James Johnson.

The recess, or Autumnal relaxation in the Highlands and Lowlands; being the home circuit versus foreign travel, a serio-comic tour to the Hebrides online

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THE



RECESS



AUTUMNAL RELAXATION



HIGHLANDS AND LOWLANDS;



BEING THB



HOME CIRCUIT VHRSVS FOREIGN TRAVEL,



A SERIO-COMIC TOUR TO THE HEBRIDES.



BY FREDERICK FAG, ESQ.



OF WESTMINSTER.



" Proximorum incuriosi longinqua sectamur." PLIK.



LONDON:
LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, GREEN, & LONGMAN,

PATERNOSTER-HOW.



MDCCCXXXir.



LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES,
Dulii Street, Lambeth.



PREFACE.



As the title-page of a book ought to convey some idea of its nature
and as a Preface should do little more, the present one will be short.
This little volume is the result of autumnal relaxation from the drudgery
of avocation in the metropolis. The name of the author, and the spe-
cies of drudgery which he undergoes can be of little or no interest to
the reader ; and it little matters whether he work with the head or the
hand with the pen or the brush with the hammer or the hand-saw.
It boots not whether he carries a hod of bricks or a bag of briefs whe-
ther he is most conversant with the composition of paints, potions, or
protocols. A tourist has one principal object in view to render him-
self agreeable both to those who travel the same circuit, and to those
who only travel round their own libraries. There are some other objects,
however, of considerable importance. During the last twenty years, the
tide of English tourists has annually rushed up the Rhine winded
through the valleys of Switzerland scaled the mighty Alps and spread
over the plains of fair Italy. More of our nobility and gentry have stood
on the Jura and the Rhighi, than on Skiddaw and Snowdon on the
Palatine Hill than on Salisbury Crags. More of them have ascended
the Simplon and the St. Bernard, than Ben-Cruachan and Ben-Lawers.
They have become more familiar with Como and Lugano, than with
Loch Tay and Loch Lomond. Many more of our countrymen have
visited Grindenwalde than Glencoe the Temple of Neptune at Psestum,
than the Temple of Nature in Staffa ! The snows of Mont Blanc have
more frequently been pressed by the feet of Englishmen, than the
summit of Ben-Nevis.

Now, one of the most important objects of travelling, is exercise
not of the body merely, but of the mind also and not the passive ex-
ercise of perception alone, but the more dignified exercise of reflection,
in addition. The moral and physical phenomena which present them-
selves on the road, may be considered as flints the intellect of the



2000163



IV PREFACE.

traveller as the steel and the sparks elicited by the collision, as the
thoughts and observations of the tourist during the journey.

It is not so much the design of the following volume to contrast or
compare the home circuit with foreign travel, as to show that, at a small
expenditure of time and money, our own islands present to the con-
templative traveller, or tourist in search of health, pleasure, or infor-
mation, a series of scenes and circumstances, not much inferior to those
which are presented on a foreign soil. If this object should be even
partially attained, the Axithor will have done some service to his country.

In a geographical point of view, the Author has necessarily trod in the
steps of his predecessors; and when it is remembered that, amongst
these were, a Johnson, a Pennant, a Boswell, a MacCulloch, and many
others of celebrity, it will be allowed that such footsteps are not less
dangerous to follow than those on fairy ground ! But the Author
believes that he has lived long enough, and travelled far enough to be
able to think for himself, and if his meditations and reflections prove
less interesting than those of his predecessors, he ventures to hope that
they will not be found less original. One word more, and he has done.
He flatters himself that this little volume will prove an acceptable
companion (as a prompter to thought and reflection) for those who
pursue the same route.

F. F.

Westminster, 1834.



Some few literal errors have escaped notice in the correction of the press. Among
others the following:

Page 47, line If) from top, for on, read or.
88, for Wally, read Willy.
100, for tottoir, lead trottoir.
161, for of. read off

220, for sise, read size.

221, line C from l.-ottom, after action put a full stop.
237, for " will go," read " will he go."



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Page
WESTMINSTER BRIDGE.

Contemplative view of the northern
bank of the Thames, from Battersea

to the Tower .... 1

Chelsea Hospital Legion of Honour ib.

