sabbaths of long ago.



20



And oh, if Memory thus hallows the past,
And brings what we most loved back again !

What shall we say of what faith reveals

Of the bliss they have gained and we pant to
gain?

" Father, I will," the Saviour hath said,

"That those Thou hast given Me be with Me
here."

With Christ ! caught up by His own desire !
Oh, who would not wish to be welcomed there ?

They have left behind them their sin-stained dress ;
They have finished their course and kept the
faith,
And now, through their Saviour's righteousness,
They are freed from sin and have conquered
Death.

They have reached the abode prepared for them,
The home they had ever kept in view ;

And the joys which they find in that Resting place
They longingly wait to share with you.



21



There's no taint of sin there, and no touch of pain —
No sorrow to grieve, and no care to annoy^ —

For as all are made perfect in holiness,
So all are made perfect in love and joy.

It would baffle an angel's tongue to express
All the joy of that pure and peaceful abode ;

Who can say what it is to behold the Lord's face ?
Who can say what it is to be ever with God ?

But the Lamb Himself is the light thereof,

And all who are there His likeness bear —
With Him and with them in that Resting

PLACE !

Oh, who would not wish to be welcomed there ?

'Tis the Saviour's will that keeps us here,
Even that same will that called them home ;

So we'll patiently wait His appointed time,
And be ready to go when He bids us come.

We will take up the work which they have laid
down,
And it may be we'll reap of that they have sowed ;



22

Into their loved labours we'll enter here —

We'll rejoice with them there in the joy of their
God.

At a distance still from our Father's house,
A little longer our cross we must bear —

In a "little while" His call will come,

And they'll be among those who will

WELCOME us THERE !



These lines, with their accompanying note, were sent
by the writer to the widow of a much loved friend, on
the occasion of her husband's death. Bereavement is the
common lot of all, and what proves consolatory to one
wounded heart may prove equally so to others. They have
therefore been revised, and are now cast on the waters, with
a prayer to the God of all comfort, that He may be pleased
to use them for blessing to His afllicted ones in their dark and
cloudy day.

My Dear Mrs.



My thoughts, which have been much
with you since Monday morning, have found expression in
the accompanying lines, which I now send to you, in the hope
of their imparling to you some of that comfort wherewith I
myself have been comforted of God. May they be blessed
for this end of Him who is the God of all comfort. To Him
I commend you, and with heartfelt sympathy, I remain yours
most sincerely, J. B. B.



IN MEMORIAM

Mary J. Nichol, for many years the active and energetic
Secretary of the Invalids' Auxiliary to the Edinburgh
Medical Missionary Society, who died at Bridge of
Allan, on 6th June 1890.

" Well done, good and faithful servant: . . . enter thou
into the joy of thy Lord."— Matt. xxv. 23.

T T APPY spirit, now released

From thy suffering and thy pain ;
Welcomed home to endless bliss,
To an everlasting reign !

Weary days and sleepless nights
Were thy portion here below,

Aching limbs and palsied frame,
Feverish tossings to and fro.



'Twas the way the Master trod,
And the way He chose for thee,

That thy sufferings might be used

To show how rich His grace could he.

Dut the suffering now is ended,

And the glory has begun ;
Now thy well-fought fight is over,

And the heavenly prize is won !

He was with thee in the furnace,
Giving grace and strength to bear —

Thou art with Him now in glory.
All His promised bliss to share.

Thy bright crown, so rich with jewels
Gathered for Him here below

By thy work and witness for Him — _
How it shines upon thy brow !

For the work thine own hands fashioned,
Gladly though 'twas wrought by thee,

Was not all thy service rendered —
No, how many now there be,



25

Winningly by thee enlisted,

Willingly their part to bear
In the blessed work of mercy,

Ever to thyself so dear.

And how many a suffering sick one
Learned from thee that even they

(In their helplessness and weakness,
Thinking they could only pray)

Could do something for the Master,
Something He would reckon good,

Something which would gain His verdict-
That she had done what she could.

Some of them are home already,
Sharing with thee in His joy ;

Some have caught thy fallen mantle,
Work like thine their loved employ.

And aloft the banner waving,
On they follow as did'st thou,

Cheered still by thy bright example.
And the thought of what thou'rt now !



