James Clark.

Historical record and regimental memoir of the Royal Scots fusiliers, formerly known as the 21st Royal North British fusiliers. Containing an account of the formation of the regiment in 1678 and its subsequent services until June 1885 online

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Online LibraryJames ClarkHistorical record and regimental memoir of the Royal Scots fusiliers, formerly known as the 21st Royal North British fusiliers. Containing an account of the formation of the regiment in 1678 and its subsequent services until June 1885 → online text (page 9 of 16)
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received for the battalion to proceed to Secunderabad to
relieve its first battalion, proceeding to England ; thus com-
pleting a tour of home duty, and taking part in three
campaigns in South Africa ; relieved its first battalion,,
which, ten years before, had relieved it in the same pre-
sidency.

The second battalion, while stationed at Secunderabad,
in honourable imitation of the first battalion, established a
regimental newspaper, called the Fusee, which not only
relieved the monotonous life induced by an Indian climate,
but stimulated the educated portion of the battalion to
amateur literary exertions.

1884. After being stationed nearly three years at
Secunderabad, the battalion was removed at the latter end
of this year to Burmah, where it remains at the present
date June 1885.




Hppenbiy.



HppenMy IRo, L



SUCCESSION OF COLONELS

OF

ftvvent^ifirst "Regiment of 3foot t

OR

THE ROYAL NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS,
NOW

THE ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS.



CHARLES, (FIFTH) EARL OF MAR.

Appointed 2jd September 1678.

CHARLES, LORD ERSKINE, succeeded to the title of EARL
OF MAR in 1668, on the decease of his father, John, fourth
Earl of Mar ; and in September 1678 he raised a regiment
of foot, now the TWENTY-FIRST, or the ROYAL NORTH
BRITISH FUSILIERS. He was a member of the Privy
Council of Scotland, in the reign of King Charles II., and
also of King James II. In 1686, he was succeeded in the
command of his regiment by Colonel Buchan.

The Earl of Mar disapproved of the measures of King
James II., and was about to embark for the Continent, in
November 1688, when the Prince of Orange landed in
England. He appeared at the Convention of the Estates
assembled by the Prince of Orange ; but joining the dis-
affected party, he was arrested. He died on the 23d of
April 1689, and was succeeded in the title by his son John,



92 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.



sixth Earl of Mar, whose estates were forfeited in conse-
quence of his having erected the standard of rebellion in
Scotland, in 1715, in favour of the Pretender, as narrated
at p. 14 of the Historical Record of the TWENTY-FIRST,
ROYAL NORTH BRITISH, FUSILIERS.



THOMAS BUCHAN.

Appointed 2qth July 1686.

Thomas Buchan was an officer in the Scots army, in the
time of King Charles II., and rose to the rank of lieutenant-
colonel in the Royal Regiment of Scots Horse, which was
disbanded in 1689. King James II. promoted him to the
colonelcy of the TWENTY-FIRST regiment ; and he adhered
to the interests of the Stuart family at the Revolution in
1688. He served in Ireland under King James, and was
detached with a few men to Scotland, to support the High-
land clans in their resistance to the Government of King
William III. The clans were, however, not successful in
their enterprises, and they submitted to the authority of
King William ; when Colonel Buchan retired to France.



FRANCIS FERGUS O'FARRELL.

Appointed ist March 1689.

This officer was a decided advocate for the principles
of the Revolution of 1688, and King William nominated
him to the colonelcy of the SCOTS FUSILIERS, which corps
he commanded in the Netherlands, under Prince Waldeck,
and afterwards under the British monarch, who promoted
him to the rank of brigadier-general. He served at the
head of a brigade of infantry during the campaign of 1694,
and was appointed governor of Deinse. He commanded
the garrison of Deinse when that place was besieged, in
July 1695 ; and was dismissed the service, by sentence of
a general court-martial, for surrendering without firing a
shot.



Succession of Colonels. 93

ROBERT MAC KAY.

Appointed ijth November 1695.