Penitentiary refuge of the profligate 2
St. Stephen's The STATE GALLEY ;

an allegory . . . . ib.
Condition of the Galley list of de-
fects . . . . ib.
Proposals for a thorough repair . 3
Opposition to a thorough repair . ib.
Arguments of the opponents . . 4
Attempted compromise . . 5
The Galley docked and repaired . ib.
Sailing-trim of the newly-repaired

Galley ..... 6

State of the crew . . . ib.

Westminster Abbey ... 7

Westminster Hall ... 8

Waterloo Bridge ... 9

Bedlam ... . ib.
Somerset Place . . . .10

King's College Milestone . . ib.

March of intellect . . . ib.
Blackfriars' Bridge . . .11

The Tower . . . . ib.
VACATION.

Migration from the capital in summer 12
THE TOURIST . . . .14
Paucity of materials for the awful and

sublime in England . . . ib.
Contrast in other countries . .15

THE STEAMER THE '' GATHERING."

Definition of a steamer . . .16

The " gathering " at Greenwich . 17

Muster-roll of the " gathering " . 18

Steam versus stage-travelling . . 20

Pleasures of travelling . . .21

THK RIVER . . . .22

Thames and Tigris compared . . ib.

Greenwich Hospital . . . ib.

THE SEA.

Reflections on Campbell's poem,

"The Sea" . . . .23

A sea-view (not Campbell's) from

St. Leonard's . . . .25

A sea-view, in humble prose . . 27

FIRTH OK FORTH . . .28

Descriptive sketch of the Forth . ib.

NEW HAVEN

Scene at landing there . . .29



of



age



30

ib.
ib.

31
32
34
ib.
35
ib.



ib.
ib.



36
37

ib.
38
ib.
39



EDINBURGH.

Definitions of Edinburgh, by Walter

Scott and others .
Contemplations on Arthur's Seat
The Old and the New Town . .
The March of Intellect Tree

Knowledge ....
Probable effects of knowledge .

Modern and Ancient Athens .
Building a ruin ruining a building .
Monuments on Gallon Hill . .
Melville and Trajan ...
Burns supplied with marble instead of

bread . . . .

Athenian ingratitude near home
The swinish multitude order and

idleness .....
Scotch and_Irish compared
Phrenological characteristics of the

Scotch

New Town Pompeian silence
Law, physic, and divinity . .
Auki Reekie versus New Town .

STIRLING CASTLE.

Departing scene at New Haven . 40
Choleraphobia . . . .41

Windings of the Forth . . . ib.
View from Stirling Castle . .42
Historical recollections . . .43
BANNOCKBURN.

Parallel of Bannockbuni and Marathon 44
CALLANDEU .... ib.
The Persian wheel divide el impera ib.
Portrait of a Highland inn . . 45
Tempora mutantur for the better . 47
Roman camp formed by nature . ib.

THE TROSACHS.

The sister lakes composition of the

Trosachs . . . .48

View from Ben Venue . . . 4'J
Trosachs compared with other lions

abroad ..... ib.
Locn KATRINE . . . .50
Poetical description of the Trosachs . 50
Helen's bower, and Helen's shower ib.
Highland rain, alias waterfall . 51

Estimate of Loch Katrine . .51
Misnomer of the lake its real name 52
Rob Roy's country . . . ib.
A young Helen Macgregor . . 53
A prescription without a fee . . 54
Highland economy a female launch ib.



Vl



CONTENTS,



Page

LOCH LOMOND . . . .55
Inversnaid a Highland Locanda . ib.
Travelling constitutions . . ib.

Loch-Lomond steamer . . .56
Steam versus sentiment . . ib.

Lake-poets smoked out . . ib.

Spirit-gauge of morality . . ib.

Estimate of Loch Lomond . .57
THE LEVEN . . . . ib.
Smollet's monument ' . . . ib.
DUMBARTON . . . .58
Historical recollections . . ib.

THE CLYDE . . . .59
Singular view from Dumbarton Castle ib.
GREENOCK . . .60

The " tide of human existence " at

Greenock . . . . ib.

View from the hills behind Greenock 61
HELENBURGH PANNANICH . 62

Hydro-mania of the Jocks and Jennies ib.
LOCH FINE HERRINGS . .63

Migrations of the herrings a " tale

of the sea" . . . ib.

EAST TARBET . . . .64
Isthmus of TarbeU-historical associa-
tions . . . . . ib.
Redundant population reverie on . 65
A Caledonian optimist . . . ib.
Fertility of Loch Scavig ! . ib.

