James H. (James Hadden) Smith.

History of Duchess county, New York : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers online

. (page 73 of 125)
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Steen Vlackten." July 20th of the same year, they
conveyed to " John De Grafe,'' " corddwiner," in
consideration of ;^i4, forty acres, " butted and
bounded on the east to the land of Barnadus
Swartwout." August 15, 1727, they conveyed to
" Gerardus Lewys," of "Pocghkeepsing," yeoman,
no acres situated at a place " called in Dutch the
Riet Vly,'' southward from " Pocghkeepsink," ad-
joining on the west i,ooo acres belonging to, Henry
Vanderburgh, and on the south and east 100 acres
conveyed to Barnardus Swartwout by Thomas
Lewis. This tract " Gerardus Lewys " conveyed
to "Tunis Slengerland," Oct. 27, 1733, to secure
the payment of £,^2.

Feb. 28, 1723, Leonard Lewis, of Duchess
county, by his last will and testament bequeathed
to his wife, so long as she remained his widow, all
his real and personal estate, and in the event of
her re-marriage, one-half was to be divided among
his children, " Geesie, now the wife of Thomas
Roberts, Jersie, now the wife of Lowrens Van
Kleeck, Cornelia, now the wife of Isack Kip,
Thomas, Sara, now the wife of Isack Titsoor, Ger-
rardus, Catharina, now the wife of Pieter Van
Kleeck," Leonard, Johanna, Barendt and Johan-
nes, in such manner that Thomas, the eldest son,
should have six shillings more than his equal share,
and the others equal portions.

Sept. 25, 1729, "JacobesVan den Boogert "
and " Greetie " his wife, and " Mindert Van den
Bogert" and "Neeltie" his wife, of Duchess
county, in consideration of J^xo, conveyed to Ja-
cobes Steenberge, of said county, " cordwinder,"
three "morgen" of land at "pocghkeepsing," on
the north of John ConckUn's land, east of " the
King's hy Rode," beginning at a " certain bridge
and Run of water."

March 24, 17 29 -'30, Jonathan Oaklee of
"Pocghkeepsink," and " Antyie " his wife, in con-
sideration of £ 80, conveyed to Augustinus Turk,
of Utster County, blacksmith, thirty-eight acres and
sixteen roods, conveyed by Thomas Sanders and



wife to Oaklee, and bounded north by lands of
Thomas Sanders & Co., east by a lane given by
said Sanders for the use of the neighborhood, south
by the land of Barnardus Swartwout, and west by
the lands of John Concklin and " John Bookhout."

May 5, 1730, Bartholomeus Hogeboom, of
Duchess County, carpenter, and " Saramyn wyf,"
in consideration of " eyty pounds currant mony of
the provence of Niew Yorck," conveyed to John
DeGrsef, of said county, " ccerdwyner," land at
" pogh Keepsinck," " butted and Bounded on the
south syde of tJie land of baltes VanKleeck," and
extending to the river, which tract was deeded to
said Hogeboom by " Myndert Harmonse" and
Helena his wife in July, 1 709.

Thomas Rathbun, "of New Shoreham (alias
Block Island,) R. I." conveyed to each of the fol-
lowing named individuals, at* the time designated,
one-seventh of all his right to land in the town of
"Pecapsha, " viz : Feb. 4, 1730, to his son-in-law,
Samuel Eldridge, of North Kingston, R. I., " cord-
winder," and Content, his wife Dec. 24, 1730, to
his sons-in-law, Benjamin Bentley, of Greenwich,
R. I., and Patience, his wife, and Jonathan Rath-
bun, of Lyme, Conn., and Sarah, his wife ; and
Feb. 10, 1730-31, to his daughter "Sybill Wil-
cocks," widow, residing with him in Shoreham, R. I.

Feb. 25, i73o-'3i, Thomas Sanders and his
wife, in consideration of ^25, conveyed to their
son-in-law, " Redolphus Swartwout, "j, of Duchess
County, and Elsie, his wife, thirty acres, bounded
north by Frederic Fisher's land, east by " Jan Kas-
pers Kill," west by lands previously in possession
of " Rodolphus Swartwout."

Nov. 9, 1730, "Jacobes Van Den Boogert " and
" Grietie " his wife, and " Mindert Van Den Boo-
gert and Nelee " his wife, in consideration of £,'^0,
conveyed to Johannis Van Kleeck fifty acres loca-
ted at " Pochkeepsen," to the west of the land of
said Van Kleeck."

