James Dwight Dana.

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H 2 O, 1.85; total, 100.27. Wright, Am. J. Sc., 26, 545, 1908.

GEIKIELITE, App., p. 28. Sustschinsky has described rhombohedral crystals from Ceylon
showing the forms: c (0001), also as parting, r (lOll) only as cleavage, </> (5058); axis c = 1.370
and rr' = *94 7' or corresponding closely with the species of the Hematite group (Min., p. 210)
and pyrophanite (p. 1045); G. = 3.976; analyses by Fr. Kaeppel:

TiO 2 MgO FeA FeO

60.00 29.86 6.90 2.03 = 98.79

61.32 28.95 7.75 2.03 = 100.05

Zs. Kr., 37, 57, 1902.

Analyses showing that FeO is always present in considerable amount and that the formula
might better be written (Mg,Fe)TiO 3 . General relations of ferromagnesian titanates discussed.
Crook and Jones, Min. Mag., 14, 160, 1906.



APPENDIX II. . 45

GEOCRONITE, Min., p. T43. Analyses, Sala, Sweden, by C. Guillemain, [Inaug.-Diss. Breslau,
1898], Zs. Kr, 33, 75.

G. D'Achiardi has studied the crystallized mineral from Val Castello, Tuscany, Att. Soc. Tosc.
Mem. 18, 1901, and makes it isomorphous with stephanite. By changing the orientation so that
(100) becomes (001) the following axial ratio, near stephanite, is obtained: & : b : c = 0.6145 : 1 :
0.6797. Forms noted c (001), m (110), (058), (067), (Oil), (032), (021), (225), (111).

Angles (001): (032) = *45 33i'; (001) : (Oil) = 34 12'. The analyses do not confirm the
relation to jordanite suggested by Solly, Min. Mag., 12, 290, 1899, but yield as formula, Pb 5 AsSbS g ,

| S 17.57 Sb 7.78 As 4.47 Pb 70.02 Cu, Fe, tr. = 99.84

Prior, Min. Mag., 13, 186, 1902, by a new analysis of "kilbrickinite " from its original occur-
rence, Kilbricken Mine, County Clare, Ireland; has shown that it is identical with the earlier
described geocronite from Sala, Sweden. Analysis follows:

Pb Sb As S

68.49 9.13 4.59 17.20 = 99.41

Georgiadesite. A. Lacroix and A.de Schulten, C. R., 146, 783, 1907; Bull. Soc. Min., 31,
86, 1908.

Orthorhombic. & : b : c = 0.5770 : 1: 0.2228. Angles: (100) : (010) = 119 59'; (Oil) : (Oil)
= 154 53'. Forms; (100), (010), (Oil), (0.11.4), (451), (16.5.4), (4.15.2). Crystals small with
hexagonal outline due to development of prism and brachypinacoid. Striated on top by oscill-
ation of dome faces. Pyramid faces small. H. = 3.5. G. = 7.1. Resinous luster. Color
white or brownish yellow. Ax. pi. || (100); Bx a c II c. Ax. angle large.

Comp. Pb 3 (AsO<) 2 .3PbCl 2 ; As 2 O 6 , 13.28; PbO, 38.61; Pb, 35.83; Cl, 12.28.

As 2 O 5 PbO Pb Ci

Anal. : 12.49 38.86 36.38 12.47 = 100.20

Obs. Found on one specimen from lead slags at Laurium, Greece, associated with fiedlerite
and matlockite. Named in honor of M. Georgiades, Director of mines at Laurium.

GERHARDTITE, Min., p. 872. A bright green coating on the granite-porphyry cliffs in Chase
Creek Canyon at Metcalf, Arizona, was found to consist of a nitrate and chloride of copper; the
presence of gerhardtite with atacamite is inferred. Lindgren and Hillebrand, Am. J. Sc., 18, 460,
1904.

GIBBSITE, Min., p. 254; App., 29. Anal, from Klein-Tresny, Mahren; Kovar Abh. bdhml.
Ak., 28, 1899]; Zs. Kr, 34, 705.