The Celestial Empire celibacy . 66
Voltaire's alternative eat or be eaten ib.
Relief to redundant population . 67

Cause of redundancy in England . ib.
Utility of fisheries . . .68
CHINAN CANAL . . . .69
Hibernian navigation . . . ib.
Cyclades in the Sound of Jura . ib.

Basaltic walls . '. .". j . ib.

CORRIVRECHAN . . . .70

The Caledonian Mahlstrb'm . . ib.
Description and cause of the whirlpool ib.
GARVELOCH Miss Martineau . 71
Great progress of political economy . 72
INVERARY TO OBAN . . .73
Coup'd'o?il of the town and castle . ib.
Solitude and society . . . ib.
Large inu, and larger innkeeper . 74
A horse on board wages , f .. . ib.
Dumb reasoning . . . .75
View of Loch Awe, Cruachan, &c. . ib.
Quadruped reflections on the sublime 76
Valley of Glenorchy . ', . ib.
Pass of Ben Cruachan . . ib.

Kilchurn Castle revolution in senti-
ment . . . . .77
Lorn and Bruce . . . . ib.
River Awe . . . .78
Piscatory propensities . . . ib.
Taynuilt ib.

OBAN.

Oban, the Ormuz of the West . 79



Page

Virgil's description of Oban . . 79

The advent at Oban (a scene) . ib.

The " gathering" (a scene) . . 80

Dunolly ruins . . . ib.

The philosophical tinker . . 81

Arts, letters, and religion . . ib.

The lords of Lorn . . ib.

Salutarium at Oban . . .82

SUNDAY . ib.

Sunday that was Sunday that is . ib.

Highlanders on Sundays . . 83

Ode to St. Andrew . . . ib.

Paley's definition of Sunday . . 84

What Sunday ought to be . . 85

SOUND OF MULL . . .86

Poetical and historical associations . ib.

Simile without similitude . . 87

A steamer without steam . . ib.

TOBERMOREY . . . ib.

Hebridean tempest . . .88
Ben-More and Morven in their cups . ib.
LULLABY ; or the SURF-SONG . ib.

Madras beach . . . .89
View from Ben More . . .90
Highland illegitimacy . . . ib.
Miracles in Mull . . . ib.

CHARACTERISTICS OF SCOTLAND

THF GOBLIN'S ODE . . .91
THE PIBROCH its magical powers . 93

STAFFA FINGAL'S HALL.

Sir Walter Scott's poetical character

of the Hall . . . .94
Terrific scene in a tempestuous night 95
Thoughts on the formation of Staffa ib.
Portentous phenomena at its formation ib.
Basaltic bridge from Staffa. to Ireland 96
Palmer's beautiful poem on Staffa . ib.
Design or accident ? . . ib.

Geological remarks . . .97
Finest view of Staffa . . 98

Astonishing scene on landing . . ib.
False portraits by Panckoucke and

others 99

Interior of Fingal's Hall . . 100

Panckoucke and his spouse, in Staffa ib.
Fairy scene in the cave . . 101

Wild and singular view from the rocks 102
Poetical description, by Palmer . ib.
Lines on Staffa, by a nobleman . 103

ION A.

Reflections on landing in lona . 106

The ruins and the burying-ground . ib.
Antiquarian sacrilege . . .107

Legendary lore . . . . ib.

St. Oran's burial alive . . . ib.
" Second sight" . . . ib.

St. Columba's antipathies to women

and cows .... 108

Dr. Johnson's reformation . . ib.

The inhabitants of lona . . . ib.



CONTENTS.



vii



Page

Black stones coronation oaths . 109
Reformers miracles . . . ib.

DUNSTAKKNAGE . . . .110

Ruins, their indications . . ib.

Highland castles . . . .Ill
Jacob's pillow the coronation stone 112
Storm at Dunstaffnage . . .113
Hospitality of the hut . . . 114
Policy of introductions . . ib.

KINO-SELLING versus KING-KILLING 115
Glance at Scottish history . . ib.
GI.EN ETIVE, or the ENCHANTED

VALLKY . . . . .116
Fits of the stupendous in travellers . ib.
Supernatural phenomena in Gleu Etive 117
APPIN TO BALLAHUI.ISH . .118
The Niagara of the North . . ib.
Berigonium, the ancient capital . 119
Magnificent scenery . . . ib.
St. Mungo's Isle and cemetery . . 120
GLENCO ..... 121
Scenic phenomena in Glenco . . ib.
Ossian's birthplace . . . 122
Massacre of Glenco reflections . ib.
Horrible "mistake" "Curse of

Glenco" .... 123

BLACK-MOOR .... 124
A scene of solitude . . . ib.
The Macadamizers . . . ib.
TYNDRUM . . . . .125
Cockney fastidiousness . . ib.

