James Henry.

Æneidea, or, Critical, exegetical, and aesthetical remarks on the Aeneis online

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quodeunque (i. 82), 'sucli as it is'
1. 306.

quuni often used for variety instead
of quam in similes 3. 608.



R



R, omission of, in Latin and English
1. 426: alliteration of 4. 177."

Racine — the vision of Jezebel to
Athalie compared with that of
Hector to Aeneas 2. 151, &c.

radius, 'the pointer' (Fr. haynette)
3. 440: the proper woi'd for
'shuttle' 3. 470, 899.

rainbow, sometimes a bad nmen
3. 1()1 : rainliow at Joan of Aic's
death in Schinm- 2. 859.

rap(U-e expresses rapidity 1. 477:
rapti Ganvnu;dis 'of Ganymede
carried off'' 1.218, &c., esp. 223.



rarescere, to stand at a distance from
one another 2. 454.

rarus, what appears onlv hei'o and
there 3. 882.

raucus, the ordinaiy wurd applied
to a shield when struck 2. 271:
not applied to singing l»irds
3. 606.

I'e- in composition has tiie idea of
doing a thing n^peatedly cp. v. 709
traliunt reti'ahuntque 3. 182: also
a retrospective force 2. 537 : 4.60.

real and emblematical mingled to-
gether 3. 785—6.



recens— rumor



31



tecens, 'wet' 3. 663, 897.

receptus, 'a place to retreat to',
often used with tutus 4. 203—4.

recipere enseni, ' to receive a sword-
thrust' 3. 872: recepit Rhoetuiu
inulta inorte (ix. 348) — fhtify^
7io).l<it Oi'.vKTO), 'received him at
tlic mighty (or full) l)oard of
Death" 3. 873: recepti ciueres
(V. 80) 3. 2U.

recuiTence [cp. repetition] of the
same word in proximate sentences
1. 214, &c. : sometimes too in
different senses, thei'ehy causing
grave confusion 1. 215 — 6: 3. 63.

redimiculum, what, 3. 1»24.

redolerc moaning 1. 672.

referre, to repeat in any maiinci'
by name or by representation

3. 696: by representation 2. 705
(iv. 329 (jui te tamen ore refcrret):

4. 289: referre, 'to bi'ing back
spoils" 2. 621.

refugere, 'to sink backwards' 2.489.

refusus, 'ebbed' 1. 386, &c. : 'flow-
ing back' 3. 517: 'spreading far
and wide' 3. 518: 'stretched at
ease ' 3. 520.

regere imperium, ' to hold autricratic
rule', gerere imperium, 'to hold
delegated authority' 1. 631 — 2.

registrv of the dead kept bv Acacus
3. 340.

regna used of a private person's
property 2. 250.

regnare, construction of, 1. 413:
means ' to rule as an autocrat '1.414.

relictus. 'abandoned", i. e. 'out of
use" 2. 236.

remigium, 'oars' not 'rowers' 3.647.

remurmurare = resonare 4. 5l.

renarrare slightly stronger than
narrare cp. Eng. relate 2. 536.

rependere with ablative 1. 518, &c.

repetition of the same word in ad-
jacent lines 1. 604, &c. : of thought
in Yirgil 2. 806: 3. 49 [cp. re-
cuiTence].

reponere, 'to repair", 'to inake good"
3. 186: repostus 'put aside' 2. 422.

requirere, 'to try to recover ' 1.503.

res, 'the world '"l. 705, 706: 3. 285,
819, 897: res summa, 'tlie state"
2. 164: 'power' (nQuyucTn) 2. 351.

residere, 'to sit in state" 3. 88.

resignare, ' to unseal ' 2. 670 : lumina
morte resignat (iv. '244), 'awakes
from sleep' 2. 665.



respondere, 'to correspond' as a
pendant 3. 225: responsa dare, of
a god 3. 180.

retexere, ' to luiweave ', i. e. ' to un-
make' 4. 317: in iv. 119 (radiis(iue
retexerit orbem) retexerit in from
retego not retexo 2. 623.

reveherc, 'to ))ring liome' 3. 635.

Rhadamanthus lives in an arx like
Aeolus 3. 344.

Rhesus, his ariival at Troy 1. 709. kc:
his sleep 1. 709, 711.

rhyme, not to be used in a verse
translation of Virgil 1.35, 48, 339.

