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I



THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




NOTES ON THE
CHURCHES OF DERBYSHIRE.



-




(LIB



NOTES



ON 1 HJ




HITFS of Dtppbpf IFF



BY



J. CHARLES COX,



Member i>l I!IL Brilif'i ArchadogUal Association, etc.



VOL. III.

THE HUNDREDS OF APPLETREE AND
REPTON AND GRESLEV.

II l.r.STRATED WITH HKLIOTVPES FROM PHOTOGRAPHS P.Y R. KEENE, AND
M'MKROUS OTHER PLATES.



" STII.I. POINTS THE TOWER AND PLEADS TIIK BEI-I..

TFI1-: SOLEMN ARCHES BREATHE IN STONK :
WINDOW AND WALL HAVE I.1PS TO TELL
THE MIGHTY FAITH OF DAYS UNKNOWN. "



CHESTERFIELD: W. EDMUNDS.

LONDON: BEMROSE AND SONS, 10. PATERNOSTER
BUILDINGS; AND DERBY.



MI irccr.. \\vii.



V,



TO
THE RIGHT REVEREND FATHER IN GOD,

CHARLES JOHN,

ONE OF THE COADJUTOR BISHOPS OF THE

DIOCESE OF LICHFIELD,
THESE PAGES ARE (BY KIND PERMISSION) DEDICATED,

AS A SMALL TOKEN
OF THE HIGH RESPECT AND ESTEEM WITH WHICH

HE IS REGARDED
BY DERBYSHIRE CHURCHMEN.



7O4783



INTRODUCTION.




|HE sources'from which the information contained in
this volume is drawn, are, for the most part, the same
as those which have been already described in detail
in the introductions to its two predecessors. It is only
necessary to remark, with respect to the Inventories of
Church Goods, temp. Edward VI., that there are none extant
of the Hundred of Appletree, with the solitary exception of
the chapel of Snelston, but that they are complete of the
Hundred of Repton and Gresk-y.

In accordance Avith valued advice, I have in this volume
made a special feature of the rectors or vicars, with their
patrons, of all the parishes herein treated, and have endeavoured
to give perfect lists from the year 1297 (when the diocesan
registers commence) down to the present time. These lists
will, in the case of rectories, be of peculiar value, if ever a
thorough manorial history of the County of Derbyshire should
be undertaken. Wherever I have found in these registers
any entries of interest, in addition to the bare record of
institution, I have given it in an abbreviated form, and have
also given occasional transcripts in full of more important
documents. For the sake of avoiding a tedious prolixity in
the notes, only occasional references have been given to the
number and folio of the registers ; but I have kept by me
my rough index of the Derbyshire entries in these registers,
and shall be very glad, on hearing privately from anyone
desirous of more closely following up the history of any par-
ticular church or churches, to furnish the precise reference
to every institution mentioned in these pages. In addition



Vlll DERBYSHIRE CHURCHES.

to the blanks in these registers between 1609-18, and 1631-62,
as mentioned in the introduction to Vol. II., there is no
Register nor Act Book of Bishops Chandler and Smallbrooke,
which leaves another blank between the years 1717 and 1750.
These blanks have, however, for the most part been filled
up from the returns of the Augmentation Office, now in the
Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, from which a large number
of the post- Reformation institutions have been supplied. Other
gaps have been supplied by reference to the parish registers
and it may here be remarked that these local records have,
in almost every instance, been carefully consulted and their
salient points noted.

Genealogists and others are well acquainted with the Par-
liamentary return of 1833, relative to the age and number
of parish register books, but it may be worth while to
mention that the original communications from the respective
clergymen, which sometimes include more ample and interest-
ing information than is supplied in the published abstract,
are preserved at the British Museum. The volume relating
to Derbyshire is numbered Add. MSS. 9,335.

