James Henry.

Æneidea, or, Critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis online

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lEIEIIEA,



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CRITICAL. EXEGETICAL, AND AESTHETICAL

EEMAEKS

OK THK

AENEIS,

WITH A PERSON' A I, COIJ-ATIOX OF AT,L THE FIRST-CLASS MSS.,

UPWARDS OF OXK HUXDRED SECOXD-CLASS MSS., ANTJ Al-L THE

PRIXCIPAL EDITIONS.

BY



JAMES HENRY,

AUTHOR OF

NOTES OF A TWELVE YEARS' VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY
IN THE FIRST SIX BOOKS OF THE AENEIS.



INDICES.



M E I 8 S E X :

PRINTED FOR THE TRUSTEES OF THE AUTHOR.

1892.



PRINTED l!Y C. 10. KLINKIOIIT & SON, M KFSSEN.



1.

INDEX OF NAMES & MATTERS.



The referenr;es are to volume and page of the Aeneidea.



Ah rupe, 'on the mountain" 2. 505.

abacta nox, 'the routed, spent
night' 3. 711.

abdere. 4o put apart' 1. 224.

abolescere, 'to wane', opposed to
adolescere. 'to wax' 3. o'22.

absdndo and abscido, diifei'ence 2. 81 1 .

abstract for concrete, 1. 159; 3. S30.

accingere. 2. 127: 'to arm witli'
1. 289: 3. 346.

aeeipite haec (iv. 611). 'hoar tlieso
words' 2. 816.

accisus. 'cut all around', lioncc
'straitened' 3. 505.

accusative of closer definition 3. 328.

Acestes. explanation of omen of his
arrow's taking fire, 3. 181:
paralleled by conversion of Julius
< 'aesar's soul into a star in Ovid
(Met. XV.) 3. 132.

Achilles, his great stature 1. 862.

ad for apud 1. 213.

adamant, an actual substance 3. 341.

additus, nnony.f:iutvoi,\\A^not neces-
sarily a bad meaning 3. 245.

adducta sagitta, the arrow being
drawn back only as far as the
shooter's body 3. 924.

adire, uvTia'Ctir, 'accost' 1. 187.

aditus, 'approaches' 3. 229.

adjective, separated by many words
from substantive, 1. 18: descriptive
adjectives explanatory of the ety-
mology of the name of the place
to which they are added, 2. 453:
often, though joined to only one
member of a series, ai)plies to aU
the members, 3. 716, cp. 913:
4. 162.

admiration, bestowed on what is
imperfectly understood 3. 362.

adnare, used of ships 1. 742, &c.



adoriri, 'to set about a thing' 3. 551.

Adrastus, represented as pale (cp.
Amm. xiv. 11. 22, Adrasteus
pallor) 3. 332.

adstare, 'to stand by", 1. 430. &c.:
"to stand ready to hand, to help'
2. 385: ?,. 934. cp. 914.

adulti fetus, of bees 1. 670.

ad vena (lY. 591), 'intrudei-', 'inter-
loper' 2. 812

adverbs, local (uude, inde, hinc,
illinc), used personally 1. 145. 203.

'•Adversaria Virgiliana" in error
2. 155, 189, 560.

adversus — procella velum adversa
ferit (i. 107), 'strikes the sail
aback' 1. 347, &c.

Aegaeus, applied to Neptune because
worshipped at Aegae 2. 378.

Aeneas, compared implicitly to Her-
cules, 1. 188. &c., and superior
to him, 1. 194, in fact is a
polished up Hercules 2. 334. 421 ;
no one feels sympathy for him.
1.288: not afraid of death but of
death by drowning, 1. 327: his
fortunes contrasted with those of
Antenor, 1. 554: not meant to
rej)resent Augustus, 1. 576: Fox's
opinion of his character, 1. 647,
of his assumption of pietas 648
and viitus 652 : his narrative of
the siege of Troy only dwells on
those points in which he took a
prominent part, 2. 18: his senti-
ments as regards Helen similar
t(j those of Aruns as regards
Camilla, 2. 286 : in many respects
his character is drawn from
Jason in ApoUouius, 2. 359 : is an
adept at dissimulation, 3. 119: in
his pontifical cliaractcr puts (iii.