Ribbeck xii; did not consult the
Medicean adequately xv, &c. : his
emendations of Vii'gil jeered at
XX, &c. : his authority on critical
questions superior to AVagner's
3. 198.

riches and religion 1. 689.

ridei-e, with dat. (iv. 128 dolis risit
repertis) 2. 627, 630.

right side of the captain the more
honourable pla<'e on ship-))oard 4. 27.

riots at Rome, compared to storms
1. 428.

rivers, statues of, carried in ti'iumphs

3. 785: their names souK'tinies
used to express the country through
which they flow 4. 227, and even
the people who live beside them

4. 2^9: re-echo to noise 4. 22fS.
roasting corn, reason for and method

of, 1. 479: ancient method of

roa.sting meat 1. 499: 3. 32.
Romiilus equipped by Mars 3.

410 — 2; is always represented

helmeted 3. 412.
Ronsard, his Frnnciade 1. 329 note,
ros (vi. 230), not 'rosemary' but

'water falling in drops' 3. 271.
Ross, Alexander, his Ckn'sh'ad{xi. 1)

describes the chasings of the cup

out of which Christ drank in

Gethsemane 3. 714.
rowing, frequent metaphors from,

1. 587.
rubescere, 'to grow red' 3. 773.
rudere, of the sea 'braying' against

the turning prow ' 2. 494.
Rudolf of Habsburg — his statue 4. 77.
ruere applied to nox means 'to rise'

1. 47: 'to fall" 4. 11.3—4.
ruina coeli, what, 1. 397, &c.
Rumon, old name of Tiber 3. 649, 651.
rumor, the ripi)le of the water at

the bow of a vessel 3. 651.



82



runipi — Servius



niiiipi. used iiietapliorically with
pectora ' to be broken-heaited "
4. 304.

vupes, ' rooky li eights " 1. 456 : 3. 226 :
nipos cavata [i. 314), the preci-



pitous bank is hollowed out below
bv the water and projects over-
head 1 592.
rursus, pleonasms witli , t'nM|U('iit
3. 404: cp. 2. 775, 762.



ii



S, this harsh letter often omitted in

Latin 4. 211.
saci'a, images of the gods 2. 163.
saevire, construction of, 1. 429: 'to

' ramp " 3. 474.
saevus (-a), an ejtithet especially

applied to Juno 1. 138.
Saleius Bass us 1. 4.
saltem, proposed by Dr. Houry for

solita (in ix. 214) 3 .S32: occurs

last woi'd in a sentence 3. 834.
saltus 2. 608. 609; 4. 201 : 'ravines'

3. 616.
salus, preservation of life 2. 17.'i.
sampogna 1. 85.
sanctus, applied to Apollo 4. 248 :

sancte deorum = sanctissimo deus

2. 805.

Sardinia, marriage ceremony in. 2. 648.

Saturn, his emblem the falx 3.508:

invented the virie-dressei's' knife

3. 511.

saucius, desperately wounded, tocu-
u(iT(('.^: vulnei'atns, less severely
wounded, TtToojui-i'u^ 2. 265.

saxo, 'on the high road', not in-
strumental abl. (in v. 275) 3. 86.

scelus, "awful fate' applied to Lao-
coons death 2 123: sceleratae
poenae. "awful death" 2. 284 — 5;
sceleratum limen , " accursed
threshold' 3. 343: per scelus
'wickedly' 3. 195.

sriMia, 'a landscape', its ileiivation
1. 460.

scenery, its description subsidiary to,
and interwoven with, the actions
of the story 3. 655.

scenis agitatus Oi'estes, 'acted on
the stage ' 2. 754.

scejitra tenens, 'invested with regal
power' 1.272: sceptra lovemque,
'sceptered Jove' 1. 307 — 8.

Schillei', his genius 2. 47 : perhajjs
imitates Virgil (iv. 700-1) in his
conclusion of Dir Jmir/frfui roii
Orleans 2. 859.

riytiiHy.i-y;, 'logs' 2. 771.