Occurs in nodular plates at Kodikanal, Palni Hills, Madras, India. Analysis agrees with accepted
formula; Warth, Min. Mag., 13, 172, 1902. Occurs with manganese-ore (pyrolusite and wad)
in part radiate-fibrous, in part in minute tabular crystals at Talevadi, Bombay (anal.); also
amorphous from Bhekowli, Satara distr. (anal.); L. Leigh Fennor, Rec. G. Surv. India, 34. 167,
1906.

Giorgiosite. A. Lacroix, Bull. Soc. Min., 28, 198, 1905; C. R., 140, 1308, 1905. Saline crusts
observed by Fouque* (Santorin et ses Eruptions, p. 213, 1879) at the surface of lava at Alphroessa,
Santorin, as a result of the eruption of 1866, have been examined by Lacroix. They consist
essentially of sodium chloride, containing small quantities of carbonate, sodium sulphate and
magnesium chloride. Magnesium carbonate was observed both as a fine white powder and also
as a light white flocculent mass. Dried at 100 they yield water and are hence inferred to be basic
carbonates of magnesium. The white powder is made up of minute radiated spherules, isolated
and in groups; these yield a black cross in parallel polarized light, with a birefringence of 0.08 to
0.09, positive in the direction of the fibers. This substance is inferred to be identical with a sub-
stance obtained by Fritsche and having the composition 4MgCO 3 .Mg(OH) 3 .4H,O. This imper-
fectly investigated mineral is called giorgiosite after the Giorgios.

The white flocculent mass is regarded as probably hydromagnesite.

GISMONDITE, Min., p. 586; App., p. 29. Analyses of material from Nicolstadt near Lieg-
nitz, Silesia, by Sachs; Centralbl. Min., 215, 1904, and from Vallerano, Capo di Boveand Mostacci-
ano, near Rome, by Zambonini, Jb. Min., 2, 91, 1902, lead to the formula CaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 . 4H a O.

Occurs as alteration product (zeagonite) of nepheline from Lobau, Austria; Thugutt. Jb
Min., 2, 65, 1900.

GLASERITE = apkthitalite, which see.

GLAUBERITE, Min., p. 898; App., p. 29. Crystals from Hallstattand from Diirnberge near
Hallein described by Koechlin, [Ann. Hofmus., Wien, 16, 103 and 149, 1900]; Zs. Kr., 36, 637.

Opal pseudomorphic afterglauberite (?) from White Cliffs, N. S. W. ; Anderson and Jevons, [Rec.
Aus. Mus., 6, 31, 1905]; Min. Mag., 14, 197.



46 APPENDIX II.

Conditions of formation discussed; van't Hoff with Chiaraviglio, Farup, d'Ans, Ber. Ak.
Berlin, 810, 1899; 1000, 1903; 478, 1905; 218, 1906.

Probable occurrence in fumaroles of Mt. Pele"e, Martinique; Lacroix, Bull Soc. Min., 28, 60.
1905.

GLAUCOCHROITE, App., p. 29. Described by Penfield and Warren in Am. J. Sc., 8, 343, 1899.
Optical determination gave: Ax.pl. ||.c-(001), Bx a JL b (010), double refraction negative; 2E y =
121 30', 2V y = 60 51'; indices a '= 1.686, ft 1.722, 7 = 1.735. The above-are near the values
for monticellite deduced by Penfield arid Forbes, Am. J. Sc., 50, 135, 1896.

GLAUCONITE, Min., p. 683; App., p. 29. General study concerning; Collet and Lee, [Proc.
Roy. Soc. Edinburgh, 26, 238, 1906]; Zs. Kr, 45, 302; C. R., 142, 996, 1906.

Anal, from near Grodno, Russia; Smirnoff, [Ann. Ge"ol. Min. Russ., 7, 28, 1904] ; Zs. Kr ., 43, 77.

