James Martin Yeager.

An brief history of the Yeager, Buffington, Creighton, Jacobs, Lemon, Hoffman and Woodside families, and their collateral kindred of Pennsylvania online

. (page 12 of 14)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

Died Sept. 11, 1835.
A soldier of the Revolu-
tion.



f James,
Nathan,
Jonathan,
Thomas, horn Dec. 23, 1787.

died Jan. 8, 1872; married

Mary Yeager.
John Wm., horn June 8, 1799-
Isaac, horn May 11, 1806;

died Feb. 23, 1884.
Mary Jane, married Simon

Sallada.
Eleanor, horn Feb. 25, 1797;

married Messnei .

Ann. horn Aug. 12, 1801 ;

married Sallada.

Margaret, horn Sept. 9. 1803;
^ married John Shott.



THOMAS WOODSIDE,
married, in 1812. Mary
Yeager, sister of Jacob
Yeager of Yeagertown,



(Jacob, born June 13, 1813

died Nov. 2, 1852.
Leah, born Mar. 23, 1816

married Henry Straub.
John, born Aug. 17, 1817.
Catherine, born July 2j, 18 19

married John Ditty.
Joseph, bom Dec. II, 1821.
Daniel, born Jan. 15, 1824

died Mar. 6, 1893.
Margaret, born Aug. 22, 1825

married Jos. Schnee.
Mary, born Feb. 13, 1828

died Jan. 18, 1862; married

Mason.

Thomas J., born Dec. 29, 1829.
Simon P., born May 8. 1835 ;
t died Mar. 24, 1856.

233



THE W O D S I D E F A M I L Y




Ht»v. Thomas W. Woodside

An ol'l photograph of the missionary to Africa



23 \



THE W O O D S I D E FAMILY



Thomas A., born Dec. 21,

1845; died Alar. 25, 1858.
John C, born Dec. 1, 185 1.
( )liver F.. born Oct. 11, 1855 ;

died Jan. 29, 1883.
D. Elmer E., born Nov. 16,

1861.
[sabella Z , born July 9, 1865 ;

died Sept. 10, 1865.

f Adaline, born Jan. 29, 1844.

Alary E.. born June 23. 1845.
I Sarah, born May 8. 1849.
«{ Aaron M., born Mar. 17, 185 1.

Thomas W.. born Dec. 25,
1852. Missionar\ in South
[Africa.

Simon Salada, mentioned above, was four times elected
to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives; in 1819,
1820, 1836, and again in 1853, when he was in his 69th year.
During his term in the legislature he was the author of
what was generally known as the "Wiconisco Feeder Bill."
He was the superintendent for the construction of the Wico-
nisco Canal. Through this outlet the Lykens Valley coal
fields were first developed.



DANIEL WOODSIDE,
son of Thomas and Mary
Yeager Woodside.



JOHN WOODSIDE, son
of Thomas and Alary
Yeager Woodside.



Willie



W.,



THOMAS J. WOOD-
SIDE, son of Thomas
and Alary Yeager Wood-
side.



( vviuiam w., born Dec. 7,

i860.
Josephine, born Apr. 24, 1863;
J married Charles Strause.
] Alary, born Jan. 19, 1866;

married Robert Binning.
1 Edith, born July 15, 1869;
v married .



The following quaint letter, written more than sixty
vears a«o to Jacob Yeager, at Yeagertown, by his niece,
Catharine Woodside Ditty, and her husband, John, is inter-
esting on account of its sentiment as well as age :

Elizabethville, Fa., November 15th, 1852,
Dear Uncle Jacob :

It has, with pain and sorrow, become our duty to in-
235



THE W O D S I D E FAMILY




■2M>



THE JV O O D S I D E FAMILY

form you that our brother, Jacob Woodside, is no more. You
are probably aware that he received an injury in his side
three years ago last summer, while erecting the bridge at
l.ufhngton's and Hartman's Mills, from which he never
was afterwards quite free, and every time he caught cold it
would settle in that place and in the last of September or be-
ginning of October, he caught a cold which again settled in
his side, but was still about attending to his business.
On Friday afternoon, the 29th of October, he and his wife
were at Mattis' store, and when they came home he laid
himself down and got worse and worse until Tuesday, the
2nd of November, between 4 and 5 o'clock he breathed his
last and was buried on Friday, the 4th, at Burlington's
Church; another sad warning to us all that in "the midst of
life we are in death", for he was just in his best days.