Schiiorr von Carolsfeld, Dr. Kranz.
ilv-loaf facing ii. 1.



scopulus, rocky island 1. 247.
sculjiture and ])ainting infei'ior to

poetry 2. 120, 264.
iScylla and her dogs \. 495.
sea, regarded as higher than the

land 3. 10.
secare arcum (v. 658) = viam facere
per arcum 3. 171: secare spcm
like sequi s|)ciii, to follow hope
as one would a road 4. 23.
secessus, 'retirement' 1. 4;)9.
Second Book, its source 2. 1 : is a
description of that poi'tion of the
Capture of Ti'oy in which Aeneas
took a prominent part, 2. 18: its
dramatic ]jropriety 2. 22 : its
splendour 2. 23.
secretus , ' apart from the rest '

3. 162, 760, 769.
secundus. its two meanings 1. 433.
sedere, "to have one's seat" 1.271:
ap|ilied to the Roman general
when ti'ium idling 4. 6(i.
sedes, the actual tomb, and then
generally the idace wiiere one is
buried 3. 462.
segnis, ' cowai'dly " 4. 86.
semita, ' a trodden path ' 3. 883.
sententia, ' deliberate opinion ' 1. 518.
sequaces undae (v. 193) 3. 5.S.
sequi, 'to court", ambire 2. 785:
'to accompany" like tntnnai 2. 728:
sequai- absens 2. 726.
sera omina (v. 524) — sero intelleeta

3 128.
sercnare, 'to cleai" 1. 556
serere, 'to conjecture', lit. 'to sow'

3. "257.
serpents [c\>. snakes] , those that
killed Laocoon typical of the de-
struction of Troy 2. 115 : kept as
pets 2. 765 : said to love gold 2. 706.
servare, ' to remain beside " 2. 235,

415.
Servius — his supposed silence on tbe
Introductory "\^erses 1. 10, &c. : on
fistula 1. 71 — 2 : a good example of
his notes that on tenui avena 1. 97 :
interprets too prosaically 1. 213:
and foolishly 1. 5U7, iSlc. , 513:



seventh Bonk — soporifenim



:i:a



his use of imago 2. 191: his
leadings sometimes altered by Lion
3. 299 : his apparent errors often
due to careless expression 3. 334.

seventh Book, its calm and beautiful
opening 3. 463, 630.

shades, had a peculiar dread of the
sword 3. 287.

shield used as an offensive weapon
3. 701 : the w^ay a horseman's
shield hung 4. 231, 233: shields
of the principal heroes on board
a ship hung up on the poop
1. 484 — 5: so curved that they
could be used as boats 2. 407 :
inscriptions on, 2 408.

shipwreck of the fleet of Aeneas
parallel to that of the fleet of
Gnaeus Octavius 204 n.c, 1. 438.

short syllables lengthened by Virgil

1. 722.

si, '• since ' 2. 742.

Sibyl, the manner in which she
arranged her oracles 2. 462 : de-
scription of her cave 3. 219, &c.

sic veniat, 'thus and thus only"

2. 824: sic sic iuvat ire sub um-
bras 2. 830: sic posita (iv. 681)
2.842: sic 'on this condition ' 4. 147.

siccus sanguine 3. 683, 799 : siccus
by itself = ' sober ' 3. 685.

sidera (cp. astra), 'the sky' not
literally ' the stars " 2. 251 ; 3. 108.

sidereus, emitting light , radiant,
like a star, 2. 497 : 4. 5 : beautiful
as the heavens 4. 275.

Sieber, Dr., librai-ian at Basel xlix,
Ivi, Ivii.

signa, signs of bad weather 4. 38 — 9:
signaferre, 'to carry the standards',
i. e. to lead the way 3. 264.

signare— new explanation of v. 317
simul ultima siguant 3. 90 : sigiiare
viam (v. 526) 3. 134.

signum dare, at the beginning of
ceremonies 2, 649 : the signum at
Dido's wedding tb.

Silius — "Rome's second Virgil" 1.
819: sometimes as great as his
master ib. : sometimes Virgil's
happiest imitator 3. 427.

Sillig — his mistake about the Basel
MS. lii-lvi.

silvae haunts of shepherds 1. 105:
silvae generally ' brusli- or under-
wood ", opposed to silva, 'tall
forest' 3. 218: hut sometimes
silva — brushwood 3. 599—601.

HENRY, AENKIDEA, INDEX I.



similes only require one or two
striking points of resemblance

1. 725: that of Pyrrhus to the
snake, its ' dazzling beauty ' and
complete application 2. 243 : that
of the ants 2. 739: that of a
marching army to the Nile some-
what negligent 3. 792.

sine crimine vita 2. 798.

