James Henry.

Æneidea, or, Critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis online

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(v. 466), 'a god in disguise' 3. 116.

convexum wliat 1. 591, 785: con-
vexum nemorum 1. 592 c[». 784.

convulsa limina, 'tiie dixivs toi'u off
their hinges ' 2. 253.

cornus mascula 2. 505.

Coroebus, tlie Othryoneus of Homei'
2. 170,



10



corona — Delille



coroDH duplex sent to Dido 1. 804:
jf^arland [ilaced on images of tute-
lary divinities in ships '2. 742 :
corona tonsa (v. obB) 'the round
crop of hair' 3. 147—8.

Coronis 4. 255.

corpora, 'living bodies' 1. 300, &c.,
339, &c. : 2.' 148 : 3. 232 : ai.plied
to the universe, the earth, chaos
3. 390.

corripere viani 3. 365.

cortina, the hell-slia]ie(| cover of a
tripod 2. 381.

coruscus, signifies rapid alti'i'nate
appearand? and disap|)earance,
'flashing', uloIo^, 1. 462, &c.

Corybantia aera, " cymbals ' 2. 383.

costae, the 'ribs' of a ship or similar
structun^, opposed to tabulae, tln'
outside Itoarding 2. 37.

cow, why saci-ificed by Dido 2. 597.

Cowley, his Davideis almost a trans-
lation of the fii'st two books of
the Aeneis 2. 349.

crepusciilum, derivation of, 3. 279.

crimen, ' unchastity ' 2. 799.

crispare, 'to clench' 1. 595: crispus
'not flaccid', 'braced' 1. 593.

crudelis opposed to pius [see pielas\
1. 181: in iv. 681 refers to Anna
not to Dido 2. 841.

crudus 3. 296, Occ. : 4. 98: joined to
viridis 3. 298.

cruentus, ' gory ' 1 . 584.

culi)a, fmix pas 2. 656.

(Jumae, hill of, described 3. 219.



cumulatam morte remittam, 2. 745.

cumulus, what, 1. 355.

(■unctans, 'tough' 3. 270.

cuncti, "air considered as a bodv

1. 738.
('upid — hie action only i-0(|uired in

the case of thosii in high rank

1. 807: he alone can despise the
tliundei'bolt 1. 811 : statue re-
pr(^senting him breaking Jupiter's
thunderbolts across his knee 1.813.

cura, uioiui'd, Litkr]nu, 1. 821: love
viewed fi'om the dark side 2. 554:
in iv. 551 'troubles' not 'cares of
love ' 2. 800 : how restricted when
applied to pei'sons 3. 379.

currus, chariot and horses, 1. 436,
720: 3. 506: 4. 289, 293.

curtains, used for a couch of death,
4. 161.

curvus, opposed to cavus 2. 50.

cuspis, carried by Aeolus, used for a
trident 1. 316.

(iustodia, both ab-stract and concrete,
3. 830.

Cybele, Rome compai'cd to her by
Virgil, Venice by Byron 3. 414 — 5.

Cvclades and Sporades not distin-
■guished by Virgil 2. 387.

Cyclic poet 1. 5.

Cyclopia saxa, i. e. Aetna 1. 496.

Cyclops, lived on the side of Aetna

2. 50.5: Polvphemus fond of music
2. 517. ■

cymba very commoidy applied to
' I 'baron's "boat 3. 307^.



]>



Dante grosslv mis(;onceives iii. 56,
2. 372: and vi. 300. 3. 294.

dare arma, 'to supply arms' 2. 199:
date (ut) vulnera lyinphis abluam
(iv. 683) 2. 844: datur bora (piieti,
•it is the liour of re.st' 3. 202.

Dardanius, ajiplied to Aeneas when
he is looking at the pi(;tures (i. 499),
as lie is iilled with Dardan iv-
collections 1. 721.

dative ethical 3. 103, 197, 661.

