James Fenimore Cooper.

The headsman; or, The Abbaye des Vignerons. A tale (Volume vol. 1) online

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Mineral Kingdoms ; the effect of digestion, and, thereby, of conver
sion ; the construction of the hand of man, and an infinite variety of
other arguments ; as also by discoveries, ancient and modern, in arts,
sciences, and the whole extent of literature.

He desired, moreover, that the profits arising from the sale of the
works so published, should be paid to the authors of the works.

The late President of the Royal Society, DA VIES GILBERT, Esq. re
quested the assistance of his Grace, the Archbishop of Canterbury,
and of the Bishop of London, in determining upon the best mode of
carrying into effect, the intentions of the Testator. Acting with their
advice, and with the concurrence of a nobleman immediately connect
ed with the deceased, Mr. Davies Gilbert appointed the following eight
gentlemen to write separate Treatises in the different branches of the
subjects here stated:

I. The Adaptation of External Nature to the Moral and Intellec-
;ual Constitution of Man, by the Rev. THOMAS CHALMERS, D. D., Pro
fessor of Divinity in the University of Edinburgh.

II. The adaptation of External Nature to the Physical Condition
of Man, by JOHN Kion, M. D., F. R. S., Regius Professor of Medicine

n the University of Oxford.

III. Astronomy and General Physics, considered with reference to
Natural Theology, by the Rev. Wm. Whcwell, M. A., F. R. S., Fel-
n ow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

IV. The hand : its mechanism and vital endowments as evincing
design, by Sir Charles Bell, K. H., F. R. S.

V. Animal and Vegetable Physiology, by Peter Mark Roget, M. D.,
Fellow of and Secretary to the Royal Society.

VI. Geology and Mineralogy, by the Rev. Wm. Buckland, D. D.,
F. R. S., Canon of Christ Church, and Professor of Geology in the
University of Oxford.

VII. The History, Habits, and Instincts of Animals, by the Rev.
Wm. Kirby, M.A., F.R.S.



New Works, published l>y Carcy 4 I*ea, & Blancliard.



BRIDGEWATER TREATISES.



VIII. Chemistry, Meteorology, and the Function of Digestion, by
Wm. Prout, M. D., F. R. S.

THE FOLLOWING ARE PUBLISHED.

ASTRONOMY AND GENERAL PHYSICS, considered with
reference to Natural Theology. By the Rev. WILLIAM WHE-
WKLL, M. A., Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Cam
bridge ; being Part III. of the Bridgewater Treatises on the
Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God, as manifested in the
Creation. In one vol. 12mo.

" It is a work of profound investigation, deep research, distinguished alike
for the calm Christian spirit which breathes throughout, and the sound, irre
sistible argumentation which is stamped on every page." Daily Intelli
gencer.

" Let works like that before us be widely disseminated, and the bold, active,
and ingenious enemies of religion be met by those, equally sagacious, alert and
resolute, and the most timid of the many who depend upon the few, need not
fear the host that conies with subtle steps to 'steal their faith away.' " JV*. Y.
American. *

" That the devoted spirit of the work is most exemplary, that we have here
and there found, or fancied, room for cavil, only peradventure because we have
been unable to follow the author through the prodigious range of his philo
sophical survey and in a word, that the work before us would have made the
reputation of any other man, and may well maintain even that of Professor
Whewcll." Metropolitan.

" He has succeeded admirably in laying a broad foundation, in the light of
nature, for the reception of the more glorious truths of revelation ; and has
produced a work well calculated to dissipate the delusions of scepticism and
infidelity, and to confirm the believer in his faith." Charleston Courier.

"The known talents, and high reputation of the author, gave an earnest of
excellence, and nobly has Mr. Whewell redeemed the pledge. In conclusion,
we have no hesitation in saying, that the present is one of the best works of
its kind, and admirably adapted to the end proposed; as such, we cordially
recommend it to our readers." London Lit. Gazette.

" It is a work of high character." Boston Recorder.

