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Rpigraphical Journey



Asia Minor.



J. R. Sitlington Sterrett.




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

RIVERSIDE



Ex Libris
! C. K. OGDEN



itaI institute of America.



PAPERS

OF THE

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CLASSICAL
STUDIES AT ATHENS



VOLUME



1883-1884.



Ax EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY IN ASIA MINOR.



BY J. Rf SITLINGTON STERRETT, PH.D.



INSTITUTE

OF
AMERICA.

'879




BOSTON:

DAMRELL AND UPHAM.
1888.



CN4IO



PRESS OF

J. S. GUSHING & CO.,

115 HIGH STREET,

BOSTON.



NOTE.



THE second and third volumes of the Papers of the American
School of Classical Studies at Athens have been devoted to the
publication of the results of Dr. Sterrett's two journeys in Asia
Minor, made in the summers of 1884 and 1885. The third volume,
which was published in March, 1888, contains the report of the
Wolfe Expedition, made in 1885. The present volume is devoted
to the journey of 1884.

The Committee of Publication wish it to be distinctly understood,
that for obvious reasons, which they trust will commend themselves
to all, they have undertaken no editorial supervision of these volumes,
and that Dr. Sterrett is solely responsible for all that appears in
them under his name, as regards both the substance and the
form.

WILLIAM W. GOODWIN, ) Committee of

THOMAS W. LUDLOW, ) Publication.
June, 1888.



PREFACE.



THE expenses of the journey in Asia Minor, the results of which
are contained in this volume, were borne by myself, with the excep-
tion of one hundred and fifty dollars, which were contributed by
gentlemen in Boston.

The inscriptions in whose headings no reference is made to a
previous publication are new. Those in whose headings reference
is made to some publication have been published before, but with

inaccuracies.


The square brackets [ ] mean that what is inclosed between them

was originally on the stone, but having become defaced has been
supplied by me. The round brackets ( ) mean that what is inclosed
between them was never on the stone, i.e. either that the word
was abbreviated on the stone and has been written out in full, or
else that an error of the stonecutter has been corrected by me.
The broken brackets <) mean that what is inclosed between them
is on the stone, but that it is redundant.

The following Turkish terms need explanation :



Ak, white.
Ashagha, lower.
Aghatch, a Tree.
Bash, a Head.

Bel, a Pass, generally low and broad :
see Gedik.



Bunar, a living Spring ; see Punar.
Boghaz, literally a Throat, applied

to defiles that lead up to a Pass

(Bel or Gedik).
Boyiik, large, big.
Dagh, a Mountain.



VI



PREFACE.



Dere, a Valley, broad or narrow;

applied also to Caflons.
Djami, a Mosque.
Diiden, a Place where water sinks

under the Ground ; Karaft66pa.
Eski, old.
Gedik, literally a Notch, applied to

a Pass where the mountains rise

up on both sides like a saddle ;

see Bel.
Gok, blue.
Gol, a Lake.
Hissar, a Castle.
Indje, narrow.
Irmak, a large River.
Kale, a Castle.
Kara, black.

Kassaba, a Market Town.
Kaya, a Rock.
Khan, a Caravansary.
Kieui, a Village.
Kilisse, a Church.
Kishla, Winter Quarters.
Kizil, red.
Kopril, a Bridge.
Kiitchiik, small.
Kuyu, a Well.
Medressi, a College for the Study

of Law and Divinity.



Mesdjid, a small parish Mosque.

Monastir, a Christian Convent.

Or en, Ruins.

Orta, middle.

Ova, a Plain.

Pnnar, a Variation of Bunar.

Sari, yellow.

ShcJiir, a Town.

Sivri, pointed, peaked ; applied to

sharp, abrupt mountain Peaks.
Su, literally Water ; applied also to

large Rivers.
Task, a Stone.
Tchai, a small River.
Tcheshme, an artificial Fountain;

see Bunar.

