James Henry.

Æneidea, or, Critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis online

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death in Virgil and Homer 1.720:
2. 148; he appi-ars to Aeneas in
a vision 2. 144. &c., the vision
compared with that of Jezebel to
AthaHe in Kaciue 2. 150, i!vc.;
Hectoris Andromache 2. 414.

heel for foot (v. 324) 3. 93 cp. Shak(-
speare Mcrcli. of Yen. 2. 2 "scorn
running with thy keels''

Heinsius, N,, his alteration from the
edition of D. Heinsius gencn-ally
for the worse 3. 248, 257, 797:
in v. 620 restores Tmarii 3. 163.
Helen, the passage relating to her in
the Second Book (567—588) cer-
tahily genuine 2. 277, Imt pro-
bably Itadly dovetailed into the
poem and so expunged by Varius
and Tucca 2. 302.
llelenus, tlie natiu'e and leasonable-
ness of his prophecies 2. 441, «S:c.



helepolis — hypallage



17



helepolis. 3. 909.

heliiK'ts not put on boforc the liattle,

3. US.
Iiptidia.ivs 1. 213. 21G. 2()3. 307, 367,
4il4, 571. oS4, SOO.

2. 334^ 3!t3. 475, 505.

3. 489, 657, 670, 719. 75S,
772. 793, 814.

4. 186, 189, 262.

Henry 11. of Franco, his coat of
mail 4. 74.

?Tonry, Dr., his first essays in the
study of the Aencis Fref. v., &c.,
his visit to Vaucluse xli: his resi-
dence in the Villa Strozzi Ixx.xiv :
his first thesis 1. 497: his ex-
ploi-ation of the Timavus 1. 521, ki- :
ills visit to Pompeii 1. 731 : his
sojourn in the Valley of the Riva
1. 786, \c. : his treatment when
a youngster l)y his grandmamma

1. 820: his visit to the Tullianum

2. 71 : eats poppy-seeds when a
hoy 3. 309, and in later life also
at Iiotzen 2. 764: his walk from
Pietra Santa to Massa 3. 89: his

■ walk from Sesto di Levant(^ to
pjorgo 3. 282: sees the tripudium
danced in the Tyrol 3. 367 : sees
the pecten used hy a musician in
Boliemia 3. 370: slee})s at Turhia
(arx Monoeci) 3. 434: resents the
ini|uisitiveness of the country folk
ill Germany 3. 808 : often struggled
along Italian burroni 4. 59: his
eyes hazel in youth liecame in old
age gray 4. 68.

Henry, Miss, the Aeiiridea dedicated
to her: her death, flv leaf facino'
1. 197.

TTercules, inijilicit compaiison of
Aeneas to, 1. 188, •■tlie rough
block out of whicli the courtly
Aeneas is hewn" 2. 334, 421:
originally called Palaemon 3. 563 :
his poplar gaiiand 3. 687 : on
account of his ex[)loits styled
vera .lovis proles 3. 692: '-the
great Quixote of anti(|uity " 3. 946:
rather given to tender feelings 4. 72.

hero, the ancient, had a large
element in him of tlie bully and
prize-fighter 4. 136.

Heroic verse. English, thi' coiTcct
nii'tiv into wiiich to trauslate
Virgil 1. .•;4.

heros, a word used as a niei'e eke
by Honu'r and Vii-gil 1. 490.

HEXRY. AEXEIDEA, INDEX I.



Hesiod. imitated by Virgil 1. 427.