Another source of minor information, of a comparatively
modern date, is the Notitia Parochialis of Lambeth Library.
These six volumes contain the answers to queries, printed by
sanction of the authorities, at the bottom of a Brief in the
year 1705, and thus circulated throughout the kingdom.
These queries emanated from a clergyman who designed to
publish The Present State of Parish Churches, a work that
was not carried out, as only 1,579 parishes filled up the
returns. It was stated that " any notices on the return of
the Brief will be taken care of and lodged with William
Hawes, bookseller, at the Golden Buck, over against St.
Dunstan's Church, in Fleet Street, for the author, a Divine
of the Church of England/'

In addition to the accounts of the old parish churches and
chapels, it will be found that these pages contain much
information not previously published, with respect to the
priories of Breadsall, Calke, Gresley, and Repton, and of the
preceptory of Yeaveley. But in none of these cases is there
any chartulary extant. Fortunately, however, chartnlsri.es of



INTRODUCTION. IX

the more important abbeys of Darley and Dale yet remain,
and these will be carefully consulted and analysed in the
fourth and concluding volume of this work. Should I find
it considered generally desirable, I hope, if space permits, to
give, in an appendix to that volume, lists of the rectors and
vicars of the parishes treated of in the previously published
pages, as well as a general index to the four volumes.

For renewed access to private MSS., I desire again to express
my hearty thanks, and also for the courtesy and help that
I have received from the authorities of the several public
libraries that I have had occasion to consult. To the Duke
of Devonshire my acknowledgments are due for most kindly
lending me the invaluable MS. Visitation of the Monasteries
of the Province of York and Diocese of Coventry and Lich-
field, temp. Henry VIII. On the baselessness of most of the
startling charges therein contained, I hope hereafter to throw
additional light. In addition to the generous assistance given
me by many of the clergy (several of whom I have more
particularly mentioned in the body of the work), I feel that
my special thanks are due to the Right Rev. Bishop Hob-
house, to Lord Scarsdale, to C. R. Colvile, Esq., to Stephen
Tucker, Esq., Rouge Croix, and to C. S. Greaves, Esq., Q.C.

Any general remarks on the history or architecture of the
churches herein treated, it will be better to reserve until
those of the whole county have been described ; and I will
content myself with remarking, in respect of the bountiful
provision of the Church of mediaeval England, that, even
within the limited area of the Hundreds of Appletree, and
of Repton and Gresley, upwards of a score of churches and
chapels, which have completely disappeared, were then open
to the worship of the faithful.

J. CHARLES COX.

, 187".



CONTENTS.



J^untrtttr of



PAGE

BAETON BLOUNT ...................................................... 5

BOYLESTON ............................................................. 15

BKADLEY ................................................................ 27

BRAILSFOKD ........................................................... 35

OSMASTON ........................................................... 46

BEEADSALL ............................................................... 58

BREADSALL PEIOEY ................................................... 67

CHUECH BEOUGHTON ................................................ 81

CUBLEY .................................................................. 91

MABSTON MONTGOMERY ................................................ 101

DALBUEY ................................................................. 107

DOVEBEIDGE ........................................................... 115

DUFFIELD ............................................................... 129

HELPER .. .................................................. .......... 142

HEAGE ................................................................... 147

TURNDITCH ...................................... ..... ................ 150

EDLASTON .................................................................. 155

ETWALL . . 161



Xll DERBYSHIRE CHURCHES.