A TREATISE ON THE ADAPTATION OF EXTERNAL
NATURE TO THE PHYSICAL CONDITION OF MAN,

principally with reference to the supply of his wants, and the
exercise of his intellectual faculties. By JOHN KIDD, M. D.,
F. R. S., Regius Professor of Medicine in the University of
Oxford ; being Part II. of the Bridgewater Treatises on the
Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God, as manifested in the
Creation. In one vol. 12mo.

" It is ably written, and replete both with interest and instruction. The
diffusion of such works cannot fail to be attended with the happiest effects in
justifying 'the ways of God to man,' and illustrating the wisdom and good
ness of the Creator by arguments which appeal irresistably both to the reason
and the feelings. Few can understand abstract reasoning, and still fewer rel
ish it, or will listen to it : but in this work the purest morality and the kindli
est feelings are inculcated through the medium of agreeable and useful infor
mation." Bait. Oaz.

" It should be in the hands of every individual who feels disposed to ' vindi
cate the ways of God to man.' " JV. Y. Com. Jldv.



New Works, published by Carey, Lea, & Blaiieliard.



BRIDGEWATER TREATISES.



No one will read this book without profit ; it is certainly one of the most
ntereating volumes we have ever read." Philadelphia Gazette.

" Dr. Kidd has fulfilled his task, and may claim the gratitude of those who
ielight to contemplate the wisdom of Providence in the works of nature, and
o discover the adaptation of the vegetable to the animal world, and the sub-
erviency of the whole to the high destinies of man." U. S. Gazette.

" The subject has been ably treated by a learned professor, and though it is
ot the most captivating topic in the world, has certainly served to display the
bility of a sound thinker, who might rise, on other themes, to eloquence."-
Sat. Evening Post.

" We congratulate Professor Kidd on the production of his work, and repeat
he commendation, to which, as a popular treatise, it is indisputably entitled."
Christian Remembrancer.

ON THE ADAPTATION OF EXTERNAL NATURE TO
THE MORAL AND INTELLECTUAL CONSTITU
TION OF MAN. By the Rev. THOMAS CHALMERS, D. D. ;
being Part I. of the Bridge water Treatises on the Power,
Wisdom, and Goodness of God, as manifested in the Crea
tion. In one vol. 12mo.

' The volumes before us are every way worthy of their subject. It would
seem almost supererogetary to pass any judgment on the style of a writer so
celebrated as Dr. Chalmers. He is well known as a logician not to be baffled
iy any difficulties ; as one who boldly grapples with his theme, and brings every
energy of his clear and nervous intellect into the field. No sophistry escapes
his eagle visions no argument that could either enforce or illustrate his sub
ject is left untouched. Our literature owes a deep debt of gratitude to the
author of these admirable volumes." Lit. Gazette.

THE HAND: ITS MECHANISM AND VITAL ENDOW
MENTS, AS EVINCING DESIGN. By Sir CHARLES
BELL, K. G. H. ; being Part IV. of the Bridgewater Treatises
on the Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God, as manifested
in the Creation. In one vol. 12mo. In the press.



SOCIETY AND MANNERS

IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND.

By the Rev. C. S. STEWART, U. S. Navy, Author of A Voyage

to the South Seas, &c. In 2 vols. 12mo. In the press.



MEN AND MANNERS IN AMERICA.

By Major HAMILTON, Author of Cyril Thornton, Annals of Pen
insular Campaigns, &c. In 1 vol. 8vo.



New Works, published toy Carey, Lea, &> Blanchard.



THE LIBRARY OF ROMANCE,

WHICH CONSISTS OF A SERIES OF

ORIGINAL TALES, NOVELS, AND OTHER WORKS OF FICTION,

BY THE MOST EMINENT WRITERS OF THE AGE, AND EDITED BY

LEITCH RITCHIE, ESQ.



VOL. I.

THE GHOST-HUNTER AND HIS FAMILY, by Mr.
BANIM, author of the O'Hara Tales, is universally acknow
ledged to be the most talented and extraordinary work that
has issued from the press for many years.