Hesperides, 2. 765.

hibeniani Lyciam, • Lycia the winter

residence of Apollo ' 2. 640.
Hidimbo, a giant in the Mdlidhiirafa.

compai'ed to the Cyclops 2. 507.
hiems, 'heavy rain' 2. 401.
hinc used personallv 1. 147, 203:

'next' 2. 492.
Hippolytus, his name alluded to

(vii. 7()7) turlmtis distractus eiiuis

3 614.
Holdsworth — his view that Deiphohe

was not the Sib.vl 3 232.
Homer, imitated bv Virgil 1. 293,

301, .332. 335, "383. 628. 658,

723. 751, 772, 848: 2. 84, 177:

3. 622: 4. 34, 67. 194, 232, 251,
306.

honey mixed with poi)py-seeds a great
di>iieac\- (the so-called cofptxm)

2. 763".

honos = I'.i^M^ , reverentia 2. 468:
a jjcrson held in honour 3. 136.

horns of a river, tvpioal of its
strength 3. 646.

horseman's shield, the wav it hung

4. 231, 233.

horses, those whicii had white colour
on the forehead, legs, and feet
were admired by the Romans

3. 152: human emotions attrilnited
ti) horses hy the aneients 4. 164:
ejuinently social animals 4. 194.

horrendus, ' awful " 3. 224.

horrens, a common Virgilian epithet
1. 20, 117.

horridus (v 37j not to lie joined
Avith in jaculis 3. 10.

hospitus, its primary meaning 're-
ceiving as a resident receives a
stranger or traveller", hence its
secondary meanings 'hospitable"
and ' stranger ' 2. 428.

humilis as applied to style opposed
to altus 1. 97: 'low-lying' applied
to the heel of Italy 2. 485: ap-
plied to depth downwards 3. 505.

humility, how regarded and practised
by the pagans, early Christians,
and ourselves 1. 649, &c.

huntsmen, four species of, 2. 625.

hurling, meaning of various Latin
words for (impellere iacio tonjueo
and their compounds) 2. 48—9.

Hymenaeus; (iv. 127 1 hie Hymenaeus
erit, 2. 626.

hypallage, 3. 739 : 4. 3.



IS



laspis — mams



laspis. 2. 683.

Ida, the name of a ship , 4. 27 :

mother of Nisus '6. 830.
ignarus, its construction in Yii'gil
2. 605 : = ignanis casus sui though
sometimes ^ ignotus 4 101.
ignes. 'lightening" 1. 854: 2. 401:
'the fiery, ethereal sky" 2. 107:
' fiery passion ' 3. 584.
ignotus, 'untold' of treasures 1. 638:
ignota planities, a plain so un-
fre((uented that nothing more was
known a}jout it except that it
existed 4. 206 : ignoto in pulvcrc,
'in the undistinguished dust' 4. 260.
Iliaci cineres et tlamma extrema
meorum (ii. 431), the moaning and
force of 'Iliaci' 2. 21(), &.c.
illabi of liglit streaming into oui'

minds 2. 380.
llle ego 1 . 57 : Jupiter ille 3. 494, &c. :
it takes the place of the definite
article 3. 496.
ilhnc used personally 1. 147.
Illyrian. the Adriatic sometiim^s su

called 1. 545.
imago, 'picture' 2. 191 •, 3. 305:
•idea" 3. 750, 848, &g.\ 4. 127,
307 : sul) imagine ' under the
appearance of", 'in the character
of 3. 287, 508. &c. : imago lunae
= luna ipsa , ' the forai of the
moon ' op. forma 3. 633: can mean
'a ghost" 3. 288: of an absent
object 4. 94.
imber, 'water' 1. 385
imitations of Virgil liy Alcimus
Avitus 1. 329, 360. 641 : 2. 232.
St. Ambrose 1. 452.
Apuleius 2. 602.
Ausonius 1. 137: 3. 152, 457.
Boileau 1. 197.
Oamoens 1. 510.
Claudian 1. 15 J : 4. 42.
Corippus 1 . 443 : 3. 455 : 4. 223.
Ilericus 1. 7.35.

Lucan 1.347, 441: 3.321, 663.
Milton 1. 28. 197. 573.
Paulinus 3. 503.
Petrus Apollonius 4. 105.
Pope 1. 197.
Prudentius 1. 509, 843: 2. 516:

3. 510.
Ross 3. 714.
Sedulius 1. 733.
Sidonius 1. 208.