PAGE

KEDLESTON ............................................................. 171

LONGFOED ................................................................. 185

ALKMANTON ................................. ............................ 195

MAESTON-ON-DOVE ................................................. 201

MUGGINTON ............................................................... 211

INTAKE CHAPEL ......................................................... 224

NOEBUEY .................................................................. 229

SNELSTON ............................................................... 248

EADBOUEN .................................................................. 253

SCEOPTON ................................................................. 263

SHIELEY .................................................................... 269

PEECEPTOEY OF YEAVELEY .................................... 279

SOMEESALL HERBERT ............................................. 287

SPONDON ................................................................ 293

CHADDESDEN ............................................................ 304

STANLEY .................................................................. 311

SUDBUEY .................................. ............................. 315

SUTTON-ON-THE-HILL ............................................... 327

TEUSLEY ................................................ . .................... 335



of ifcpton antr



CALEB, PEIOEY AND CHUECH ................................ 345

CHILCOTE .................................................................. 351

CROXALL ............................................... , ..................... 355

CATTON ................................ ..................................... 863

GEESLEY, PEIOEY AND CHUECH ......................... 367

HAETSHOEN . . 379



CONTENTS. Xlll

PAGE

LULLINGTON 387

COTON-IN-THE-ELMS 891

MELBOUEN 395

CHELLASTON 409

RAVENSTON 415

EEPTON, PEIOKY AND CHUECH 423

BRETBY 441

FORE-MARK AND IXGLEBY 443

MEASHAM 446

NEWTON SOLNEY 450

SMITHSBY 455

TICKENHALL 459

STANTON-BY-BEIDGE 467

s. BRIDE'S 472

STAPENHILL 475

CAX.DWELL 481

STEETTON-EN-LE-FIELDS 483

SWAEKESTON 491

AVALTON-ON-TEENT 503

ROSLESTON 514

WILLESLEY 517

ADDENDA 522

APPENDIX 525

INDEX OF PEESONS 543

INDEX OF PLACES . . 554



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

MELBOUEN CHURCH, S.E (FRONTISPIECE).

BREADSALL CHURCH, S.E 53

CHURCH BROUGHTON CHURCH, s.w 81

DoVEBRIDGE CHURCH, S.E 115

DETAILS OF DOVEBRIDGE AND CHURCH BROUGHTON 120

BELPER CHAPEL, s.w 142

ETWALL, MONUMENT OF SIR JOHN PORT 167

KEDLESTON, MONUMENTS 177

LONGFORD, MONUMENTS 192

MUGGINTON, KNIVETON BRASS 219

NORBURY CHURCH, s 229

NORBURY CHURCH, E 232

NORBURY, MONUMENTS 286

EADBOURN, FONT COVER 256

YEAVELEY AND PRECEPTORY 279

DETAILS OF SPONDON AND CHADDESDEN 298

MELBOURN CHURCH, INTERIOR 895

FONTS OF CHADDESDEN, CHURCH BROUGHTON, SOMERSALL HERBERT,

AND MELBOURN 405

EEPTON CHURCH, s.w 423

REPTON CRYPT AND DETAILS 434

DETAILS OF STANTON-BY-BRIDGE AND MEASHAM 469

WALTON CHURCH, S.E 505

PlETA FOUND IN BREADSALL CHURCH 522




of





Barton llotinl.



Parfon -SBIouni




A.ETON was one of the numerous Derbyshire manors be-
stowed upon Henry de Ferrers at the Conquest. At the
time of the Domesday Survey, it was held under de
Ferrers by one Ealph, and it is recorded that at that time it was
possessed of a priest and a church.

In the thirteenth century, the manor of Barton was held tinder
the Ferrers by the family of Bakepuze, whence it became known
as Barton-Bakepuze, to distinguish it from the numerous other
places of the same name. The land at Barton formed one of the
twenty-eight knights-fees held by Kobert de Ferrers, fifth and last
Earl of Derby, in this county, for which he was paid forty shillings
a-year by John de Bakepuze.* Robert de Ferrers, for his numerous
acts of rebellion, was eventually deprived by Henry III. of all his
estates in this county;* he died in 1278. The chief portion of these
estates was conferred upon Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, brother of
Edward I. At his death, in 1296, we find that John de Bakepuze
still held the manor of Barton on the same terms.t This inquisi-
tion specially records that Bakepuze possessed the advowson of the
church of Barton, which indeed never seems to have been separated
from the manor, except for a brief interval in the seventeenth
century; for we obtain proof of the successive lords of the manor
being patrons of the living from later inquisitions, as well as
from institutions in the episcopal registers at Lichfield.

Though we do not know for certain that this manor was held



* Testa de Nevill, ff. 18, 38. A Knight's Fee, strictly speaking, contained twelve
plough lauds, or 600 acres. Subsequently the term was often used for the rent (40s.
in this case) which was paid to the lord for the use of the fee, and this varied very
much iu amount.

t Inq. post, Mort., 25 Edw. I., No. 51.



