James O'Laverty.

An historical account of the Diocese of Down and Connor, ancient and modern (Volume 3) online

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ATE UNIVERSITY



2001



^^^^ GRADUATE



North Carolina State University Bulletin
r^ =^iGH, North Carolina




This catalog is intended for informational purposes only. Requirements, rules, procedures, courses and informational
statements set forth herein are subject to change. Notice of changes will be conveyed to duly enrolled students and other
appropriate persons at the time such changes are effected.



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN
(USPS 393-040)

VOLUME 99 MAY 2001 NUMBER 2

Published quarterly by North Carolina State University, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1 12 Peele Hall, Box 7103,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7103. Second class postage paid at Raleigh, NC 27676. ATTN POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
North Carolina State University, Box 7103, Raleigh, NC 27695-7103.




m




TMl
^mAID)IUATI
SCHOOL



Graduate Catalog




North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

NCSU Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalog2001nort



CONTENTS

North Carolina State University 1

Administration, North Carolina State University 3

Board of Trustees 3

Mission of North Carolina State University 4

Nondiscrimination Statement 5

Code of Student Conduct 6

The Graduate School 7

The Calendar 9

University Graduate Student Association 12

General Admissions Information 13

Application 13

International Students 13

Admission 13

Registration and Records 17

Tuition and Fees 23

Financial Support for Graduate Students 28

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 28

Graduate School Fellowships 29

Other Financial Aid 34

Military Education and Training 35

Health Services 37

Housing 37

Graduate Programs 39

Master's Degrees 39

Master of Science and Master of Arts 39

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 39

Requirements for Master's Degrees 39

Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 44

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 46

Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy and

Doctor of Education Degrees 50

The NC State Libraries 52

Institutes 53



special Laboratories, Facilities and Centers 54

Special Programs 62

Fields of Instruction 63

Major Fields of Study 69

Minor and Other Organized Programs of Study 217

Graduate Faculty 227

Administration, University of North Carolina 264

Board of Governors 264

History of the University of North Carolina 265

University Patent and Copyright Procedures 266

Policy on Illegal Drugs 273

Index 274

Campus Map 282



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

North Carolina State University (NC State) is a national center for research, teaching and
extension, and its graduate education has stood for quality for more than a century. As a Land-
Grant state university, it shares the distinctive characteristics of these institutions nationally— broad
academic offerings, extensive public service, national and international activities, and large-scale
extension and research programs.

Faculty

NC State's faculty are the foundation for the university's academic strength with the more 2,000
Graduate Faculty being based in the university's ten colleges and the Graduate School. The
colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Education, Engineering, Natural Resources,
Humanities and Social Sciences, Management, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textile and
Veterinary Medicine. Innovators, fine mentors and nationally respected leaders in their fields, the
faculty have won significant research grants and maintain an impressive record of publication. In
the 1999-2000 academic year, they attracted more than SI 33 million in externally fiinded grant
and contract support.

Twenty faculty are members of the National Academy of Science or National Academy of
Engineering. Others are Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellows; winners of Presidential awards for
Yoimg Investigators and for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring; and
recipients of prestigious honors in their fields.

The open academic atmosphere at NC State makes for a vital exchange of ideas between graduate
students and faculty who are dedicated to their roles as mentors. Typical graduate academic
environments involve small groups, while students and faculty often work in solo mentor-protege
relationships.

Students

The more than 5,000 master's and doctoral students enrolled at NC State reflect the richness and
diversity energizing the university community and come from 49 states and 76 different countries.
In numbers of graduates, NC State is one of America's top forty doctorate-granting institutions
according to the National Opinion Research Center Survey of Earned Doctorates. In 1999-2000,
1,168 men and women earned master's degrees while 317 earned doctoral degrees. The university
takes pride in its record for rapid doctoral time-to-degree, especially given the rigor of these
programs.

Graduate students play important roles in the dynamic research environment by engaging in
research within traditional disciplines and as members of interdisciplinary teams, and working
alongside faculty, they make vital contributions to investigations with regional, national and
international impact. Basic and applied research takes place in state-of-the-art facilities, including
more than four dozen specialized research centers, while the NC State Libraries rank among the
nation's top 50 university libraries. Faculty and students also work closely with leading-edge
corporations and research centers on Centennial campus and in nearby Research Triangle Park,
including the North Carolina Supercomputing Center, the Research Triangle Institute and the
North Carolina Biotechnology Center.



Accreditation

NC State is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges.
It is also a member of the American Council on Education, the College Entrance Examination
Board, the Council of Graduate Schools, the National Commission on Accrediting and the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

NC State is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees. Numerous
professional fields are also accredited by national accrediting agencies.