T.YNDRUM TO KlLLIN . . . 126

High-way robberies . . . ib.

Argyle and Breadalbane . . ib.

Comparison of climates . . . 127

Moral and physical enjoyments . 128

KILLIN, a lion of the Highlands . 129

River god of Loch Dochart . . ib.

Burial ground of a clan . . 130

Moral reflections . . . ib.

A Highland innkeeper . . . 131

A limping machiner . . ib.

A Highland palaver . . . 132

Penny wise and pound foolish . ib.

Scott's character of the Scotch . 133

Critical remarks on this character . ib.

Striking trait of Scottish character . 134

DUNKELU valley of the Tay . . 135

Scenery of Dunkeld . . .136

Boswell and Johnson . . . 138

Plantation mania . . . . ib.

KlLLICRANKIE . . . ,139

Nuptials of the Tummel and the

Tay ib.

Romantic scenery of Glen Tummel . 140
Reflections on cataracts . . ib.

PASS of KII.LICRANKIE . .141

Hanoverian apprehensions . . ib.
Descriptive scenery . . . ib.
Disappointment . . . .142
Project of a tour to the NETHER-lands ib.
Hints to tourists in Tartarus . , 143



Page

Mr. Heraud and Cobbett . .143
The TIMES, the HERALD, &c.,in Tar-
tarus ..... 144
Infernal news-room . . . ib.
Turk and Tartar in the drop-scene . ib.

KlLLICRANKIE tO INVERNESS . 145

Singular scene of wild sterility . ib.

A Highland hanging bridge . . 146
Wolf of Badenoch Prince Charles

Edward 147

Cairn-gorums, alias Brazilian pebbles ib.
Exchange no robbery . . . ib.

Ossian 148

Fingal Macpherson ... 149
Field of Culloden reflections . ib.

INVERNESS .... 150

Brief characteristics of Inverness . ib.
Cholera ecclesiastes ... 151
Strictures on certain religious tenets 152
" Nothing new under the sun " . ib.
Divine origin of cholera . . 153

Religio Laici . . . .154
CRAIG PHJJDRIC vitrified forts . 155
Antiquarian absurdities . . ib.

TOM-NA-HEURICH . . . 156
Origin of Rip Van Winkle . . 157
CALEDONIAN CANAL . . .158
Geological reflections . . . ib.
A national UNDERTAKER . . ib.
Stupendous scenery Johnson in Sky 159
Fall of Fyers . . . .160
Odious comparisons . . . ib.
Loch Oich and Loch Lochy wild

scenery . . . . .161
DEPOPULATION various theories of 162
True theory of Highland depopulation 163
A frightful picture political economy ib.
Curious inducements to matrimony . 164
FORT WILLIAM Neptune's Staircase 165
A Highland shower . . . ib,
A Highland Bivouac . . .166
Night-cap and slippers on the Caledo-
nian Canal . . . . ib.
Rise and progress of a Highland town 167
PARALLEL ROADS Glenroy . .168
Geological remarks . . . 169
OBAN to INVERARY . . . 170
Johnson blind, and Boswell stupid . ib.
National dialogue . . . 171
A lee-lurch and a safe landing .172

INVERARY to LOCH LOMOND . .173

Highland tactics a widow's appeal ib.
Solitary scene Glen Kinglas . ib.

Emigration a poet's portrait , 174

Loco-migration political economy .175
Portrait of a Highlander that was . 176
Politico-moral reflections . . ib.
Highland character . . . 177
Highlanders Malthusians . . 178
Poor-laws in Scotland . . . 179
GI.ENCIIOE, description of , , 180
The cobbler rock . . , , ib,



Vlll



CONTENTS.



f Page

Seven-league boots . . . ISO
Hell-valley desolate scene . .181
BEN LOMOND .... 182
Comparative scenery, at home and

abroad . . . . . ib.
Four views from Ben Lomond . 183

A Greek's description of a Highland

climate . . . . . ib.
GLASGOW ..... 184
Singular site and appearance of . ib.
Aspect of the inhabitants cholera-
phobia ..... 185
A harbour on a hill . . ib.