Tekke, a Mohammedan Convent.
Tepe, a Hill.
Toprak, Field, Soil.
Tnrbe, a Mausoleum or Chapel built

over a Tomb.
Ulu, large.
Uzun, long.

Veran or Viran, Ruins, ancient Site.
Yaila, Summer Quarters.
Yaziilii, inscribed.
Yeni or Yeni, new.
Yer, Earth, Dirt.
Yokara, upper.



I desire to tender again to Professor Heinrich Kiepert, of the
University of Berlin, my most hearty thanks for the cartographical
construction of my routes from observations and measurements made
by me in the field.

The first part of my road-notes were turned over to Professor
W. M. Ramsay, according to our agreement, by which the geo-
graphical results of that part of the journey during which we worked
together were to belong to him, and the epigraphical results to me.
Accordingly, my routes begin at Isparta, the point where I ceased
to give my road-notes to Mr. Ramsay.



PREFACE. Vll

The routes made on the journey from Isparta to Ak Serai are
laid down on the large map which accompanies the Wolfe Expedition
to Asia Minor. The routes made on the journey from Ak Serai to
the Euphrates, and from the Euphrates to Angora, are given in the
two maps which accompany the present volume.

In editing this volume I have had suggestions from W. M. Ram-
say, F. D. Allen, Th. Mommsen, B. Pick, and my lamented friend,

J. McKeen Lewis.

J. R. SITLINGTON STERRETT.

June, 1888.



AN



EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



IN ASIA MINOR,



DURING THE SUMMER OF 1884.



J. R. SITLINGTON STERRETT.



AN



EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY IN ASIA MINOR.



IN the fall of 1883 I was in Smyrna, having just returned from my
summer's work with W. M. Ramsay, Esq., in Phrygia. I was making
preparations to return to the interior on a journey of my own, when
I received a telegram from Professor L. R. Packard, then Director
of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, requesting me
to come to Athens immediately in order to assist him in the School.
I went to Athens at his call, but with the determination to indemnify
myself for the journey I had to abandon by undertaking a more
extended tour at my own expense during the summer of 1884.
Fortunately I was able to carry out my plans, and this present volume
embodies the results of that journey. Mr. Ramsay had also made
arrangements for spending this summer of 1884 in archaeological
research in Asia Minor, and it seemed expedient for us to work in
concert as long as the general plan of our journeys would allow, for
thus a greater extent of country could be explored systematically.

In pursuance then of our agreement we met in Smyrna on May
1 5th, 1884, where I provided myself with the necessary travelling
outfit. I then went to Aidin Giuzel Hissar, the ancient Tralleis, to
buy horses and make other final arrangements.

Mr. Ramsay, who was to be accompanied by A. H. Smith, Esq.,
of Cambridge, England, was detained in Smyrna, and in the mean-
time I undertook an excursion in the direction of Nazli, during which
I copied the first four inscriptions.



4 AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY

No. 1.

Kiosk. On a round pedestal in a caf/. It is broken at the top
and bottom, there being some faint traces of a line at the
bottom but none at the top. The Alpha bars vary as
indicated. 1



10



2ANAPON02EIAAN

NEIKOMHAEABIOAO l~oN

ASIONEIKHNAIATETHN

TOYEPrOYYTTEPOXHNKAl

TOK03MIONTOYH00YNEI

KHSANTAAEENASIAATQNA3

nTENAYKIAAEKAITTAM4>YAlA

Ffi^BOYAEYTHNAEANTIOXe

QNKAIHPAKAEQTQNTEPOY

SIA^THNAEMEIAICI^N




Sta re
TOV epyov vTrepo^yv /cat

6 TO KOO-p-lOV TOV r)00VS, Vl-

KTjcTavTa Se eV 'Acrta
117', ev AVKLOL Se /cat



i Ligatures occur: line 2, MH ; line 3, HN bis; 4, HNK; 5, NE ; 8, HN. In
line 2 the between f and N is small, as is also line 10 the Q between I and N.
In line 10 there was probably a horizontal bar connecting I and L ; in other
words, the two letters were HC in ligature, but this is conjecture, as I failed to see
such a connecting bar, and my copy has 1C as given above.