Sinon, Virgil's admirable art in the
treatment of, 2. 58, &c.

sinus, horizontal 'a bay', vertical
' a billowy wave " 1 . 446 ; in its
horizontal sense ambiguous 4. 223 :
very often used in the plural to
signify a single object 1. 544, &c. :
the actual bosom, or the garment
covering the bosom 2. 576 : 3. 782 :
flowing dress gathered in a knot
4. 224.

sixth Book, its ending quite simple,
3. 457.

size : when extraordinary size is
mentioned, Virgil generally dwells
on it in considerable detail 3. 913.

skins, slej)t on by those who wished
to have communication with tlie
dead 3. 488.

G/MTiia = arx 2. 807.

sky faUing 1. 397, &e.

slaves, of the same age, did not
wait on iirivate individuals 1.832.

snakes, typical of death and ruin

3. 775 — -6 : the snakes behind
Cleopatra (viii. 697) perhaps quite
metaphorical 3. 776.

solum, the sea 3. 66.

solus — qua sola sidera adibam (iv. 322)

2. 700.

solvere, ' to loose entirely ', pudorem
2 587, 589: the metaphors 'strict'
and ' loose ' applied to morals 2. 587 :
solvei'e lumina (v. 856) said of
Somnus who looses the eyes, i. e.
lets them go to sleep 3. 203—4.

somnus differs from sopor 1. 822:
Fi'onto's fable of the creation of
sleep 1. 824.

sonare, used actively ' to vociferate '

4. 305.

sonus, 'voice' 2. 212.

Sophocles— his Eledra the most pa-
thetic of all ancient dramas 2. 150.

sopor any kind of insensibility 1. 822 :
nee sopor illud erat (iii. 175) = ov/
ovuti ((/.?. I'TiKO fn!l/.oi' 2. 396.

sojioriferum, an ornamental predicate
of papaver 2. 762.



84



soror — subtraliitunjiK'



soror, eumpanioii, ,ties|>ielinn 1. 620.
sors reruin, ' share of the woiitl "

2. 819: 4. 13.

sortitus, with ace. = Ic.yctf ' whose
lot was ■ e. g. soi'titi reiiios,
' rowers ', mortalcs animas sortita
= mortalia 2. 478 : 3. 40G.

.sound of verse suited to sense

3. 272, 333, 349.

aoifxt'.^ of a living bod\' 1. 340.
spargere, 'to fling" 2. 5(X), 7G1:

sparsas manus (iv. 665), ' hands

outspreading' not 'sprinkled witli

blood' 2. 835
Spartana — Venus comjiared to an

athletic Spartan womau 1. BOl!.
spatiari ante ora deum (iv. (52) takes

the place of the dancing of barbaric

ritual 2. 597.
spatium, with mora ^- 'time fur delay'.

with reiiuies, 'time for rest' 4. 66.
Spears, Robert B., Esq., Ixv, Ixxv.
specimen, an amulet or talisman 4. 274.
specularia, in fenestrae, 2. 395.
speciilae (iv. 586), not watch-towers,

but simply the arx 2. 807 : 4. 260.
Spenser, his fault is to be too

consistently copious 3. 382.
spes luli, 'the promise lulus gave

of being a great man" 1. 759.
spirae, S[)iral coils tending upwards

2. 121.

spirare = vivere 2. 599 , 600 : ' to
have aspirations or thoughts, Jivnr

3. 572 : of heaving water 4. 51 :
spirantia exta, 'living" not 'pal-
pitating entrails ' 2. 598.

spissa arena, compact sand 3. 98.

sponda, what, 1. 826.

spondees affected by Virgil 3. 162.

sponte = e projjrio motu, ' spontane-
ously ' ; non sponte, the will not
acting as in the case of an in-
sensible i)erson, opposed to invite,
the will resisting 4. 253.

springs , sacred in all times and
countries 1. 474.

squamae and aurum the material of
cuii-asses 3. 719.

stabula had high conical roofs 3. 575,
888: alta is the constant epithet
applied to them 3. 888: 4. 107

stagua 1. 387.

riTidhu'. y.oi'/.ii 1. 282.

stare, a variety of esse 2. 53 :
3. 528: but never so in Virgil
2. 91: with abl. 'to stand by
moans of 2. 109: 'to stand as a



combatant' 3. 914: as applied to
the skv e-xju'esses the fixedness
that belongs to it 4. 294.

stars, regarded as fires 1. 788; need
food lb. : thcii- food the exhalations
from the earth and water 1. 78!».

statio, a roadstead op})0sed to portus,
a regular harbour 2. 41.

