James Henry.

Æneidea, or, Critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis online

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Aeneas 4. 298.

meta coeli media, the middle point
between the meta of rising and the
meta of setting 3. 201: metae,
'bounds', 'limits' 4. 307.

metaphor, "the life of poetry or
prose" 1. 623: qualifications of a
correct one 3. 334: often used in
poetiy 3. 546: very strong meta-
phors 3. 716.

meteors 2. 327.

metonymy 1. 101, 116, 117, 122—3,
789, 808, 849: 2. 29, &c.

metuere to feai' an immediate and
urgent danger : praemetuere to fear
a remote and uncertain one 2. 282,

meus vocative 3. 435,



24



Mezentias — Nature



Mezentius— his ini|)iety of a i»rartical,
not a theoretical, kind 4. 110, 111,
114: his stately hearing ooini)ared
to that of Orion 4. 116: always
rei)rescnted as carrying a hnge
weapon 4. 117: his grief for the
death of Lausus most affecting,
comiiared tci that of David for
Absalom 4. 134: his dignified
character and demeanour 4. 137.

Milton — his address to the Muse
(P. L. i. 1) most splendid 1. 153:
uses current terms in primitive
sense -. 28: his admirable versi-
fication 3. 252: Ids Catalogue
similar to Virgil's, superior to
Homer's 3. 593: alone of all poets
resembles Virgil in "delicate
second shadings" ii. 688.

minae whatever projects upwards
2. 613: a[»plied to pai'apets
(^huyy.iu) 2. 6 1 4.

minari, 'to hold the head high'
1. 457: 2. 129, 298.

Minerva has nothing to do with
building the horse 2. 30: Miner vae
Castrum (or Aix) 2. 485.

ministrare velis fvi. 302), double
interpretation of, 3, 295 c]). 4. 33.

mirari to be surprized by and wonder
at 4. 71.

misceri of confused noise 3. 607.

misero fato eripi to die a violent
death; fato eripi to die a natural
death 2. 339.

mitra, head-dress of women 2. 658.

modus can mean ' manner " or
'measure' or 'moderation' 4. 36.

moenia can only be applied to a
fortified place 3. 827.

moles combines the ideas of weight
and bulk 2. 507: 'job' 1. '232:
'disturbance' 1. 407: moles maris
' weight of sea ' 1 . 409 : vasta
mole, 'with great e.xertion' 2. 506:
moles of a ship its majestic motion
not its bulk only 3. 33: ni()lil)us
opj)ugnare urbein, to besiege a
city with siege-works , such as
aggers, walls, redoubts, &c.

molliro, 'to soften', differs from
lenire "to soothe' I. 274.



Monoeci ar.\ i)i-(ibalily on the site of

the village of Turbia 3. 434.
monere (movere) cantus 3. 5fM.
mens, ' boulder ' 1 . 278.
monstrare, "to direct enc'. irrisen

1. 620: 'to dictate' 3. 7;i6: 4. 261.
Montaigne thought the Fifth Book

of the Aeneid • le plus parfait '
3. ] : his Essais criticized 3. 1.

niorae. 'impediments' 3. 820.

morari intransitive, • to l)e tedious '

2. 82: in v. 207 'to delay' not
'to liack water' 3. 68: 'to care
for' c/.t-ytiv, icktyiitti' 3. 104:
cp. 2. 155: 4. 183: nil moror,
■I don't care about' 4. 183.

Moreland, his [)icture of the farm-
yard 3. 766.

u«)i>ia, unchastity, 2. 799.

moribundus can be applied to any
part of a moribund liody 4. r)7.

morning bird , the cock , not the
swallow 3. 724-8.

mors — media, extrema morte, applied
to people in imminent danger of
death 2. 265: 'sleep' 2. 669.

jnoi-tars, for bi'uising corn in,

1. 479, &c.

mos — sine more ' rudely ' 3. 176, 763:
more ferae (iv. 551) said of a
chaste, simide life 2. 789—800,
illustrated liy the lives of Camilla
and Daphne 2. 793: mos i)acis,
• the ways of peace ' 3 443.

motion, the notion of, contained in
the idea of speech by the ancients

2. 9.

movere, a verlnim medium whose
special sense is dei'ived from the
cont(>xt 1. 560: 'to move by
speech' 1. 561.

niox, opposed to nunc 4. 296.

mulcere, 'to tame', 'to subdue
1. 291, &c.