U DERBYSHIRE CHURCHES.

by the Bakepuzes before the time of Henry III., it is very probable
that it came to them soon after the Conquest, and that Robert
cle Bakepuze, the benefactor of Abiugdon Abbey, held it under the
Ferrers within a few years of the compilation of the Domesday
Survey. The family held several estates in Derbyshire in the
thirteenth century ; thus Geoffrey de Bakepuze (a brother, we
believe, of John) held Alknionton under Robert, Earl Ferrers, and
his son Ralph under Edmund of Lancaster.* Ralph also held land
at Holbrook. The last heir male of this house was William, son
of Thomas de Bakepuze, living in 1375. He died without issue,
leaving an only sister, Helen, who became the wife of Nicholas
Longford, of Longford. All, or a greater part of, the lands of the
Bakepuze family, including the manors of Barton, Derbyshire, and
Allexton, Leicestershire, were purchased in the year 1381 by Sir
Walter Blount, son and heir of Sir Thomas Blouut, treasurer of
Normandy.f In 1385, Sir Walter Blount, who was subsequently
slain at the battle of Shrewsbury, where he was the king's standard
bearer, obtained a charter of free warren over his manors of Barton,
Alkmonton, Sapperton, and Hollington.J On the Blount s purchas-
ing the manor, its suffix was changed from Bakepuze to Blount,
as it was at Barton that Sir Walter and his descendants for
several generations had their chief seat.

Sir Walter married for his second wife Sancha de Ayala, eldest
daughter of Don Diego Gomez, of Toledo, a Spanish lady, who
came into England with Constancia, daughter of Peter, King of
Castile, and wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. A portion
of the manor of Barton Blouut was settled on her in dowry. The
arms of Blount quartering Ayala and Castile, peculiarly emblazoned,
were formerly in the windows of the old church of Barton, and
may now be noticed on the Kniveton tomb, in Mugginton Church.
By his will, dated 1401, and proved in 1403, Sir Walter ordered
his body to be buried at St. Mary's, Newark.

Walter, great grandson of Sir Walter Blouut, was an especial



* Abbrev. Placitorum 3 Edw. I. (Hillary), rot. 10 indorse. The Close Eolls also
tell us that the family of Bakepnze held lauds in Dorsetshire and Berkshire, and we
shall refer to them again as the founders of Alknionton hospital.

t Nichols' Leicestershire, vol. iii., p. 7. History of Croke Family, vol. ii., p. 173.
The first mention of Sir Walter Blount occurs in 1367, when he granted to Sir God-
frey Foljambe the manor of Hazelwood.

J Rot. Chart, 9 and 10, Ric. II., No. 23.

See the account of Mugginton Church, infra, where further particulars re-
specting Sancha de Ayala are given.

|| In some pedigrees (e.g., the Gresley Chartulary) he is made to be the grandson,
but this we believe to be an error.



HARTON BLOUNT. 7

favourite of Edward IV. He was appointed Lord High Treasurer
in 1464, and in the following year created Lord Mountjoy, with a
pension of twenty marks.* Two years later the King granted him
large estates in Devonshire, f He died on August 1st, 1474, seized
of three manors in Staffordshire, five in Leicestershire, eleven in
Devonshire, two in Hampshire, one in Worcestershire, and twenty
in Derbyshire, including Elvaston, Thurvastou, Barton Blount,
Alkmonton, Stretton-in-the- fields, Measham, Hazelwood, &c.[ By
his will he ordered that every parish church within the Hundred
of Appletree, wherein he was bred, should have a vestment after
the discretion of his executors.