GLAUCOPHANE, Min., p. 399; App., p. 29. Study of crystals, with analysis, from Chatey-
roux in Gressoney, Piedmont; Zambonini, Rend. Ace. Line., 11, (1), 204, 1902; from New Jersey;
Prather, Jour. Geol., 13, 509, 1905.

Occurrence of var. "rhodusite " from Asskys river, Minassinsk, Siberia, with analyses and dis-
cussion of chemical composition; Iskull, Zs. Kr., 44, 370, 1907.

Chemical study of glaucophane schists from many localities; Washington, Am. J. Sc., 11,
35, 1901; from Conandale Range, Queensland ; Jensen, Proc. Linnaean Soc. N. S. W., 32, (1), 701,
1907; paragenesis of minerals in glaucophane rocks in California discussed by Smith, Proc. Am.
Phil. Soc., 45, 183, 1906; anal, of glaucophane from rocks at Lavintzie, Bagnetal, Wallis,
Switzerland; Grubenmann, Festschr. von Harry Rosenbusch, 1906, p. 1.

Glendonite. Name suggested for calcite.pseudomorphs after glauberite in various localities
in N. S. Wales, after original locality of Glendon ; David, Taylor, Woolnough and Foxall, [Rec.
Geol. Sur. N. S. W., 8, 161, 1905]; Zs. Kr., 43, 622.

GMELINITE, Min., p. 593; App., p. 29. Crystals from Scottish localities; Goodchild, [Trans,
Geol. Soc. Glasgow, 12, Suppl., 1-68, 1903]; Zs. Kr., 45, 307.

Occurrence (with anal.) at Kurzi south of Sympheropol, Taurien, and on Commordor island,
Bering Sea, Russia; Fersmann, Centralbl. Min., 573, 1906.

From Aci Castello; Di Franco, Att, Ace. Line , 13, (1), 640, 1904.

GOLD, Min., p. 14;. App., p. 29. Crystals from Wemyi, Lena gold district, Siberia; Samoi-
loff, [Ver. russ. min. Gesells., 43, 237, 1905]; Zr. Kr., 44, 87; from Pralorgnan, Vald'Aosta, Italy;
Millosevich, Rend. Ace. Line., 15, (1), 320, 1906; from Brusson, Val d'Aosta; Colomba, Att.
Ace. Torino, 42, 904, 1907.

Structure planes; Miigge, Jb. Min., 2, 55, 1899.

Nuggets with concentric structure, from New Guinea; Liversidge, Proc. Roy. Soc. N. S. W.,
40, 161, 1906; also internal structure of some crystals, ibid., 41, 143, 1907.

Gold in meteorites; Liversidge, Proc. Roy. Soc. N. S W., Sept., 1902.

GOLDSCHMIDTITE, App., p. 30. Shown by Palache, Zs. Kr., 34, 542, to be identical with
sylvanite, (100) on goldschmidtite becoming (101) on sylvanite. The position of a number of the
goldschmidtite forms was due to twinning.

Georceixite. E. Hussak, Min. petr. Mitth., 25, 338, 1906.

Microcrystalline, in rolled pebbles.

H. = 6. G. from 3.036 to 3.123. Luster non-metallic, jasper-like on fresh fracture. Color
various shades of brown and white. In thin section appears as an aggregate of small colorless
irregular grains, with brown powder between. Optically uniaxial and positive. Index of refrac-
tion, 1.6253 (Gaubert, Bull. Soc. Min., 30, 108, 1907). Weak double refraction. Composition,
(Ba,Ca,Ce)O.2Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 .5H 2 O. Analyses (by G. Florence of material from Rio Abaete) gave:

SiO 2 Fe 2 O 3 PoO 5 A1 2 O, BaO CaO CeO TiO 2 H 2 O

1. 1.55 4.10 22.74 35.00 15.42 3.55 1.55 0.67 14.62 = 99.20
la 22.48 37.68 16.60 3.82 1.67 .... 15.74 = 100.00

2. 6.50 1,67 21.47 35.20 15.30 2.24 2.35 0.75 14.73 = 100.21
2a 23.52 38.56 16.76 2.45 2.57 16.14 = 100.00

Analyses la and 2a are recalculated from 1 and 2 by subtracting the SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 and TiO 2 as
impurities. Qualitative tests showed SrO in some specimens. Occurs as rounded pebbles in
the diamond sands of Brazil, commonly called favas. Named from H. Gorceix, the first director
of the School of Mines, Ouro-Preto, Minas Geraes.