10



IN ASIA MINOR.

KS', flovXevTrjv Be '

o)v Kal 'Hpa/cXeamSi', yepov-

criao'Trjv Se



This inscription is a replica of one found in 1866 in the theatre of
Tralleis, and published by Waddington from a copy of Salvetti. The
first two lines have been restored from the inscription of Tralleis
[Le Bas-Waddington, Voyage Archeologique, 1652^].



No. 2.

Kiosk. On a large round pedestal in the cemetery. A large
segment has been broken out of tJic pedestal, and with it
has disappeared the left side of the inscription. Cf. Le Bas-
Waddington, Voyage Archeologique, 600 a. C.I.G. 2942 a 7 . 1



E P fl N A K A AHA I N

EBA^TO-NrEP'MANIKON

OKPATOPA6EON



W m 0~ OK AIS APEQNKAOIEPflSE

E TT I A N Y TT A T Y
P I Y TT A A^pO Y :? I A Y A ,= Y A I A N Y

ETTI M EAHOENTO^
BEPIOYKAAYAIOYIEPOKAEOY^
WMMfi YPEINAIEPOKAEOY$*IAOKAI^AP05
IATNOY YIOYTTOAEO^



[Katcrapa]



1 In line 7 end, AIANOY is certain. In line 10, TTOAEOZ is certain, not
TTOAEiil.



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



s] o Kaia-apecov
eVt avSvirarov



[T]i/3e/nov KXauStov, '
[vtou], KvpetVa, 'lepo/cXeou? <J>tXoK-atcra/3O5
10 [2]ayi/ov ?, vtov TroXe(w)?.

Mr. Waddington places this inscription in the last years of Nero's
reign, about 54 A.D. ; cf. his commentary in Voyage Archeologique,
600 a,

No. 3.

Kavakavak, near Kiosk. Quadrangular stone built into the
wall of a well, with the inscription tip. Cf. Le B as -Wad-
dington, Voyage Archeologique, 1652 /.

TT-AIAIONAAKITTA/y %ff
TONETTITOYKOTTf?N C^f^
AYTOKPATOPO^AAPIAN



6 'TT-A I A I05TTAOYTA TOPOY

YI05 EPMOA??P05
A P E T H $ E A I T

E I :> T H N T NO



II. AtXtov



TOI/



TOV



Kaurapos
5 II. AtXto?,



dperfjs e[vKa\ /cat TTjts]
et? r^f [TrdXtv ev]i>ot[as].



IN ASIA MINOR.



The reading ofline i is certain. Mr. Waddington (loc. cit.) con-
jectures AAKIBIAAHN, and identifies him with the person men-
tioned C.I.G. 2947, 2948. The name 'AAKiTroAijs is certainly strange,
but still not more so than many others that occur on Asiatic soil.

No. 4.

At a fountain by the roadside one hour west of Kiosk. It is
a long rectangular stone, with a fragmentary inscription in
two columns. The left end of the stone is broken away,
and with it the commencement of the lines of the inscription
forming Column I. The letters of this inscription are larger
t/ian those of its mate in Column II., which has been mucli
worn away by the action of water, Cf. Le Bas-Wadding-
ton, Voyage Archeologique, 1652 ; My Preliminary Re-

port, /. 4.

COLUMN I.

^STOYENTHIEPAKQ i ..... , ,T

^KENAEIQMAAIOYEAE
SIONIEPA:EKOMHSKATOI*



APYMENATQATTOAAfiN I
STASTOY0EOYQEPATTEIAI::.
^25ATTAPXHSEIXEN ETQAE
^TT OTQNTTPOEMOYBASI
pv|Z EINTEKAITATQN0E

T H N
COLUMN II.