Mulciber derived from mulcere 1. 292.

music solaces the cares of difiV'rcnt
workers 2. 519, &c.

mussarc, to push forward the under-
lip when (im; is dolilierating 4.311.

myrtle, used in honour of the dead

3. 27- used hy shepherds for their
crooks 3. ti21.







Naeke, his mistake about tht; l^asel

MS. 1-liii.
Napoleon 1., his criticism on the



Seciind Hook of the Acj/ria exam-
ined 2. 20, &c., 158, 288.
Naturi", metajihorically. represented



i'(fAx).)jOog — numen



with emotions as the result of
physical effects ;{. 670-680.

vicixlijoo.; — soi'titus iiavciii 'vcl
ronuini) 2. 48(\

Xautes 3. ITS.

HOC |ilura = nec [ilur.i ilixit 8. o02.

nee siicnio — lubens accipio .'{. 527.

nemora and colics, fn'<inontly in
connexion in Vii'i^il H. H(i!». H!t4.
69!!.

Neptune — his •placiduin caput' 1.
392: his dominion ov(!r the winds
hard to be reconciled M-ith that of
Aeolus 1.409: his intervention in
the storm 1. 419, &c. : builder of
Troy and engaged in its over-
th)-ow 2. 29S; called 'Aegaeus'
b(!cause worsliipped
2. 378: intolerandus



at Aeaao
190.
•not knowing
2. (JOS.

unresisting liy
necatus 'e-xe-



nescuis, "unaware ,
what he had done

nex, death of tlie
violence 2. 70:
cuted ' ih.

nexantem ,v. 279) nut ni.xantem 3.86.

nexosijue i-esolveret artus (iv. 695;,
'loose the knitted structure (the
coit/pa(/es) of the limbs' 2. SoJ.

ni with sul)j. when principal verb is
(1) indicative, (2) sul)junctive
3. 733—735, cp. 4. 315.

Xibelungen-Lied 1 63(j.

Jiidus, the young brood 3. 74. 67S.

nights [see no.r] — the slowly de-
parting nights of winter 1. 856:
to the ancients the nights like the
sun rise in the east from the
ocean, traverse the whole sky and
set in the ocean in the west 1 . 858 ;
2. 25, 137.

nil magnae laudis egeutes (v. 571j,
• feeling no jot the want of areat
gloi-y' 3. 184, &!■.

nimbus wind witli rnin i. 326:
2. 291: of soot 3. 174-

Niobe 4. 256.

Nisus and Euryalus had amor unus,
the same desire sc. of l)attl(,' 3. 831 :
the episode of Xisus and Euryalus
is "the most chtmning e|)isode
that ever ■ adorned prose- work oi'
poem, reality or fiction '' 3. 947.
nitens, tauras, a white Inill. 2. 360 :
applied to land opi>osed to sijuali-
dus 3. 377.
niti gradibus, • to ascend the steps '
2. 235: nitens alis not -poised on",



but -pushing forward witli wings"

2. 679.

iiobilis has not necessarily the idea
of |irais"wortliy 3. 581.

nodai'i in aurum. 'to lie tied into a
golden liand " 2. 639

nodus, (1) -a tying", (2) "a string',
cp. 'tie', for -cravat' 1 613, &c.:
used for the undiM-girdle (iJiouoortjo)
of women 1. 6l4: nodo 'in a
knot', in nodum, "afte]' the manner
of a knot' 3. 682 cp. 3. 294.

nomen, -fame' 1. 790: 3. 557: sine
nomine, -nameless', i. e. of no
fame', (fvon'rito^- 2. 'lib, &c. :

3. H71: nomen is essentially the
>ii(jninii of the man 3. 464: nomen
signare ib.: 'kinrls'. 'species'

3. .541 : nomen Echionium, nomen
Latinum -of Tlndian. Latin stock'
4 300.

non tolerabile, Svrr/.uuiniuv, cut-

yianov I?) 3. 190.
North AVind in winter 2. 693:

attended with clear weather 3. 4.
Nott. Dr.. his Life of the Earl of

Surrey 2. ;;48
Notus, the South Wind as the britiger

of wet and wintry weather 4. 39.
novare. 'to make a new thing' 3. 160.
Nova Troja— the attack on, by Turn us

and Messapus 3. 824 — 830: never

entered tiy Pallas and his Arcadians

4. 62: a mere temporary residence
4. 169.