Mr. Chambers' curious picture of Glas-
gow . . . . . ib.
Reflections on the statue of John

Knox 186

The Hunterian museum, reflections in

the 187

AILSA. Compared with Stafl'a, Sky,

&c 188

Stupendous scenery on the western

side . . . . . ib.
The gull-storm of Ailsa . . 189

The biped and quadruped population ib.
Magnificent basaltic columns . . 190
TOURISTS in SCOTLAND . . 191

Severe treatment of Dr. Johnson . 192
Arguments per contra . . . ib.
Rev. Dr. M'Nicol's remarks on John-
son ... . . ib.
Dr. MacCulloch's strictures . . 19-1
MEMORY . . . . .195
Memory influenced by climate . ib.
Prairies and Alps compared . . ib.
Philosophy of memory . . . 196
Futile complaints of bad memory . 198
Inattention the cause of bad memory ib.
Memory a voluntary power curious

examples . . . .199
LANARK . .... 200
Owenism, criticisms on . . ib.

New Lanark, romantic site of . 201

FALLS of the CLYDE . . ib.

Disappointment in waterfalls . . ib.

Gorgeous description of the Clyde

Falls 202

GRETNA GREEN .... 203
Joint-stock company of Celestials . ib.
CARLISLE historical recollections . 204
Wall of Severus, inefficacy of . . ib.
ENGLISH LAKES, compared with others 205
A Catholic clergyman's sentiments . 206
Wordsworth .... 207
Beautiful mirror of Grassmere . 208

Climate, and character of scenery . ib.
LIVERPOOL .... 209



Characteristics of this emporium

Cemeteries, reflections on . .

STEAM-CARRIAGE RAIL-ROADS

Descriptive sketch of the steam-car-
riage .....

Probable effects of steam-carriages in
war .....

Effects of steam-carriages in peace .

Graphic sketch of journey from Liver-
pool to Manchester . . .

The starting ....

The ascent ....

The descent the meetings the Chat-
moss . . . . ; J J :

The comptroller of the gammon

Hint to a reformed parliament

MIDLAND MOVEMENTS Buxton
Matlock .

BIRMINGHAM . . . -fli,

KENILWORTH ....

The conjuror's scene in Kenilworth .

Moral and poetical retribution

CHELTENHAM ....

The pump-room a scene . -/*(0

The factor . . . . >j)S

The nabob ....

The disappointed politician . .

The boroughmonger . .

The Caribbean ....

The water-melon . .

The highway-man . .

The lunatic asylum keeper . . <*i

The grey magician . . .

Yorick . . . . .

The absentees ....

The financier ....

The registrar ....

The man of doubts . . .

Whigs, Tories, and Radicals . .

M. P.'S .....

JOHN BULL . . . .

National characteristics . .

Revolutions in sentiment . .

Changes of creed . . .

The British channel . . .

Redundant population . . .

Intellectual combination . .

Agriculturists versus artisans . .

Jury of Bakers . . . .

Remedies for pauperism . .

Emigration . . . .

Alternative emigration ...

Diffusion of knowledge .

Labour .....

Recapitulation of remedies .

Conclusion . .



210
211
212

ib.

213

ib.

214
ib.

ib.

215

216
ib.

217
218
219
220
221
223
224

ib.

ib.
225

ib.

ib.

ib.

ih.
226

ib.
227

ib.
228
229

ib.

ib.
230

ib.
231
232
233

ib.

ib.
234
236

ib.
241

ib.

ib.
242
243
244
245



THE
RECESS,

OK

AUTUMNAL RELAXATION

IN THE

HIGHLANDS AND LOWLANDS,

8fc. 8fc.



WESTMINSTER BRIDGE.