July 4, 1732, Christophel Warabome, of Duchess
County, " Tailor," in consideration of ;^i6o, con-
veyed to Matthew Dubois, of same county, yeoman,
one hundred and twenty acres contiguous to a
piece of land bought by Dubois of Andrew Teller,
commonly called Cuyler's Flat, adjoining and
north of Wappingers Creek.

Dec. 4, 1832, Isaac Fietsoort, of Duchess Coun-
ty, blacksmith, conveyed to Samuel Taylor, Jr.,
four acres " near the place called Pocghkeepsingk
and on the east side of the Kings Heigh Road.''
March 26, 1735, Isaac Fietsoort, in consideration,
of ;£ii5, conveyed to Timothy Low, shopkeeper,



TOWN OF POUGHKEEPSIE.



363



" in the Middle Ward at Pocghkeepsingk,'' eighty
acres "in the Middle Ward of Duchess County,"
"near the place called Pocghkeepsingk and on the
east side of the Kings Heigh Road," and Oct. 29,
1736, Lowe, in consideration of ;^ii8, conveyed
the same to "Symon Freer," of "the Middle
Ward at Pocghkeepsingk," yeoman.

April 15, 1735, Jacobus Vandenbogert, of
Duchess county, yeoman and wife, and Myndert
Vandenbogert, of the same county, and wife, in
consideration of ;£ioo, conveyed to Jan de Graeff,
of said county, land in " poucghkeepsinck," on Fall
Creek, adjoining the land of the widow of John
Kip, deceased, also of Col. Leonard Lewis, then
late of Duchess county, deceased, and of Baltus
Van Kleeck, then late of Duchess county, de-
ceased, and then in possession of Franc Filkin,
excepting and reserving the mill creek, called Fall
Kill, and a road down to the mill.

May 19, 1735, Henry Filkins, of "Poghkeep-
sinck," merchant, conveyed to John Marshall, of
New Vork City, merchant, land " lying and being
at Poghkeepsinck," on the East side of the King's
highway and north of the land of Lawrence Van
Kleeck, to secure the payment of _£5s, 'os-J the
payment of which was acknowledged Feb. 24,
1738-9, by Johannes Marshall.

The following list, which appears in an old tax
list of the county in 1771, and is on file in the
clerk's office in Poughkeepsie, is the fullest and
earliest list of the names of the inhabitants of the
town which has come under our observation. It
has a further interest in showing the comparative
wealth of those early settlers, many of whose names
are perpetuated in their descendants of the present
generation. The list which also includes the Pre-
cints of Pawling, Rhinebeck, North East, Amenia,
Beekman, Charlotte, Rombout and Southern, is
preceded by the following extract from a record of
a meeting of the Supervisors, at Poughkeepsie, on
Tuesday, June 4, 1771 =—

"The Assesser being met the same time were-
qualified by Justice Hopkins proceeded to their
business of assessing, signed all the Lists they then
delivered them to the Supervisors, Who having
signed the warrents directed to the Collectors,
Ordered the Clerk to Calculate the four days, who
finding the General County Charge to be at 3f d.
pr pound, and as each respective precinct have
their peculiar Charge causeth a variation in the
poundage."

The vote for the Precinct of Poughkeepsie, which
is the only list we subjoin, was 4s., 9d. per pound.
Following is the list : —



Assessment.