1*



Aeneis



aitus



288) the inscriptiou on the shield,

2. 408: his personal appearance
rufus, qiiadratus, 2. 564: compared
to Apollo, 2. 639: Virgil is fond
of separating him from his com-
panions, 3. 223, 760: in all his
actions is led along 1>y an
irresistible force, 3. 327: the true
descendant of Jupiter, 3. 703: is
never out of our siglit during the
whole poem, 3. 943 — 951, herein
fjuite diiTerent to Orlando in Ariosto.

3. 951 : stretches out liis liand in
pity to Laiisus when the latter
is dying 4. 127.

Aeneis [see Virgil |.

Aeolian islands, physical nature of
1. 3M.

Aeolus, how reiiresented as ruling
the winds, 1. 269, &c., 409; the
nature of his cavern. 1. 275, &c..
313, &c., 411 : a legate or khedive
of Jupiter, 1. 2<S9: politeness of to
Juno, 1. 302: his cuspis a trident,

1. 316: cai'icatured by the trans-
lators 1. 415.

aequare sequendo . ' to follow with
equal speed ', 2. 526 : aequatae
aurae, 'winds evenly blowing".
3. 202: aequatis procedere velis,
'to sail before the wind with
squared sails' 2. 808—811.

aequor, ' plain ' 4. 304.

aequus — non passibus aequis
(ii. 724), 2. 336—7: can mean
'impartial" and "propitious' 3.831.

aer, used for 'darkness', 1. 665: used
iniliscriminately with aether 3. 479.

aoratus. ' plated with bi'ouze". aereus.
' made of bronze ' 2. 249.

aerea pup]»is. 'having bronze rostra "
3. 65.

aeriae arces, 'loffv heights' 2. 408.
cp. 530.

Aeschylus, imitated by Virgil 2. 160.

aestus, of anger, 2. 779: 'the tide
of the sea' 1. 364.

aether, carelesslv used. 3. 319, 4S6,
(cp. 614). 777.

aetherias (v. 520), corrected by
Ijachmann to ai-rias 3. 127 — 8.

aothra. «i!h)tu<, 'bright sky' 2. 497.

alValiilis, i-rjinoanyonus: 2. 5(12.

ailV'ctare, 'to endeavoui' to get at'

2. 524.

afllare. 'to blast" 2. 312.
aftHetus, ' daslied tn Ihe ground'
2. 77.



Africus, the wind now called Tii-

beccio 1. 326
age, '^allex," an exclamation of

drivers to horses 2. 675.
agere , ' to marshal ', 2. 481 : agere

ventos, 'to drive the winds',

2. 671; 4. 92: agi (not agit) res
tempus (v. 638). 3. 170: nubibus
actus, 'riding on the clouds' as in
a chariot 3 ^790.

agger, 'stuff" for fdling up a cavity,

3. 912: tlie rampart built up
against the wall of a fort on the
inside 4. 11: agger viae, 'the high
road' 3. 86.

agitatus ('acted', 'performed') scenis
Orestes 2. 756.

agmen, applied to the serpents
coming across the sea 2. 119:
its three meanings 2. 346 :
applied to a marching army
3. 793: aginen remorum (v. 211).
'the march of the oars' 3. 70.

Agnes, St.. church of, at Kome 3. 46.

agnoscere, ' to recognize as an old
acquaintance' 2. 212.

Aix, mosaic at representing Dares.
Entellus and Bull 3. 121.

Ajax Uileus 1. 237. &c.: his fate
1. 241: 2. 162: painting of 1. 241.

Alliani i)atres 1. 148. &c.

• Alba's blood ' — a faulty ex-
])ression 1. 52.

alae (iv. 121), •huntsmen', not
pinnae 2. 265: alae velorum, 'the
wing-like sails ' 2. 484.

alere. tok^hv, said of Love 2. 551.

Alfieri. his version of Virgil reckless,
but as far as corrected superior to
Dryden's, 2. 738: his copy of the
Baskerville Virgil in the Laurentian
Library (1. xxxiv).

alga, what 1. 502.

Allecto, herself a type, deals with
tyiies and not with the things
typified, 3. 540: quite calm in her
dealings with Amata 3. 542.

allegory in the detection of Juno's
sti;atagem by Neptune 1. 402.

alliteration (praeterea praedicta
jiriorum, iv. 464) 2. 753.

alludere, ' to joke to another' 3.501.