Statins contrasted witli Vii'gil 1.28:
his poem greatly neglected 2. 497.

statucri', to ai)point what is to be
stated or usual, as opposed to in-
dicero to appoint what is to be
for a particular occasion only
1. 793: applied to the mixer
1 crater), while ponere is applied
to the goblets 1. 839.

statues, living beautv compared to,

1. 774, &c.'

status rerum. a common expi'ession

in Latin 3. 470 — 480.
stellatus 2. 683.
sternax Q(]\\ws. = y.c.TioittaTt]^ i/ijioi;

4. 289.
sterni to prostrate oneself 4. 16 j :

steruitur aequor aquis (v. 821)

3 200.
oTtoi'oi' 1. 253.
stipula 1. 83.

storm and battle, resemblance of, 1.320.
strata viarum 1. 667.
strepitus, of the Inistle of sei'vants

(i. 721), 1. 840.
stringere, to gripe, painfidlv affect

3. 856, 858.

stupere in aliquo, to be so astonished
at a thing that one can do nothing
but gaze at it iv. 71.

Styx, its characteristics 3. 813.

sub, 'during' 2. 68.

subactus insidiis (xii. 494) stimulated,
stung by the treacherous attack

4. 297.

sublimis 1. i^dC): 'sublime', 'noble"
3. 385: 'on horseback' 4. 222.

submissi ot vumujiTovTi^ the sup-
pliants in a temple 2. 382.

subnexus not subnixus (in iv. 217)

2. 659.

subniti, 'to lean u])on' 1. 734: 'to

rely upon ' 2. 452.
subserere, 'to suggest" in .Vmmianus

(xvi. 2) 3. 258.
subsidere, 'to possess by guile' (de-

victam Asiam subsedit adulter

xi. -268) A. 175.
subtrahiturque solum (v. 199) 3. 65-

parallels in Knglisli 3. 68.



<uccuu'tus — terrt'iituui



sj:



suecinctus (1) specially ' uiulergirt '.
i. e. with kuee exposed. (2) geii-
erallv 'er[uipped with " 1.617. &c..
622 ■ -2. 289.

sudor used metaplioricallv .'). s97.

Sulmo, the naturr of his wound
3. 891—2.

Suu, by not going to certain nations
brought it to pass that they were
uncultivated, 'benighted' 1. 761:
labours of I'i. 746) to ))e taken
literally, not as eclipses 1. 852, &c.

super used adverbially 1. 225:

2. 171: 3. 936: 'concerning"
1. 861: super adsistere. to stand
beside so as to tower above 4. 74.

su|;erare 1. 547 : locum priniorem

(V. 125) 'to win first place" 3.54.

superi the inhabitants of the earth

3. 326. 332. 412.

superne above in the upper world 3. 372.

surgeus in cornua, of a young stag with

his first antlers just budding 4. 108.



aroiy:^ 1. 67. 7(1, 89: poem of that
I name by Simmias or Theocritus 1 .89.

Surrey's translation of Mrgil, the
beauty of its blank verse 2. 348 :
his blank verso somewhat monot-
onous , however , and in this
resj)ect contrasted with Milton's
3. 252.

susponsus, " at a loss what to do '
2. 91, 338, 423, 559.

suspicore to look up to with ad-
miration 1. 673.

sutilis opposed to textus 3. 307 : 4. 284.

swans simile of explained (i. 397, &c.)
1. 657. &c.

Sychaeus, not murdered before Dido's
eyes 1. 636.

synchronous events, in Virgil's
account of, rapid transitions arc
made from one to another 2. 262.

synecdoche 1. 794; 3. 476.

Svrtes— their nature 1. 363, 417, &c.;
'2 582.



T



Tabernacle, the Jewish 1. 728, &c.

table-rapping in ancient times 2. 381.

tal>ula(', 'planks' 7itv(r/.(^ 1. 384.

tabulata — solarium , tlie terrace on
the to]) of a house 2. 239.