James Livingston j£i6 ^^3

Peter Jobs. Lassing 6 i

Peter Wm. Lassing's widow 2

Casparus Westerfelt 3

Matthew Van Keuren ........ 6 i

Henry Wilsie 3

Jacob Van Bunschoten 7 i

Ehas Van Bunschoten 9 2

John Concklin 10 2

Henry Livingston 38 9

Robert Hoffman 22 5

Nathan Freer 3 o

Simeon Freer 4

Baltus Van Kleeck 7 i

Peter Van Kleeck 12 2

Leonard Van Kleeck 32 7

Henry Vanderburgh 6 i

William Jaycocks 8 i

William Cipher's estate 4

William Lassing 3

John Vanderburgh 8 i

Jeremiah Dubois i

Peter Dubois 2

Clear Everitt 3

Peter Laroy 8 i

Boudewyn Lacount's widow .... 4

Robert Kidney i

Henry Pells 3

Everet Pells 10 2

Michael Pells 9 2

Peter Palmetier 2

Jacobus Palmetier 10 2

Arie Van Vliet 10 2

Tennis Tappen 2

John Swartwout 5 i

John De Graafif . ... 3

Cornelius Vielie 6 i

Peter Low 7 i

James Lucky 3

Abraham Freer 2

John Ferdon 4

Barent Kip i

John Miller 2

John Ferdon Jr 4

Gulian Ackerman 9 2

Robert ChurcheL 8 i

Henry Bush's estate 3

Michael Palmetier i

William Erwin i

John Freer 11 2

Cornelius Van Keuren 4

Cornelius Westerfelt 6 i

Isaac Concklin 2

Jacobus Van Kleeck 3

Benjamin Westerfelt 5 i

Thomas Dearing 3

John Seabury i

Myndert E. Vandebogert 3

Markus Van Bomel 2

Bartholomew Crannell 17 4

Zachary Ferdon 5 1

Mathias Moss i

Peter Vandebogert 1



Tax.



1 6s.


od


8


6


9


6


14
8


3
6


14


3


13


3


2

7



9
6
6


4


6


14


3


19





13


3


17





12





8


6


10





19





14
18


3



4
9


9
6


18


3



19





4


9


14
7


3
6


2
9
7
7
9


9
6
6
6
6


3


9


14
8


3
6


13


3


14
9


3
6


19





4
9


9
6


19





2
18


9



14


3


4


9


4


9


12


3


19
8



6


9


6


14


3


3


9


14


3


4


9


14
9


3
6





9


3


9


4


9


4


9



3^4



HISTORY OF DUCHESS COUNTY.



Assessment.

Joshua Owen ^ii ^2

Bartholemew Noxon 2

Richard Davis 10 2

Jacobus Freer 5 i

John Midler 5 i

Wines Manney .'. 5 i

Murray Lester's House i

Karl Hoffman 2

John Hoghteling 2

Jury Michael 2

WiUiam Low 3'

Richard Snedeker 22 5

Myndert Rynders i

John Fort 2 2

Abraham Van Keuren 1

Simon W. Lassing 2

Benjamin Jaycocks i

Elisha Adams i

William I. Lassing i

John Romer i

Thomas Burnet i

Jacob Ferdon 5 i

John Crookes farm i

Isaac VanBunschoten i

Simon Bartley 1

John Low 2

Barent Van Kleek 3

The Minister's house i

James Weldon 1

Isaac Fitchet i

Hans Palmetier 2

Francis Jaycocks, Jr. i

Henry Ellis 2

William Vanderburgh's estate . . 5 i

Mathew Dubois, Jr. 2

Zephaniah Piatt „.. 16 3

John P. VanKleeck 3

Peter M. Palmetier i

Isaac Palmetier i

Johannis P. Lassing 3

Johannis W. Lassing 1

Cornelius Brewer 2

John Bailey, Jr. 13 3

James Winans 2

Alex. Griggs i

Wyndert VanKleek 8 i

Michael Weldon i

Eh Emmons 2

John Coupman Jr 2

Jacob D. Palmetier. 3

John B. Kip i

Henry Hendrickse 4

John Hunt 4

Henry Vanderburgh Jr i

Isaac Balding 16

Jacob Bush i

Leonardus Lewis i

William Burnet i

Parson Beardsley 3

Nicholas Brewer's place i

Edward Schoonmaker, 7 i

Francis Hegemen 2

Thomas Dubois i



Tax.



I2S

9

7


• 3d
6
6


3


9


3


9


3


9


4
9
9
9


9
6
6
6


14
4


3
6


4


9


t7





4
9


9
6


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


3


9


4


9


4


9


4
9


9
6


14


3


4


9


4


9


4
9


9
6


4
9


9
6


3

9
16


9
6



14


3


4


9


4


9


14


3


4
9


9
6


I
9


9
6


4
18


9



4
9
9


9'
6
6


14


3


4


9


19





4


9


4
3 1


9
6


4


9


4


9


4


9


14


3


4


9


13
9


3

6


4


9



Tax.