GOSLARITE, Min., p. 939; App., p. 30. Cuprogoslarite is a variety containing copper de-
scribed by Rogers, Kansas Univ. Q., 8, 105, 1899. Occurs as a translucent light greenish blue



APPENDIX 11. 47

incrustation on the wall of an abandoned zinc mine at Galena, Cherokee, Kansas. H. = 2. On
exposure to the air loses part of its water and becomes white. Analysis:

SO 3 ZnO CuO FeO H 2 O Insol.

[27.02] 23.83 6.68 0.13 41.76 0.58 = 100

GOTHITE, Min., pp. 247, 1036. Crystallographic and optical studies; Cesaro and Abraham,
Bull. Acad. Roy. cf. Belg., 179, 1903.

Graftonite. S. L. Penfield, Am. J. Sc., 9, 20, 1900.

Monoclinic. Axes a : b : c = 0.886 : 1 : 0.582; /? = 66. Forms: a (100), b (010), m (110),
/ (120), n (130), d(011), e (021), p (111). Fundamental measurements only approximate;
bAd = 62; bAm = 51.

In rough composite crystals in which the graftonite is closely interlaminated with a pale-
green triphylite. the tatter usually dark from alteration. The plane of lamination is parallel to
6 (010) of the graftonite, the two minerals being intergrown in such a way that the macro-axis
of triphylite is parallel to the clino-axis of graftonite and (102) of the former coincides with (010)
of the latter.

H. =5. G. = 3.672. Luster vitreous to resinous. Color when fresh, a delicate salmon-pink,
resembling lithiophilite (but usually dark from alteration).

Composition, R 3 P 2 O,, with R = Fe, Mn and Ca.

Analyses, 1, Penfield, on the fresh mineral; 2, Ford, material partly altered and oxidized:

P 2 O 5 Fe 2 O 3 FeO MnO MgO CaO Li 2 O Na 2 O K 2 O H 2 O

1.41.20 ... 30.65 17.62 0.40 9.23 0.33* 0.75 = 100.18

2.40.80 10.16 24.28 15.38 ... 7.25 ... 1.15 0.14 1.17 = 100.33

* Containing some Na 2 O.

B. B. darkens and fuses at 2 to a slightly magnetic globule; gives a bluish green color to the
flame; reacts for manganese with sodium carbonate. Readily soluble in hydrochloric acid.

From the south side of Melvin Mountain five miles west of Grafton, New Hampshire; occurs
sparingly in a pegmatite vein with beryl, black tourmaline, garnet, etc.

GRAHAMITE, Min., p. 1020; App., p. 30. From study of occurrence in Ritchie Co., W. Va.,
thought to be an oxidation product of petroleum; White, Bull. Geol. Soc. Amet., 10, 277, 1899;
Zs. Kr. 34, 205.

Grandidierite. A. Lacroix, Bull. Soc. Min., 25, 85, 1902; 27, 259, 1904; C. R., 137,
582, 1903.

Orthorhombic. In anhedral elongated individuals up to 8 cm. in length; these show two
cleavages in the zone of elongation, a (100) and 6 (010), the former more perfect.

G. = 2.99. Luster vitreous, on the cleavage surface a somewhat pearly. Color bluish green.
Extinction parallel. Ax. pi. || c or transverse to the direction of elongation. Bx a -L a. Bire-
fringence negative. Indices (Na) a = 1.6018, /? = 1.6360,7 = 1.6385. 2Vtf a . = 30 16'. Also
by measurement 2 ENa = 49 30'. 2E gr = 52 (Ti.). Dispersion p < v. Strongly pleochroic,
with a > ft > y. In thin sections colorless in direction of elongation, blue and green transverse
to this. Sections normal to an optic axis showing blue brushes on a white ground, belonging to
the same type as andalusite.