Robert Mackay, third son of John, Lord Reay, was an
officer in the Scots Brigade in the Dutch service, and
accompanied the Prince of Orange to England in 1688.
He was promoted captain of the grenadier company in
Major-General Hugh Mackay's regiment, and served in
Scotland in 1689. He distinguished himself at the battle
of Killicrankie, where he received several wounds, and was
left for dead on the field of battle. He, however, showed
some signs of life, and was removed to a cottage by the
enemy, and eventually recovered. He was soon afterwards
promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and King
William gave him the colonelcy of a newly raised Scots
regiment (afterwards disbanded), from which he was re-
moved, in 1695, to the TWENTY-FIRST FUSILIERS. His
constitution had become debilitated by severe service and
numerous wounds, and he died at Tongue, the seat of his
family, in December 1696.



ARCHIBALD Row.

Appointed 1st January 1697.

This officer entered the army in the reign of King
James II., and at the Revolution in 1688 he joined the
Prince of Orange, who promoted him to the lieutenant-
colonelcy of the Sixteenth regiment, with which corps he
served in the Netherlands, and acquired the reputation of
a brave and skilful officer. He served at the battles of
Steenkirk and Landen, and at the siege of Namur ; and
was rewarded, in 1697, with the colonelcy of the TWENTY-
FIRST FUSILIERS. He served under the great Duke of
Marlborough in 1703, and in 1704 he commanded a bri-
gade at the battles of Schellenberg and Blenheim. On
the last-mentioned occasion his brigade led the attack on
the village of Blenheim, and he headed his own regiment



94 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.



with distinguished gallantry, advancing up to the enemy's
palisades before he gave the word " fire." In a moment
afterwards he was shot, and thus closed a life of honour
with a death of glory. His valour has rendered his name
immortal in the history of his country.



JOHN, VISCOUNT MORDAUNT.

Appointed 25th August 1704.

John, Viscount Mordaunt, son of Charles, Earl of Peter-
borough, was an officer in the first regiment of Foot Guards,
in which corps he rose to the rank of captain and lieutenant-
colonel. He evinced great gallantry at the battle of
Schellenberg, where he headed fifty grenadiers, at the
storm of the enemy's works, and of that number only him-
self and ten grenadiers escaped. At the memorable battle of
Blenheim he lost his left arm. His services were rewarded
with the colonelcy of the TWENTY-FIRST FUSILIERS, from
which he exchanged to the Twenty-eighth regiment ; but,
on the death of Major-General De Lalo, who was killed at
the battle of Malplaquet, in 1709, Viscount Mordaunt was
reappointed to the TWENTY-FIRST regiment. He was
promoted to the rank of brigadier-general on the 1st of
January 1710, and died of the smallpox in April following.



SAMPSON DE LALO.

Appointed 26th June 1706.

Sampson de Lalo was a French gentleman of the Pro-
testant religion, whom the Edict of Nantes forced to quit
his native country. He found an asylum from persecution
in England, and, entering the British army, proved an effi-
cient and meritorious officer. After a distinguished career
of service in the subordinate commissions, he was appointed
lieutenant-colonel of the Twenty-eighth regiment, and was
promoted to the colonelcy of the same corps in February



Succession of Colonels. 95



1704; in June 1706, he exchanged to the TWENTY-FIRST
FUSILIERS. He commanded a brigade under the great
Duke of Marlborough, served at several battles and sieges,
and was promoted to the rank of major-general in January
1709. During the siege of the castle of Tournay, he was
nominated by the Duke of Marlborough to negotiate the
terms of capitulation with the governor. He evinced great
gallantry at the battle of Malplaquet, where he was mor-
tally wounded. In the Annals of Queen Anne it is stated
that " he was in great favour and esteem in the British
army."



JOHN, VISCOUNT MORDAUNT.

Reappointed 4th September f/og.
Died in 1710.



THOMAS MEREDITH.

Appointed ist May 1710.

This officer served in the wars of King William III.,
who promoted him to the commission of captain in the
Third Horse, now Second Dragoon Guards. On the
augmentation of the army in 1702, he was nominated colonel
of the Thirty-seventh regiment, then newly raised, and he
accompanied that corps to Holland in 1703. In 1704 he
served at the battles of Schellenberg and Blenheim, and
was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general on the 25th
of August 1704. In 1705 he commanded a brigade at the
forcing of the French lines at Helixem and Xeer-Hespen.
He was advanced to the rank of major-general in 1706,
and to that of lieutenant-general in 1707 ; in 1710 he was
removed to the TWENTY-FIRST regiment, and in 1714 to
the Twentieth. He died in 1719.