His age was 39 years, 4 months, 20 days, and he might
have been a useful man for many years yet to come, but an
all wise Providence whose thoughts are not our thoughts
saw fit to remove him from this world to another and I hope
a better.

All the rest of your friends and relatives are enjoying
good health as far as we know. I hope these few lines may
meet vou all enjoying good health and prospects.

We send our best respects to Aunt and all of our
cousins. The last we heard from you we were told you had
the ague but we hope that has left you and that you are now
restored again to good health. There is at present very
little sickness about here. Xo more at present, but we re-
main. Yours sincerely,

John Ditty, Catherine Ditty.



Thomas W. Woodside

Rev. Thomas \Y. Woodside was born at Brookville.
Ogle County, Illinois, December 25. 1852. His parents
were John and Mary Ann Woodside. He was graduated
from the Freeport, 111., High Schol and from the Naper-
ville College. He entered the ministry of the United Evan-
gelical Church. Married Miss Emma Dreisbach, Dec. 28,
237



THE W O O D S I D E FAMILY



1882. Sailed as a missionary from Boston under the Amer-
ican Board of Foreign Missions. June 2, 1888. Two chil-
dren, Mabel and Frances, were born in this country and two
Ruth and Milford, were born in Africa. The former two
are graduates of Oberlin College. The father and mother
have been in Africa twenty-five years and have visited the
home-land but twice.



238



THE COUNTRY CHURCH



The Country Church



Tt stood among the chestnuts — its white spire
And slender turrets pointing where man's heart should
oftener turn.

Heaven bless thee, lonely church.

And daily may'st thou warn a pilgrim-band

From toil, from cumbrance. and from strife to flee.

And drink the waters of eternal life :

Still in sweet fellowship with tree and skies,

Friend both of earth and heaven devoutly stand

To guide the living and to guard the dead.

— Mrs. Sigourney.



239



THE C U X T R Y



C II U R C II



Organizers of Early Churches
in Pennsylvania



Richard Buffington, the First, was probably the first
Englishman in the Province of Pennsylvania to make a be-
quest to a religious organization. He assisted in organiz-
ing a Baptist Society at Birmingham, Chester county, in




Birmingham Meeting House

rith which Richard Buffington, the First, was identified, and where
the American forces formed at the Battle of the Brandywine.



1715 and made in his will a small bequest to ( )wen Thomas.
at that time minister of the Baptist Society and bequeathed
it\ p< mnds to the church.

240




St. John's Lutheran Church

near Berrysburg, Pa., formerly Buffington Church
241



THE C O U X T R V CHURCH

The location of this church in its relation to the Brandy-
wine battlefield may he seen by referring to the map of the
"Battle of Brandywine" on pa'4'e 118.

The Buffmgton church in the Lykens Valley, now St.
John's Lutheran, near Berrvsburq:, Penna., is located in the




Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church

formerly Row's Church. Founded hy relatives of Catharine Row Yeager
in 1773-4.



very centre of the valley, in the northern part of Dauphin
county, noted for its beauty and fertility.

The Rev. J. Michael Enterline — pioneer missionary,

great-grandfather of Rev. Wm. E. Yeager and Dr. Frank

. Yeager, began his labors here in 1773, and organized



242



THE COUNTRY CHURCH

this congregation in 1780. The present church edifice was
dedicated November II, 1877. The present pastor, Rev. H.
H. Krauss, refers to it in a recent letter as "Buffington's
church, formerly," and Dr. W. H. Egle, the late State Li-
brarian of Pennsylvania, says in his Notes and Queries that
George Buffington lived near Buffington's Church, on the
hill."