Davics, .Tohn Fletcher, Es(i., Ixvii,
Ixxxii, fly leaf facing 1. 1.

de- in composition lias the force of
' away ', e. g. degrandinai'c ' to
hail away' 2. 586; or 'to the end ',
'out', e. g. deflere 'to weei» to tlie
end', 'to weep it out' 4- 161.



death depicted evei'y where at the
taking of Troy 2. 184 : the helpless-
ness of the dead, their ignorance
of their fate, " tliey neitlier bear
nor see" 4. 102.

decus addere, ' to add gra<"e or lieautv
to a thing" 3. 694.

decut(n'e, applied to knocking oft
missil(>s liy one's shield 4. 105.

dedecus, appbed to defeat 4. 310.

dedication of children to the gods 4. 54.

ilcfensor, applied to what is inaninuite
2. 257.

defiu're, often a|)])liod to travellers
from on(i shore to another 3. .555.

Deipbolx^, the Sibyl herself 3. 232.

Delille's translation of Virgil very
faulty 2. 169 : also sing-song 2. 778,



Delphi — donum



11



Delphi, Jubtin's dt>scriiirinn of uracular
cave at, 3. 225.

demigods, free fioiu dt^ith o. 25().

demittere neei, to send down to
death (the lower world) by tlie
executioner 2. 70, 205: deniissa
ex hiuneris 2. (384 [cp. e.v\.

demonstrations made by ancients by
waving any i)art of the dress above
the head 3. 778: demonstration
expressing an invitation to one s
embrace made by opening the gar-
ment 3. 779.

depasci, 'to feed away on' 2. 121.

depositus, said of a sick man whos('
case is laid down [l e. given up)
by his physic-ians ilnokf-Xfiuutio^-
4. 294.

deprensus, of a wild Ix^ast caught in
a trap 4. 19.

desertus, -lonely', 'solitary' 4 254:
deseitae Cereris 'of Ceres in the
wild' 2 333: deseitas terras, 'the
lonely lands of exile'.

desolatus, ' abandoned by ' 4. 260.

despectare, 'to look down witii con-
tempt' 1. 660.

deus, doubtful whetln'r a special god
or the Divinity generally, 'heaven'
1. 589: used indefinitely and co:n-
plimentaiily 1. 798: used for a
divinity genei'ally making no dis-
tinction of god or goddess 1. 801:
applied to Sleep 3. 866 [see <!o(ls\.

dextra, 'by force', 'with fighting'
cp. manu 2. 526.

Diana = shooting with Ituws and ai'rows
just as Mars = war, Vulcanus = fire
4. 219 : is especially noticed as
having slain many actual persons
4. 255 — 6 : was considei'ed the
slayer of aU those wlio dic-d from
mysterious and unknown causes
4. 257.

Dickson, Rev. Dr., of Glasgow liii,
Iv, Ivii, Ixv, Ixxv.

dictus, used of epithets 3. 559.

Dido, '' the most jierfect embodiment
of disintei'ested love, nay, of lo\'e
in ojtposition to interest for which
a grateful world has to thank a
poet" 1. 635: has something
masculine in lier character 1, 640,
720: does not drink wine at the
banipiet 1. 847: Virgil's delineation
of her character 2. 544: imitated
in the Sofonisba of Tiissino and
the IJidon sc sacrlfimit of Jodelle



2. 544 : Viigil uidebted as regards
her to ApoUonius and Theocritus
2. 546: her character tinged with
snpeistition 2. 658 : was never
married l>ut only affianced to
Sychaeus 2. 567: breaks tlirough
all restraints of shame and is really
tiie seducer of Aeneas 2. 591 :
Ausonius's epigram on her 2. 592:
her fault not voluntary 2. 656 :
her suicide compaied with Panthea's
2. 823, and with that of Ajax
2. 825 : her desin; of fame after
deatli 2. 827: her death conti'asted
with that of Mezentius 2. 849.

digerere, n^notiv, 'disj)oseof' 2. 114.

dii, possible form of diei (Gell. ix.
14. 8) I. 795.

dilectus, loved by choice 2. 347.

dirus, a constant epithet of iron 1. 583.

discere, "to practise' 3. 75.

discinctus, 'loose-giil;', applied to
praecinctus, ' ligjitly-giit ' 3. 785.

dis(;olor 3. 268.

discurrere pares (v. 580) 3. 154.

dissimulation when successful, when
not 1. 395.

ilissyllables of wliich the second
syllal)le is short, if at the com-
mencement of a verse do not end
a clause 4. 47—9, 118.

di versus, diversity of situation 2. 158 :
diversa exsilia, • differr'nt exiles '

2. 352, &c.

dives opum, 'in- easy circu)nstances '
opp. to luidus opum 1. 198.

dividere, to distribute 1. 491.

divinus, -supremely excellent' 2. 36.