96 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.

CHARLES, EARL OF ORRERY, K.T.

Appointed 8th December 17 10.

The Earl of Orrery took an active part in raising a
regiment of foot (afterwards disbanded), of which he was
appointed colonel on the 1st of May 1703 ; in 1705 he was
nominated Knight of the Thistle ; and in 1706 he was re-
moved to another regiment, afterwards disbanded. He was
promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1709, and
served at the battle of Malplaquet, at the head of a brigade
of infantry, and evinced great gallantry. In 1710 he was
advanced to the rank of major-general, nominated Envoy
Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the States of Brabant
and Flanders, and removed to the TWENTY-FIRST FUSI-
LIERS ; in 1711 he was created a peer of Great Britain, by
the title of Baron Boyle, of Marston, in Somersetshire ;
and in 1712 he served under the Duke of Ormond. He was
sworn a member of the Privy Council in 1713. On the
arrival of King George I. in England, in the autumn of
1714, the Earl of Orrery was appointed one of the Lords
of the Bedchamber ; he was afterwards sworn a member of
the Privy Council. In 1722 he was committed a prisoner
to the Tower of London, on a charge of high treason, but
no crime was proved against him. He died on the 28th of
August 1731.

GEORGE MACARTNEY.

Appointed 1 2th July 1716.

This officer entered the army in the reign of King Wil-
liam III., and was promoted in April 1703 to the colonelcy
of a newly raised regiment of foot (afterwards disbanded),
with which he served three campaigns on the Continent,
under the great Duke of Maryborough. He afterwards
proceeded to Spain, and commanded a brigade of infantry
at the battle of Almanza, where he distinguished himself,
and was taken prisoner. In 1709 he was promoted to the
rank of major-general, and in 1710 to that of lieutenant-



Succession of Colonels. 97



general. His regiment having been disbanded at the Peace
of Utrecht, he was appointed to the colonelcy of the
ROYAL NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS in 1716, and removed
in 1727 to the Seventh Horse, now Sixth Dragoon Guards.
He died in July 1730.

SIR JAMES WOOD.

Appointed yth March 1727.

Sir James Wood served many years in the army of the
States-General of the United Provinces of the Netherlands.
His first commission was dated the 3ist of December 1688,
and he rose to the rank of brigadier-general in 1704, in
which rank he was admitted into the British service, in con-
sequence of his reputation ; and in 1727 he was appointed
colonel of the TWENTY-FIRST regiment. In 1735 he was
promoted to the rank of major-general. His decease oc-
curred on the 1 8th of May 1738.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Appointed ist November 1738.

John Campbell of Mamore was an officer in the army
in the reign of Queen Anne, and attained the rank of lieu-
tenant-colonel. During the rebellion in 1715 and 1716 he
was aide-de-camp to the Duke of Argyll ; and in June 1737
he obtained the colonelcy of the Thirty-ninth regiment,
from which he was removed in the following year to the
ROYAL NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS. He commanded a
brigade at the battle of Dettingen, in 1743 ; was appointed
major-general in the following year; and during the rebel-
lion in 1745 and 1746 he held a command in Scotland.
He was advanced to the rank of lieutenant-general in
1747 ; removed from the Fusiliers to the Scots Greys in
1752 ; and in 1761 he was appointed governor of Lime-
rick, and also succeeded to the title of Duke of Argyll.
The Order of the Thistle was conferred upon his Grace in
1765. He died in 1770.



98 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.

WILLIAM, EARL OF PANMURE.

Appointed 2qth April 1752.