Row's Church was one of the first to be established, if
not the first, in Pennsylvania west of the Susquehanna river.
This church was founded by the ancestors of Catharina Row,
who married John Yeager, July 1, 1788.

W. K. Miller, Esq., now superintendent of the Sabbath
school, says that this church was organized in 1774 and that
the records have been remarkably well preserved from that
date to the present time. It is now known as Salem Evan-
gelical Lutheran Church.



St. Vincent Reformed Church

of Chester County, Pennsylvania

A recent writer says : ''The location of this church is
one of great natural beauty. One can catch glimpses of
the counties of Delaware, Montgomery, Berks and Lancas-
ter. There are but few congregations whose lines fall in
pleasanter places."

The first meeting for the purpose of securing a site
for the location of this church was held at the home of
Henry Yeager, Sr., November 15, 185 1. At another meet-
ing a building committee was appointed consisting of John
Ash, Henry Yeager, Sr., Peter Yeager, Sr., John Yeager,
Sr., and George Yeager. This church was dedicated Sep-
tember 4th, 1853.

243



THE CO U N T R V C II U R C H




■i 1 1



THE COUNTRY CHURCH

A new church edifice was dedicated September 4, 1890.
The building committee consisted of the following: Abra-
ham Taney, Christian Friday, Jesse Ash, Xathan Yeager,
O. T. Tanev, W. H. Yeager, A. E. Yeager, Jones Yeager,
Elmer T. Prizer. For this "cosy little citv church built in
the country" much credit is given, we observe by the printed
report of the Ladies 5 Mite Society and the Ladies' Financial
Committee.

The first Sunday school superintendent in 1853 was
Davis Yeager and the present, E. T. Prizer. — ( Reformed
Churches in Chester County.)



Hoffman's Reformed Church

Lykens Valley, Dauphin County. Pa.

This church was organized according to the date of the
oldest tombstone found in the grave yard adjoining, prior
to the nineteenth century. The first house of worship was
erected by Levi Buffington, whose wife was Susanna, a
daughter of John Nicholas Hoffman. It is located about
three miles southwest of the village of Gratz, and the Lykens
\ alley, in which this house of worship is erected, is one that
the aggressive Scotch-Irishman did not settle in, but from
across the mountain in the direction of the rising of the sun
came the sturdy German and Swiss Huguenot from out of
the Tulpehocken settlement, and from the south across Berrys'
[Mountain out of the valleys of Armstrong, Powell. Clarks,
Paxtang and Lancaster county as now bounded. The
earliest place of worship in this valley for these early pioneers
was the shrine of St. David's, located about three miles
northwest from the mouth of the Wiconisco creek.
245



T H E C O U N T R V C H U R C H




Hoffman's Church

in Lykens Valley, founded l»y tli<> family of Barbara Hoffman, jirand-
mother of J. M. Yeajjer. of Yeagertown.



210



THE COUNTRY CHURCH

The ground upon which Hoffman's church was located
was donated by John Nicholas Hoffman, son of John Peter
Hoffman, (grandfather of Susannah Buffington Yeager),
a native of Germany, who was born in the year 1709. He
gave the land "for church, school and burial purposes." The
present church house is a frame structure painted in an im-
maculate white color, and the grave yard contains the re-
mains of many of the first settlers in the end of Lykens Val-
ley and their descendants. Many are, however, not marked
with tombstones, which is to be regretted as they were en-
listed in the companies that were formed in that valley which
went to the forefront and engaged in doing valiant service
against the incursions of the barbarous Red men and in the
War of the Revolution.

Andrew Yeager helped to organize St. David's German
Reformed Church at Killinger and here his wife, Anna Bar-
bara was buried in August, 1779.