Silius 1. 345, 350, 354, 358, 505,
787, SI 7, 840.
2. 14. 52, 150, 163. 243,

271, 275, 5'22, 61 '2.
3.314. 422. 44(;, 453, 463,
466, 55! >, 640, 748, 799,
878. 937.
4. J 23, 291.
Spenser 1. 28, 510.
Statins 2. 15, 93, 126: 3. 483,

602, 900.
Tasso 1. 119.

Valerius Flaccus ]. 115: 2. 146:
3. 713: 4. 51.
immanis applied to small rivers 2 533.
immersion in sea necessaiy to wash

away eaithly impui'ities 3. 818.
imminere 1. 462: 4. 27.
immittere, funes laxos 3. 777: e(iuos

4. '286: /to liound on" 3. 938.
impedire, to suu'ound with a hoop

3. 722-3.

im|)ellere, ' to push ' 2.49: ' to push
a thing so that it falls over, 2. 241 :
impellere arma, meaning and orii^in
of. 3. 628-9. 681.

impeiium used for the command of
the Tuscan army whei'e it may
readily be mistaken for the Koman
Empire 4. 153—4.

impius, its two senses (1) ' iiard-
hearted '. (2) 'impious" 1. 635:
•pitiless' 2. 768: 3. 339

implere used without any mention
of what the oltject was filled with

4. 262.

iniplicare, 'to fold round" withmit
anv idea of entanglement 4. 214,
316.

imponere, much strongei' tlian ponere,

3. 441.

impressa toro os, 'burying iicr face

in the bed' 2. 829.
improbus alwaj's 'wicked' 2. 174, 285.
improvising, the excitement of, 3. 237.
imprudens, 'thoughtless' 3. 885.
in, 'in respect of", 'as regards'

4. 268: in- (prefix) intensitive in
intonare 2. 51.

inaccessus aflteTo^-, 'shunneil', 'novel'
approached ' 3. 4f)7.

inanis, 'unsubstantial' 1. 707: 'use-
less' 3. 175: inania verba, words
whicli are not the expression (jf
any internal mind or consciousness,
4. 93.



inoedere — inter se



19



inoedere, simply 'to walk' not 'to
walk majestically' 1. 2bS.

incendere, 'to set on fire' 3. 906;
has a more extended use than the
English 'to fire' 3. 907 cp. 4. 1G8.

iiieerta luna 3. 277, itc

incipere, 'to undeiiak(> ' 1. 26, «.Vc.

incohare not ' to begin ' i)uf ' to make
a first rough plan ' 3. 274.

ini'onsultus ccnij/icro,- 'not knowing
wliat to do ' 2. 4()o.

increpitare always has tlie idea of
chiding 1. 846.

incumhere to press vertically 1 . 824 :
to press so as to accelerate 2. 313 :
to press downward (of wind)
tnatyiCtiv or y.dTiayi^ttv 4. 291.

ineutere vim ventis, meaning of,
1 295, &c.: verbera, 1. 297.

inde used personally 1. 146: 4. 15.

indelicacy wrongiv charged to iv. 318
by AVakefield 2.' 697, by Fox 2, 770.

indicere of a special extraordinary
act, opposed to statuere of a stated
or usual act 1. 793.

induere both to clothe and to pion-e
cp. Ital. iiircsf/re 498.

indutus (subst.l ?,. 597—8, &c.

inelegancies in Virgil [cp. contra-
dictions] 1. 201, 207, 212, 214, .V:c.,
257, 324. 328, 481, 486, 490,
539, 626, 744.

2. 99, 187, 287, 353, 504. 511, 783

3. 319, 382, 394, 448, 535, 705,
761, 765, 783, 790, 792.