William Maule, who had been several years an officer
in the Scots Foot Guards, and a member of Parliament,
was created a peer of Ireland on the 6th of April 1743, by
the title of Earl of Panmure. He served at the battle of
Dettingen in the same year ; also at the battle of Fontenoy
in 1745 J an d on the ist of December 1747 was promoted
to the colonelcy of the Twenty-fifth foot ; from which he
was removed, in 1752, to the ROYAL NORTH BRITISH
FUSILIERS. The rank of major-general was conferred upon
his lordship in 1755. ^ n the following year he was second
in command at Gibraltar ; and in 1758 he was promoted to
the rank of lieutenant-general. He was further advanced
to the rank of general in 1770 ; and obtained the colonelcy
of the Scots Greys in November of the same year. He
died on the 4th of January 1782.

THE HONOURABLE ALEXANDER MACKAY.

Appointed loth May 1770.

The Honourable Alexander Mackay, son of George,
third Lord Reay, was appointed ensign in the Twenty-fifth
regiment in 1737 ; and in 1745 he obtained the commission
of captain in the Earl of Loudoun's newly raised regiment
of Highlanders, afterwards disbanded. He served against
the rebels in the same year, and was taken prisoner at the
battle of Prestonpans. In 1750 he was nominated major in
the Third foot, and on the 2ist of December 1755 he was
promoted to the lieutenant-colonelcy of the Fifty-second
regiment, then newly raised, from which he exchanged, in
March 1760, to the Thirty-ninth ; in 1761 he was elected a
member of Parliament for Sunderland ; in August 1762 he
was promoted to the colonelcy of the One Hundred and
Twenty-second regiment, which was disbanded at the Peace
of Fontainebleau ; and in March 1764 he obtained the
colonelcy of the Sixty-fifth. He served in America, in



\



Succession of Colonels. 99



which country he obtained the local rank of major-general
in 1768; in 1770 he received the same rank in the army,
and was removed to the ROYAL NORTH BRITISH Fusi-
LIERS in the same year. In 1772 he received the appoint-
ment of Governor of Tynemouth and Clifford's Fort ; in
1777 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-general,
and in the following year appointed Governor of Landguard
Fort, from which he was afterwards removed to the govern-
ment of Stirling Castle. In 1780 he was nominated Com-
mander-in-Chief in Scotland. He died in May 1789.

THE HONOURABLE JAMES MURRAY.

Appointed $th June 1789.

The Honourable James Murray served in the Fifteenth
regiment, in which corps he attained the rank of major, and
was promoted to the lieutenant-colonelcy on the 5th of
January 1751. He commanded the Fifteenth in the expe-
dition against Rochefort, under Lieutenant-General Sir
John Mordaunt, in 1757, and at the capture of Louisbourg
in 1758 ; in 1759 he commanded a brigade at the battle and
capture of Quebec, under the renowned Major-General James
Wolfe ; in 1760 he led a division up the river St Lawrence,
and contributed to the reduction of Montreal, which com-
pleted the conquest of Canada from the French. He was
promoted to colonel-commandant of a battalion of the Six-
tieth regiment in 1759, and to the local rank of major-
general in America in 1760. In 1762 he was advanced to
the rank of major-general ; and in 1767 he was removed to
the colonelcy of the Thirteenth regiment. He was promoted
to the rank of lieutenant-general in 1772, and to that of
general in 1783 ; in 1789 he was removed to the ROYAL
NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS. He died in 1794.

JAMES HAMILTON.

Appointed 2oth June 1794.

After a progressive service in the subordinate commis-
sions, this officer was promoted to the lieutenant-colonelcy



100 T/ie Royal Scots Fusiliers.



of the TWENTY-FIRST FUSILIERS on the nth of March
1774. He served in North America during two campaigns
of the War of Independence ; was promoted to the rank of
major-general in 1787 ; and was appointed colonel of the
Fifteenth foot in 1792, from which he was removed to the
TWENTY-FIRST FUSILIERS in 1794. He obtained the rank
of lieutenant-general in 1797, and that of general in 1802.
His decease occurred in 1803.

THE HONOURABLE WILLIAM GORDON.

Appomted 6th August 1803.

The Honourable William Gordon was appointed captain
in the Sixteenth Light Dragoons, when that corps was
raised in the year 1759 ; in October 1762 he was appointed
lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Fifth regiment,
and in 1777 he was promoted to the colonelcy of the Eighty-
first regiment, which was afterwards disbanded. In 1781 he
was promoted to the rank of major-general, and in 1789
was nominated colonel of the Seventy-first Highlanders.
He was advanced to the rank of lieutenant-general in 1793,
to that of general in 1798, and was removed to the ROYAL
NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS in 1803. He died in 1816.