TEKAin'SETIMHGHAIATA J|||
THNTTATPIONB A^A E I A N K A
TOSTETAYTT
SKHTTTPONEXOYCHIKvl^



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY
COLUMN I.



05 TOV a> r)

[e]So>/ci/ dta>/xa Bi ov e'Xe-
d<f>rJK rows Tr\r)]criov 'le/aas Kleujjarys /carot-
[/coiWas /cat raj tSpv^te^a r&5 '
....... [etjg ras rov 0eov



? an
[d]7ro TO>V Trpo e/zov

av^ett' re /cat ra raiv



COLUMN II.

re /cat a>5 en/x^^ Sta

r^f irdrpiov ^SacrtXetav /c[at

705 re TO- v7ror[eray)LteVa]



] 9



This inscription is a fragment of a letter of one of the later kings,
possibly Antiochus the Great, in regard to the people of Hiera Kome
and the sanctuary of Apollo.

At Kuyudjak I met Messrs. Ramsay and Smith. From this point
our final start was made, going by way of Antiochia to Aphrodisias,
the modern Geira.

Antiochia has disappeared entirely, it seems, and from the villages
of this region we collected only a few insignificant inscriptions.



IN ASIA MINOR. 9

No. 5.

Ali Aglia TcJiiftlik. On a square marble basis. Circular
anatlicnia with a hole in the centre. Copied by W. M.
Ramsay. 1

llllfliilliP N [blank space]

N K P A T I N
5 HP AMENOYTH5-



10



A Y T Y [blank]

YTQNTTA- TPIQN
ITOYKYPIOY

OK P A T P 5



5 [irpovor)]o'aiJLi>ov rfjs
[dfcurrlacrea) 1 ? rov a
[avro?] Zanrifuyv row
avrov,
v rait'

10 [^eaiv /ca]t roO Kvplov
[av]TOKpa.Topo<;.



1 The lower lines are 10^ inches long; the lost space is 5% inches. In line i,
HN are in ligature.



10 AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY

No. 6.

Ali Agha Tchiftlik. In a cemetery on a hill near a Tnrbc,
about fifteen minutes east of tlie village.



TOMNHMEION TO

ATTOAAQNIOYTOY ['AjTroXXwvtov TOV

ATTOAAQN IOY ['A]7roA\a>iov.
Z H Z0.

No. 7.

Ali Aghi TcJdftlik. Broken at botJi ends ; letters six:
inches high. Copied by W. M. Ramsay^

M * Vf * I A I N 0!

NO. a

Yenidje. Large block broken at both ends, now serving as-
a mouth-piece to a well.



E P I TT



A large number of inscriptions from Gei'ra (Aphrodisias) have
been published already, and consequently we could not hope for
great epigraphical gain unless we should spend a number of days
among the ruins, in order to sift the new from the old, the unknown
from the known inscriptions. But time pressed, and we reluctantly
abandoned the plan of investigating the site carefully. Still our visit
was not wholly without fruit.

1 NT are in ligature.



IN ASIA MINOR.



0)



^ o

~5 o



*1

^ ''S.

<5>
i/~t ~4

tN. ^

d v

^3 "^

S ^

si vj
"^ =S



S o



I

I



VT "^

<^0 >2

O* TN,

1

JO ^i



1-S



s



o
h-

o
<
o

UJ

o

<

\-

>-

LJ

<3

X

^:

LU



O
CL
O

w

z

X

w



O

h



^ '-S




12 AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



i

o <.

* 1 *

s~> <a. o

S- "* ^

~ ^ ^ ' -0-

jh 'H l-all

-. ? VS a *= ? b -e-

'



* * -

- ' 2rJ I * SK- 3- -

ti o b ^ 2 <3 x s ? S o
u co O QL ? C H v g .ft

ill "i " H- N i^-

*i ij:g.i F ^ci^

^ i






60






o QQ. ti o

P. J" 'vu h S



>

"



IN ASIA MINOR. 13



No. 1O.