novus. -unu-sual', -supernatural'
2. 398: 3 817, 939: nova bella
•revolutionary wars' 3. 429.

nox [see nights \ , used figuratively
of the night or shadow of death
2. 176, &c : the darkness of sleep

2. 182: 3. 433: used figuratively
for darkness 3. 275: nox praeci-
pitat, • nigiit sets ' ; nox i-uit. night
rises' 2. 25.

noxius, • felonious ' 3. 536.

nubes, nuliila, -sky' 2. 676: 3. 129.

nudare. its two meanings 1.636, &c.

numen, sclf-oriuinating inclination,
its nature 1. 157. 260, 688, 813,
819: 2. 112. 115, 200, 298;

3. 189, 646: 4. 13: applied to
Roman Emperors before their dei-
fication 1. 159: iliffei-s from vo-
luntas 1. 11)2: numen laesum
1. 163, &c. : perverse numine, 'the
will ruiming counter to that of



26



numerus — Ovid



destiny" 3. 585, 705: magnum et
memorahile numen 2. 619.
numerus, a com|)any of soldiers dis-
posed 'rank and file' 2. 462: in
music numeri ' the tune " 3. 369 :
aequati numero 'marehini; in
time to juusic' 8. 604 — o.



nunc of a poet taking up a new

theme 1. 113: 3. 636: opposed to

mox 4. 296.
nuniiuam, much stronger than iifin

2. 317. &c.
Xyinpharum domus, 'iit for the

nym])hs ' ] . 474.



o



<Jbli(juare sinus, what, 3. 8.

obloqui to speak to (before) the listeners
3. 367.

obscurity in Virgil 1. 277: [Virgil]
"so little sollicitous about perspi-
cuity, and so very sollicitous about
harmony and effect" 2. 223.

obsidere poi'tas, of defenders posting
pickets at their gates 3. 825.

obtusus, 'stujiid', 'uncultivated'
1. 761.

occurrere, 'to interrupt accidentally'

1. 823.

ocean — wrong use of, by Mi', (^"oning-
ton 1. 87.

oculus, the ball of the eye, opposed
to lumen the sight of the eye
3. 659 : nostri fi'ecjuently joined
with oculi 3. 670, &c.

olim, 'at times' 3. 51.

Olympus, for the onliuai'y lieaven
3. 350, 513

omina. 'marriage' 1. (533: omen
= 'import' good or bad to lie de-
cided from the context 2. 366 :
the 'omina' at the imion of Aeneas
and Dido not unlucky 2. 645.

omission of subject with infinitive

2. 796.

omina tuta timens (iv. 298) 2. 689, &c.
onerare, with al)l. to clothe a person

with 2. 476.
opacus, 'shady' not 'dark' 2. 337:

covered with trees 2. 477.
opes, 'necessaries' 1. 765: 'nutans'

2. 349.
opimus, 'in good condition' 2. 344:

construction of, 2. 34.').
optare, virtually 'to command ' 1 . 304:

'to pray for' 1. 47."): ojitata urbs

(ill. 132) 'the longed-for city' 2. 389.
o|)ulcntus. not limited to opulence in

prcc-ious metals and stones 1. 688.
ora, 'the voice', ojiposcd to vultus

'the look, the eyes' 3. 841 — 2: ora

tenerc aTOj.iu fx^v to withhold the

voice, to be silent 2, 3; 3, 525:



4. 167, opposite to ora solvere,
movere 2. 5: ora ipiierunt, 'the
voice was still' 2. 9: ora lit. 'the
mouth', thou 'the whole face',
then 'the head' 3. 899.

orbes orbibus impedire (v. 584)
meaning 3, 155.

ordo, 'the row of oars' 3. 49: ex
ordine, 'one after the other' 3. 190.

Orion 4. 256.

ornare may be apjilied to weapons
or things carried as well as to
tilings worn 4. 93 : the regular
word for e(iuipping 4. 287 : just
like our 'dress' comes to have the
meaning of ornament ih. : when
instruere is joined with ornare.
the former expresses the use of
the thing to its possessor, thi3 latter
its effect on the senses of the be-
holder 4. 288.

orthography — ipiestions of, ought not
to be introduced into an edition of
Virgil xviii.

ossa, 'Innbs', 'body', not specially
'bones' 1. 808.

ostendere of martial exhibitions, as
'show' in English 3. 146.