JAMES, LORD FORBES.

Appointed ist Jime 1816.

James, Lord Forbes, was appointed ensign in the Second
Foot Guards in 1781. In 1793 he served in Flanders,
under His Royal Highness the Duke of York, and com-
manded a company at the battle of Famars. He served
at the siege of Valenciennes, and led a portion of his regi-
ment at the storm of the outworks. He was engaged at
the recapture of the post of Lincelles, where the Foot
Guards distinguished themselves ; also served at the siege
of Dunkirk. In 1794 he served at the actions of Vaux,
Cateau, Tournay, and Mouvaux ; at the defence of Nime-



Succession of Colonels. 10l



guen and Fort St Andre, and in the retreat through Holland
to Germany. After the action of Lincelles, in 1793, he was
promoted to the rank of captain and lieutenant-colonel, in
succession to Lieutenant-Colonel Bosville, who was killed
on that occasion. In 1796 he obtained the rank of colonel ;
and in 1799 he served in the expedition to the Helder, and
was present at every action of that short campaign in Hol-
land, excepting one. In 1802 Lord Forbes was promoted
to the rank of major-general, and nominated to the com-
mand of the troops stationed at Ashford, in Kent, and sub-
sequently of the garrison at Dover, and he occasionally
commanded the Kent District in the absence of Lieutenant-
General Sir David Dundas and of Lord Ludlow. He was
appointed second in command of the troops stationed on
the island of Sicily in 1808, and promoted to the rank of
lieutenant-general. On his return to England, in 1811, he
was placed on the staff of Ireland.

Lord Forbes was elected one of the representative peers
of Scotland in 1806, and held that distinguished situation
many years. The colonelcy of the Third Garrison Batta-
lion was conferred upon his lordship in 1806; he was
removed to the Ninety-fourth regiment in 1808, to the
Fifty-fourth in 1809, and to the ROYAL NORTH BRITISH
FUSILIERS in 1816 ; in 1819 he was promoted to the rank
of general. He died in 1843.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR FREDERICK ADAM,
G.C.B., G.C.M.G.

Appointed 31 st May 1843.

The Right Honourable Sir Frederick Adam served in
the Twenty-first regiment, and, as lieutenant-colonel, com-
manded and led it against the French on the I7th and iSth
of September 1810, on the coast of Calabria, seven miles
south of Messina. He was afterwards promoted to the
rank of general ; and on 3ist May 1843 was appointed to
the colonelcy of the ROYAL NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS.
He died on the 24th of August 1853.



102 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.

SIR DE LACEY EVANS, K.C.B.

Appointed 2gth August 1853.

Sir De Lacey Evans served in India from 1807 till
1810; Portugal, Spain, and France, from 1812 till 1814;
America, in 1814-1815; Belgium and France, from 1815 till
1818 ; and in Spain, from 1835 till 1837, as commander of
the Anglo-Spanish Legion.

Present during the operations against Ameer Khan and
the Pindarics, capture of the Mauritius, part of the retreat
from Burgos, action on the Hormaza (wounded), battle of
Vittoria, investment of Pampeluna, battle of the Pyrenees,
investment of Bayonne (horse shot), actions of Vic Bijorre
and Forbes, battle of Toulouse (horse shot), battle of Bla-
densburg (two horses shot), capture of Washington, attack
on Baltimore, operations before New Orleans (boarding
and capture of American flotilla), action of 25th December
(wounded severely), unsuccessful assault, January (wounded
severely), battle of Quatre Bras; retreat of I7th June,
Waterloo (horse shot, and one sabred), investment and capi-
tulation of Paris.

Sir De Lacey Evans received the war medal, with three
clasps, for Vittoria, Pyrenees, and Toulouse ; promoted to
major-general 9th of November 1846, to the colonelcy of
the ROVAL NORTH BRITISH FUSILIERS, 29th of August
1853 ; promoted to lieutenant-general 2Oth of June 1854.