4. 12, 42, 72, 78, 187, 225, 292,
313, 329.

iiKductabilis SvaniduiOTo^-, lafv/.To^,
that from which no escape can be
made by any exertion 2. 165.

inermis, ' helpless ' not 'weaponless'
2. .55.

inertia corpora, ' bodii'S whicli had
offered no resistance' 2. 188.

infandus which should not be told
'horrible' 2. 15: its Greek equi-
valents 2. 16: applied to love

2. 613.

infants, ' their position in Hades '

3. 311, &c.

infectus (veneno), stronger tlian per-

fusus 3. 543.
inferar (iv. 545) not • to iittack ' but

' to join ' 2. 786.
inferiae offered to Manes 3. 12,
inferre se with dat. 'to bear oneself

over" 4. 115.



infigere, ' to fix on ' not ' to impale '

1. 239.
informis applied to suicide 4. 309.
infracta (v. 784 j y.urHxkuaDtiai'.

3. 192.
ingeminare (T^/jAoftftr to repeat again

and again 1 . 858 : takes accus.

not ablat. ih.
ingemuit (iv. 692), the most touching

word in the Afiiris 2. 848.
ingens—'" Virgil's maid of all work "

3. 39 — 45 : '' her fellow servant is

contra'' 3 44: ingentiijue manii

(v. 487 ) ' with a large hand '

3. 121—3.

iuhaerere intensitive of infigere 1. 244.

inhoiTuit unda tenebris (v. 11),
' shuddered at the darkness ' 3. 6.

inhospita Syrtis either physically
' mif riendly ' or ' with savage
neighbours ' 2. 582.

inimica castra (ix. 315), 'the camp
that was to destroy them ' not
"the enemy's camp' 3. 861, 941:
inimica terra 'the enemy's ground'

4. 52.

iniiiuus of persons 'luifair' 2. 360:
of positions 'inconvenient' opposed
to aequus 4. 207.

innectere, 'to contrive' 2. 585: 'to
tie round anything ' 3. 688.

insequi, ' to follow immediately after '

1. 354: with ablat. 1. 355.
insei-tare used for inserere on account

of the metre 2. 320
insertorium, the handle of a shield

2. 320.

insidere figuratively used of Cupid

1. 836.

insignis tntarjito^- 1. 187.

insomnia, ti'vmiu, always 'bad
dreams ' 2. 556 : sent hy the
Manes 2. 558 : the dramatic effect
of the word (iv. 9) 2. 556.

instar, • amount ' 3. 448.

instaurare, ' to begin de novo '

2. 373, &c., 598.
insurgere remis, 3. 58.

intacta seges, 'uncut corn' 3. 621.
intempesta nox, w'i xutovIh^, 2. 498.
intendere, ' to stretch ' or ' strain '

2. 771 cp. intenditque locum seiiis
(iv. 506) ih., intenta brachia (v. 136)

3. 52, intendi brachia velis (v. S29)
3. 201).

inter se, ' the several ', ' the respective '
1. 703: inter nubein differs fVom
inter iiu1)cs and in nube 3. 741 :

2*



20



inteiT'alatofv — .Tuno



inter prai-mia (xii. 437 1 'whevo
prizes are to be wou ' 4. 296.

intercalatory passages in Virgil [cp.
parentlieses] 1. 423; 3. 523, 524.
550. 752. 794, 897 (cp. ^'16), 942:
4. 38, 96. 126, 174, 193.

interior gyro, meaning of, 4. 233.

interpres (iv. 608), 'agent', 'go-
between ' 2. 815.

interruptus always signifies brcaeli
of continuity of time or space
3. 83H

intima, its meaning, 1. 545. &c.