" Mr. Banim has put forth all the vigor that belongs to the old O'Hara
Tales, and avoided the weakness that sullied his subsequent efforts." Mhe-
ncBum.

"There is more tenderness, more delicacy shown in the development of female
character, than we have ever before met with in the works of this powerful |
novelist.

" Banim never conceived a character more finely than the young Ghost- Hun
ter, Morris Brady. It is a bold and striking outline." Author of Eugene
Aram.

"There is no living author who has excelled Mr. Banim in a striking por
traiture of national manners. The volume now on our tables, by this amiable
and highly gifted writer, exhibits more of his excellencies than any of his
longer writings we remember to have read : every character, without excep
tion, in his animated and natural groups, have a distinct, a probable, and a
vivid individuality," &c. Times.



VOL. II.
SCHINDERHANNES, THE ROBBER OF THE RHINE,

BY THE EDITOR.

" It is long since we have met with so bold, spirited, and original a story."
Literary Gazette.

" We now once more recommend the work itself, and the series, of which
t is a worthy volume, to the public." Athenaum.

"Decidedly one of the best romances we have ever read." Court Journal.

" Mr. Ritchie's Tales sometimes amount to the sublime, either in the terri
ble exigency or the melting pathos of the event, or in the picturesque energy
of the description. Schinderhannes may be esteemed as the best work of fic
tion for which we are indebted to his pen." Atlas.



New "Works, published l>y Carey, tea, &. ISlaucharcl.



VOL. III.
W A L T 1 1 A M ,

A NOVEL.

" Certain we are that very few of our modern novels can produce a charac
ter more admirably drawn than that of Murdock Macara, and Johnson the
quondam tutor ; Mr. Bolton and Unison are sketches that no one but a man

of talent could have conceived, and none but a master could have filled up."

London Monthly Magazine.

" It is a publication of no ordinary merit, is written with considerable pow
er, and embodies a story of deep interest. The Library of Romance has
already an extensive circulation, and deserves still greater.

"The numbers published thus far, are devoted to works of the best descrip
tion, and are calculated to entertain without offending a single moral pre
cept." Penn. Inquirer.

" There are some fine passages, and touches of strong descriptive powers of
lature and characters." Salt, fitter.

VOL. IV.
THE STOLEN CHILD,

A TALE OF THE TOWN,

BY JOHN GALT.

"The auto-biography in this volume is equal to Mr. Gait's best days, and
ven his subordinate characters are worthy to be recorded in the Annals of
the Parish." Athenaum.

" The Stolen Child is a most cleverly managed story.

" We do not think any one ever exceeded Mr. Gait in sketching national
portraits they are preserved as if for a museum of natural curiosities."
Lit. Gaz.

A story of considerable interest." Bait. Gazette.

VOL. V.
THE BONDMAN,

A TALE OF THE TIMES OF WAT TYLER.

A very picturesque and interesting story, and laid during a period which
well deserves illustration." Lit. Gaz.

" One of those stirring narrations that give a picture of the times, and take
along the reader with the events, as if he was indeed a part of what he read.
This series of romances has thus far maintained its character for novelty and
raciness, and while the whole is worthy of especial commendation, each num
ber is in itself a complete story." U. S. Gazette.

" The narrative embraces one of the most interesting periods of English his
tory, and is full of life and spirit. The character of Wat Tyler is well depict
ed." Bait. Gazette.

VOL. VI.

THE SLAVE-KING,
FROM THE "BUG-JARGAL" OF VICTOR HUGO.

" In this abridged tale from Victor Hugo, may the readers of wonderful in
cidents 'woo terror to delight' them. The attention is aroused, and maintain
ed to a frelizied state of excitement anxious to be satisfied with similar de
tails." JJm. Sentinel.

" This peculiar and interesting romance well merited a translation, and the
one before us is executed in a style likely to render it most popular with Eng
lish readers, while the original French character is adequately preserved."

" It is a tale of active and thrilling interest." JV. Y. Courier Sf Advertiser.

Other Volumes are in preparation.