Ovid superior to Virgil sometimes
1. 140: his versification simple
and artless I. 133, 618: "Let no
one say that Ovid is not a poet,
or subscribe to Dryden's most un-
just o|iinion of him. He was a
more natural, more genial, more
cordial, more inuxginative, more
playfLil poet not only than Dryden,
but than our author |Virgil| or any
other Latin p(ji't. His style is liesides
a very model of simplicity and
|)erspicuity " 1.618: compared with
Vii'gil as regards jilayfulness 2. 206 :
closely follows Vii-gil in Dido's
Epistle to Aeneas (Her. 7 j 2. 746, &c.:
mu(di more precise than A'^irgil
3. 486, 600: rarely more brief
than Virgil 4. 266,



paean — perlabi



27



Paean, wbat, ;l 371.

jjalace of Priam as il('sci'il)i'il \>\

Virgil niodelltMl nn a Ixonian home

2. 250.
l)alaestra, metaphors talcen from.

1. 352.

Palamedos, the cliarge against him.

2. 08.

palla, tlic cloak j)ut over tlic vt-kmen.
the tunic 1. 804.

Palladium, described In' Proi'oiiius
2. 110.

Pallas (the goddess), her art 2. 31 ;
she had nothing to do with huild-
ing the Trojan horse 2. 30 : the
ai-x was her especial invention
2. 290: her limbus 2. 293: her
palla 2 294 : her peplus ih.

Pallas (son of Evander), his dc-
pai-ture for the war conipai-ed with
the departure of Dido and Aeneas
for the chase 3. 754.

pandi suspensus, of crucifi.xion, 3.
395.

Panthea, her suicide compared with
Dido's 2. 823.

pantheism, explicitly set forth in
vi. 723, &c., 3. 387, in other Latin
poets 3. 388.

Pantheon, before Virgil's mind in
the description of I)ido"s temple

1. G99.

[)a]' always in A'irgil of gimilai'ity of
ajipearance 4. 83 cp. 288 : paribus
alls, 'wings moved simultaneously'

2. 681.

l)arare joined with fata 2. 94.
parcere to spare one inorally by not

exposing oneself to death 4. 137 — 8,

parcere dels to spare the gods in

this sense 4. 141.
parens l)oth masc. and fern. 3. 855.
parentalia founded by Aeneas 3. 19:

parentales an ill-omened word

3. 855.

parentheses [cp. intercalatory [)assagesj
freijuent in Virgil 1. 110: 2. 100.
146. 233, 499. 586 : 3. 172, 179, S44.

Pai'is signifies Tiraao^- a torcli 3. 530:
why Paris liad a second name
Alexander ib.

|)arra 4. 327.

particularization by a second clause
|cp. Theme and Variation] 1. 237,
252, 299, 311, 833: 2. 38, 42,
51, 388, 606, 617: 3. 595, &c.



Pater Kcjiuanus, the iiead of the
Roman people 3. 896.

patere. in arma 'to be exposed to the
arms of the enemy' 4. 255: patet
ianua leto iii. 661), "the door is
open for deatli to enter' 2. 316.

pati, 'to be subjected to' 3. 399: pati
manes ' to he manes ' ib. : patiens
with ace. and genit. 3. 569.

])atience is defeat not victory 3.
182.

patria i»i(}tas, parental affection 3. 855 :
4. 72, 127: patrius 7/f<r()f;>of = be-
longing to a father 3. 856 — 8.

Paul II., letters of Joannes Andreas,
bishop of Aleria, to, Pref. p. xlix,
Ixii — Ixiv, Ixvi — Ixviii; 1. 136.

pax Romana 3. 443.

pi-cten 3. 369, 469: th.> shuttle and
not the sley, though properly the
latter 3. 470.

pectus, the wider and nari'ower senses
of when applied to the body 1. 252;
■ emotion ' 2. 86 : ' carcass ' 3. 687.

P(:'erlkanii) a prosaic commentator

2. 297, 391 ; 3. 865: 4. 20 and
passim : is sonietimes ingenious

3. 186: hastily condemns lines
3. 482: 4. 71, ^U, kc: his ina-
bility to see irony 4 90.

jjelagus, synonomous witli mare
1. 536: jit).(f.yiLfiv 1. 537: how
paraphiased by Virgil 1. 538.