" The Estate S. Pinckney is on," £ i

John Joh's VanSteenbergh i

Joseph Gale i

Richard Warner. i

James Armstrong 2

Maurice Smith 2

Henry and George Sands 16

Samuel Smith 3

Abraham Bartley i

John Jaycocks i

Jacob Low, Jr 2

Jacob Coapman i

John M. Retser 3

Isaac Baldwin, Jr 1

Ezekiel Cooper 3

Isaac Harris -. i

George Dallis i

Henry Van Vlarum 4

Barent Lewis, Jr i

Simeon Freer, Jr i

Isaac Romyn i

Robert Patton 1

John Paiton i

John Wilsie i

John Barns .' i

Peter Kip 1

Rooliff Westervelt's farm i

Thomas Newcomb i

Thomas Freer i

Gale Yelverton i

Samuel Dodge 6

Samuel Curry i

Thomas Jaycocks r

Casparus Romyn i

John Lovot I

Matthew Van Keuren, Jr i

Isaac I. Lassing 1

Jerry Hardman i

John Buys i

Caleb Carman o

Thomas Poole 2

William Terry 2

Ezekiel Pinckney 2

Samuel Cooke 3

Thomas Pinckney 2

Peter Harris «. 14

Joshua Moss e

Arie M|dler ', 2

CorneUus Buys i

Joel Dubois 2

Peter Andries Lassing 3

Isaiah Wildey 2

Stephen Wildey i

William Furraan 2

Mr. Schoonmaker 2

Hugh Van Kleek 2

Gilbert Livingston c

Lewis Dubois e

Samuel Pinckney i

David Ackerman j

William Barns 4

Barent Dutcher "4

Martin Bush , j



£ 4S


i. gd


4


9


4


9


4

9

9

3 16


9
6
6



14


3


4


9


4
9


9
6


4
9


9
6


4


9


14


3


4


9


4


9


19





4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4
I 8


9
6


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


4


9


14
9
9
9


3
6
6
6


14

9

3 6


3
6
6


I 3
9


9
6


4
9


9
6


14
9


3
6


4
9
9
9


9
6

6

6


I 3


9


1 3


9


. 4


9


I 3


9


19





19





4


9



TOWN OF POUGHKEEPSIE.



36s



Assessment.



Tax.



Benjamin Dubois ^

John Bush

Nathaniel Brooks

William Terry, Hatter

Jonas Kelsie

Philip Cooper ,

John Childs

William Emott

John Mc Bride

Anthony Hill

Zephaniah Hill

John Davis

John Emmons, Brickmaker

Peter B. Van Kleek, Jr

John Van Bunschoten

Phonix Lewis

Isaiah Bartley

John M. Palmetier

Jacobus Rynders

Peter Luyster

John . Carman

- Richard Everitt

Sands & Company's miller ....

Aaron Reade

Peter B. Van Kleek's farm

Peter Ab'm Lassing

Wm. Ab'm Lassing , . ....

Joseph Scott

Francis S. Laroy

Francis Jno. Laroy

Simon Laroy, Jr

Henry Bailey

Matthew Concklin

Peter Velie

Barnardus Swartwout

Richard Spraight

Alex. Barr

Jacob Kip

Francis Pells

Wm. Yeats .

Lodowick Cipher

David Cipher

Andrew John Ostrum

Joseph Sprague

Francis Harris



£



4s. gd
4 9



4
4
4
4
9
4
4
4
4
14
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4



9
9
9
9
6

9
9
9
9
3
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9



Total £^o?>^ 191 8s. od

The town contains several small villages, none
of them, however, of much commercial importance.
The principal of these are New Hamburgh and
Channingville, the latter being the most populous,
and now forming a part of the corporation of Wap-
pingers Falls.

Wappingers Falls.

Wappingers Falls is situated in the south part of
the town, on and about one and one-half miles
above the mouth of the creek from which it derives
its name, but mainly on the east side of the creek,
in the town of Wappinger. It is an incorporated



village of a little more than 4,000 inhabitants,
about seven-eighths of whom are operatives in
mills, and about one-third in the town of Pough-
keepsie. It is to this one-third portion that we
shall confine ourselves here, as the village will be
more properly described in connection with the
town of Wappinger.