Gc'ira. Inscription on a large stone, circa 6 X 4^ feet.
Letters ornamentally cut, \y% inches in height. Copied by
A. H. Smith.

ORQMOSKAIHETTIKEIM
YTTOTIBEPIOYIOYAIOY
IOAIANOY X EISHN30P
PIANOS KAIOYATTIA- K
5 AYTOYETEP03AEOY
AYTHN ^EANAETISETT
TQNENKHAEYO
TQNAIATETATME



[. . . . /cat] 6 [/8]aj/ao? /cat 17 eTrt/cet/xteVij aura) cropo?]

[Kareo-KevdcrOrjcrav ?] UTTO Tt^Sepiov IouAtoi>[ ...... ]

[ ...... ] 'lovXiavov, et? ^v o~op[o^ K^S

[auro? /cat OvaXeJ^tap'o? Kat OvXiria /c[at ov?



[~s\9 x e 5 < X91 ^v $x >f^ N

Lata-05 /cat ?) oeu/a T) ywi^'J avrov, ere/aog oe ouLoet?

V->- 5> / "I

eget egoucrtai/j

r/)/| ^*\\ >1 > v >N S' >f O "f ~\

levuatyai TWO. aXXov cts] avrrjv eaj/ oe rts eTrletcrpia^TatJ
[ ........... ]ra>^ e^/cSevt^Jt .......... ]



From Gei'ra Messrs. Ramsay and Smith went around Baba Dagh
to the north, by way of Denizli, and I to the south. On this excur-
sion these gentlemen copied the following two inscriptions.



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY




No. 11.

*

In a wall. Copied by W. M. Ramsay.

P A S

Y T Y A^
Q T A T
WMtMfi E T Y A

I TT T H N

WMMtfi- I N I A N r-
P N I Y



TOV . .



8-



[ta



No. 12.

Hadji Eyuplu, half an hour from Denizli. Copied by
W. M. Ramsay.

The inscription is on a stele with a gable, in which is represented
the sun ; below the gable is inscription A. Below this is an arched
niche, in which are represented two human figures. On the arch is
inscription B.



IN ASIA MINOR. 15

A.

ZQ^AAIMOAOSQOXQPOS
OKIAAPAZEQNMNIA3XAPIN



EATTI3TTAPOAITAISXEPIN

A.

MoXocrw 6
a^ecof p,via<;

"' The country of the Kilarazeis to Zosas Molosos, by way of
remembrance."

B.
'EA.7U?



" Elpis greets the passers-by."

The name Zwo-Ss occurs C.I.G. 3665, but neither is this form or
the form Swcras, arcs common in Greek onomatology (see Revue
Archeologique, 1878, XXXVI. p. 318, and Letronne, Inscriptions
Grecques et Romaines de FEgypte, II. p. 457.

Possibly the Z(Tc>^AAI of our inscription maybe a mistake for
ZQ^ATI or Z67)^AAH. The form SwcraSTys occurs in an inscription
of Athens in 4>tAto-Tw/D III. p. 568. 9

May 29. Gei'ra to Makuf, 4 h. 40 m. The plateau upon which
Aphrodisias was situated contracts gradually as one advances, until it
strikes the foot of a spur of Baba Dagh immediately beyond Besh
Kavaklar. We cross this spur of Baba Dagh, and in 2 h. 15 m. from
Besh Kavaklar we reach its foot in the Davas Ova. Traversing the
plain we reach Kara Hissar in 35 m.

1 In line 3, XEPIN stands for XAIPEIN.



i6



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



No. 13.

Kara Hissar. Block now used as a mouth-piece to a well
near t/tc village. Length, i.io m. ; width, 0.90 m. ; height
of letters, 0.06 w.