Penates, wliat 2. 156: "the dwell-
ing' 2. 254: they appear to
Aeneas personally 2. 394.

pendere 1. 359: in what sense rocks
are said pendere 1. 465, &c. : of
a prow aground 3. 68.

penetrare 1. 542, 545.

penitus not far away but far within
1. 494.

pensum the material to be woven,
not the woven material 3. 899.

penum, 'meats', 'eatables' 1. 831.

per with a vei'b of lying refers to
the stretched-out position of the
body 2. 503.

peramplus read in i. 729 bv Dr. Henry
1. 843.

percarrere. of a gliding motion 3. 470.

perfringere, to sma.sh, 4. 45.

periculo used absolutely = in periculo
3. 747.

perlabi 1. 426,



28



perpetuae — postes



licrpt'tuae mensae 3. TjOT cp. 6<J2.

persun and tiling not sufficiently
distinguislu'il 1. 346.

Pcrtinax. his statue 4. 73.

IV'i-tz, xvi; his enur as reganls the
I'itiiou iJS. xxxii, \"(j. : his idea ef
what constitutes an '" iVugustan ''
MS. xxxviii.

pes. the whole leg. 3. 151: collective
3. 152.

pete Jtaliaui ventis (iv. SiSl) 2. <24.

I'etilia meas 'little': the town made
a gallant defence in the 2""^ Punic
War 2. 452.

Phaethon, myth of, in Vii-gil and
Claudian 4. 30.

Phlegyas 3. 357.

l)iceus, dark, l>lrtcl<, like [atrh
3. 805, v\cc.

pietas [and piusj, 'kindliness', -tendei'-
iiess', not 'piety' 1. 175, 430,
(351, 745: 2. 269, 326, 367, 378:
3. 88, 176. 191: 4. 325: illud
ipsuin gravissimum ac sanetissimuni
nomen pietatis (Cie. Fam. i. 9. 1)

1. 181 : especially lionourod by
the Romans 1. 187: opposed to
crudelitas 1. 181 : how the woi'd
appears in modern languages 1.
182, lice. : its original sense main-
tained for the most part in tlie
<lernian frojirn/, wholly in Italian
p/rfa 1. 183: answers to old
English di'lmnaijre 1. 182—184:
distingiushed fronr iustitia as love
from law 3. 337.

pigeons— sacred pigeons always went

in pairs 3. 268.
Pindar, imitated by ^'il•gil 3. 3133.
pinnae, applied to a palisade 3. 506.
pipe, Pandean, 1. 66, iS:e.
pix, anv substance as lilack as [litch

3. 814.
plus [see pirtas\, a constant epithet

of vates 3. 374.
Pius IX., Encvclieal of, on pantheism

3. 387. ■
placabilis 3. 613.
plausu (v. 506j apiilaus(j of the

si)ei;tatoi's , not Happing of the

pigeons' wings 3. Izi.
plays on words — as explanations of

oracles 3. 496 — 7: in tin' names

of gods 3. 563.
ple()nasm with rursus 2. 779, 782:

3. 404: other instances of similar

pl(?onasm in (ireek and Latin

2. 779. 782.



.'i/.ijoianou; 3. 477.

[ihiperfect followed hy itnperfe(^t
1. 720.

plui'alis modestiae 3. 781.

|)oetry — its essence ideality 1. '2.")6 :
its motto videri 1. 281: not ne-
cessarily logical 3. 533 — 5. 8(i2:
4. 162— 3, ''209: proceeds from
general to [»articiUar not vici; versa
3. 610: poetic tropes 3. 93.

polire, to finish off 3. 719.

Polites, celebrated for swiftness of
foot 2. 261.

pollute amoi'e, ' l)etraved love ' (v. 5, 6)
3. 5.

Polyphemus, fond of music 2. 517.

Pom |ieins Magnus, his death supposed
by Servius to have been depicted
in that of Priam 2. 275.

Poinponius Laetus (or Infortimatus)
Ixiv, Ixvi, ixix, Ixxii, Ixxiv.

ponere, Ti^lhvai, to offer juizes. 3. 88.