Tacitus, the Roman Emperor 3. 425.

tacitus, liypallage of, 3. 544.

tactu innoxia. 'harmless to be
touched ' 2. 322.

tallness, part of the ancient idea of
dignity 1. 725.

tangere cubile, unTtoUi'.t If/fior
2. 416: tetigit fluctus, 'he reached
the sea' 2. 523: 'to move, affect'
diyyavttv 2. 814.

tautum (iv. 329) preferable to tamcn
2. 705.

tardus, ' lame ' 2. 233.

Tasso, his Qerusulenmic Lihcrcda "a
splendid adaptation of the Aeneis
to the times of the Crusades "
2. 777 cp. 1. 119: his style too
consistently copious 3. 382.

tears, hyperboles in different languages
as regards [e. g. 'floods of tears')
2. 577.

tectum, the house of an ordinary
citizen ; domus the honse of a
great man 2. 190: ajiplied to a
tower which had a roof 3. 911.

teetus, 'shut up in his dwelling"
(of Calchas) 2. 95.



tegmen lupae , ' covering made of
wolfs hide' 1. 567, lyncis. 'made
of lynx-skin' 1.626: tegmina hu-
meri, metal plates on the shoulder
of the cuirass 4. 73.

Telius, why present at the union of
Dido and Aeneas 2. 646.

uon temnere divos (vi. 620) — not
to set at nought the divine command
to be just 3. 358.

temperare, 'to aliate ' 1. 422.

tempestas, 'weather' 3. 791.

temple, the ancient, description of,
1. 728, &c. : the cella and temple
to be distinguished 1. 728: temples
of fJacchiis and of Isis at Pompeii
1. 731 : the seats of ilistinguished
personages in temples 1. 732.

tempoi a, ' temples of the head ' 3. 770.

tendere, ' to march ', tendere contra,
'to march against ', tendere retro,
'to retreat' 3. 878: 'to stretch'
(of a counti-y), ' to trend ' 3. 879 :
generally ' to move forward ', hence
metaphorically ' to take steps ' tb.

Tenedos, why chosen by the Greeks,
to anchor in 2. 40: contrast of
its condition before and during
the Trojan war //;.

tercentum tonat ore deos (iv. 510)
i. e innumerable gods 2. 773.

3*



80



tersa — Triton



terga, (1) 'back", (2) 'hide', (3)
' body ' 1. 794 : tergum ' an ox-hide
shield' 3.891: 4. 106: terga fern,
coats or coatings of iron 4 74

terni^tres 3. 149.

terra, ' place ' 3. 409.

texere tlie proiter word for building
a ship 4. 178, op. textrinum 'a
building dock' 4. 179.

thalanii exporteni sine criniine vitam
degere (iv. 550), possible con-
structions ..f, 2. 797.

Theme and Variation, its advantages
1. 206. &c.: the verb most used
in this construction is ire 1. 739:
detailed discussion on 1. 745, &c. :
" of all the arts of the poet this
little manoeuvre is perliaps the
simplest, most natural, and most
effectual" 1. 749: most frequently
and ha|(iiily used by Pope 1 . 746 :
used of projiositions only 2. 617:
"it f'>rms the most pleasing
peculiarity of the style of Virgil "
3. 731 : exami-les of its use

1. 133, 170, 205, 216, 301, 334,462,
540, 567. 574, 664, 738, 843.

2. 5, 38, 43, 93, 125, 140, 216, 287,
341, 342, 343. 351, 359, 362, 407,
422, 463, 483, 486, 498, 500, 522,
553, 606, 705, 707, 708, 709, 723,
725, 760, 778.

3 48, 89, 101, 249, 251, 256, 257,
258, 274, 275, 284, 286, 303, 310,
334! 335, 347, 477, 481, 483,486,
513, 529, 546, 568, 572, 575. 581.
589, 590, 595, 599, 600, 611, 614,
615, 616, 630, 631, 632, 648, 655,
657, 658, 667, 681, 682, 687, 698,
703, 704, 705, 706. 715, 7ii9, 731,
732. 744, 752, 753, 761, 763, 790,
791, 798, 806, 809, 811, 815, 817,
818, 820, 846, 876, 880, 888, 895,
897, 905, 908, 910, 923, 924, 934,
938 953.