Composition, a basic silicate, calculated formula 7SiO 2 ,ll(Al,Fe) 2 O 3 , 7(Mg,Fe,Ca)O, 2(Na,
K,H) 2 0.

Analysis, Pisani:

SiO 2 A1,O, Fe 2 O 3 FeO MgO CaO Na 2 O K 2 O H 2 O
20.90 52.80 6.60 4.86 9.65 2.10 2.22 0.40 1.25 = 100.78

B. B. infusible; unattacked by acids.

Occurs as an accessory constituent of a pegmatite and an aplite from the faults of Andraho-
mana, near Fort Dauphin, in the extreme southern part of Madagascar. It is associated with
quartz, orthoclase and microcline, almandite, spinel, also biotite and andalusite; encloses the
other rock elements in a poikilitic manner. Grandidierite is easily altered, passing into a green
fibro-lamellar substance apparently related to kryptotite. Named after M. Alfred Grandidier,
who has described the geography and natural history of Madagascar.

GRAPHITE, Min., pp. 7, 1036; App., p. 31. Description of occurrences in Styria and in



Ceylon; Weinschenk, [Abh. bayer. Akad. Wiss., 21, 233 and 281, 1900]; Zs. pr. Geol., 1900, 8,
36 and 174; Zs. Kr., 36 f 316. In basalts of lower Rhine; Brauns, Centralbl. Min., 97, 1908.

Greenalite. C. K. Leith, Mon. 43, U. S. G. S., 1903.

Name given to a green hydrated ferrous silicate occurring in the form of granules in the
cherty rocks associated with the iron ores of the Mesabi district, Minn. Resembles glauconite
,(and was originally called so) but shows no potash.



48 APPENDIX II.

GREENOCKITE, Min., pp. 69, 1036; App., p. 31. On calcite from Joplin, Mo.; Cornwall,,
Am. J. Sc., 14, 7, 1902. Occurrence with smithsonite at Montevecchio ; Lovisato, Rend. Ace.
Line., 12, (2), 642, 1903.

GUARINITE, Min., p. 717; App., p, 31. Discussion of chem. comp. by Zambonini; Centralbl.
Min., 524 and 667, 1902. Crystals studied gave axial ratio: & : b : i =0.99268 : 1 : 0.37008.
G. between 2.9 and 3.3. Double refraction like that of quartz. 2V = near 90. Axial pi. || c.
Bx a = a. Strong dispersion p > v. Pleochroism a = canary yellow; b = colorless; c = very
pale yellow. Axial ratio and optical properties agree closely with those of danburite.

GUMMITE, Min., p. 892; App., p. 31. Ratio of radium to uranium; Boltwood, Am. J. Sc.,
18, 97, 1904.

GYPSUM, Min., p. 933; App., p. 31. Cryst. Crystals from Lebo, Coffey Co., Kansas;
Rogers, Am. J. Sc., 9, 364, 1900; from Tarajungitsok, Godhavn District, Greenland; Steenstrup,
[Medd. om Gronl., 24, 294, 1900]; from the Bad Lands, So. Dakota_ with (13.7.0); Rogers,
Sch. Mines Q., 23, 133, 1902; from Ballabio, with new forms (212), (313); Artini, Rend. Roy.
Inst. Lomb., 36, 1181, 1903; sand crystals; Delkeskamp, Zs. fur Naturwiss., Halle, 75, 185,
1902; crystals from dolomite limestone, Wietze, Hannover; Hofer, Ber. Ak. Wien, 113, (I), 169,
1904; crystal from Bellisio, with (314); Cesaro, Bull. Ac. Belg., 140, 1905; from marble of Car-
rara; D'Achiardi, Att. Soc. Tosc. Sc., Mem., 21, 1905; unusual crystals from salt springs at
Pachpadra, Jodhpur, Rajputana; Fermor, [Rec. Geol. Sur. India, 32, 231, 1905]; Zs. Kr., 43,
620; crystals from Igmand, Hungary; Torborffy, Foldt. Kozl., 37, 312, 1907; crystals from
sulphur caves near Lomano, Siena; Manasse, Att. Soc. Tosc., 23, 1907. Microscopic study of
the crystallization of gypsum; Maschke and Vater, Zs. Kr., 33, 57; crystals from Cetine di Cor-
torniano, Siena; Viola, Rend. Ace. Line., 17, (1), 501, 1908. Etched crystals; Wiegers, Zs. fur
Naturwiss., Halle, 73, 266, 1900. Naturally etched crystals from Kommern, Bohemia; Miihl-
hauser, Min. Mitth., 20, 367, 1901. Etching figures, natural and artificial, fail to show the ex-
istence of a plane of symmetry; Viola, Zs. Kr., 35, 220, 1901.