William, fourth Lord Mountjoy, died in 1535. By will, dated
October 13th, of the previous year, he ordered that, if he should
die in Derbyshire or Staffordshire, he was to be buried in the
parish church of Barton (in which parish he was born), in an arch
.on the south side, near the high altar ; if in Northamptonshire, at
the college of Fothermgham ; if at Standon, within the chapel
there; and if in London, at Grey Friars, where his grandfather,
grandmother, father, Lady Alice his wife, and other of his kindred
and friends were already interred. He further ordered that he was
to have a convenient tomb, by reason that the King had called
him to the Order of the Garter. Dying in or near London, he
was buried at Christ Church, Grey Friars, in the Apostles' Chapel. ||

His son Charles, fifth Lord Mountjoy, served in 1544 in the
king's army in France, and died in 1545. Before starting on
this expedition, he made his will, by which he ordered, that, if
slain in France, the following epitaph was to be placed on his
tomb :

" Willingly have I soughte

And willingly have I founde
The fatall ende that wrought
Me liirlifr, ns dntie bounde.



*Rot. Patent, 4Edw. IV., 2nd numbers, M. 28; 5 Edw. IV., 1st numbers. M. ('>.

t Rot. Patent, 7 Edw. IV., 1st numbers, M. 1.

t Inq. post. Mort., 14 Edw. IV., No. 24.

Stowe's Survey, book iii., p. 133. His important will (Dugdale's Baronage,
vol. 1., p. 328) will be noticed at length in our account of Elvaston Church.

|| Stowe gives the names of the following members of the Blount family, inter alia,
who were interred and had monuments at Grey Friars, London now the site of the
Blue Coat hospital : Walter Blount, 1st Lord Mountjoy, 1474; Edward, his son and
heir, 1475 ; John Blount, 3rd Lord Mountjoy, 1485 ; William Blount, 4th Lord Mount-
joy, 1535 ; Alice Blount, Lady Mountjoy, sometime wife to William Browne, Mayor
of London; James Blount, b'th Lori Monntjoy: and Elizabeth Blount, wife of Sir
Robert Curzon, 1492; etc.. etc.



8 DERBYSHIRE CHURCHES.

Discharged I am of that I ought
To my countrie by honest owude ;

My soul departed Christ hathe bought;
The ende of man is grounde."*

James, sixth Lord Mountjoy, became involved in pecuniary diffi-
culties, and sold Barton and other portions of the family estate ;
John Merry, gentleman, of London, was the purchaser of the
manor and advowson of Barton Blouut.

William, grandson of the above-mentioned Charles, and seventh
Lord Mountjoy, died in 1594, and was succeeded by his brother
Charles. Charles, the last Lord Mountjoy, was created Earl of
Devonshire in 1603, in reward for his services as Lord-lieutenant
of Ireland ; he died in 1606, and, having no legitimate issue,
parted with most of the remaining estates during his lifetime.
Thurvaston, however, was left by his will to Mountjoy Blount, his
natural son, who was subsequently created Earl of Newport, a title
that became extinct in 1681.

John Merry was succeeded by his son Henry, and subsequently
by his grandson, Sir Henry Merry, who is described in the Visita-
tion of 1611, as of Barton Park.t Sir Henry was followed by a
son of the same name, and by a grandson, John. John Merry
died without issue, and his only sister and heir brought the Barton
Blouut manor and advowsou, by marriage, to the family of Simpson.
About the year 1700, Merry Simpson, the issue of this marriage,
retired to a French Monastery, and the estate was purchased of his
trustees by Sir Nathaniel Curzon. We are not able to explain
how it came to pass that the advowson of the rectory was, for a
time, disassociated from the manor, still less, how the University of
Cambridge became, for a single turn, the patron of the living; but
it reverted to the lord of the manor, either by right or repurchase,
in the second half of last century, as will be seen from the
subjoined list of rectors and patrons.