Introductory Verses— ]i roved genuine
1. 2, &c. : similar to the in-
troductions to the Varus, the
I'ollio and (ieorgics ii. & iii.
1. 7, &c. : supposed silence of
Servins thereon 1. 10, &c. : omitted
in sonn^ e«Htions from the earliest
timi's 1. 15: Dryden's opinion of
thiMu S(nerely criticised 1. 18, &c.:
))i'(ipi'r treatment of 1. 23. &c.



invadere viam. 'to enter on a journov'
3. 275.

invectus, fjio/o^-, driving 3. 528.

invi'uirc dncs not mean 'to find hi/
ihdiici' ' 3. "ilS.

mvisus. 'the hated one' (detestatus)
2 '283: never active 4. 181-2.

ire =: esse with additional idea of
motion 3. 82 : other synonyms of
esse like ire 3. 84: ibjue redit(|ne
' goes over and over again ' 3. 251 :
it = 'pi'cvails', 'is rife', e. g. it
timor 3. 748.

Iris fv. 6(l9j recalls desci-iption of
Haidee in Don Juan 3. KJl.

irony, its force in poetry, 4. 90.

irrigare applied to 'dewv' sleep
1. 824.

irrisa, 2. 782.

Italian derivatives sometimes I'ctain
tlie meaning of tiie Latin word,
I', g. jiictu 1. 183: ft/ioiif/i'r 'to
play a musical instrument' 1.8.'i().



Jaeeres, in vii. 427 tiie second piM'Son
is very mal-a-propos, 3. 560.

jam dudum, 'now for some time'
1. 769: 2. H2: almost tlie opposite
of i|uam pi'imum 2. 83.

jam istinc. 3. 305.

jam janKiue marks succession of
time Ms every moment' 2. 264.

jam turn 1. 202.

Japan unjustlv attacked by tlie
English 3. 76(i.

Joan of .\iv, compared to Harpalyce
I. 6(17.

Joannes .\ndreas Kpiscopus Aleriensis
— letters of, to Paul 11 Fref. xlix,
Ixii — Ixiv, Ixvi— Ixviii, 136: to
l'uin])onius Infortunatus Ixiv, &c.
The MS. he obtained from Pom-
ponius Infoiiunatus was the Me-
dicean Ixix: his deatli in 1475 Ixviii.

Jodelle. Estienne, his D/doii sr .sacri-
fiaiif 2. 544.

Juan, Don. liis shipwreck — nuxterials
whence derived 1. 438.

jubar. 2 (;35.

jugnm of a i)air of horses drawing
a chai'iot, jugis immissis (v. 14()|
3. 53 : also n])i)lied to tiiat part
of a mountain chain liy wliich you
pass from one side to the other.



Fr. r-ol. (ierm. Jor//. 4. 208: instare
jugis 'to press the enemy by
means of this position on the
juga' 4. 209. or -to stand on the
juga' 4. 210.
Juno — her cliai'actei' in Virgil 1. 138,
230 : the nature of lier anger
against Aeneas 1. 139: is always
angi'y with some one «ninxri^ij<;
1. 166. &c. (cp. Shakesp. Corio-
lanus iv. 2. fin. 'And leave tiiis
puling and lament as 1 do, in
anger. .luno-like ') : aims and
chariots were lirst made for her
1. 19;): causes of her hatred
against the Trojans during tlie
Trojan war 1. 217: her bribery
of Aeolus 1. 287: difficulty Virgil
felt as to how to represent hei'
1 . 28^^ : iier special province to
dispose of empire 1. 308: makes
interest with Jupiter for gods who
ol)ligod her 1. 309: a goddess of
the air ]. 402: her doli 1. 403:
the fcai' slie inspired that siie
misilit oppose the Pates 1. 568:
called atrox 'ruthless' ]. 809:
.lunonia hospitia 1. 815: .luno
proiiui)a, 2. 632, (;4(). 648; \u'.i
assistanc(> of Turnns 3. 940: hei'
conversation with Juturna in which



Jupiter — Lausus



21



she tells a lie to sviit her purpose
4. 209-272
.Tupitei', Seretius 1. oofi : 2. 0^4;
Flavins 1. 556: Jupiti'i's relation
to the Fates in Virgil and (_)y'n\
1. 5o6, iVe. : neei'ssary to the
sueeess of eve)'y undertaking 2.388:
god of line weatiier 2. 384: some-
times takes part in nullifying his
predietions hy plays on words



3. 497: with his aegis raises the
tluuiderstorni 3. 699: turns the
stars 3. <S10: assei'ted by Juno to
he ungrateful towards his mistresses

4. 269, &('. : does not sliow any
uxoiiousni'ss towards Juno 4.
319, 320.

jura dai'e, 'to legislate ' 1. 581 ; dillers
from jui-a dicere, 'to interi)ret the
laws' 1. 583, 735.