Dolon original of Sinon, but an in-
ferior creation 2. (30.

dolphins — boys in the Ludus Troiae
appropriat(dy compared to them

3. 157: cp. Falconer's description
of dolphins ih.

doinus, the house of a gi'eat man,
while tectum is the house of an
ordinary man 2. 190: hence came //
(hioino, oixo';, to (?xpress the principal
churcli in a city 2. 190: the land
where a god is es|)ei,-iallv worship-
ped 3. (539—640.

Donatus, the commentator of Terence
is not the same as the Donatus
mentioned by Servins 2. 272.

^ovcci, what, 1. 74.

donum Minervae, ' gift to Minerva'
2.44: gifts of enemies fatal (t/i)^QO)v
adiooH 6m(hc y.ovx ofrjoiiac) 2. 48;



12



door — Evandrius



doiiuin Triviae (i. e. Camilla), ' gift
to Trivia' 4. 217: the reason why
Trivia herself calls Camilla "do-
iium Triviae" 4. 217 — 8.
door of Dido's temple 1. (3!»a, i&c. :
nature of words expressing 'door'

1. 093: postes applied to a door

2. 248.

dorsum, 'hump' or 'hummock'
1. 3G(J: 3. 677.

dotalis, 'as a dower' 2. (321.

di-agon of the Hesperides 2. 765.

Drances 4. 180, &c.

dreams, origin of the notion that
morning dreams are true 1. 71(3:
sacrifices after dreams 2. .594.

drowning, death by, especially feared
in ancient times 1. 327: possible
reason wiiy this was so 1. 329, &c.



Dryden , severe criticism on his omission
of the Introductory lines 1. 18, &c..
cp. 98 : his mistranslation of
pietas 1. 183: the general faultiness
of his translation of Virgil 1. 337:
2. 348, 738: si)ecial inaccuracies
2. 15, 30, 43, 118, 345.

ducere noctem, 'to pass the nigiit',
(xlucere noctem, 'to pass the
ichole night' 1. 8(30.

dum with conditional mood 1. 142.

duplex amictus, what, 3. ] 0(3 : du-
plices 'two', not 'joined' 1. 331:
applied to objects which form a
pair 1. 332.

durare, 'to have patience' 1. 497.

durus Ulixes 'hardened' and so 'in-
domitable ', 2. 24.

dux, • a guide' 2. 467.



£



Earth([uake, supposed to have taken
place at the union of Aeneas and
Dido 2. 645.

echo, the Latins had no single word
for, 3. 605— (3.

editions of Virgil, detailed account
of the principal Ixi — Ixxxv. The
second Roman edition Ixiv, kc. ;
it is not the original of the Codex
Basileensis 1 — liii. The Junta
edition and some remarks on the
woodcuts therein Ixxix— Ixxxii.

effeminate dress of Aeneas 2. 058.

eft'erre, 'to raise the standards' 2. 140:
3. 628.

efficere portum, 'to nurke a complete
harbour of it' 1. 440.

cffiUgere applied to effulgeni^e in
dress 2. 297.

effusus, of a racer stai'ting (v. 317)
3. 90: 'spilled' 3. 301.

egressus, a favourite word of Virgil's

1. 10().

eic'ctus, (1) an outlaw i-y.fl^^-iXriiii-fni;

2. 719, (-2) cast ashore 1.' 768,
(3) dislocated (luxatus) 4. 140.

Eighth Book, its spirited opening,
cfjnti'asted with the calm opening
of the Seventh Book 3. ()30.

eniicare alte, -to sjuing up', rH'oa'
Kunfoihd 4. 195 — 6: cmicat
luxurians = f7/rfOTf< 4. 1!)8.

cminere, differs from minari 1. 157.