Alps, the barriers of Italy 3. 433.

alternative, thrown in i)arenthetically
1. 299.

altus, 'august', not 'lofty' 3. 727,
934: an ei)ithet reserved for the
gods or demigods 4. 109: (■y.nitylo-



alveus — arma



TUTOi lb.: alte simply 'up', 'in au
upward directiou', not 'on high'
in cniicat alto (xi. 496) 4. 196:
alto humero, 'high uj) on the
^shoulder", in scopulo alto, "high
up on the rock ' 4. 380 : altum
applied to tlie sea ~ "the high '
and not "the deep' 1. 232 cp. 653:
alto prospiciens, 'looking from a
height' 1. 388.

alveus has a contemptuous sense
3. 306.

amans not applied contenijjtuously to
Menelaus but = ' husband ' 3. 336.

aniare focos, ' to stay close beside
the hearth' 2. 389: amare litus,
■ to hug the shore ' 3. 59.

amaricus, sacred to Tlymen 1. 825.

Amata turns Bacchanal, not Lavinia
3. 552.

Amazons dwell beside the Thermo-
don 4. 226, 228.

ambiguumque relinquat (v. 326),
ambiguum is masculine 3. 92.

ambrosiae comae, 'diffusing the odour
of ambrosia' 1. 662.

"amerced" 1. 35.

Ammianus Marcellinus, liis hue
Miltonic account of the death of
Valentinian 2. 853.

anacolutha 1. 66, 207,211, especially
510: 4. 79, 214, 274.

uvaytalhat, lit. 'to ascend', hence
'to put to sea' 1. 654.

(cv«(&fi((i; ^(t)ao<: 2. 270.

anceps formido , ' distracting fear '

2. 369: in prose it often means
•two fears' 2. 370: applied to the
sword anceps represents uik/ ijxijg,
Si!)r]y.Tog, (iuifiSi^iog, (ciof inkiji

3. 576.

Anchises considers himself unworthy
of burial (facilis iactura sepulcri)
as having been struck by light-
ning 2. 309 : is in the liighest
degree religious 2. 310.

anchored sliips had their sterns next
the shore 4. 52.

anfractus, a turn on itself 4. 200.

augere, lit. 'to narrow' 3. 683.

anima muudi, the source froni whicli
men and cattle have siu'ung 1. 853:
anima purpurea (foivo^; tivaug, the
purple life, the life-blood ;).'874 — 5.

animus added as an explanation of
a previous subject 3. 329: animi
'spirit' 3. 550.



Anius, compared to Melchisedek
2. 378.

ante omncs, with verbs, 4. 250:
ante not used as an adjective
1. 492.

antenna, description of, 2. 490.

Antenor— his voyage from Troy
1. 540, &c. : the town he built
I 'ailed Troy 1. 551, &c. : the peace
he enjoyed 1. 552, &c. : his for-
tunes elaborately contrasted with
those of Aeneas 1. 552.

antiquus, ' old and deai- ' 2. 98 : 3. 160,

antithetical style of Virgil 1. 702.

antrum of tlie winds 1. 272, 275, &c.

aperire, ' to make clear and open '

1. 418: 2. 54, cp. 2. 407, of ob-
jects being disclosed to view by
rounding a promontoiy.

apex, yhoaou nroog 2. 321: 4. 41:
or 'the cone of a helmet' 4. 42.

Apollo a marriage god 2. 596 :
Aeneas compared to A])ollo 2. 639 :
celebrated for his gait 2. 640.

ApoUonius Rhodius imitated by
Virgil 2. 644, 603, 712 : 3. 635, 852.

apparere, 'to present oneself 2. 211:
' to be an attendant on ' (apparitor)
4. 325.

applause — at entertainments, accord-
ing to Roman etiquette, should be
commenced by the household 1. 859.

a])tare classem, ' to rig a fleet ' 2. 689 :
aptus 'rigged' 2. 761.

Aquilo 1. 345 : the producer of clear
skies, 3. 547 : Aquilone secarc
(v. 2) 3. 2.

arbor, used for an ' oar ' 4. 32.