K



Kiclauog, wjuit, 1. 73.
■/.uruiyii;, /.(CTmyiChtf, wliat, 4. 291.
y.dTanknv to rctuiii to land 1. ()54.
Keil, his emendati(ni iiKtxiinns in

vi. 797 adopted 3. 419
kings the gift of lieaven 1. 285:

similar in tiiat and otln'r respe(;ts

to sleep il).
y.h];h,(i, wliat, 1. 268, 282.



Klemm, Di., lihi-arian at Dresden —

his kindness xliii, Ixxvii.
•/.(hIh in what sense applied to

yJ.}l!)or( 1. 282.
y.oD.vg a eonseerated loek 2. 858.
y.ontCni' used pumiiugly, 1. (j03.
y.ovii^ like •■inis twofold nieaniug of,

2. 822.



Labi expresses a i;ontinuous ai;tion

2. 30.

labor (subst.) 1 305: of the sun
(i. 74t)) to l)e taken literally not
as "eelipse' 1 852, &c : ■ti'ouble',
•misfortune', ;iovo<, 4. 25, 113:
•working', operation' 4. 18().

"laboured" 1. 43.

La Cerda — perhaps the l)est cnnimen-
tator on Yirgil 3. 697: out of
fashion now 4. 106.

Laehmann, liis erroneous view of
(vi. 791), 3. 417: his alteration
IV. 520) of aetherias into aerias

3. 127.

la<'rimae (so. Aeneae) volvunturinanes

2. 749.

laeus, pool at the sourei^ of a river

3. 645.

laedere, its relation to doh're 1. 1(]3, &e.:
laesum numen, 1. 163, 261.

laena /J.atia, what, 2. 683.

laetitia dei (1. 640), 'joy such as a
god might have bestowed' 1. 796.

laetus with genit. 1. 673: Mieauti-
ful' 1. 771: may mean •alunidant'
or 'munihci'nt' or • delightful'
1. 800, &e., ofti'n of the delight
of parents in theii- ciiildren and
children in their parents 3. 595.

lampas, •a torch' 3. .350,



Laocoon, the sculpture inferior to
Virgil's desci'iption 2. 120.

largus opum, • lavish witli his wealth ',
of l)i'ani3es 4. 180.

latebi'ae con\eys an idea of refuge
in which there is something dis-
iionoural)le 4. 89: no correspond-
ing word in Knglish (ital. ims-
coiuli(fli) 2. 51.

latebrosus, full of lurking places
3. 784.

Latin language, poor in words, some-
times compelled to represent by
two words what English can lo-
prescnt by one 2. 117.

latus used for the wholi3 body I. 254:
in latus 'to one side' 1. 282, &e.:
dare latus 1. 351, &(;. : abire in
latus 1. 353: always expressive
of an •objection' or obstiicle
1. 443: "sea-coast' when high and
precipitous 3. 226, 715.

Launintum, why so caUc'd, 3. 484.

laui'us, as symbolical of a triumph,
cultivated in tlu^ gardens of the
great 2. 253.

laus, -virtue' 3. 430: laudcm not
fraudem (in xi. 708) 4. 240.

Lausus a second Antilochus 4, 123 ;
his deatli 4. 127.