New "Works, published l>y Carey, Ijea, &> Blancliard.



PENCIL. SKETCHES,

OR OUTLINES OF CHARACTER AND MANNERS.

BY MISS LESLIE.

" Look here upon this picture, and on this." Shakspearc.

CONTENTS. The Escorted Lady. A Pic-Nic at the Sea-
Shore. The Miss Vanlears. Country Lodgings. Sociable Vis
iting. Frank Finlay. The Travelling Tin-man. Mrs. Wash
ington Potts. Uncle Philip. The Revolutionary Officer. Poland
and Liberty. The Duchess and Sancho. The Clean Face.
Lady Jane Grey. In one volume, 12mo.



" Miss Leslie hits, skilfully and hard, the follies, foibles, and exceptionable
manners of our meridian. She is perhaps too severe ; she draws too broadly,
b.jt she is always more or less entertaining, and conveys salutary lessons even
in her strongest caricatures. Her subjects, incidents, and persons, are happily
chosen for her purposes." National Gaicttc.

" For the most part, they are excellent, well and naturally written, and the
pictures they give of real life are such as cannot fail to entertain, as well as
instruct, Miss. L. possesses a happy faculty as a writer of short stories."
Penn. Inquirer.

" All abounding in genuine humor, and in rich and true sketches of char
acter." Daily Chronicle.

" The work is composed of ' tales of real life,' in which the gifted authoress
has scarcely a superior at the present day. Her 'Mrs. Washington Potts,' so
justly admired for its exact delineation of men, women, aud manners, as they
are, is now accompanied by many oilier tKjually happy sketches, which make
up a family group." U. S. Qazette.

" As a writer. Miss Leslie has chosen a course for herself. She is free from
the besetting sins of the novelists of the day ; and the emanations from her
pen are calculated not only to amuse, but also to have a beneficial effect."
Pennnylvanian.

"This is one of the most amusing little volumes we have read for a long
time.

" Miss Leslie bids fair, we think, to prove an ornament to the literature of
our country. She displays great tact in the delineation of character and man
ners." Baltimore Gazette.

"The happy faculty she has of catching a thousand little peculiarities of
manner, and hitting off the broader features of character, certainly entitles
Miss Leslie to very great praise. As a new writer, she holds forth liberal
promise for her future efforts." JV. Y. American.

" A series of light but admirable sketches, emanating from a well-regulated
and observant mind." Daily Intelligencer.



New Works, published by Carey, Lea, & Blanchard*



DELO RAINE,

A Novel, in 2 Vols.

BY W. GODWIN, AUTHOR OF CALEB WILLIAMS, &C. &C.

"We always regarded the novels of Godwin as grand productions. No one
ever more forcibly portrayed the workings of the mind, whether it were in its
joyous hilarity of happiness, or in the sublime agonies of despair. His tales,
if we may so express it, have each but one character, and one end ; but that
character, how all-absorbing in interest, and how vividly depicted; and that
ond, how consistent with its preliminaries, how satisfactory, and how beauti
ful !" Metropolitan.

" A creation of an imagination to the last degree wonderful, grand and
striking as an outline of which, in his best days, he need not have been
ashamed. The female character is, in many respects, beautifully developed."
Ncio Monthly Magazine.

" Mr. Godwin exhibits great power in the treatment of his story. It is rich
in interest of a dramatic kind, which is not usual in Mr. Godwin's novels.
The whole account of the ruined castle on the Rhine, of the singular man who
resides in it, of the dangers to which its alarmed inmates are exposed day by
day, and the minuteness with which the scene and the circumstances are de
scribed, cannot be perused without the liveliest emotions. It ranks in dramatic
power with the Kreut.zcr of Miss Lee, and far surpasses that admirable tale
in qualities of a loftier kind. F'ich a picture of youthful feelings, of early
love, and the passions incidcnt:il to the spring-time of life as this work con
tains, was never produced at such a period of life by any other writer, except,
perhaps, Goethe." Atlas.



ASMODEUS AT LARGE,
A FICTION.