He commanded the second division in the Eastern cam-
paign of 1854, including the battles of Alma (wounded),
Balaklava, and Inkerman, and siege of Sebastopol, com-
prising the repulse of the powerful sortie on 27th of Octo-
ber 1854. He continued to hold the colonelcy of the Fusi-
liers till his death in 1869.

SIR FREDERICK WILLIAM HAMILTON.

Appointed nth January 1870.

Sir Frederick W. Hamilton served with the Grenadier
Guards throughout the Eastern campaign, 1854-1855, in-



Succession of Colonels. 103



eluding the battles of Alma, Balaklava, and Inkerman
(wounded, and horse shot) ; sortie on 26th October, and
siege of Sebastopol. During the latter part he commanded
divisions of the army in the trenches, and was in temporary
command of the Grenadier Guards after Inkerman. C.B.
medal, with four clasps, Officer of the Legion of Honour,
third class of the Medjidie, and Turkish medal. He was
appointed to the colonelcy of the ROYAL NORTH BRITISH
FUSILIERS, nth January 1870, which appointment he still
holds at this date June 1885.




HppenM; iRo. 2.



SUCCESSION OF LIEUTENANT-COLONELS



WHO HAVE COMMANDED



Scots fueUfers,

FROM 1838 UNTIL JUNE 1885.



FIRST BATTALION.
I.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL GEORGE DEARE.
Appointed 28th December 1838.

SUCCEEDED to the command of the Royal North British
Fusiliers on the promotion of Colonel Walker, in the East
Indies, in 1838 ; retired from the service in 1850.

II.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JOHN CROFTON PEDDIE.

Appointed in /<?J0,

In succession to Colonel Deare ; exchanged into the
Forty-first regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Gore
Browne, 1850.



106 The Royal Scots Fusiliers.

III.
LIEUTENANT-COLONEL THOMAS GORE BROWNE.

Appointed in 1850,
In exchange with Colonel Peddie ; retired in 1851.

IV.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL EDWARD THORPE.

Appointed in 1851^
From Eighty-ninth regiment ; retired in 1852.

V.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL FREDERICK GEORGE AlNSLTE.
Appointed in 1852,

From senior regimental major ; died at Scutari, I4th
of November 1854, of wounds received at the battle of
Inkerman.

VI.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JOHN RAMSAY STUART.

Appointed i$th November 1854.

Senior regimental major, in succession to Colonel Ainslie.
Served in the Crimean War of 1854, and the latter part of
1855, including the battles of Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman,
siege and fall of Sebastopol ; twice mentioned in despatches.
Medal with four clasps, fifth class of the Medjidie, Turkish
medal, and Companion of the Bath. Retired from the com-
mand on the 1 7th of April 1867 ; promoted major-general
6th March 1868, and held the command of the troops in
the North British district until his promotion to lieutenant-
general. Is colonel of the Dorset regiment. Promoted
to general 3d December 1880, and is now on the retired list.



Succession of Lieutenant-Colonels. 107

VII.
LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JOHN THOMAS DALYELL.

Appointed ifth April 1867,

From senior regimental major ; served in the Eastern
campaign of 1854, and part of 1855, including battles of
Alma, Inkerman, and siege of Sebastopol ; brevet-major,
medal with three clasps, fifth class of the Medjidie, and
Turkish medal ; retired from the command in January 1878,
on obtaining the command of the First Regimental District,
at Glencorse ; promoted to major-general, on the active list,
on the 2/th June 1883.

VIII.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ALFRED TEMPLEMAN.

Appointed 2jd January 1878,

From senior regimental major ; served throughout the
Eastern campaign, 1854-55, including the battles of Alma,
Balaklava, and Inkerman (wounded), siege and fall of
Sebastopol, and attack on the Great Redan, on the iSth
June 1855, also the expedition to Kinburn. Medal with
four clasps, Knight of the French Legion of Honour, and
Turkish medal. Retired from the command on the


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Online LibraryJames ClarkHistorical record and regimental memoir of the Royal Scots fusiliers, formerly known as the 21st Royal North British fusiliers. Containing an account of the formation of the regiment in 1678 and its subsequent services until June 1885 → online text (page 9 of 16)