T N



w/, mmmmmmm.
:<ONAPX.IEPEAMEri5T

Y S I A 3 T 121HP~ ^K P A T P

A n.v~%

N OY:>




[TO -?



Lvi ?/c]ov ap^iepea /LieyurrCop]
e^olfcrta? TO [
TO ', Tra[repa
...... avovcra

.... [c/c] Sta^r^^t? TtVov?]

. . . . ov -yei/o/x[eVov] ap^idr^pov /cat]

[o-T<f>ainr)<f>6pov] TOV Kvpiov



Concerning the dpX' aT P os > see Marquardt, Privatleben, II. p. 75 5 r
No. 4; Le Bas -Waddington, Voyage Archeologique, 1695; C.I.G.
3953 h ; Bulletin de Correspondence Hellenique, 1883, p. 360, 1885,.
P- 337> No. 20.

The office of <TTe<f>avr)(f>6po<; is connected with that of the apxiarpo^
in an inscription of Heraclea given in Bulletin de Correspondance Hel-
lenique, 1885, p. 337, No. 20, so that it must probably be restored here.

Travelling east from Kara Hissar we reach Makuf, the site of the
ancient Heraclea (see Le Bas-Waddington, Voyage Archeologique, 1695,.
and Bulletin de Correspondance Hcllenique, 1885, p. 330), in 22 m.

The Stadion at Heraclea is still very distinct. The Acropolis is
a low hill of great extent on top. The walls of the Acropolis are



IN ASIA MINOR. I/

easily followed around the whole circuit. In some places they are
level with the ground, while in others they are still erect. The walls
have been destroyed and then rebuilt, as is clear from the archi-
tectural fragments, and even inscribed stones which are built into the
present wall. But that the foundations of the wall date from a com-
paratively early period is shown by the fact that on the outside the
wall is provided with finely executed stone shoots at the bottom to
carry the water off. Still, it must be noted that, at a place where the
wall is now used as a quarry by the villagers of Makuf, I discovered
an honorary inscription (No. 15) in the very foundation. The walls
were evidently rebuilt in time of great and pressing need, when the
anxious citizens made use of anything in the shape of stone that came
in. their way.

No. 14.

Makuf \^Hcraclea~\. Near the Acropolis walls and close to the
Stadion. The stone is unpolished and very roughly hewn.
See my Preliminary Report, pp. 4, 5. Shortly after its
appearance in the Preliminary Report the inscription was
also published in the Bulletin de Corresponclance Hellenique,
1885, /. 332. / had to copy the inscription in a rain and
could not read the last lines given by the French gentlemen,
who saw the stone tinder -more propitious circumstances. It
is 0.41 m. in height ; 0.50 in. in width.

HGHKHHrOPACGHYTTOTITOYCTATIAI

M H T 1 X O Y 6 N H T 6 6 H C 6 T 6 A Y T C K A I H r Y N i^

AYTOYAYPHAIAMGAITIN H A I N YC I OY K^^
ONANAYTOITTePIONTeceOYAHGUUCINeTG



fjeNOAYAITINATTOTICeiTUUKYPIAKUJ
|:>ICKUJ*<t>KAITHBOYAHTHHPAKAeUJ
TUUN*4>KeOYAe NHT TONOeMTACO



10



1 8 AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



'H 0Y)Kr) r)yopd<T07) vno TtYov S

M^rto^ou, eV f) Te#i7'creT( = ai) avro? /cat 17

avrov A.vpr)\ia MeXtrti^ Aioz/ucriou /c[ai]

oi^ av avrot Tre/otdt'Te? j3ov\.r)0a)crLi> er[e]-

pa> 8e ovSet't e^ecrrat e^^ai//e( = at) nvd' C[TTI]

[6] vOd^a.(<i) TLV(CL) aTrortVet rw Kupta/cw

oj (Srjvdpia Tre^ra/cdcrta) /cat TiJ (3ov\fj rfj



Tre^ra/cdcrta), /ce ovSev YJTTOV 6 e
rre( = at) r^9 fmyptuffis rav]-
10 [TTJS aTrXjovf avriypd^ov a,77e[re-
et? ra dp^eta, [erou?] ....
et/crov,



Line 3. The Bulletin reads AYPHAIAI instead of AYPHAIA.