22



Lavinia — manes



Laviiiiii. why treated as a mere

cypher 1. 634.
Lavinimn 1. 142: '"Aeueas's— fated

city" 4. 168.
Jaxare, "to open' 2. 141.
leaf, music peiiormed on a, 1. 189.
Lefranc, his Didon 2. 545.
lenihant curas et corda oblita laliorum

(iv. 528) probably genuine 2. 778.
lentare (1) ' to make supple ', hence

'to ply much' or (2) 'to make

slow', i. e. 'to draj,' slowly', 'to

tug' 2. 448.
Icntus, 'passive', 'yielding slowly

and with diil'iculty ', 'tough' 2.

446—8: 4. 284: applied to water

' sluggish ' 3. 477.
levare, 'to entirely do away with'

like our ' relieve ', ' abate ' 2. 363, &< •.
leve pectus applied to the breast of

a young man 4. 153.
lex talionis is the law in all ages

3. 339
libamina prima, 'the first taste ' 3. 273.
libations ancient, relics of, 1. 848.
light, regarded as food, 1. 753.
limes, a 'boundary', then a 'path'

2. 330: 3. 863: limite lecto

'straight' 3. 457.
limina, 'the doorcase' 1. 696, &c.-,

the closed entrance 2. 248, &c :

limina dei, the door of the inner

shrine 1. 381, 423: the limen in

ancient houses was raised, and so

afforded a seat 2. 757: in Hmine

(iv. 473) not 'on the tlireshold ' but

'about tlie door' 2. 758: in limine

= in principio 3. 587.
linquere, of leaving a shaft in a

wound, 2. 606.
liquidus, 'clear', 'transparent' 3. 486.

608, 708.
littore excipere 2. 718.
locus, 'condition' 2. 163.



loiiga jiiga, 'long-stretcliing hills'
4. 212: juga longa neinonim
^ ovoia tm/.ua /.ai r?.ii 4. 213:
longae naves, 3. 54.

longe esse alicui. to be of no usr
to anybody or anything 4. 266:
longe I'ecusat (v. 406) 'refuses at
a distance ' 3. 105.

longius, first word of a line with
especial emphasis 1. 559, eVc.

Loyola, Ignatius, anecdote of, 2. 768.

Lucagus, white captain O.tvxoi;:
ayoj) 4. 83: the description of his
death 4. 84—5.

Lucan, '-alw^iys the rhetorician,
never the poet : a commentator
on the action, never th(> actor"
3. 895.

lucere means both 'to shine' and
'to glimmer', hence not much
more than (fULvtaUai 3. 883.

luctantem animam (iv. 695) 2. 849,
852.

ludm-e, -to deceive' 4. 188.

Indus Tr( ijae (v. 54.1—602) 3.139—143.

luniina adimere. 'to take away the
daylight' 2.509: supremo lumine.
'on their last day' 3. 395: lumina
vertere ' to scowl ' or ' to turn up
the whites of the eyes' 3. 720 — 1 :
luminibus tacitis 2. 711: lumina
morte resignat, 'awakes from
sleep ' 2. 665.

lunae silentia not the interluniuTn
2. 139: ad lunam perhaps by the
light of the full moon 2. 774.

lustrare 1. 787: to go round and
round a central object 3. 553.

Lutrin of Boileau 2. 349.

lux Clara, 'light of day' 1. 769:
lux mea, 'light of my eyes'
2. 154; 'life' 2. 178: 3. 386, 406;
its opposite nox 3. 433 : ' safety '
((f (COS-) 2. 182.

lynx said l)y Servius to know only
one mate 2. 789.