That portion of the village lying north of the
creek was formerly known as Channingville, which
name is derived from the Channing family, who
owned the farm on which it mostly lies,* and pre-
viously as Ednamville. It contains one church
(Catholic), a union school, ten stores, mostly small,
one hotel, (the North American, kept by Patrick
Kennedy,) the Empire Overall Manufactory, the
Fancy Dye Works, a branch of the Duchess Co.'s
Print works, a wagon shop, kept by Brower Bros.,
a blacksmith shop, kept by Alonzo Vannosdall,
three tailor shops, kept respectively by Messrs.
Baum, Louis Diamond and Leopold Lippman, two
bakeries, kept by Edward W. Eagan and Edward
Odell, one photographer, (Walter Smith,) one un-
dertaker, (Richard F. Delaney,) two builders,
(John O'Farrell and Jeremiah Pardee,) and
Eagan's opera house, which was built in 1876 by
John Eagan, and has a seating capacity for five
hundred people.

Merchants. — The first merchant in this portion
of the village was John Crilley,who came here from
Glenham in 1842. He was a native of Ireland and
a cooper by trade. He built for his use, in 1842,
the store now occupied by John Eagan as a grocery.
It was the first brick building erected in the village,
on either side of the creek. Crilley did business
here some twenty years. James Roy, who had
previously kept a drug store on the east side of the
creek, succeeded Crilley in the Eagan store. He
removed after a few years to the store now occu-
pied by his widow and sons, who succeeded him
in business at his death. Samuel Brown, a native
of Ireland, was engaged for some years in the
print works, and about 1848 or '49 embarked in
mercantile business where his son John H. Brown
is now located. He continued in business till his
death January 22, 1876, at the age of seventy-
two, when his son succeeded him. John Eagan, a
native of London, England, emigrated thence to
New York in 1836. In 1847, he came to Wap-
pingers Falls, and was employed in the print
works till 1865, when he purchased the Crilley
store of the Crilley heirs. He was engaged in mer-

* The Channing farm is bounded on the north by Delaware street and
on the south by North South street.



366



HISTORY OF DUCHESS COUNTY.



can tile business until his death, November 15,
1881, at which time he was the oldest merchant
on the west side of the creek. His eldest son,
John F. Eagan succeeds him in business. When
Mr. Eagan came here in 1847, there were only
about a dozen houses, and Crilley's was then the
only store. The present merchants are John F.
Eagan, grocer, James Roy, druggist, John H.
Brown, general merchant, William Hanrahan,
grocer, William Eagan, grocer, John J. Hughes,
grocer, Michael Cary, grocer, Michael McCluskey,
grocer, John H. Dakin, stationer and tobacconist,
and Barlow & Stevenson, stove dealers and
plumbers.

Postmasters. — The first postoffice in Wappingers
Falls was established, says Mr. Eagan, about 1 840,
and was kept in 1847 by Joseph Blackburn, who
also kept the hotel now kept by Patrick Kennedy,
in Channingville. James Roy afterwards kept the
office for a short time in the Crilley store. Elias
Brown, who was and still is engaged in the manu-
facture of combs, next kept the postoffice in the
store now occupied, by John H. Dakin. He kept
the office about four years, till its removal to the
east side of the creek, about eight years ago,
where Clinton Sweet kept it some eight years,
and was succeeded in the latter part of 1880, by
Armenius Armstrong.

Professional Men. — Dr. Wm. H. Proal, who was
born February 9, 1822, and whose father was an
Episcopal minister at Utica, was the only physician
who has located on the west side of the creek. He
was here in 1847, and continued in practice till his
death, July 16, 1858. Not a single lawyer has
taken up his abode here.

The Empire Overall Manufactory, was estab-
lished in 1878, by John Eagan & Co., who con-
ducted the business till the death of Mr. Eagan,
Nov. 15, 1881, when his son, John F. Eagan suc-
ceeded to its management. The building is of
brick, is two stories high, and about forty feet
square. The rear portion was built for a tene-
ment house by John Gibbons over forty years ago ;
the front addition was erected by John Eagan in
1863, since which time till 1878, it was variously
occupied as a dwelling, barber shop and hotel. In
T878, it was converted to its f)resent use. Some
sixty persons are employed in the factory, the major
portion of whom are adult females. About 300
dozens of overalls are made per week.