•mini, in tlie phrase tibi cniiu til)i
(viii. 84) 3. 047,



eniti, ' to bring forth children' 2.417;

can 1)6 used absolutely ih.
Entellus, too heavy 3. 108.
entrails of victims thrown into the

sea 3. 77.
ei)exegesis, introduced by et 1. 131 :

2. 78 : 3. 569 ; by -(|ue 2. 38, 49 :

3. 588: formed bv a single word

4. 88.

epithets, \ised with no peculiar force
3. 5-2.

eijues, in wliat i)Osition Virgil uses
it 3. 444.

equus acer 1. 075: the head of the
horse signified that the Cartha-
ginians would be both warlike and
simple 1. ()83, &c. : the October
horse 1. G85.

toy.og o(foi'T(i)i', 3. 491.

erubescere, i. e. to be not (tfdi&iji
2. 270.

eructare, (cnuilkrit-if 2. 504.

ess(>, its place often taken in Latin
by the more graidiic stare, iacere,
ire 3. 280. For fuit vide s. v.

et introduces expexegesis, a Virgiliau
usage 1. 131: 2. 78.

Ethemea, 4. 256.

evadere, /-XiitcirfU' to go the whole
wav through so as to [tass out on
th(> other side 2. 237, 264.

evalere, force of c-, 'to prevail so
far as to' 3. 010.

p]vandrius ensis. The sword of
J'allas is so called because he was



eventus — Fate



1^



fighting under the ausi)ices of
Evander 4. 65, 69: regiia Evan-
dria = the Roman p]mpiiv in SiHus
(vii. 16) ib.

pventus, foiiunate resuh 4. 247.

evocat Oreo (iv. 242). 2. 663.

Euripides imitated bv Virgil 2. 4:>,
52, 167. 412. 415. 421 : his Hr-
r-iibn seldom al>seiit from Virgil's
mind during the eomi>ositinn of tlie
Tliird and Fomih Books 2. 470.

fv(/ rjuHTi =^hona verba dicite. not
silete 3. 22.

ex, 'from off', ex liumeris differs
from ab ('from") humeris 3. 2!i4.

exacta refen-e, 'to report proceedings",
i. e. what has been done 1. 51)0.

exaggeration, essential to ]ioetry
1.^208. 256: 4. 56: in Yirgil's
style 1. 767: 2. 168: 8. 214: 4.^36.

excipere. 'to receive in hospitality"
2. 718. 722 : differently used in
vi. 178 -to take in" 2.' 722: re-
quires abl. of instrument when the
instrument does not I'eadilv suggest
itself ?,. 798.

excitus, physically, not mentally,
roused up 2. 529.

exedisse. not excidisse (v. 785) 3. 1 93.



exercere, 'to worry', takes the place
of diminutive to fatigare 1. 571:
2.401: ferrum exercere. 'to work
iron' 8. 715.

exhalare vitam. 2. 279.

exhaurire helium, "to fight a war
out" 2. 566.

exire. 'to avoid" (v. 438) 3. 108:
with dat 3. 640, with abl. 3. 641 :
often used of rivei-s 3. 644. 646.

exitus. generally tlie end of a penson..
finis always of a thing 2. 274.

expedire. ' to supply, serve " 1 . 829, &c.

expeUere. of shipwreck 1. 768.

explore numerum, opposed to rare-
scere, 8. 340.

explorare, 1. 802.

expugnai'e. used literally and meta-
phorically 4. 17: expugnavit Spar-
tam (x. 92) an exaggerated ex-
pression lb.

exsors , used absolutely ' out of
coiuse " 3. 314 : tiaiotTOi choice,
selected 3. 744.

oxspirare, used loosely 1. 254.

exstinguere, its metaphorical use
3. 908.

extendere virtutcm, 'to lengihen out
one's fame to posterity ' 3. 422 — 424.

extremus halitus of Dido, why Anna
sought ' legere " it 2. 844.



F



Facies, not necessarily the face, Intt
generally in A'irgil the whole form,
appearance 3. 188. 566, 663.

facilis. 1. 682 : facilis victu 1. 677. kc

1. 680. \'c. : visa facilis 'agreeable
to see" 2. 501.

facta impia (iv. 596) of Dido, not of

Aeneas 2. 812.
fallere amoreni, 2. 662.
falx, the emblem of Saturn 3. 508.
fama prior, 2. 702 — 3.
famulus (V. 95i. the demonological

• faniihar ' 3. 82.

fando, 'in conversation' 1. 67: fandi

not nandi in x. 225. 4. 34.
fas. 'privilege' 1. 305: 3. 811:

• divine sanction ' 2. 342 : differs
from fatum and hcet 2. 342: as
it contains the notion of permission,
fas sinit would lie tautological

2. 343: 3. .320.

fastigia tecti. a sloping roof 2. 159.