Pope has made a gi'oss error in his
translation (of //. xix, 126j 2. 37, 118.

poppy-seeds , not a narcotic 3. 309 ;
ai'e esculent and sweet 2. 763 : the
capsule of the popi»y bitter and
narcotic 2. 764.

populus magnus, people inhabiting
a great city 1. 4i!7.

poiro intei'mediate lietween prope and
procul 3. 379.

prjitae Belli virtually I'ljuivalent to
t<implum Belli 1. 584.

Poitunus, i^ e. Neptunus 3. 78.

poitus applied juetaphoric'allv to
death 3. 589.

poscamus ventos 3. 12; differi'iitly
interpreted 3. 21.

pijsition, emphatic, of words 1. 118,
135, 217, 233, 242, 259,27-2,325,
412, 414, 415, 430, 516, 517, 559,
756. 758, 811, 835: 2. 12, 28,
92, 131— 137 (this is a detailed
discussion with numerous examples
of ))assages in which the position
of w((rds adds emphasis to them),
210, 253, 2(55, 291, 340, 351, 415,
572, 60(5, 662, 685, 694, 695, 768:
3. 1, 203, 241, 292, 308, 325. 416,
427, 772, 808, 892, 941 : 4. 5,
47—49, 76, 77, 177.

l)ositus, its various meanings 2.303,&c..
esp(.H;ially 306.

posse, to liring onestdf to do a thing,
moral possibility 4. 178, 272.

|)Ostes, why was 'door' exj)ressed liy
a plural noun 2. 248.



postuiniis — prouus



29



postumus. -latp bofn", r/j/.ry^ros

3. 407.

potens with .uenit. "lord of 1. 311:
witli abl. influential and ivs[)octod
by means of 3. 436 — 8.

Pottier, his serious mistake on .\.705,

4. 100.

Poiissin . liis picture of tlic Holy
P'aniily 3. 29.5.

l)raeeeps, •steep": in pi'uecipiti. on
the edge of a prei'ipiee 2. 238.

praecipere spe. to have iK^foi'ehand
by the force of e.vpoi'tation or
imagination 4. llil.

praecipitare. to t!y hastily 2. 26 : of
night ' to set ih.

praecisis saxis, with precipitous sides
3. (j7(j (cp. circumciso sa.xo).

praecordia. the seat of haughtiness
and anger 4. 65.

praelato honori (v. n41 ). the honouivd
person preferred 3. 136.

praemia Veneris, i. e. given by Venus,
cp. praemia Martis 2. 580.

praepes perhaps the (Jieek Dufoio^
(Aesch. Ag. Ill) 2. 421 : tlying
rapidly forward 3. 81.

praeruptus, 'precipitous height" 1.
3.o(). kc.

pracstai'e. 'to excel'; praestai'e se, to
show or exhiliit oneself 4. 188.

praeti'ndere takes dat. of object
screened, adversus with ace. of
oliject against which the screen is
held up 3. 916: i)raetendere taedas.
to be taken literally 2. 707.

[iraetentura. 'a picket' 3. 921.

Praxiteles 1. 726.

premerearval 531: premere vestigia,
to plant one's steps firmly on the
ground, but not uecessarilv to sto|t
3. 261. &c., 300, 4. 248; differs
slightly from reprimere vestigia, to
stop temporarily, comprimei'e vesti-
gia, to stop ]jermanently 3. 263 :
to press a thing in the mind
3. 503 ; premere vocem , to be
silent, premere gemitum, to entirely
sup])ress a groan 3. 863-5.

present tense used of a futui'e action
1. 210, &c. : used vividlv of a jiast
action 3. 845.

presents sent by Aeneas to Dido
significant of his love 1. 802: old
heir-looms sent as presents to
monarchs 3. 524.

Pi'iam, the reason for liis indignation
at the death of Polites 2. 263:



Virgil's account of his death sug-
gested liv tluit of Pompeius the
Great 2. '275.
primaiy and secondary senses of
vei'lis united to different objects
in tlie >aine sentence (zeugma)

1. 637: ])rimary sense used where
we should expect secondary and
vice versa 1. 626.

primi anni, the age of commencing
manhood poetical for iniens aetas

2. 72, &c.

inimus. 'in former tinu'' 1.213: [iri-
mus sonnius. -the beginning of
sleep' 1 701). \-c. : |irima terra,
tile sliore 1. 74.i: primus Machaon,
• Macliaon wlio took a principal
[lai't in the business' or "chief in
his art' 2. 141. 143. 289: it is
tlie most ambiguous word in Virgil

2. 143: i]riini iiortarum vigiles,
tlie 7j 007 ^7.<«;?*s•, • pickets', 2. 169:
used almost equal to an adverb
prinium 3. 204, 426, 695, 710:
primi duces, -tln' principal leaders"

3. 630: primani urbem vidimus,
■we got a glimiise of the city".
i)r 'we saw the distant citv"
3. 840—1.

priorum. not |iiorum. vatum (iv. 464)
2. 752.