ADMINISTRATION

Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor

Charles G. Moreland, Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice

Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

Terry D. Wood, Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Mary Beth Kurz, Vice Chancellor and General Counsel

Deans of Colleges and School

James L. Obhnger, Dean, Agriculture and Life Sciences

Marvin J. Malecha, Dean, Design

Kathryn M. Moore, Dean, Education

Nino A. Masnari, Dean, Engineering

Robert S. Sowell, Dean, Graduate School

Margaret A. Zahn, Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences

Jon Bartley, Dean, Management

Larry W. Tombaugh, Dean, Natural Resources

Daniel L. Solomon, Dean, Physical and Mathematical Sciences

A. Blanton Godfrey, Dean, Textiles

Oscar J. Fletcher, Dean, Veterinary Medicine

Graduate School— Administrative Office

Robert S. Sowell, Dean

Margaret F. King, Associate Vice Chancellor and Senior Associate Dean

Rebeca C. Rufty, Associate Dean

Duane K. Larick, Assistant Dean

BOARD OF TRUSTEES - 2000-2001

Peaches Gunter Simpkins, Nashville, TN, Chair

Richard G. Robb, Linville, Vice Chair

H. E. "Butch" Wilson, Jr., Burlington, Vice Chair

Edward E. Hood, Jr., Banner Elk, Secretary

W. Steven Edwards, Raleigh

Ann Baggett Goodnight, Cary

Suzanne Gordon, Cary

Flora Hull Grantham, Smithfield

Vernon Malone, Raleigh

Wendell H. Murphy, Rose Hill

C. Richard Vaughn, Mount Airy

Smedes York, Raleigh

Ex-officio

Harold Pettigrew, President, Student Government, NC State



Mission of North Carolina State University

The unique mission of North Carolina State University is to serve the citizens of North Carolina as
the state's only research university in the land-grant tradition. Since its founding in 1887, NC State
has been committed to science and technology as pathways to human betterment and has served as
an innovative educational resource, providing leadership for positive intellectual, social, and
technological change. Faithful to its founding mission, the University must now meet the
challenges posed by the increasing complexity of our global society and the accelerated growth in
knowledge and technology. At the same time, it must continually address the effects of these
developments on the environment and on the social and economic well-being of the people of
North Carolina, the nation, and the world. Spurred by these new challenges, NC State will
continue to fiilfill its mission through the integrated functions of teaching, research, and extension,
its unique form of public service.

Teaching, research, and public service will continue to be mutually enriching enterprises at NC
State. The activities of research and extension interact to provide students with an environment for
learning that stresses creativity, problem solving, social responsibility, and respect for human
diversity. The educational and extension ftmctions join to apply, test, and disseminate the new
knowledge generated by research.

During the University's first hundred years, its distinctive mandate has led to preeminence in
science, technology, and engineering. This mandate will continue to shape fiiture development,
necessitating excellence in the fiill spectrum of disciplines that provide the intellectual and critical
foundations for understanding, anticipating, and responding to public needs.

Undergraduate education is a major responsibility of NC State. Core education is provided in
science and the humanities, with specializations offered in physical, social, and life sciences, in the
humanities, and in professional and technical disciplines. The atmosphere of a research university
provides distinctive opportunities for undergraduates to benefit from the experience of research in
the classroom, laboratory, and informal settings. Exposure to the discovery and synthesis of new
information provides students with a basis for identifying and solving society's problems and
builds a critical foundation for their personal growth, cultural enrichment, and professional
development.

As a national center for doctoral studies, NC State embraces the responsibility to maintain
excellence in graduate research and education. Students work as partners with faculty in the
creation, expansion, conservation, and transmission of knowledge. Graduate education will
continue to evolve as the University builds on its traditional and preeminent strengths in science,
technology, and engineering and as it develops further strengths in complementary disciplines.

Research and scholarly inquiry form the foundation for education and public service at NC State.
Faculty and students in all disciplines engage in the art and science of discovery in a climate of
free inquiry and creativity, extending the boundaries of knowledge and horizons of human
intellect. The research mandate of NC State is signified in its national classification as a Research
University - Extensive.



The University's land-grant philosophy is manifest in its commitment to active stewardship of the
human and natural resources of the state. NC State has been an integral part of significant
economic and technological changes in North Carolina for the past one hundred years. This
stewardship is expressed currently through public service activities in all the University's colleges
and schools, whereby the expertise resident among the faculty and students is disseminated across
the state through extension, technical assistance, professional development, lifelong education, and
technology transfer programs. Loyal to the vision of its founders in the nineteenth century, NC
State will continue to strive through extension and public service to improve the quality of life for
North Carolinians into the twenty-first century.

NC State's dual designations as land-grant university and a Research University - Extensive form
the basis for the unique role of NC State in The University of North Carolina. NC State enters a
new century with deep appreciation for the significance of these mandates and the commitment to
excellence and change that they jointly require.

Accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

NC State is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees.

Nondiscrimination Statement

Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination

It is the policy of the State of North Carolina to provide equality of opportunity in education and
employment for all students and employees. Accordingly, the university does not practice or
condone unlawful discrimination in any form against students, employees or applicants on the
grounds of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or veteran status. It is the
internal policy of North Carolina State University to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual
orientation. Retaliation against any person complaining of discrimination is in violation of federal
and state law and North Carolina State University policy, and will not be tolerated.

Unlawful Harassment

Harassment based upon race, color, religion, creed, sex, national origin, age or disability is a form
of discrimination in violation of federal and state law and North Carolina State University policy
and will not be tolerated. It is the internal policy of North Carolina State University to prohibit
harassment on the basis of sexual orientation. Retaliation against any person complaining of
harassment is in violation of federal and state law and North Carolina State Univeisity policy, and
will not be tolerated. North Carolina State University will respond promptly to all complaints of
harassment and retaliation. Violation of this policy can result in serious disciplinary action up to
and including expulsion for students or discharge for employees.

Every individual is encouraged, and should feel free, to seek assistance, information and guidance
fi-om his/her supervisor, the Office for Equal Opportunity, the Office of Student Conduct or the
Employees Relations section of Human Resources.



For additional information, contact:

Office for Equal Opportunity

Box 7530

North Carolina State University

Raleigh, NC 27695-7530

Phone: (919) 515-1329 or 515-3148

Disability Services for Students

Students desiring reasonable accommodations for their documented disability should contact
Disability Services for Students (DSS), Suite 1900, Student Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue,
(919) 515-7653 (Voice), (919) 515-8829 (TTY). Services and accommodations are provided based
on the student's documented needs and are determined in consultation with the student and his/her
DSS service provider. Such requests should be made far in advance of registration deadlines to
ensure timely services and accommodations. All contact with DSS personnel is held in the strictest
of confidence, and information is released only with the student's permission.

Code of Student Conduct

North Carolina State University is committed to academic integrity, and all students are required
to adhere to the NC State Code of Student Conduct.

Additional Information

If additional information is needed, contact the Graduate School, 106 Peek Hall, P. O. Box 7102,
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7102 (telephone 919/515-2871).



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Graduate instruction was first offered at North Carolina State University in 1893, and the first
doctoral degree was conferred in 1926. In the ensuing years, the Graduate School has grown
steadily and now provides instruction and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of
agriculture and life sciences, design, education, engineering, natural resources, humanities and
social sciences, management, physical and mathematical sciences, textiles and veterinary
medicine.

The Graduate School is currently composed of more than 2,000 graduate faculty
members. Educated at major universities throughout the world and established both in advanced
teaching and research, these scholars guide the University's 6,000 master's and doctoral students
from all areas of the U.S. and many other countries.

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities, including libraries, laboratories,
modem equipment and special research areas. Additionally, a cooperative agreement exists among
the Graduate Schools of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro, Duke University and North Carolina State University which increases the
educational and research possibilities associated with each.

Graduate School— Administrative Offlce

Robert S. Sowell, Dean

Margaret F. King, Associate Vice Chancellor and Senior Associate Dean

Rebeca C. Rufty, Associate Dean

Duane K. Larick, Assistant Dean

Administrative Board of the Graduate School

Term Expires

R. S. Sowell, Dean

M. F. King, Senior Associate Dean

R. C. Rufty, Associate Dean

D. K. Larick, Assistant Dean

D. H. Akroyd, Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education June, 2003

G. T. Barthalmus Professor of Zoology; Associate Dean and Director of June, 2003

Academic Programs, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

S. M. Bedair, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of December,
Engineering 2001

B. J. Fox, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction June, 2004

J. E. Gadsby, Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and December,

Radiology 2004



J. G. Gilligan, Professor of Nuclear Engineering; Associate Dean for Academic June, 2002
Affairs, College of Engineering

C. R. Knoeber, Professor of Economics April, 200 1

C. E. Knowles, Professor of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Interim June, 2002
Associate Dean, Physical and Mathematical Sciences

R. C. Long, Professor of Crop Science June, 2003

C. R. Miller, Professor of English February, 2001

G. E. Mitchell, Professor of Physics July, 2001

Elizabeth O'Sullivan, Associate Professor of Political Science and Public April, 2005
Administration; Director of Graduate Programs, Public Administration

W. Oxenham, Professor of Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management; August, 2002
Associate Head and Director of Graduate Programs

S. R. Raval, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture August, 2003

B. E. Wilson, Associate Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism June, 2003
Management and Director of Graduate Programs



THE CALENDAR

This calendar is subject to periodic review and revision. Please check with the University
Registrar and/or the Graduate School to determine if changes have been made.