Anna Margaret Yeager was baptized by the minister
of St. David's, September 29, 1774.

John Yeager, grandfather of J. M. Yeager of Yeager-
town. Pa., was confirmed here in 1782, at the age of sixteen.



The Church of St. David

Lykens Valley, Dauphin County, Pa.

St. David's church, is located about 2^/2 miles N. E. of
Millersburg, in a beautiful portion of Lykens Valley. Here
are at this time built two large brick churches, occupied re-
spectively by the Reformed and Lutheran congregations,
with towering spires as if to outrival each other, and which
stand sentinel-like at the end of the valley. The church at
this place was originally called "The Church of the Wis-
quen-es-que Creek, in Upper Packstone Township, Lancas-
ter county. Pa., and was organized about 1770. It was a
privilege to visit the place on a beautiful Good Friday some
years ago and copy from the two graveyards the inscrip-
247



THE COUNTRY C H U R C H

tions upon the tombstones, which silently tell us the names
of the early settlers of the "Upper End." In these grave-
yards rest the remains of many who were soldiers in the
Revolution, and here are probably buried more Revolution-
ary soldiers in proportion to the population at that time than




St. David's Reformed Church

in the Lykens Valley, where Andrew Yeajjer and his wife Anna Barbara.
John Yeager and his wife Catharine (Row) are buried. Great-grand-
parents and grandparents of J. M. Yeager of Yeagertown.



in any other burial ground in Dauphin County or in Penn-
sylvania; nearly all were Germans or rather descendants of
( H-nnaii ancestry, the exceptions being of Eluguenot extrac-
tion.



N O M O N E Y AT HAMBURG



No Money at Hamburg



During the preparation of this volume a number of
letters were received inquiring about a supposed fortune in
Germany to which the descendants of one Benjamin Yeager
residing in the United States were entitled. The sub-joined
letter from the Consul-General at Hamburg and the accom-
panying despatch to the Assistant-Secretary of State should
convince the heirs of any Benjamin Yeager residing in this
country that their fortune will not come via Hamburg. I
know of no Benjamin Yeager among the earlv Yeager im-
migrants.



American Consular Service

Hamburg, Germany, March 10, 1910.
James Martin Yeager, Esq.,
United States Marshal,
Scranton, Pa.

Sir — Referring to your recent letter, without date, in
regard to a persistent report that there is a large s:im of
money on deposit in one of the banks of Hamburg for cer-
tain Yeager heirs in the United States, and in which you
request an authoritative statement on the subject, I beg to
inform you that this supposed estate has been brought to
my attention by a number of correspondents since my resi-
dence in Hamburg, as it had also been brought to the atten-
tion of several of my predecessors in years gone by.

I have not, myself, made any official inquiry in regard
to this matter as I am convinced from the records on file
in this Consulate-General that it would be entirely useless to
do so. I enclose herewith, for your information, a copy of
a despatch written October 26, 1895, by W. Henry Rob-
ertson, then Consul at Hamburg, stating that no such estate
as you describe has any existence under the names of Yager,
Jager or Jaeger.

249



A' O M O N E Y A T H A M B U R G



If I can be of any further assistance to yon in this mat-
ter I am entirely at your disposition for the pnrpose named.
I am. Sir. Your obedient servant.

Your obedient servant,

ROBERT P. FRKXTER.
, Consul-General.

Enclosure: Copy of despatch from Consul Robertson.

EXITED STATES CONSULATE,
Xo. 262 Hamburg, October 26th, 1895.

11.. 11. Edwin F. Uhl,

Assistant Secretary of State,
Washington, D. C.