4.8, 13, 14, 15, 19, 31, 42, 46,
72, 78, 79. 91. 93, 97, 98, 113,
165, 170, 173, 176, 185, 186,187,
188, 210, 214, 222, 246, 247, 262,
265,266,286,297,310,312.
Tlieocritus influence of onVirgil in the

Aenels 1 . 310 : especially in Book lY.

2. 546: imitated by Virgil 3. 376.
Thermodon not represented as frozen

in xi 659: 4. 226.
Threissa — a Tliracnan maid and there-

fciro skilled in masculine exercises

4. 259.



thunder, supposed to have been
caused by the tramplmg of Ju-
piter's horses 3. 351.
■,)voto^, what, 1. 280.
Tiber, its colour 3. 638: the river-
god's admonitions to Aeneas 3.
638—645: a Tuscan river 3.642:
its old name was Rumon 3. 649, 651.
Timavus. what, 1. 521, &c. : its fens
1. 523, 547, &c. : its nine mouths
1. 523, 549: why compared to a
sea 1 . 536, &c. : Virgil's description
is that of the Timavus in Hood 1.531 .
Tisiphone not a partisan but a mere
creator of strife 4. 114: an emble-
matical not a real actor 4. 115.
Titian, his picture of (ranymede and
the P]agle 3. 81 : his picture of
the Tribute money 3. 769.
Tmarii (v. 620) true reading restored

by N. Heinsius 3. 163.
Tobernca, an Irish spring like

.\rethusa 1. 470
tollere, in tantum 'to do credit to' 3. 452 :
of an ox 'tollere cornua' does not
necessarily imply anger 3. 615:
•to rear a child' 3. 910: tollite
rates (X. 295), 'lift the boats out
of the water ', the effect of power-
ful rowing 4. 52.
tori properly the cushions of the bed,

hence the l)ed itself 3. 354.

ton^uere vestigia (vi. 547j, 'to turn

the steps ' 3. 341 : torsit oculos

(iv. 220), 'turned his eyes' 2. 661.

torrjues, how worn ;}. 149.

toirens (ix. 105), 'flowing like a

torrent', not 'boiling' 3. 812.
torvus often ousted from MSS. by

tortus 3. 346.
towers on roof (speculae), quite
common 2. 239: verv frequent in
Cadiz 2. 241.
towns called after the rivers on

which they are built 2. 532.
trabes, 'girders', 'cross-beams' 1.
697 : tral)es nexae acre, ' brazen
jdates riveted together" 1. (599 :
' panels ' of a door 2. '249.
trahere noctem, 'to pass the night'

1. 8139.
transire, ' to pass by ' in a race 3. 95.
transmittere camjjos, lit. ' to send the

plains past them' 2. 642 — 3.
trident used for stirring up the sea 2.210.
Trissino, his Sofonisha 2. 544.
Triton the name and TKtoaoijuov of
a ship 4. 32.



Troia— vanus



37.



Troia, Ital. troja, Fr. truie m<.'ans

a ' sow ' 2. 450.
Trolter, Fox's letter to, 1. 647.
Tiicca 1. 2: 2. 278.
tueri acerba. ' to look bitter thiugs '

as we would say 'to look daggers'

8. 954.
Tullianum, visiti;dby Dr. Henry 2. 71.
turn vero marks a climax or tho

production of the full ett'ect

2. 160. 737: 3. 173.
tumentes applied to the swollen limbs

of the apparition of Hector 2. 147.
tumidus, the constant epithet of

snakes, as swelling with poison

2. 244: may be applied to any
part of the body of a haughty or
angiy person 4. 64.

tumor, '■ vaingloriousness ' or ' anger '

4. 65.
tumulus. • a tomb ', not ' a barrow '

3. 450.

tunc etiam (ii. 246j e<j[uivalent to

etiam tunc 2. 130.
tune etiam (xi. 857), "are you also

you degenerate creature ' 4. 255 — 8.



tunica recta, /irov ooHonTaSioc: 1 . 804

turbare, trepida ostia Nili (vi. 801)
3. 420: turbatus used absolutely for
•confused' 3.672: turbatum ocuUs,
■ seeing confusedly ' cp. turbatus
mento, -agitated' ?t. 672—3. 717.

turbo anything tliat whirls, hence can
be applied to a thunderbolt 3. 351.

Turgot, translati's th(; Aetieis 2. 778.

Turuus, a horse fancier 4. 8, 112:
his principal use to be a foil to
Aeneas 4. 128—130 cp. 308: his


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