26



TELL THE STORY FAR AND WIDE.

" How beautiful upon the mountains arc the feet of him
that bringcth t;oo(l tidings, that publisheth peace ; that
bringeth good tidings of good, that pubhsheth salvation ; that
saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth. " — Isa. lii. 7.

'T*ELL the story far and wide,

Tell it o'er and o'er again —
Tell what mercy doth provide,
Rebel hearts like ours to gain.

Tell the story far and wide,

Tell it o'er and o'er again —
A victim to the altar led.

The Lamb of God for sinners slain.

Tell the story far and wide,
Tell it o'er and o'er again —
• Jesus Christ is crucified,

God is reconciled to men.



27



Tell the story far and wide.

Tell it o'er and o'er again —
Justice now is satisfied,

Sin atoned, and left no stain.

Tell the story far and wide.
Tell it o'er and o'er again —

Jesus Christ is glorified.

And He comes as King to reign.

Tell the story far and wide,
Tell it o'er and o'er again —

Now the gospel banquet's spread.
Costly viands, choicest wine.

Tell the story far and wide,
Tell it o'er and o'er again —

Christ's Himself the living bread,.
Giving health and life to men.

Tell the story far and wide,
Tell it o'er and o'er again —

Hear the Spirit and the Bride
Calling — Shall they call in vain ?



28



Tell the story far and wide,
Tell it o'er and o'er again —

All may come, for all are bid,
All may freely enter in.



29



POOR NELL.

" I am sought of them that asked not for Me ; I am found
of them that sought Me not."— IsA. Ixv. i.

"Jesus called them unto Him, and said, Suffer little
children to come unto Me, and forbid them not : for of such
is the kingdom of God." — Luke xviii. i6.

T^ARK lowered the wintry sky,

And the rain in torrents fell,
The biting winds were high,
When poor little ragged Nell,

While she struggled against the storm.

Chanced, as she ran, to espy
A room, oh, so bright and so warm,
. And so pleasing to the eye !



30



The fire in the well-filled grate
Sent its beams across the way,

And told of the welcome heat
It gave out on that stormy day.

And glad children went trooping in —
Nell heard their happy song —

And the teacher looked so good and kind,
As he stood 'mid the happy throng.

The contrast was so great,

Twixt the cheerful scene within,

And the cold and cheerless street —
She could not but wish to be in.

But the children, as in they passed.
Were all tidy and neat and clean,

And she was a ragged lass,

Her clothes tattered and torn and mean.

Yet she thought of the kindly look
That beamed on the teacher's face.

As he welcomed each little one in,
So she plucked up heart of grace.



31



And when next the door was opened
To let more of the children through,

She ran and she thus addressed him,
Ere he from the door withdrew —

*' Please, Sir, I'm a poor little creature.
My clothes neither tidy nor clean,
But you seem so kind, may I ask, Sir,
If the likes of me may come in ? "

The teacher had learned of the Master,
And he thought of the words He had given,
*' Let the little ones come unto Me,

For of such is the kingdom of heaven."

His heart and his eyes too were full

As he looked on poor Nell, and he smiled ;
While she joyed as she heard his reply,
" You are heartily welcome, my child."

So he took the poor wanderer in,
And near the fire gave her a place,

Where the wet garments soon became drier,
And happiness lit up her face.



32



While the little ones gather around,
Each with a sweet welcome prepared

For this other poor child who had found
The shelter that long they had shared.

There was joy at that hour, too, in heaven,
'Midst the angels and saints above,

O'er this poor little waif who had found
Her way to the Lord whom they love.



33



"I HAVE PRAYED FOR THEE, THAT THY
FAITH FAIL NOT."



"Ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus." —
Gal. iii. 26. "Justified by faith." — RoM. v. i. " Precious
faith."— 2 Pet. i. i. "Worketh by love."— Gal. v. 6.
"Purifying their hearts by faith." — Acts xv. 9. "Over-
cometh the world." — i John v. 4.

"Receiving the end of your faith, even the salvation of your
souls."— I Pet. i. 9.

' ' And what shall I more say ? for the time would fail me to
tell."— Heb. xi. 32.

A H, Peter ! — confident and vain —

Thou'rt in the tempter's toils again !
And hid from thy pride-blinded eyes


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