Fate and tlie (Jods. 1. 125. 226,
234: 2. 431, 437: 3. 529, 810:
tiieir antagonism the main-spring
of the Aeiieis 1. 127 c}). 514:
fatis agi 1. 227. 228, kc: relation
of the Fates to Jupiter in A^irgil
and Ovid 1. 556: Troiae fata, the
series of fates app<»inted to Troy
from the beginning 2. 46 : the
three (or four) fata of Troy 2. 126 :
the Fates do not allow Aeneas to
be killed at the siege of Troy
2. 224: great fates and smaU
fates 2. 427 : the Fates use the
gods as their instruments 2. 431, kc. :
the dogma which lies at the bottom
of the whole pagan superstructure
is ' what is fated nothing can
prevent '2. 451 : fata very commonly
used with woids of hindering 3. 320 :
the Fates decreed that Aeneas was
to be Latinus"s son-in-law 3. 526 :
thev can be thwarted and delayed



14



fata — fovere



but not fi-usti'ated 3. 707: they
hiing round definite periods of
time 3. 815: joined with Foituna
3. 24G, 843.

fata, 'death' 1. 5()8: fato, • liy a
natui'al death ' 2. cS56 : fatis abl.
'according to tlie fates' 3. 658:
fatis incerta feror (iv. 110), I am
uncertain in the matter of, con-
cerning, the fates 2 023: 'the
span of life' 4. 170—1.

fatigare, 'to worry', 'to give no
peace to' 1. 569,'607, &c.-, 3.585.
<)52, 924 : 4. 53 : soeios fatigat
(iv. 572) (ju. with the foot 2.804:
its diminutive is exercere 1. 571.

fauces hiviae. tlie defile leading into
and the defile leading out of a
pass, 4. 201.

favete linguis [cp. tv(f rjittm-l^ 'speak
words of good omen', not 'he
silent ' ; in fact an invitation to the
spectators to enjoy themselves, 3. 26.

Faunus, his oracle at Laurontum
3. 486, kc.

femina, collective 2. 803.

fenestrae . what 2. 394 : insertae
fenesti-a(\ ' window-frames hung on
liinges " 2. 395.

Ferdinand IV., 1. 160.

ferox, ' elated with success ', ' over-
bearing' 4. 329.

feiratus, ' plated with iron ' 3. 590.

ferre, ' to bring news ' 2. 56 : used
to give a participle the force of
a finite verb, e. g. (ii. 13) conversa
tulere 2. 97 : of carn'ing fire

2. 722: of taking hold of 3. 100:
ferre sacra, to officiate as priest

3. 424 : ferre by itself cannot mean
' to extol ' 3. 429 : of a stream
' to cari-y away ' 4. 83 : ferre
fidem = afferre fidem. 'to cause to
l)e believed' 4. 121.

Ferrucci, Cavalieri, librarian at Flo-
rence — his kindness and couilesy

XXV.

ferrugo, the colour of the violet

3. 916—7.
ferrum anceps, 'two-edged sword"

3. 575 — 6 : ferro collai)sam. 2. 837.
fervere, 'to be busv heart and soul'

1. 672.
fessi rerum , 'tired of their lives',

opposed to laeti rerum 1. 478:

fessus = " kilt " 3. 114.
fides, ntmig, 'moral truth' 2. 100:

differs from verum ' actual . ob-



jective! trutli ' 2. 101 : manifesta
fides, a current expi'ession among
the Romans 2. 161 : ' confidence
and hope' 3. 812: joined with
fortima 3. 843.

fiducia, with objective genit. 1. 404:
its meaning 2. 56.

filial duty, great stress laid on it iti
Rome 3. 851.

fingei'e, applied to taming a horse

3. 243: 'to invent' 3. 565: tibi
fingere, ' to imagine, to persuade
yourself 4. 183.

fire, considered as especiallv i-apid

4. 247.

finis, always the end of a tiling,
exitus generallv that of a pei-son

2. 274.
fistula, 1. 70, 86.
flagrans, 'fiushed' 1. 833.
fiamma, used for the torch raised by the

admii'al's ship when starting 2. 140.
fiatterv of the great in tlie Acneis

1. 149, &c.
flava oliva, its meaning 3. 89.
flectere equos, 'to wheel ones horses'

1.432: fiectere viani veils (v. 281.