Lines. The Bulletin reads GNTA^G for CNGA^C; and in
line 6, GNTA^AC instead of GNOA^AC. On the contrary, the
reading of the Biilletin at the end of line 5, 6TTG is certainly more
accurate than my GITC.

No. 15.

Makuf. Quadrangular cippus in the wall of the Acropolis.
Long, i.^om.; wide, 0.45 m.

ITEIMHCANIEP^ N-^A M e



NOOETINEKT^NK A'ff
AEI4>0ENT^NTHTTOAEI
YTTOATTOAA^N IOYTOY
TYAE^CTOYANAPO ^j
10 T H C K A A A I E T A 5 A T C%
OATTOA Af? N IOC TH WETTI



IN ASIA MINOR. 19



MEAIANTHCANACTACe
^CTTOIHCAMEN^NSKY
MNOYKAIATTOAAO
15 4>ANOYCT^NAAPAC
TOYCKYMNOYArQ,
NOQET^NTHCH P^^
TAETHPIAOC

['H fi]ov\r) /cat [6 SrJ/nos
ejret/r^crav e !e/3w[^tS]a Me-

/c[at]
KOI y[v\-



IK rwv /ca[ra]-

\.L<f>6eVT(t)V TV) TToXet
V7TO 'ATToXXdJ^tOV TOU

TvSeaj? roG ai/Syoot? ov]-

* /)* * ^ '^rri

10 TT;?, Kac7 a oiera^aTLoj

6 'A7roXXajwo9 ' rrjv eVt-
cuxxoracre-



/cat 'ATroXXo-
15 <f>dvov<;
rov

(6^80179)



Two similar inscriptions from Makuf have been published in the
Bulletin de Correspondence Hellenique, 1885, pp. 338-339, one of
which is in honor of Hieronis, and the other in honor of Apollonios
himself.

Concerning the conferring of honors, such as those mentioned in
this inscription, upon women, see C.I.G. 3415, 3953 c an d d; Cur-
tius, Beitrage zur Geschichte und Topographic Kleinasiens, p. 62 ;
Bulletin de Correspondance Hellenique, 1885, p. 339 ; Journal of
Philology, XL p. 143.



2O



AX EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



No. 16.

Maknf. Cippiis lying by the side of Hie Acropolis walls,
Length, 1.27 m. ; width, 0.33 m.

S E T I M H S A N
Y<t>QNOSYION H PQA
^ANTAAIOAOYTOY

{ T A S H

AINYKTO^TTPQ
T E T H N I A I
TQ N TT I



A T P I A A E Y



10



16




X E 3 I N K A I
AGE^INTOY
ATP03IEPEIA3



['H /3ovA7) /cat 6

ji/o5 vtoi^

8t' oXov rov

[erov?

5 ........... Kttt t'VKTO?

\ 5 /
............ re TT\V tot-

Ilto-
ev-

. . . Jcr^ecrtf /cat
10 ............ yu]yotraorta/o^ta5

rou



iTWiV



Tart-
j 'ArrdXov] ^[v]yarp6?, tepetag



15 77^069



erov?



IN ASIA MINOR.



21



In line 15, the units come first, as is the case in Nos. 19 and 26.

If the era used be that of Sulla, then the inscription dates from
the year 74 A.D. ; if the era be that of Cibyra, then the date is
183 A.D.

No. 17.