Sir: — 1 have the honor to inform the Department that.
during the last few weeks, I have received a number of let-
ters from parties in various sections of the United States,
making inquiry as to the existence and status of an estate
which is supposed to exist in this city in favor of the heirs
of one Benjamin Yager, who is alleged to have emigrated
from Hamburg to the United States, and to have settled in
Virginia, in 1700. With some of these letters have been
transmitted newspaper clippings, referring to such an estate;
and I would invite special attention to the enclosed reprinted
notice of one A. Y. Yager, of Xo. 700 South Cherry St..
Xashville. Tennessee, in which the estate has been estimated
at the handsome sum of $50,000,000.00 (fifty millions of dol-
lars). Several of these circulars have reached me as en-
closures, showing that the author bas been circulating them
in tbe United States, with a view to interesting possible
heirs in the matter, and also, perhaps, of having himself ap-
pointed their general representative.

I have deemed it proper, under the circumstances, to
make a thorough investigation of the facts, and am now in
possession of assurances from the proper officials of Ham-
burg and from each of its banks, to the effect that no such
estate as the one described exists, neither under the names
Yager, Jager nor Jaeger.

I would respectfully suggest that a brief notice of this
fact be given to the press, in the interest of those who would
probably thus be saved a waste of time, money and anxiety
in the prosecution of their imaginary claims.

I am, Sir. Your obedient servant,

(signed) W. HENRY ROBERTSON,

Consul.

250



AT HOME AND ABROAD



The compiler has delivered many addresses during the
past few years on travel, religious, literary and political
subjects.

At the request of friends interested in this compilation
extracts of a few of these public utterances are here pub-
lished, gathered from daily papers which printed them
when delivered.



251



/ T II M E A K P A B ROAD




At Chaquimayo Camp on the headwaters of the
Amazon, Eastern Peru, L905



:wi



AT HOME AND ABROAD



At Home and Abroad



A Tropical Forest in Southern Peru Visited in May, 1905

We have now come to the edge of the Montana or Great
Peruvian Forest. Our mules, horses and llamas are aban-
doned, left with Indians to await our return, for with no
bridges ahead they cannot cross the San Gaban River. We
cross and recross this river no less than six times in wooden
triangles, curiously fastened, at the apex to a wire by a
pulley. Once when about the middle of the river, whose fall
was 250 feet per mile, the pulley refused to work, and we
found our feet dangling in mid-air forty feet above the sur-
face of the water. It was a memorable incident, and we
realized that it was no place for gymnastics, and so we clung
tightly to the sides of the triangle and kept "perfectly still"
until the pesky invention for fording South American rivers
got to working again. Bridges are in process of construc-
tion to supersede this primitive mode of transportation.

The desire to go where no other man has yet been is
one of the unquenchable aspirations of the traveler. There
are thousands of square miles of unexplored forest in Peru.
Africa has been called the dark continent, but there are re-
gions in South America, in Fastern Peru, which are just as
mysterious and little known to civilized man. We were the
first Americans to penetrate by this road these virgin for-
ests, so that we are writing about territory which has been
little seen by civilized man and has never been written about.
We are now about to enter a primeval forest. You have
often heard of it, but you must behold it to comprehend the
reality. It is impossible to describe the eagerness with
which we began our tramp. Incas had blazed a way for
us a distance of ten miles through the seemingly impenetrable
mass of tropical luxuriance. Rare and beautiful trees are
ranked in heavy phalanxes, while between their branches,
hung festoons of matted creepers, "hanging baskets," cov-
ered with rare flowers, wrought so deftly and gracefully by
nature's hand as to give the impression that some good
housewife had suspended them and between the trunks there
was a varying thickness of undergrowth according to the
shade which the trees gave. We walked for miles along the
narrow Indian trail. We knew that to digress from it meant
that an American would be lost in the Andes or on the head-

253



A T H OME A X D A B R O A D

waters of the Amazon. With but one footpath leading to
our destination we knew, too, that it would be impossible to
get lost. Accordingly, we told our companions to push on
if they desired and we would follow, and so we walked with
staff in hand for several leagues alone. Once you have
penetrated one of these great tropical forests — thousands
of miles from home and native land — remote from the world
— undisturbed by any human voice — an impression of mys-
tery lays hold upon the mind and you can never quite divest
yourself of its influence.