Dispersion; Konig, [Ann. d. Phys., 69, 1, 1899]; Zs. Kr., 35, 193. Effect of low temperatures
upon optical properties; Panichi, [Mem. Ace. Line., 4, 389, 1902]; Zs. Kr., 40, 88.

Occ. at Cetine di Cortorniano, near Rosia, Siena; Pelloux, Rend. Ace. Line., 10, (2), 10, 1901;
in Kansas; Grimsley and Bailey, Uni. Geol. Sur. Kansas, 5.

Conditions of formation discussed; van't Hoff with Armstrong, Hiurchsen, Weigert, Ber.
Ak. Berlin, 559, 1900; 570, 1140, 1901.

GYROLITE, Min., p. 566. Study of crystals from Niakornat and other Greenland localities
by Boggild, Medd. om Gronl., 34, 93, 1908, gave the following new facts: Crystallization rhombohe-
dral tetartohedral. Axis c = 1.9360. Forms c(0001), r(1011), w(1012). Angles: r : c = *65 54' ;
u c = 48 11'. Crystals small hexagonal plates, with curved faces giving inexact measure-
ments. Crystals easily etched, figures showing tetartohedral symmetry. Cleavage per. |j c(0001).
Six rayed percussion fig. Optically . w = 1.5645. c = 1.5590.

Anal.: SiO 2 , 54.83; A1 2 O 3 , 4.58; CaO, 31.15; Na 2 O, 1.74; H 2 O, 8.14; total, 100.44.

Discussion of relations to other occurrences of gyrolite and other similar zeolites. The
mineral from Niakornat has been described as a new species, reyerite, which see.

New occurrences in Scotland; Currie, Min. Mag., 14, 93, 1905. Occurrence (with anal.)
in diabase from Mogy-guassu, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Hussak, Centralbl. Min., 330, 1906.

Thought to be indentical with zeophyllite; Corau, Centralbl. Min., 80, 1906.

Hackmanite. L. H. Borgstrom, Geol. F6r. Forh., 23, 563, 1901 ; Zs. Kr., 37, 284.

Isometric; in dodecahedrons.

H. = 5. G. = 3.32 3.33.

Color reddish violet, becoming colorless on exposure to daylight. Transparent and isotropic
Refractive index (Na) 1.4868.

Composition: Member of sodalite group. It may be regarded as a sodalite with 6.23 p.c.
of the "white ultramarine compound" Na 4 [Al(NaS)]Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 of Brogger and Bachstrom (Zs.
Kr., 18, 223, 1890).

Analysis:

SiO, A1A Fe 2 O 8 CaO Na 2 O K 2 O Cl S
| 36.99 31.77 0.17 0.05 25.84 0.16 6.44 0.39 = 101.81 less O (= C1,S) 1.64 - 100.17

Soluble in dilute hydrochloric acid with evolution of H 2 S and the separation of a small amount
of flocculent silica.

Occurs in the rock called tawite (W. Ramsay) from the Tawa valley in the Lujaur-Urt on the
Kola peninsula, Lapland. Tawite consists of hackmanite with asgirite, also, as accessories, nephe-
lite, albite, microcline, eudialyte, etc. Sometimes altered on the exterior to natrolite.