Makuf. By the side of the walls. Greatest heiglrt, 0.50 m.;
width, 0.47 m. Cf. Bulletin de Correspondance Hellenique,

1885, /. 337-

MIAOYMEN/I

YTAN1NKA.f3T-9
* O P N K A I A P X t A

5 .^NKAIEYSXHMONES

lAT^NATTOTTPOrON^NBOY

KAIAEITOYPTIA^EK
KOTATHTTATPIAIK
10 AANTTPOTATONT
MOTATONOY^A
TT A T P I
b A 5 T




[ov



[T]-
M.v[dv]-

at crr[e]-
[(f>avri<j)]6pov KOL ap^ia-
[rpov, e^]a rwv tvyevecr-
5 [rarjw^ /cat evar\r)iJ.oi>a -
[r]ara)v 0,770 Trpoyovaiv ftov-
\VT(t>v, Tracra? ap^a? r[e]
KCU Xetrovpyta? e/crtereXe-] ?

/ * /o r\>\

/cora T7y rrarpioi /ca[t eTTt ro
10 XavrrpOTdTOv (/c)a[t TToXvSaTr
(f)oraro^ 0vcra[vTa, rot?]

^[eot? /cat rot? e]-



\io

oj



22



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



^









s

^ s
<r> .



cy
Er



\

x









o




Ci)




f=











>-


^


x




o


o


O


-e-




3


o


<t


H




x


Q-


1-


^




^


o


<


1






L_




O o




1-


3;


CL






O


X


>


CD *"




O


^


"*


<; >




>_


-j-


Q-


, <




o





<C


<; CD




1-


X


2


K 1-




Ci)



/



g g

- &

L/

-



Jp

3



\



X




IN ASIA MINOR.



23



6[s] 8' O[KOV
/cat Sia 7775



A.

[K\.V]TOV eviropov ovr[o? 6 r]w/8
17 TKva) (jiLya /cat [o"wo]/zewa>,
"^atpe" Xe'yet



"Eroix;
'H



', fjir)(vos) Aoiou S'.
-QyopdcrBrj VTTO
A.vp(r)\LOv) 'ArraXov



Tara, ets
re avrd?.



If the era be that of Sulla, then the inscription dates from the
year 225 A.D. ; if the era be that of Cibyra, then the inscription dates
from 334 A.D. The former is most probably the true date.

In A, line 4, M I f A is the adverb with.



No. 19.

Maknf. In tJie i^all of the Acropolis; the stone is very
rough and luas never polished. Bulletin de Correspond-
ance Hellenique, 1885, /. 340.

////s///'////'//// i N r n P A r o \\' / /7/ / /?/w/ "> A v p A i^ p y wf

W%wffiwj//fa/%'/ ' " I U r A \j f "w////vXW///. -'"'"Ml r i i I

WYvMy ~ f^y/// A I O Kl V r* I O V

N H C H^N T I NAUUNHCATOYTTOMAYPTTOCI
AITTTTOYeNHeNTA4>HCAITeHArPITT
TT I N A'K 6 O N A N IT 6 P I O Y C&iB O Y A H e H



[ C H



TTti/a /ce



rj-yopdcrdr) [vrro] Au/aC^Xta?) ' A[y\p[nnri-]
rjVTiva ? aiv^craro VTTO M. Avp. no<rt-
T) eVra^cratre 17 'Ayptvr-
at' 7re/3tov(r[a] j3ov\r)6[rj].



AN EPIGRAPHICAL JOURNEY



Between lines i and 2 the real names of the woman and her
father have been inserted as an afterthought. The name of the
woman may be 'EA^Vrj, McXirtv^, McXnVi/, or MeAmov, all of which
are common. The reading of the inscription is certain.

No. 20.

Makuf. Fragment in the wall near the Stadion.




A 4> H NAieTTIATTO



\T\



QV



'ATTO-



No. 21.

Makuf. Unpolished stone serving as a post to a gateway.


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Online LibraryJ. R. Sitlington (John Robert Sitlington) SterrettAn epigraphical journey in Asia Minor [during the summer of 1884] → online text (page 1 of 14)