'to tack' 3. 9.
fletus, its difteiYMit kinds 3. 906.
florere, 'to bloom', in its motai»lioii-

cal sense always beai^s the perfume

of the fiower garden 3. 610: its

various secondary applications

3. 616 — 8: applicable to masculine
bloom 3. 619: flor(>re acre differs
from fulgere acre 3. 620.

fiuctuat aestu Dido, 2. 779.

fiuctus, iLsed as a noun of multitude
1. 742.

fluere, simply 'to fiow', a neutral
word 2. 110: fiuxae res, 'unstable
fortunes ' 4. 16.

foedare, to spoil, to put out of its
normal state 2. .11, 405: 4. 163.

foedus, 'covenant' 1. 286: 4. 147.

forma, with genit. (o/rjiuc, ^fu«,',
/oi}/.'((} simply 'the shape", not
necessarily a large shape 3. 474.

Fortuna, of coordinate authority with
Fate 3. 246, 843: foituna laborum
3. 581 : si qua furtuna fuisset,
"if any trouble happens' 3. 581,
795 : ' chance ' 3. 838 : fortiuia
populi, 'the common weal' 4. 180.

Fourth Book, Burger's Leonora com-
pared witli. 2. 556.

fovere, 1.200—1: foveiv bdla, 'to
hatch wars' 4. 19.



Fox— Gods



16



Fox, 0. J., quoted 1. (i47: Iiis letter
to Gilbert Wakefield on tlio .luthenti-
citv of ii. 567— o8S. 2. 277: on
iv." 318. 2. ()97— It: ou iv. 502,
2. 769-770: liis lettn- to Trotter
on Virgil's delineation of Dido
2. 543: notices Vii'gil's imitation
of ApoUonius 2. 712 : on spondees
affV'cted l»y Virgil 3. 1(51.

Francis I.. 1. 231: quatrains attri-
l)iited to him 2. 803: his coat of
mail 4. 74.

f langere, cannot = collidere 3. 889.

fratemus, used of cousins 2. r)70;
of a sister's love 2. 571.

fiena. for horses 1. 437.

f]-omm, retains some of the idea of
pietas 1. 183.

frons. o(f(ji\-, • hlutt" 1. 463. iVc.

frusta, -collops' 1. 4(19.

frustia nioritura 2. 741.

fuga, applied to Camilla's nianoeuvio
of flight 4. 237—0.

fugax, of dastardly flight. 4. L^o.

fuit, 'was and is no longer" 1. 198:
death of a person spoken of liv
fuit 2. 165, &c., 360.



fulcra, the whole frame-woi'k of a
bed 3. 352 ; the bed itself 3. 353.

fulmen. its nature, made of wind
and flame 2. 311: l)reaks through
tlie clouds 2. 402: 'the thunder-
holf ' 3. 437 : applied to the Soipios
and to Bajazet /h.

fundare, 'to make secure" 3. 427.

fundere, not necessarily of profusion
1. 677, &c. : 2. 40: see fusi.

funerals, extravagance of, 3. 904:
funeral rites ib.

funus, 'death' 3. 588: nee te tua
funcra prodnxi lix. 486) 3. 900—1.

furias Oilei. 'tJK; furious <.»ileus'
1. 237: furiis agitatus Orestes
(iii. 331) 'driven by his mad
state ', not ' by the Furies' 2. 419:
Furies seated in vestibule 2. 759.

furit aestus arenis (i. Ill), its
meaning 1. 360.

furta, •stratagem", 'tn-achery', 3.820.

fusi, 'stretched at ease" 1. 501.
' scattered ' is dispersi 2. 138.

future events, divided into two classes
3. 180: the future revealed in
frenzv 3. 249.



^



Garments =thi'own over a dead lioilv

4. 164.
gates = of ancient cities verv small

2. 125.
gaza, 1. 384, &c.
• ieertz, his conjecture Inris (ix. 387)

for locos 3 887.
gemini, 'two' 1. 456: 3. 267.
gemitus, groaning or creaking of an

inanimate thing 2. 51 : ' loud roar '

2, 208: a loud audible sound, a

groan, opposed to suspirium, 'a

sigh' 4. 329.
genialis, 'festal' 3. 354.
genitive, objective after via 2. 208.
genitor, a tender and respectful term

1. 517: Jupiter so addressed by

Jarbas 2. 685.
gilding (circumdai'e auro), simile

from 1. 772.
Giiiliari , Monsignoi'. lilirarian at

Verona xii.