SUMMER SESSIONS, 2001
First Session



May 23


Wed


May 24


Thurs


May 28


Mon



June 1



Fri



First day of classes

Last day to add a course without permission of instructor

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition and fees) or to add a
course. Last day to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. (NOTE:
The tuition and fees charge is based on the official number of hours
and courses carried at 5;00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS closes at 5:00
p.m. (After this day, drops processed in 1000 Harris Hall)

Departmental recommendations for US citizen applicants for Second
Summer Session 2001 due in Graduate Admissions Office



June 6



June 8



June 25



Wed



Fri



Mon



June 26


Tues


June 27


Wed


June 28-29


Thurs-Fri


Second Session


Julys


Thurs


July 6


Fri


July 10


Tues



Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Workshop

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without a grade at the 400 level
or below. Last day to change from credit to audit at the 400 level or
below

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without a grade at the 500-800
level. Last day to change fi'om credit to audit at the 500-800 level

Graduate Admission application deadline for US citizen applicants for
Fall 2001

Last day of classes
Reading Day
Final examinations



First day of classes

Last day to add a course without permission of instructor

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition and fees) or to add a
course. Last day to withdraw or drop a course with a refimd. (NOTE:
The tuition and fees charge is based on the official number of hours
and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) TRACS closes at 5:00
p.m. (After this day, drops processed in 1000 Harris Hall)



July 1 1

July 16
July 19

July 20

August i

August

August



9-10
10



Wed



Mon
Thurs

Fri

Wed

Thurs-Fri

Fri



Deadline for submission of theses and dissertations to the Graduate
School, in final form as approved by advisory committees, by
candidates for master's and doctoral degrees in August, 2001. Last
day for unconditional pass on final oral examinations by candidates
for master's degrees not requirins theses.

Departmental recommendations for US citizen applicants for Fall
2001 semester due in Graduate Admissions Office
Last day to withdraw or drop a course without a grade at the 400
level or below. Last day to change from credit to audit at the 400
level or below

Last day to withdraw or drop a course without a grade at the 500-800
level. Last day to change from credit to audit at the 500-800 level

Last day of classes

Final examinations

Summer Graduation (no commencement program)



FALL SEMESTER, 2001



August 20


Mon


Sept. 3


Mon


Sept. 28


Fri


October 12


Fri


October 16


Wed


November 9


Fri



November 2 1 Wed

November 26 Mon

December 7 Fri

Dec. 10-18 Mon-Tues

December 19 Wed



First day of classes

Holiday (Labor Day)

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Workshop

Fall vacation begins at 10:20 p.m.

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m.. Centennial Campus

Deadline for submission of theses and dissertations to the Graduate

School, in final form as approved by advisory committees, by

candidates for master's and doctoral degrees in December, 2001. Last

day for unconditional pass on final oral examinations by candidates

for master's degrees not requirins theses.

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 : 1 5 p.m.

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m., Centeruiial Campus

Last day of classes

Final examinations

Fall Graduation Exercise



SPRING SEMESTER, 2002



January 7 Mon

January 21-22 Mon-Tues

March 8 Fri

March Mon



First day of classes

Holiday (Martin Luther King Jr. Day)

Spring vacation begins at 10:20 p.m.

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m.. Centennial Campus



10



April 5 Fri Deadline for submission of theses or dissertations to the Graduate

School, in final form as approved by advisory committees, by
candidates for master's and doctoral degrees in May, 2002 Last day for
unconditional pass on final oral examinations by candidates for
master's degrees not requiring theses.

Holiday (Good Friday)

Last day of classes

Final examinations

Spring Commencement

Drop Dates for Minicourses

The drop date for a five-week minicourse is the last day of the third week of the minicourse. The
drop date for a seven-week minicourse is the last day of the fourth week of the minicourse.



±19


Fri


3


Fri


6-14


Mon-Tues


18


Sat



11



University Graduate Student Association

The University Graduate Student Association (UGSA) is an academic, political and social
organization comprising all graduate students. It is governed by elected officers and
representatives from departmental GSA chapters. Officially recognized by the university as the
voice of graduate students, it provides graduate student representation on various university
committees. The UGSA President has full voting membership on the Administrative Board of the
Graduate School and meets regularly with other university officials, including the Dean of the
Graduate School and the Chancellor of NC State.

Some services provided by the UGSA include travel reimbursement for presenting original
research at professional conferences, graduate student orientation, a teaching effectiveness
workshop and outstanding TA awards, cash rebates to departmental chapters and assistance with
electronic communications among NC State graduate students.

The graduate student experience is filled with both opportunities and possibilities. As is the case



Online LibraryJames O'LavertyAn historical account of the Diocese of Down and Connor, ancient and modern (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 32)