IT was on a beautiful morning in early Autumn) that a small party, ex-
hausted by the fever of a London season, and anxious to escape, for a
time, from the fury of politics, the terror of epidemics, and the thousand
toils and turmoils by which time is frittered away and life ultimately
curtailed in the metropolitan vortex, drove up Westminster bridge, and
halted on its highest arch. One of the party surveyed, for a few minutes,
the northern banks of the Thames, from Battersea to the Tower, with an
eye of contemplation rather than of curiosity, and with a countenance in
which a La vater might have seen or fancied a series of different emotions,
corresponding with the impression of various images impinged on the
mental mirror. The physiognomist would probably have read in that
countenance more of melancholy than of joy more of pity than of cen-
sure more of despondency than of hope more of pain than of pleasure
more of disdain than of admiration while the eye glanced rapidly
from bridge to bridge, and from object to object. My own eye pursued
the same track by a kind of mechanical impulse ; and, pointing to a
large building, high up the river, and pleasantly situated between two of
its bridges, being backed and flanked with gardens and walks, through
which were sauntering a number of uncouthly dressed beings, aged,
maimed, and tottering on the verge of life, I asked my companion what
it was ?

" It is," said he, " the RENDEZVOUS or asylum of the ' LEGION of
HONOUR ' of wooden legs, empty sleeves, and unsightly scars of vete-
rans, who have shed their blood and defeated the enemies of their counii y



2 PENITENTIARY STATE GALLEY.

on every hill and dale, mountain and valley, from the Pyramids to the
Pyrenees, from the Tagus to the Texel, from the Ganges and Indus to
La Plata and the Mississippi. It is the ' Place de Carousel,' not of
drones, and sycophants, consuming the treasures of the state, but of
time-worn warriors merrily rehearsing some of the most dangerous acts
of their stormy lives, and

' Shouldering the crutch to show how fields were won.' "

To a similar question respecting a convent-looking structure situated
in a marsh at the foot of Vauxhall bridge, my companion answered :
" That is a REFUGE for the PROFLIGATE, where PENITENCE weeps over
sins, not because they are wicked, but because they are punishable over
crimes, not because they were committed, but because they were detected.
It is an asylum, where the most disinterested benevolence is wasted on the
most worthless objects ; and where the minimum of advantage results
from the maximum of expenditure."

From this mansion of repentance the eye wandered eastward till it
encountered a massive pile of buildings at the foot of the bridge on which
we stood. I asked my fellow traveller for a definition of this structure.
" That," he replied, " is the famous DOCK YARD from which has been
launched the new or at least, the newly-repaired, STATE GALLEY, or
CONSTITUTION YACHT. You may have heard," said he, " of
' The flag that braved, a thousand years,
The battle and the breeze.' "

I answered, " That every one heard of that flag in a celebrated speech of
an illustrious senator." " It would have been wonderful," said he, " if
that flag had suffered neither wear nor tear from the hand of time or the
assaults of the enemy. The fact is, that it had been so patched and
darned by state tailors, that many people declared they could scarcely
recognize a single stripe or thread of the original bunting ! But not the
flag alone, the vessel which bore it, was considered, by a great majority
of the crew, to be in a crazy state ; and architects were ordered to exa-
mine and report on her condition. It was represented that she had the
dry rot that she was leaky that the ballast had shifted to one side,
rendering her liable to upset in sudden squalls that the masts were too
tant for the hull that the top-gallant sails and royals were too square,
in proportion to the lower and larger sails that the rigging and stays
were not well tarred that the ship was over-officered and the crew neg-
lected that there were too many marines on board that the IDLERS
were far too numerous, occasioning heavy duty to fall on those who kept
watch that the captain, and commissioned officers, in all councils of
war, battles, or tempests, drowned or despised the voice of the petty
officers and seamen that the cabins and wardrooms of the captain and



STATE GALLEY. *}

officers encroached on the berths and comforts of the men, and forced
them to mess on the lower decks, with the disadvantages of bad air and
scanty provisions that promotion went on unfairly, the vacancies being
generally filled up by favourites of the captain or superior officers, to the
discouragement of meritorious men among the crew that many berths
were held on board by merely nominal occupants ; so that it was not
uncommon for the captain or superior officers to have their horses or even
their donkies rated as quartermasters, while the rations and pay went into
the pockets of men who did no duty whatever that the provisions and
stores were often lent to vessels of foreign nations in distress ; but never
returned ; by which, the crew were frequently put on short allowance
or obliged to run on tick with Jews and slopmen that drafts were not
seldom made from the ship's company to serve in foreign ships and on
foreign stations, where their blood was shed, and their pay expended,
without any ultimate advantage to themselves or their country that



Online LibraryJames JohnsonThe recess, or Autumnal relaxation in the Highlands and Lowlands; being the home circuit versus foreign travel, a serio-comic tour to the Hebrides → online text (page 1 of 28)