Giulio Romano, his painting of the
Muses and Apollo dancing 1. 618.

Gladstone, W. E., deficient in calmness
1. 394.



gloinerare, to form into a liand by
successive additions 2. 495.

gioiy — Virgil sometimes regards it
as empty 3. 465 : Gloi'ia in xi. 708
is personifii'd Glorv. not gloriatio
4. 240.

Gods -thwarted bv Fate 1. 125, 135,
226, 234; the first object of wor-
ship 1. 144: necessity of prayer
to, an opinion of the ancients
1. 152: 2.437: subject to human
passions 1. 196, 809, yet it was
considered that they should rise
superior to them, 4. 323 : the
gods of the Aencis anachronisms

1. 289: their court analogous to
earthly courts, 1. 309: do not
show their faces in intercoui-se
with mortals, 1. 662, 664: their
assistance less re<iuired as know-
ledge advances , 2. 35 : leave a
conquered city, 2. 172: if the gods
looked on you mildly it was a
sign that they granted your prayer,

2. 324: they are the cause of
everytliing tliat happens to man,
especially of what happens contrary



16



ffoose — Heloiius



to his own will and guidance,

2. 534. or to his anticipation,

3. 477. 571 : they never forestall
the inventions of men, 2. 708:
their proximity and close connexion
with men in the heroic times,

4. 139-143: a man has paid all
his debts to the gods of heaven
(caelestes) when he dies. 4. 155,
157, 158: the gods tell lies to
suit their purposes, 4. 271.

goose, the most watcliful of Inrds,

3. 767.
Gossrau, severe criticism on,

2. 132, &c.
gracefulness, in a translation 1. 33.
gracilis avena, 1. 81, 91, &c.
grates is only gratias accommodated

to the hexameter 1. 779.
gratiam referre, 'to reward hy deeds',

gratias agere ' to reward in words '

i. 777.



gravida imperils (iv. 229j, 'full of
not 'pregnant with' 2. 662.

gravis dictis (v. 387), 3. 103: if used
without further explanation gravis
ahvavs means phvsical heaviness
4. 297.

Greek accents and hreatliings omitted
by Dr. Henry, reason for so
doing viii.

Greek and Roman styles compared
1. 97: Greek tragedians illaudably
hide catastrophe l>ehind tlie scenes
1. 482; are less precise than the
Romans in their language 2. 16:
hut richer and more various 2. 17.

gremium = tutela 3. 844.

grief, when excessive, is speechless
4. 169

ground, the table of our Irish fore-
fathers 3. 493.

gurges, ' body of water ' not 'vortex'
1. 368, &c.

gyi'i (v. 85), why seven 3. 31.



H



habenae yia.iru figurativelv used ]
3. 209, 'kv. ■ I

habere, of the grave, 2. 820.
habilis fvihro^- "handy' 1. 612.
habitus, 'appearance', 'air' 1.599,&c.:
its definition in Cicero 1. 603: os
lial>itum([ue expresses the tout
ensemble of a person 1. 601:
habitum gerere, 'to weai' the
appearance' 1. 604.
hactenus, Tonc.rTc, 3. 159.
Hades, rivers of, i-egarded as much
larger than we suppose 3. 303:
position of infants in 3. 31 1 : peo-
pled in Virgil only ]>y Trojan,
Grecian, and Ronuxn ai'istoirats
3. 313.
Hadrian, his sors Virgiliana 3. 424.
Haemonides, the account of his death
(X. 539, Ike.) is strikingly dis-
tinguished from that of every
other death in the Aencis 4. 80.
haerere, 1. 245.

iiair, if uncombed, repugnant to tlie
ancient notion of female beauty

1. 613: a lock of hair dedicated

2. H58.

Hanno in Silius is a second-hand

Drances 4. 181.
Harpies were falcons 2. 404.



hasta impedire, to us(^ tlie manoeuvre
invented by Marius, 4. 82.

liaud fi-equently not merely negatives
tlie word to Avhicli it is joined but
affirms the opposite — I it of ex 4. 173 :
baud not aut in ix. 283, 3. 846.

Hebrus, a very rapid river 1. 598:
quite wrong to alter to Eurus
(i. 321), 1. 597, &c.

Hector, different accounts of liis


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