* Harl. MSS. 78, f. 18. We venture to put this curious epitaph in the text, verbatim
from the MS., though it has no immediate bearing on Barton Church; but it has so
often been printed erroneously. Stowe, Weever, and Nichols, all give different ver-
sions. Charles Blouni further stated in his will, that if he died out of the wars, then
he should be buried in the "Church moste of resorte ther aboute." He died in
London, and was buried in St. Mary's Aldermary, in Cordwainer Street. Stowe states
that he " made or glazed the east window (of this church) as appears by his arms."
The fifth Lord Mountjoy was a scholar and patron of learned men. Roth Erasmus
and Leland speak highly of his elegant style, but, as Sir Alexander Croke remarks
(History of Croke Family, vol. ii., p. 226) when commenting on this epitaph, mauy
highly polished scholars of that age wrote very ruggedly in their own language.

t Amongst the very large number of persons of all conditions who were so
heavily fined throughout Derbyshire, under the "mild" sway of Elizabeth, for
adhering to the ancient faith and declining to attend Church, we find the name of
Margaret, wife of Henry Merry, of Barton Blouut, gentleman, under the year 1594.
Exchequer Pipe Office, Recusant Roll, Eliz., No. 1.



BARTON BLOUNT. 9

From the Curzous, the estate passed by sale to the Listers, from
the Listers" to the Cromptons, arid eventually, about the beginning
of the present century, to the Bradshaws.

The following is a list of the rectors and patrons of this bem'l'uv.
taken from the Lichfield Episcopal Registers, and from the books
of the Augmentation Office.

1-299. Simon de Heighington (Eggiuton); patron, Sir John Baggepuz. He had

leave of absence from the Bishop for study adeundi scolds for which he

had to pay annually to the Bishop one mark on the feast of the nativity

of St. John the Baptist.
1307. Ralph de Bakepuiz, acolyte; patron, Sir John Bakepuiz. The Bishop,

Walter de Laugtou, dates his deed of induction from Essex, and by the

same letters admits Ralph to the order of sub-deacon.

1349. Robert de Syleston; patron, Thomas de Bakepoz. On the death of R. de B.
1375. Robert de Upton ; patron, William de Bakepuz. On the death of R. de S.
1397. John de Stanley, in first tonsure; patrons, William Wynseby, John Segge-

nans, Henry Tyttensover, clerk, and John Fitzherbert, by consent of Sir

Walter Blount, for this turn. On the death of R. de U.
. John Buchard.
1423. Roger Hayward (alias Heywood), vicar of Longford, exchanges benefices

with John Buchard, rector of Barton; patron, William Kelham, attorney

for Sir Thomas Blount.

1444. Robert Hasull ; patron, Sir Thomas Blount. On the death of Roger H.
1451. John Fyton; patron, Sir Thomas Blouut. On the resignation of Robert

Hasull, who was instituted to the rectory of Brailsford.
1457. John Pulston ; patron, John Boyvyll, trustee of the late Sir Thomas Blount.

On the resignation of J. F.
1475. Henry Gretton; patrons, John, Bishop of Exeter, William Dudley, clerk,

Richard Fowler, Henry Schotehill, William Drayton, clerk, John Cornysshe,

Thomas Powtrell, and Thomas Hunt, trustees of the late Walter Blouut,

Lord Mountjoy. On the death of J. P.
. Richard Shyrle.
1541. John Cole ; patron, George Willoughby, for Dorothy. Lady Mouiitjoy, widow.

On the death of R. S.

1571. James Hall; patron, John Merry. On the death of J. C.
1574. Richard Sprysoe ; patron, John Merry. On the resignation of J. H.

* * * *

(1650.) Emanuel Heywood.

1662, Sept. 15th. Thomas Tatham; patron, John Merry.
1689. Jchn Gretton ; patron, Merry Simpson.
1697, May 7th. John Allsop, M.A. ; patron, Merry Simpson.
1719, Sept. 5th. Charles Byrch ; patron, Edward Sudell, "pleno jure."
1744, June 7th. Robert Holden ; patron, University of Cambridge.
1762, Aug. 2nd. George Fletcher ; patron, Lord Scarsdale.
1776, Aug. 3rd. Thomas Muchall; patron, Nathaniel Lister.
1804, Dec. 10th. Josaph Bradshaw ; patron, Francis Bradshaw.

. William Thomas Beer.
1821, Sept. 4th. Gorges Paulin Lowther; patron, Francis Bradshaw.

From some unexplained cause the Church of Barton is omitted



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