It is an hour after sunrise in the month of May. As
we pursue our way over this long drawn aisle, hewed out by
Indians with their inevitable machetes, carpeted with
mosses, arched with a network of rare old trees, through
which daylight filtered occasionally, affording glimpses of a
deep blue sky ; as we listened to birds of rare song and plum-
age ; as we witness the great variety of life about us, veg-
etable, insect, bird and animal ; as we see rain drops — for it
had rained during the nieht — which hang from every leaf and
flower and plant, transfigured by the magical rays of the
growing day into diamonds and rubies and amethysts and
saophires and all precious stones; when we see every stump
and dead limb, and rock and grotto and glade and precipice,
bespangled with delicate dowers of rich odor — with mosses
and ferns and lilies and begonias and heliotrope — when we
see groves of feathery bamboo and a little farther on orchids
in such profusion that every tree looks like a veritable orchid-
garden ; when we are spellbound at waterfalls and cascades
which leap over the rocks, send their spray up into the air.
plunge for a thousand feet and then go singing toward the
great Father of Waters; when we behold a thousand trop-
ical blossoms unknown to us and stroll along for hours in
the midst of like fragrance and beauty and grandeur, we
said: "This must be the home, the dwelling place of Aurora,
the Goddess of Morn, and from her rosy fingers have come
all these glories of earth and air and sky."

Some day the world will awaken to the knowledge of
the wonderful charms of this wonderful country, and Amer-
icans, instead of leaving a hundred million dollars each year
along the beaten paths of Europe will seek health and
recreation in the beautiful land of the Incas on the South-
ern hemisphere.

254



AT HOME AND ABROAD
The Y. M. C. A.

As an Upbuilder in the Community



Delivered on Sunday, March 4, 1906, in Lewistown
Court House in behalf of the establishment of a Young
Men's Christian Association, at Burnham, Penna.

Sixty two years ago George Williams, a young man of
23, organized some of his friends and companions in the city
of London, into a Young Men's Christian Association. The
idea then launched has girdled the globe. You will find the
Y. M. C. A. in Japan, China, India, Austria, Italy, South
Africa, Germany, France, Holland, Great Britain and South
America. You will find it from the Hudson River to the
Pacific coast, in Australia and the isles of the seas. This fact
would indicate its universal adaptation to man's universal
needs. It has gone to every civilized country, quickening
the mental and social life, elevating individual and public
character, promoting good cheer and good fellowship and
contributing to the sum total of the world's best citizenship.

We are gratified at the widespread interest in the estab-
lishment of a Y. M. C. A. in our community because it stands
for physical culture, the care of the body, and athletics.
This association recognizes the intensity of our modern com-
mercial and industrial life and believes in large draughts of
fresh air, in a healthful and interested occupation of the
four or five hours which every man has in the twenty-four,
when the hours of working, eating and sleeping are deducted.
It believes in recreations which are re-creations of body and
mind. It believes in modern, manly, clean, fair and square
athletics, both in-door and out-door, and in the traits and
qualities which these develop — traits and qualities so much
needed in the great game of life.

The Y. M. C. A. furnishes reading rooms, a library,
larger and better accommodations and rooms than can be
found anywhere else, lectures which embody the ripest
thoughts of the richest minds, stereopticon entertainments
which reproduce scenes and cities from the whole round
world, games without gambling, house pastimes, and field
sports, concerts, musicales, and in many other ways widens
the outlook, enlarges the vision, enriches the mind and up-
lifts the life.

All of these things are practically guaranteed in con-

255



AT H O M E AND ABROAD

nection with the Burnham Association, by the splendid gift
of the Standard Steel Works, and the cordial co-operation
of the public — a response which amounts already to sub-
scriptions of more than $5000.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 14