Arco Scuro, inscription on chapel
of Virgin under 1. 761.

Ardea, its derivation 3. 558.

ardere, a very strong word in Latin

2. 85.

arduus expresses erect attitude and

tall stature 3. 691.
Arethusa, the patroness i)robably of

all littoral springs 2. 532.
argutus applied to sound ' whirring '

3. 471.

aries, 'battering', not ■battering-
ram' 2. 251.

Ariosto sometimes ridiculous 3. 602:
his grotesque exaggeration 4. 329.

arma, 'wars' 1. 116: 2. 79: 'sliield'
1. 484, &c.: 4. 134: all kinds of
means of offence and defence (cp.
inermis) 2. 55: the profession of
arms 2. 76; the 'battle', 'held of



armi — battle



arms' 4. 116: 'armed soldiers'
4. 222: "arma virumque " a
favourite Virgilian combination
4. 246: (V. 15) 'oars' not 'sails'

3. 6: a general term for oyzA« but
deriving a special sense from the
context 3. 7 : ' oai's ' 2. 689 : arma
colligere not ' to shorten sail ' but
•to make all tight' 3. 8.

armi, ' shoulders ' of a man 2. 560,
663 cp. 4. 225: that part of the
horse where the rider sat 3. 454.

armillary sphere 3. 440.

arms of Aeneas are not clashed
together in the sky 3. 736: sounds
and actions depicted thereon 3. 766.

arrcctus applied to a chariot 3. 863.

ars, 'cunning' 4. 247.

article the, unfortunate want of in
Latin 1. 68, 143, 591, 674, &c.:
2. 376, 504, 605: 4. 293.

arundo, what, 1. 74.

Aruns, his combat with ('aniilla

4. 235, &c.

ai'va and urbes joined together 1. 758.
arx of Aeolus 1. 270. 272; arces

= a steep hill 3. 222.
Ascanius — liis treatment by Venus

1. 820: why called -mea maxima
cura' ib.

AsgiU, John, his simplicity 3. 93.

aspirare of winds 3. 160.

assuetus with genit., 4. 193.

assurgere used of the actual rising
of the rower from his seat to in-
crease the force with which he
pulls the oar 4. 32: cp. assurgere
in clipeum 4. 176.

astra, ' the heavens ' 2. 494 : Titauia
astra, ' the sun ' 3. 389.

at first word of a passage 1. 112:
contrasts two countei-pait pictures

2. 247 : not in itself imprecatory
2. 268.

Atlas 2. (377—8.

at<]ue introducing a chmax 1. 265:

differs in use from -(juc 1. 476.
atra dies, r/;A(^^s m^i'-Q, perhaps a

nursery phrase 3. 316: atris igui-

bus uri, ' with the fires of a guilty

conscience' 2. 728.



atrox, 'ruthless', (cthjvii^- 1. 809.
attactus, production of the sense of

feeling 3. 545.
Attila and Romulus 3. 766: Attila's

funeral compared with that of

Pallas 4. 152.
attollere with ablative 2. 390.
attouitus 3. 240.

audens opposed to a\idax 3. 248.
audire, 'to be called' 2. 81.
Augustine, St., his regret at having

wasted his time reading the

classics 2. 861 : converted by

reading Cicero's Hortensius ih.
Augustus not adumbrated in Aeneas

1. 576: his genealogy on both

sides divine 3. 434.
aula of Aeolus 1. 412: applied to the

abode of any man or animal iO.
aulaea, hangings of a room 1. 825,

&c., 828.
aura, 'radiance' 1.753: aurae, 'the

sky ' 2. 340 : its usages 3. 392 :

per auras can be used without a

verb of motion 3. 579.
aureus used metaphorically 3. 698 :

4. 144, 190.
Aurora performs the same journey

each day as Phoebus 3. 339.
aurum used for a gold cup 1. 849:

for a gold fastening 4. 247.
auspicia. majora and minora 2. 426.
Autonoe, the successor of the Sibyl

in Silius 3. -235.
avena, what, 1. 66, &c.
Aventinus, his shield 3. 595 — 6.
Avernus, Lake 3. 250: sacrifices

offered at 3. 273.
avertere, 'to tui'n back' 1. 233:

aversus 1. 762: aversi not to be

read for adversi (ix. 412) 3. 891,

nor aversum for adversuin (xi 691)

4. 231.
avulsus, ' torn away ' (with ropes),

of a tree 2. '299.
-ax -^ Ital. -accio signifies a bad

degree of a thing 3. 58 , 248 :

4. -245, 266, '289.
axis coeli, *the loUing heavens'

3. 417, sometimes axis lias the

same, meaning witliout coeli ib.