II



Machina, 'contrivance', 'kunstwcrk'
2. 615, with des(;riptive gcnit.
2. 615, k<u

magical ceremonies 2. 775.

magnanimus appHed to horses ' high-
bred', (c/ijfoxi 2. 533

magnetic light, possible allusion to,
in Virgil 2. 497.



magiuis. applied especially to Her-
cules 2. 253.

inanare, 'to ooze" 2. 367, differs
from fluere ' to flow ' 2. 398.

manere, a variety of esse 2. 53.
manes, ' the state of death ' 3. 397 :
Hades 4 13,



manus — meus



23



mnniis. /tio, ircJ.an >j, 'handiwork'
1. 703" (('i.. Milton P. R. iv. 55):
lit ('aderoni inei'uisse manu (ii. 434),
' 1\V fighting' 2. 233, 308: nianum
for inamiuni 3 5(j9: in manibus
esse, 'to lie on hand', 'to be being
performed " 4. 46 : inanii, ' by
gestures' 4. 1H9.

manuscripts — jealous guarding of
MSS. by their owners at the time
of the Eenaissance Ixvi: eiTois
of 1. 129: many eopied from
dictation 1. 130, 723: 3. «34:
errors of Rom. 1. xiv, 397 : readings
of MSS. should not be disregarded
but followed even when giving
what api)ears unworthy of authors

1. 589, 631; a rule not always
adhered to by Dr. Heni'y 1. 668,
757: 2. 245, 326, 385: 3. 498,
833 : 4. 326 : confusion of c and /
in MSS. 1. 692, and of n and /

2. 297 : scribes alter what they
think errors 1. 723: punctuation
of MSS. woi-thless 1. 812: 3. 844,
especially that of the Medioean

3. 252, 305: 4. 35.
manuscripts of Virgil-^ detailed ac-
count of X, xi, &c. : those of the
First Class xii— xxxviii: Foggini's
transcript of the Medicean xv,
XXV, &c. : rule of the Laurentian
library as regards the study of the
Medicean xxv: Pithou's MS, xxxv:
MSS. of the Second Class xxxix
— Ixi: the Laurentian xxxix: the
Gudian xli: the Bern No. 165
xlvii: the Basel F III. 3 xlviii.
is not a transcript of the 2'2^ Ro-
man edition xlix., &c ; the " liber
Colotianus" the same as the
Medicean Ixix: the various pos-
sessors of the Medicean Ixxii: the
punctuation of the Medicean worth-
less o. 252, 305: 4. 35: the authority
of the Medicean jier se of little
weight 3. 695

Manutius, his letter to Naugerius

1. 170.

Maria di Priverno, a second < 'ainilla,

4. 211.

Markland — his conjectures tasteless

2. 742.

marriages, second, disapproved of l)y
the ancients 1. 633: 2. 573:
marriage presents 1. 802, iVc:
marriage veil, crown and necklace
1. 803.



Mars introduces Romulus into the
l)rof(;ssion of arms by equipping
him 3. 410: his pecidiar emblem
a double-crested helmet 3. 412:
mai's (with small in) used for
•war' 3 749, 921: 4. 45: mars
ipse (X. 280) 'very battle',
battle as opposed to siege 4. 45:
mavors (xi. 389) — mars = bellica
virtus 4. 185.

Mary, St., of Egypt 1. 630.

maternae aves 2. 644.

meatus coeli, the great heavenly
circles 3. 439.

mediaeque Mycenae, 'the middle of
Mycenae ' 3. 548, 941 : consulere
in medium, fa; to xotvoi', 'for the
common advantage ', prodire in
medium, ' to apjjear in public ' 4. 1 79.

medulla, used metaphorically 2. 505.

Jiielioreni animam (v. 483) 3. 121.

Memnon, Dido asks about his Vulcan-
wrouglit arms 1. 862.

memor faultily applied to Juno's anger

1. 140.

-men, words ending in, their signi-
fication 1. 160, &c.

mendax differs from vanus 2. 66.

mene, its position at beginning of a
solilo(iuy 1. 233: 2. 314.

mens, 'consciousness' 4. 94: mcnte
concipere, 'to have a notion of

2. 768.

mensae remotae, ' dishes removed '

1. 502, 838.

Mercury puts asleep and awakes

2. 668.

merere manu (moiiem), ' to earn
death in battle by brave fighting'
4. 75.

Messapus, his treacherous attack on


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