Schools.— Iht first school house in Channing-
ville stopd on the corner of Main and Church streets,
on the site of the brick building now owned by



James Lynch. It was a long, low, wooden build-
ing, and was in use till the present brick building
was erected in 1866. John Meaney, if not the first,
was one of the first teachers on the west side of the
creek. John Farrington, now a physician in Pough-
keepsie, and Walter, his brother, now a lawyer in
that city, were early teachers in the old school
house. The union school was organized about
twenty years since. The first, principal was proba-
bly Mr. Howarth. He was succeeded by S. Mans-
field, who filled the position from 1862 to 1877.
Mr. MaccledufF next filled the position for one
term, and was succeeded by Thomas G. Schriver,
the present principal. William Dakin and Miss
Jane Dakin were among the early teachers before
the organization of the union school.

St. Mary's Church of Wappingers Falls ( Chan-
ningville). — Father Miles Maxwtell, who was locat-
ed at Poughkeepsiej' is believed to have been the
first priest who ministered to the people in the vi-
cinity of Wappingers Falls. He came here occas-
ionally and held mass in a private house, which is
known as the " black house," from the dark colored
paint used in its exterior decoration. The house
is still standing. It is located . on Clinton street,
and is the property of John Murray. It is believed
that the first church owned by the society was built
during the ministration of Father Maxwell, in
1840. That church is the central portion of the
building standing directly west of the parsonage,
which was used for pubUc worship until the present
church edifice was erected, additions having been
made to it on both ends. The church was origi-
nally twenty-four by thirty-six feet. Two ad-
ditions, one of thirty-two feet and the other of
thirty-five feet, were subsequently made, one on
either end of the original structure, with which they
are uniform in width. A further addition of four-
teen by sixteen feet was made about 18*70, to ac-
commodate the choir, and the fine organ, bought
about that time, which is still in use in the present
church. This old building, made disproportionately
long by its additions, is now used for Sunday school
purposes, for church meetings, and various kinds
of parish work. It is not known in what year it
was built, but Father Maxwell was here prior to
1846, and the church was erected previous to that
year.

Father John Smith, who was located at Pough-
keepsie, succeeded Father Maxwell in monthly ser-
vices for a short time. He was followed by Father
Michael Riordan, whose advent dates from June,
1844, in which year he located at Poughkeepsie,



TOWN OF POUGHKEEPSIE.



367



where he was the first resident priest. He extend-
ed his labors to this place once a month, and con-
tinued them about four years, also ministering to
the people at Rondout, which was equally true of
Fathers Maxwell and Smith.

In 1846, the Clinton Mill at Wappingers Falls,
(which was burned June 19, 1855,) was in process
of erection by James Ingham and others, and soon
after, the construction of the Hudson River Rail-
road was begun through this locality. These en-
terprises attracted many persons to Wappingers
Falls and its vicinity, both as employes in the mill
and as laborers on the railroad, and among them
many who were adherents of the Catholic faith.
In 1848-49 the cholera prevailed among the rail-
road employes at New Hamburgh, and was quite
fatal. The presence and services of a resident
priest thus became very desirable, and Anthony
Russell was deputized to visit Archbishop Hughes
in this behalf. In response to this solicitation the
Bishop sent to this locality Father J. Scollon, who
was the first resident priest at this place.

Father Scollon heroically devoted himself to the
arduous duties these labors devolved on him, gen-
erously sacrificing personal comfort in his minis-
trations toward the sick and dying. At times, for
a week together, he was known to have gone with-
out removing his clothing, lying down and snatch-
ing a few moments rest in the intervals of duty, so
constant were the demands on him. His services
during a period of about one and a half years, the
length of his stay here, form a strong feature in the
church history.

Father George R. Brophy succeeded Father-
Scollon and remained about three years, dividing
his labors between this place, Matteawan, and the
ore-beds in Beekman. He also, as well as those
who have succeded him on this charge, was a resi-
dent pastor.

In 1853, Father Dennis Sheehan entered upon
a pastorate of twenty-two years, continuing till his
death, Oct. 27, 1875. During his long and faith-
ful labors the church increased in numbers, making
necessary the two additions to their house of wor-
ship already referred to. He also built the churches
at Matteawan and Beekman, the former about
1856, and the latter about 1859, to both of which
stations he extended his labors.

Father Hugh S. O'Hare next supplied the pulpit
for a few months, and was succeeded in July, 1876,
by the present pastor. Father Charles M. O'Keefe,
who entered upon the work of the parish with such
spirit and energy that, by May, 1877, he had ex-



tinguished a church debt of $5,182, and prepared
the plans for a new church. During the second



Online LibraryJames H. (James Hadden) SmithHistory of Duchess county, New York : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers → online text (page 73 of 125)