B



bacchari, ' to liot ' 4. 14.
Bacchus a marriage god 2. 596.
Baiae, its bay has black sand because
formed out of lava 3. 938.



lialancing of sentences 3. 239, 244.
balteus used for tlie zona or upper

girdle of women 1. 616.
battle and storm, resemblance of, 1 .321 ,



bees — caput



bees, Virgil's idea of their production

1. 671: a bad omen 3. 485: con-
sidered by the American Indians
as the harbinger of the white man
3. 486.

bidens, wliy a sheep is so called

2. 595.

bilingnis diyXMOous 1. 808.

bipatentes portae, • gates two-valved
and open' 2. 168: 4. 6: bipatens
tectum, a house with two doors
and those doors open 4. 6.

bipeunis not used by Trojans and
Latins 3. 577.

birds, easy downward flight of, '.i. 74.

Bitias, the way he fell in death

3. 935-7.
bivium, what, 3. 837.
jShoftaTKcg (cqto^ 3. 500.

body — a fine body considered ne-
cessary for superior greatness of
mind 2. 565: body the prison of
the soul 2. 852.

Boileau, his L/driii 2. 349.

boiling of meat not unknown in
heroic times 1. 500, &c.

boots not worn in the house 2. 662.

Bopp. 1. 38.

Boreas, the strongest of winds 4. 291 :
famous for rolling great waves and
bringing clear weather 4. 292.



Borgia, Caesar, killed an ox as En-
tellus did, 3. 121.

bow and arrows, only once used by
Aeneas 1. 489: generally carried
for heroes by an attendant 1.486:
[see D/'ana].

British Museum, discourtesy of the
officials Ixvii, Ixxvii — Ixxviii.

Brutus, his execution of his sons a
preeminently Roman act 3. 431.

bullae on a belt 4. 77.

Burger, liis Leonora compared with
the Fourth Book of the Aeneid
2. 556.

burroni, beds of Italian torrents 4. 59.

burying one's friends, the second
most important duty among the
ancients 2. 219.

Butes, the nature of his wound
4. 231-2.

Byron, his sketches generally hasty
and immature 3. 161 : his com-
parison of Rome to Niobe, the
reverse of Virgil's comparison of
Rome to Cyltele 3. 414: compares
Venice to Cybele 3. 415, wliich
image he derived from Sabellicus
ih. : the materials for his account
of Don Juan's shipwreck whence
derived 1. 438.



c



Cacus a robber, hence read fui'is,

not furiis in viii. 205, 3. 664:

the position of his cave 3. 678 — 9.
cadere applied to sails, 'collapse',

2. 403.
cadus, earthenware jar, its nature

1. 487, &c. : the word survives in

•'tea-caddy' 1. 488.
caecus ' hidden ' 2. 553.
caelestes used for the gods when

the dii infcrni are excluded, 4. 157.
caelum, carelessly used 3. 319: used

for our world in ojjposition to

Hades 1. 349.
Oaeneus 3. 324.
calamus, what 1. 73.
calces, of horses fore-paws 4. 145:

I'alx for pes 3. 93 [cp. keel].
calles, 'glailes', "lawns" 3. 322, 883.
CalUmachus, imitated by Virgil 3. 566.
('allisto 4. 255.
Camilla, her troop not a cohort of

Amazons 4- 198; her name sof-



tened from Casmilla 4. 211: her
dedication to Trivia 4. 215, &c. :
the poetical beauty of her story
4. 219 : her combat with Aruns
4. 235, &c. : her death the turn-
ing point of the war 4. 250 : her
prototype Penthesilea 4. 260.

caudens, 'glowing' 2. 494.

canentia lumina, the whitening eyes
I'f old-age, for in old age the
colour of the eyes generally be-
comes light, 4. 68.

canere, 'to musicize' 1. 120, &c.

canistra, their shape 1. 830.