Pi'iveruuni. the ciiurage of its in-
habitants 4. 211.

l)riscus, • aboi'iginal ' 3. ()95: • old-
fashioned" 3. 808.

pro, -on' 2. 914-5: pro turribus.
' in place of towers ' 3. 928.

l-rocella. a s.piall 1. 326. 347.
pi'ocumbei-e, to fall (slain) 3. 33:'..
jiroderc 1. 717.
proditio — falsa sub [iroditione (ii. 83)

not "a charge (jf treason' but

•duriiiii' a false alarm of treason"

2. 68.'
producere to conduct forth a funeral

procession 3. 902.
profugus closelv allied with tlie verb

1. 123.
proluere se 1. 84!).

pronouns omitted geaei'ally in Latin,
and so a cause of gi'eat obscurity

2. 65: [>ronoun in one line con-
nected with verb and limiting ad-
junct in next 3. 444.

proiius apiJied to the sea 1. 6.')4 :

3. 70: jironi in verbera I v. 147 1
3. 53.



So



proper name — real



proper name separated by many
words from its adjective 1. 835.

propius (1) 'more closely', (2) 'more
kindly' 1. 741.

proprius 1. oOl: proprium dare, to
give what is not to be given back,
to bestow ; mutuum dare, to give what
is to be given back, to lend il o31.

propngnacula 3. 831.

prose<iui 'to escort' noon i-uji ni'2. 388.

prosopopoeia often objectionable in
Yirgil 2. 161: 3. 611—2.

pruna, ' live coals ' 4. 248.

pudor regarded as a garment 2. 592.

piilmo the seat of pride and anger 4. 64.



pulsaro, 'to thump' 2. 501: 'to do

violence to ' 3. 356.
pulsus, ' beaten ', both in the literal

and metaphorical sense ('defeated')

4. 183-4.
[)ura pai'ma a shield without a device ; or

perhaps a white shield cp. pura vestis

(xii. 16'.») a white garment 4. 244.
putris, ' crumbly ' ; putrescei-e opjiosed

to concrescere 3. 757.
Pygmalion — his murder of Sychaeus

1. 635, &c. : his opes 1. 639, &c.
Pyri'hic dance — as described by

Apuleius and <3audian compared

with tlie Indus Troiae 3. 142.



«l



Quadra 3. 498: how it diffei's from
placenta 3. 499.

(juadrupedans, ' galloping " 3. 756.

quae quibus anteferam 2. 714.

quaerere arma, ' to have recourse to
war ' 2. 79 : = desiderare 3. 1 98 :
quaesivit coelo lucem (iv. 692),
'looked up to the sky to have a
last look at the light she was
leaving" 2. 848: (piaesitum parti-
ciple not supine (ix. 241)
3. 838—840.

(juaesitor, 'judge" 3. 318.

quails, their arrival on the Italian
coast 3. 607.

-que, added metri gratia in violation
of sense and grammar, a mere
eke 1. 814: 3. 110: epexegetieal
2. 38, 49.

questions, exclamatory 1. 15: "ques-
tions are rude at all times" 3. 808.



iiuii'scerr, 'in ht.Tdme still" 2. .')38.

(^)uii'inus is no emlilem of peace
1. 581.

quis (indef.) Anthca si (juem videat
(i. 185), ' if he might see anytliing
like Antheus' opposite to ipsum
Anth(>a 1. 483: 2. 459.

quis (interi-og.) used as a compound
relative, e. g. dicite quis avertit
(vvithout not<^ of intm'i'ogation)
3. 806 — 808 : quid ago, ' what an\
I to doV' 2. 781: quid mnror
(iv. 325) sc. in vita 2. 703.

Quixote, Dr. llenrv com[)ares him-
self to, 1. 44.

quod superest (v. 796), 'what remains
now', 'for the rest' 3. 196.


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