BY BULWER, AUTHOR OF PELHAM, EUGENE ARAM, &C.

" Tins is another admirable production from the prolific pen of Mr. Bulwer
distinguished by the same profundity of thought and matchless humor which
are so h.-ippily combined in all his writings." Baltimore Weekly Messenger.

" Our readers have felt that the impassioned pen of the author of Eugene
Arum has not lost its power in these sketches." JV. Y. American.

Jttfes &u*ten' totals, Complete.

EMMA, A Novel, by Miss Austen, 2 vols.
SENSE AND SENSIBILITY, 2 vols.
MANSFIELD PARK,
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE,
NORTHANGER ABBEY,
PERSUASION,

"There are few works of fiction, so acceptable in republication as the Nov
els of Miss Austen.

" They never weary, their interest is never lost, for, as in the prints of Ho
garth, we find fresh matter for admiration upon every renewal of onr ac
quaintance. In her works the scene is before us with all the reality of the
world, and, free from the engrossment of acting a part in it, we discover points
of interest which a divided attention had overlooked.

" Her merit considered, her perfection in one style. Miss Austen is the worst
appreciated Novelist of her time. The Quarterly Review, (to its honor be it
remembered,) was the first critical authority which did justice to her merits,
and that after the grave closed over her unconscious and modest genius.

" It is remarkable that Scott, who noticed with praise many inferior authors,
never mentioned Miss Austen." Examiner.



New "Works, published by Carey, Lea, &> Blanchard*



LITTERATURE FRANCAISE.

BIBLIOTHEQUE CHOISIE DE LITTERATURE FRANCAISE.
SELECT LIBRARY

OF MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE.

THIS work is published semi-monthly, containing 60 large
ind closely-printed pages per Number, at $5 per annum, if paid
n advance. Each page embraces double the quantity of matter
usually contained in the ordinary pages of novels, and can be
sent by mail at a very trifling expense.

The Editor of this work is fully aware of the necessity of
caution in the selection of books for republication, and it will be
lis study to avoid all those that a father might hesitate to place
in the hands of his daughters. All new books of importance, in
the various departments of polite literature, will be received
mmediately after publication in Paris ; and every exertion will
be made so to diversify the contents of this work, as to give a
satisfactory idea of 'the French Literature of the present day.

WORKS PUBLISHED.

LES ECORCHEURS. By Vicomte D'Arlincourt.
CINQ MARS. By Comte de Vigne.
Of "Cinq Mars," Lady Morgan says,

'A charming production there are scenes in them, which, for vigor i
vivacity, exceed any thing in the English or Scotch novels of the day." Lady
Morgan's France.



THE SUMMER FETE.

A POEM, WITH SONGS.
By THOMAS MOORE, Esq., Author of Irish Melodies, &c.

"The description of the Fete is in easy, graceful, flowing verse, and the
songs with which it is interspersed are, unlike many of those which that gift
cd poet has published, unexceptionable in their moral tendency." JV*. Y. Com
mcfcial Advertiser.

" Many of the songs interspersed are pretty and pleasing, and savor of the
usual richness of sentiment and luxuriance of style habitual to Moore. We
can willingly recommend the work to all ladies and lovers of good poetry.'
American Sentinel.

THE WIFE.

A TALE OF MANTUA.

A Play, in Five Acts, by JAMES SHERIDAN KNOWLES, Authoi
of Virginius, The Hunchback, Magdalen and other Tales, &c

"The story of the play is described as highly interesting, and is worked up
with so much skill, that the feelings are strongly excited, and kept alive from
the onset. The piece will soon be introduced, no doubt, into this country."
Nat. Gazette.



New Works, published by Carey, Lea, & Blancliard*



LEGENDS OF THE LIBRARY AT LILIES.

BY THE LORD AND LADY THERE.

In 2 vols. 12mo.

" Two delightful volumes, various, graceful, with the pathos exquisitely
relieved by gaiety; and the romantic legend well contrasted by the lively
sketch from actual existence." Literary Gazette.