Named after Dr. Victor Hackman.



APPENDIX II. 49

HAIDINGERITE, Min., p. 827. Artificial production; de Schulten, Bull. Soc. Min., 26, 18, 1903;
also of the corresponding barium and strontium compounds; id., ibid., 27, 104, 1904.

HALITE, Min., pp. 154, 1036; App., p. 32. Crystals from Sicily with pseudo-rhombohedral
Asymmetry; Andree, Centralbl. Min., 88, 1904. Influence of various dissolved salts on the crystal
form of sodium chloride; Korbs, Zs. Kr., 43, 451, 1906.

Determination of refractive index from Stassfurt, colorless and blue; Dudenhausen, Jb. Min.,
1, 22, 1904. Artificial dichroismof blue halite; Siedentopf, [Verh. deutsch. phys. Ges., 621, 1907J ;
Jb. Min., 1, 57, 1908.

Cause of blue color; Ochsenius, Centralbl. Min., 381, 1903; Focke and Bruckmoser, Min. Mitth.,
25, 43, 1906; Cornu, Jb. Min., 1, 32, 1908.

Analyses of occurrences in recent lavas from Vesuvius; Casoria, [Ann. R. Scuola sup. di agric.
di Portici, 4, 1, 1903]; Zs. Kr., 41, 276; also Brauns; Centralbl. Min., 321, 1906; and Lacroix, Bull.
Soc. Min., 30, 239, 1907.

Deformation under pressure; Rinne, Jb. Min., 1, 114, 1904.

Cubic crystals found in volcanic ash from Mt. Pelee, Martinique; Lacroix, Bull. Soc. Min., 28,
68, 1905. Occurrence in Bilma oasis, Sahara desert; Lacroix, ibid., 31, 40, 1908.

HALLO YSITE, Min., p. 688. Anal, from Edwards Co., Texas; var. lenzinite from Ventura Co.,
Calif.; Merrill, U. S. Nat. Mus. Rep., (2), 330, 1899; Zs. Kr., 36, 73. Chem. constitution; McNeil,
Jour. Amer. Chem. Soc., 28, 593, 1906.

Occurs somewhat abundantly as a pink clay (anal.) at the lepidolite mine near Pala, San Diego,
Cal. ; Schaller, Am. J. Sc., 17, 191, 1904.

HAMLINITE, Min., p. 762. Suggested by Prior, Min. Mag., 12, 249, 1900, that hamlinite
florencite, plumbogummite, beudantite and svanbergite are members of one group, as follows:

r Ar'

Hamlinite 2SrO.3Al 2 O 3 .2P 2 O 5 .7H 2 O 87 2' c = 1.1353

Svanbergite 2SrO.3Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 .2SO 3 .6H 2 O 89 25' c = 1.2063

Plumbogummite 2PbO.3Al 2 O 3 .2P 2 O 5 .7H 2 O

Beudantite 2PbO.3Fe,O 3 -P 2 O 5 .2SO 3 .6H 2 O 88 42' b = 1.1842

Florencite Ce 2 O 3 .3Al 2 O 3 .2P 2 O 5 .6H 2 O 88 56' c = 1.1901

Identified in the diamond-bearing sands of the Serra de Congonhas, Diamantina, Brazil;
Hussak, Ann. Nat. Hofmus., 19, 93, 1904; Am. J. Sc., 19, 202, 1905.

Material from Binnenthal, Switzerland, described originally by Solly; Nature, 71, 118; Min.
Mag., 14, 80, 1905, as a new species and named bowmanite, was proven by Bowman; Min. Mag.,
14, 389, 1907, to be identical with hamlinite. Occurs in small honey-yeilow crystals forming
either hexagonal plates or combinations of rhombohedron and base. Some of the plates show in
convergent polarized light a division into six triangular biaxial sectors, showing that the mineral
is pseudo-hexagonal. Analyses given.