canna, 'pipe' 1. 76.

canus applied to aged divinities
1. 577.

capere terras, its meaning 1. 659.

capi, 'to be captivated' with a
thing 3. 695.

captare, ' to try to eatch ' 2. 482.

caput, often used in close ccmnection
with death 2. 859 : of the source of



cara — city



a river 3. 640: applied to the
wliole body 3. 899: the principal
personage in a business 4. 186.

cara niihi (iv. 634), not sisto niihi,
2. 823.

carmen, 'melody' 1. 99: not ne-
cessarily in verse ' motto ' 2. 408.

carpere contains in all its senses the
idea of ' gradually ', ' bit by bit '
2. 554.

cassus with abl. answers to our
enclitic -lens with adjectives, o g.
cassus lumine ' lightless ', i. e.
'lifeless'.

castigare moras, meaning 2. 740.

castra movere, used metaphorically

2. 484.

oastus, a constant epithet of sacerdos

3. 374.

Catalogue of Italian warriors in
Seventh Book shows the aristo-
cratic spirit of A'irgil 3. 591: it
is vastly superior to Homer's
Catalogue 3. 593 — 5 : shows pre-
eminently Virgil's variety and
command of language 3. 594.

Catiline, the threatener gibbeted in
Hades on a threatening rock 3. 768.

(Jato, once a "ductor" in the Ludus
Troiae 3. 149.

Caudine Forks served as the model
to Yirgil for his description of the
place in which Turnus laid his
ambush 4. 199, &c.

causa lacrimis vnixxavucc tij^ kv/irjg^
'incentive to grief 2. 409.

cavus 1 . 282 : opposite to curvus
2. 50: a mere eke 2. 51 : ' envelop-
ing' or 'empty' 2. 186: applied
to a shield 2. 407: 'having no
substance' 3. 289: applied to
apertures which were permanently
open 3. 900.

ccdere, ' to pass to ' 2. 409 : of
yielding to an impulse, hixtiv
2.474: cedere loco, 'to give place'
(loco not special) 3. 538.

celorabat (iv. 641) not coleliraliat
2. 825.

eella, of ancient temple 1. 728: its
transition to the modern I'haneel
1. 732.

cclsus, of grandeur 3. 643.

Centaurus, the jiKoaatjnoi' of a ship

4. 31.

centum, used generally 1. 584.
Cerberus, appears to liavc got vi.M-y
little food 3. 690.



Cerealia arma, pestle and mortar

1. 477.

Ceres, her temples built in lonely
places 2. 333 : a marriage goddess

2. 596.

cernere, appropriately used 2. 739.

certamen (nondum certamine misso
V. 545) of a single event , not
equivalent to the whole ludi 3. 144.

certus nuntius, "special messenger",
not 'faithful messenger" J. 766:
applied to heavenly luminaries

3. 277, &c.

chalumeau, from calamus 1. 86.

chariot races, simile taken from, 1 . 266.

Charles V., 1. 231.

chastity, rare among married women
of the lower classes at Eome 3. 713.

Chateaubriand misunderstood immota
lumina (iv. 331—2) 2. 706.

Chimaera, name of a ship (v. 118)
3. 33.

Chione 4. 256.

yoioui;, what, 1. 257, 366.

chorus, a number of persons in a
circle, either singing or dancing,
or both, and probably at the same
time holding each others hands
3. 553.

('hrist, his teaching perverted by
literal interpretation 3. 651 : nor
can it be understood without a
knowledge of Eastern customs
3. 662.

cicuta, 'pipe' 1. 76.

ciere, ' to produce ', e. g. lacrimas,
'to Aveep' 3. 3'29, bella, 'to carry
on wars' 3. 429, nimbos, 'to
thunder' 3. 702.

einctus Cabinus 3. 590.

cingere flamma, ' to set on fire '

1. 815, &c. : sometimes not to
' surround ' but to ' bound ' on one
side only ;]. 898: einctus flammis
' armed witli fire, carrying fire in
one's hands ' 4. 321.

(•inis atar 2. 819: cineri Sychaei»,
api)osition (not cinei'i Sychaei)

2. 801 : twofold meaning of 2. 821
[cp. y.ovt^\.

Circello , Monte , its grove not
apprnached even in this century

3. 467.