" The author of these volumes merits much higher praise than most of the
pretenders to the palm of genius." Bait. American.

FRANKENSTEIN,

OR, THE MODERN PROMETHEUS.

BY MRS. SHELLEY. IN 2 VOLUMES, 12mO.

" The romance of a child of genius." Canning.

" One of those original conceptions that take hold of the public mind at
once and for ever." Moore's Life of Byron.

" Certainly one of the most original works that ever proceeded from a
female pen." Literary Gazette.

" This work will be universally acceptable." Atlas.

" Perhaps there is no modern invention which has taken more thorough
hold of the popular imagination than Frankenstein." Spectator.

ANDREW THE SAVOYARD.

A Novel, by PAUL DE KOCK, Author of Modern Cymon, &c.

In 2 vols. 12mo. In the press.

" Another adaptation from the light and witty pages of De Kock, and exe
cuted with equal judgment and animation as regards the translation."

" Still, the same epigrammatic spirit pervades the work ; the same lively
delineation of character, often hit off by a single touch ; and the same char
acter so intensely French." Athenaum.

"The more we see of Kock's inventions, the more we like them. Upon
the frame-work of this story, which is by no means impossible, he has inter
woven much humor, touches of sterling nature, and specimens of search
ing wit."

" We prognosticate that this book will be read with avidity by all classes,
and not the least by those whose constrained and affected nicety will make
them openly condemn it the most." Metropolitan.



THE MODERN CYMON.

From the Jean of C. PAUL DE KOCK, Author of Andrew the
Savoyard, &c. In 2 vols. 12mo.

" De Kock is quite unrivalled in his sketches of Parisian society. There is
much character and spirit thrown into the translation, and the dialogues are
excellent." Lit. Gazette.

" A good translation of a clever work. Paul de Koek paints to the life the
bourgeois of Paris." Athenaeum.

" We cannot withhold our applause of the subtle spirit of fun, the fine
dramatic tact, and the natural portraiture of character." Atlas.



New "Works, published Ity Carey, Lea, &> Blauchard*



THE MAGDALEN AND OTHER TALES.

By SHERIDAN KNOWLES, Author of The Wife, Hunchback, &c.

In 1 volume, 18mo. In the press.

GODOL.PHIN,

A Novel. In Two Volumes, 12mo.

" These volumes are evidently intended as a satire on the Aristocracy.
Sheridan, Lady Jersey, Lord Dudley, &c. are among the dramatis personse. They
bear evidence of being the production of a practised writer, and a very clever
but dissatisfied man." Lit. Gazette.

" This is a very spirited work, far above the ordinary class of English
novels, and partaking in no small degree of the characteristic merits of
1 Vivian Grey,' and Bulwer's ' Disowned.' With much that is strained in
sentiment and overdrawn and exaggerated in incident, it is a deeply in
teresting work, by a man of strong mind and vivid feelings." Bait. Republi
can.

" It is the work of a superior mind, contains many thrilling and eloquent
passages, and would do no discredit to the reputation even of Bulwer." Penn.
Inquirer.

" There are well written scenes of deep interest represented, and various
passions depicted with a master hand. These, taken in connexion with the
regular plot of the work, must constitute a novel of no ordinary character."
U. S. Gazette.

THE CANTERBURY TALES.

BY SOPHIA AND HARRIET LEE.

In the press.

"There are fine things in the ' The Canterbury Tales.' Nothing of Scott's
is finer than 'The German Tale.' I admired it when a boy, and have con
tinued to like what I did then. This, I remember, particularly affected me."
Lord Byron.

" To read the Canterbury Talcs of the Misses Lee once more, is a species of
temporary regeneration. There is scarcely any educated person of this cen
tury who has not, at some time or other, of youth, drawn a sincere pleasure
from these pages. The different tales have been to many like turning down
a leaf in life ; we can find our place again in juvenile existence by the asso


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Online LibraryJames Fenimore CooperThe headsman; or, The Abbaye des Vignerons. A tale (Volume vol. 1) → online text (page 20 of 22)