Hampdenite. Name given to serpentine occurring at Chester, Mass., enclosing serpentine
pseudomorphs after olivine (hampshirite) ; Roe and Parsons, Bull. Minn. Acad. Sci., 4, 2, 268,
276, 1906; and Palache, Am. J. Sc., 24, 491, 1907.

Hampshirite, see under Chrysolite.

HANCOCKITE, App. I, p. 32. Described by Penfield and Warren, Am. J. Sc., 8, 339, 1899.

Approximate measurements, on crystals elongated || 6, yielded the angles: ce (001 A 101)= 36 15',
ca (101 A 100) = 30 45', cr (001 A 101) = 63, nn" f (111) A (111) = 67; these are near the cor-
responding angles for epidote. Analyses by Warren yielded:

SiO 2 A1 2 O 3 Fe 2 O 3 Mn O 3 PbO MnO MgO CaO SrO H 2 O

1. 30.99 17.89 (|)12.33 1.38 (1)18.53 2.12 0.52 11.50 3.89 1.62=100.77.

2. 30.88 17.99 12.96 17.47 2.96* 1.02 15.33 1.62

* Mn 2 O 3 not determined.

ii in in it in in

The formula is that of epidote, R(ROH)R 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 ; here R = Pb, Ca, Sr, Mn and R = Al, Fe
in
and Mn

HANNAYITE, Min., p. 832. From guano deposits in Australia, with analysis ; Maclvor, Chem.
News, 86, 181, 217, 1902.



50



APPENDIX II.



HARDYSTONITE, App., p. 32. Wolff has determined the indices of refraction, as follows:

- 1.6691, cNa = 1.6568; w L i = 1.6758, e L i = 1.6647.
A new analysis gave:



SiO 2
37.78



A1 2 3
0.91



Fe 2 s
0.43



ZnO
23.38



MnO
1.26



CaO
34.22



MgO
0.26



K 2 O
0.78



1.10



Ign.

0.34 = 100.46.



The alkalies, not shown in an earlier Analysis, may be due, at least in part, to impurities. Proc.
Amer. Acad., 36, 113, 1900.



HARMOTOME, Min., p. 581; App., p. 33. Crystals from Sarrabus, Sardinia; D'Achiardi,
Mem. Soc. Tosc, 17, 1900; from Scottish localities; Goodchild, [Trans. Geol. Soc. Glasgow, 12,
Suppl., 1-68, 1903]; Zs. Kr., 45, 306.

Harttite. E. Hussak, Min. Mitth., 25, 339, 1906.

Hexagonal. Occasionally in microscopic crystals with hexagonal cross section. Microcrystal-
line, in rolled pebbles.

H. = 4.5-5. G. = 3.21. Luster non-metallic. Color flesh-red, seldom yellow or white. In thin
section appears as an aggregate of small colorless grains and crystals.

Optically uniaxial and positive.

Composition, (Sr,Ca)O.2Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 .SO 3 .5H 2 O.

Analysis by G. Florence of material from Rio Sao Jose gave:



P 2 5

1. 21.17

2. 21.64



SO, '
11.53
11.78



A1 2 3
33.36
34.40



SrO
16.80
17.17



CaO
2.80
2.19



CeO
1.02



TiO,
1.42"



H 2

12.53 = 100.93*

12.81 = 100.00



* Summation of anal. 1 is given by author as 100.27. Probably there is a misprint in case of
percentage of CaO which should read 2.14 in order to account for CaO = 2.19 of anal. 2.

Analysis 2 is recalculated from 1 by deducting the CeO and TiO 2 as impurities.
Occurs in the diamond sands of Brazil as rounded pebbles, commonly called favas.
Named from F. Hartt, the first director of the Geological Survey of Brazil.

HATCHETTOLITE, Min., p. 727. Possible occurrence on Mt. Bity, Madagascar; Lacroix, Bull.



Online LibraryJames Dwight DanaThe system of mineralogy of James Dwight Dana. 1837-1868 → online text (page 211 of 222)