Ciris as it ajipears in the Cod.
Uasileensis is a transcrijit from the
2'i'l Ivoman edition liii— Iv.

city. The ancient city had three
essential parts niuri, arx, tecta.



clamor — Coroebus



9



1. 669 : cities in ancient Libyae
1. 767: silvae and urhes embrace
the whole coimtiy 1. 767: cities
represented as dead 3. lUi-J.

clamor the death-wail, its effect 2. S3S.

clarus, 'distinii'uislied ', 'conspicuous'
3. U17.

classes like at i-ij^t,- in Homer means
'the encampment', ships and tents
forming one group 2. 48.

claustra, ' the barriers ' 1 . 266, 26S :
applied to straits 1. 26'J : 2. 256:
'the enclosure' 2. 140.

clavus, 'tiller', 'helm', y.anui 3. 57.

Clement Vll. 1. '231.

Cleonymus — his voyage to the Brenta
1. 541.

clouds, supposed to be compressed
air 3. 8.

clypeum, neuter 3. 935.

Clyte, the mother of, 4. 256.

cogere, force of, 1. 108.

colla, moUia colla applied to the
necks of horses 4. 223.

colles and nemora fre(iuentlv con-
nected in Virgil 3. 669, 694, 699.

colligere the regular word for
'shortening' ladies' dress 1. 615:
colligere arma (v. 15) 'to gather
up oars ' 3. 7, yet cp. 3. 8.

Cologne, martyrs of, their exercises
compared with the Ludus Troiaii
3. 143.

color, the visible appearance of things
3. 286.

comites, always in attendani'e on the
great 3. 447.

commentators on Virgil generally
not subtle enough 1. 820.

committere portam , • to close a
gate' 3. 926.

commotes, 'disturbed' 1. 387.

compages, what, 1. 583: 2. 50.

comparative sometimes less emphatic
than positive 1. 512: 3. '248, 512.

complex thought, sonietimes ex-
pressed by separate sentences,
each sentence applying to tiio
whole thought 3. 473.

componere diem, lit. 'to put thi.' day
to bed' 1. 644, i^c. : eompouere se,
'to settle oneself 1. 82(i.

compound passages in \'irgil 3.
381, &c.

con-, intensitive prefix 2. 4S, 271,
299, 312, 429, 48(5, 494: 3. 11'2,
365, 424, 647, 726, 755. 865,
877; 4. 54, 145.



concidere, 'to fall all of a heap"
2. 264.

concipere focdus, 'to fcrnudatc the
tieaty' 4. 266.

concitus, always applied to the
moving not td the resisting power
in Virgil. Hence {\\\. 127) read
crebris freta consita terris 2. 385.

conclamatio 1. 503, kc: its object
1. 506.

concutere, "to shake violentlv' 3. 628,
701.

condere, to put into a jilace so as
to hide 2. 205.

confeta sus 3. 635.

Conington, J. — his verse trans-
lation of the Aeneis severely criti-
cised 1. '29—56. cp. 329, 535, 543:
his honesty 2. 654.

conscendere ae({Uor 1. 653 — 4.

conscius, for conscius sibi 2. 78.

eonsessu (v. 290) dat. 'the seated
assembly' not 'the place of assem-
blage' 3. 88.

consilium, possilil(> mistake f(jr con-
cilium 2. 77.

conspicere, 'to liave a full view of

1. 430.

Constantine the (ireat, anecdote of,

2. 8-28.

constare, 'to remain tlio same', 'to
be settled' 2. 484.

consulere, 'to conn^ to a determi-
nation" 4. 179.

contemptor divum, not 'blasphemer'
but ' disregarder of tlie gods ' 3. 361,
630: 4. 110.

conticesco, ' to be pei-fectly still ' ;
often used of a single person 2. 11
(cp. 48); 3. 241.

contra, often used by Virgil 3. 44:
4. 83, 318; "fellow-servant with
ingens" 3. 44: 'in return' 4. 58.

./ontradictions in Virgil 1. 14S, 409,
415, 508 : 2. 358 : 3. 270, 296, 560.

contrarius, 'advers(!' 1. 520.

conversa ousjiidc, • with thc> butt-end
of his spear' 1. 312: converse
pollice 1. 313 : conversa numina


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