James P Snell.

History of Sussex and Warren counties, New Jersey : online

. (page 112 of 190)
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436



SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY.



interests of Lis township, and filled various places of
trust and responsibility.

He was honored by the citizens of Sussex County
by election on the Democratic ticket as a member of
the lower branch of the State Legislature for three
years, 1868, 1869, and 1870.

In this public capacity his integrity was never
questioned, and as chairman of the committee on
banks and insurance he did efficient service for the
State.

During his term of service in the Legislature he
began the collection of historical works on his own
and other States, historical data, rare books, and origi-
nal ancient manuscripts pertaining to the early history
of his native county and State, and is said to have in
his possession and own one of the most complete
libraries of historical matter in the State of New
Jersey.

He always had a fondness for reading, and this has
led him to acquire a taste for that deep spirit of re-
search after historical matter which has characterized
his life in his later years.

He is a member of the New Jersey Historical
Society, and some years since he was made an hon-
orary vice-president of the Wisconsin State Historical
Society.

For many years he has been a stockholder in the
banks at Newton, and is a director and vice-president
of the Merchants' National Bank of that place.

He is a member of the Baptist Church at Newton,
and has always taken a deep interest in the principles
of morality and religion.

His wife was Mary P., a daughter of Jonathan and
Elizabeth (Price) Hill, of Green township, whom he
married Dec. 24, 1846. She was born Aug. 1, 1819,
was a devoted wife and mother, a member of the
Baptist Church at Newton, and died in February,
1859.

Their only daughter, Anna E. Hunt, died at the
age of twelve, and one son, Joshua S. Hunt, died at
the age of sixteen.

Their only surviving child is Dr. Joseph H. Hunt,
who was graduated at Washington College in 1869,
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York,
in 1873, and is practicing his profession in Brooklyn,
N. Y.

HON. GEORGE GREER.
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch was
Joseph Greer, who emigrated to this county from the
north of Ireland about the middle of the eighteenth
century. He first settled in Orange Co., N. Y., and
married Miss Buchanan, of Milford, Pa. He after-
wards removed to Stillwater township, Sussex Co.,
and, after living there some years, removed to Ohio,
where he died. His son Joseph was born in Orange
Co., N. Y., Jan. 14, 1791. When he was twelve years
old the family removed to Stillwater township. He
afterwards resided in Newton township, now Hamp-



ton. He married Christine, daughter of John Sava-
.cool, of Newton township. Of this union were born
the following children : J. S., Robert (deceased), Jo-
seph (deceased), George; Margaret S., married C. B.




Van Sickle, of Hampton township; Anne E., living
in Newton. Joseph Greer was a farmer, and one of
the leading men of his county. He was judge of the
Court of Common Pleas for the county of Sussex, and
represented his county in both branches of the State
Legislature, and was also prominently connected with
the militia of New Jersey. He died in New York in
1867, while on a visit. George Greer was born on
the old homestead in Newton township, Oct. 6, 1822.
He came to Green township in 1S50, and lived on the
old Hull farm nineteen years, which was then the
property of his father. In 1865 he purchased the
farm on which he now resides from Nathaniel Drake.
In 1849 he married Margaret A., daughter of Adam
and Elizabeth Hibler, of Green township. Of this
marriage were born the following children : Emma (de-
ceased) ; Mai'garet J., married Daniel Losey, of Mend-
ham, Morris Co., N. J. ; Julia H., Robert (deceased),
Marshall J., Anne Christine. In politics, Mr. Greer
has always been a Democrat. He has served his
township as freeholder, judge of elections, and repre-
sented his county in the lower branch of the State
Legislature during the years 1877 and 1878. While
in the Legislature lie was chairman of the committee
on the revision of laws and member of the commit-
tees of education and agriculture. Though not a




JOSHUA HARDIN.



The Hardin family are mentioned among the early
settlers of New Englaud; from there they removed
to that part of New Jersey now Sussex County.

The grandfather of the subject of our sketch was
Thomas Hardin, who settled in Lafayette township,
Sussex Co., before the Revolutionary war; he married
Elizabeth Lance, of the same place. Later in life he
removed to Ohio, where he died.

Reuben Hardin, one of his sons, was born in Lafay-
ette township, and married Susan, daughter of Casper
Snook, of the same place. Of this union were bom
the following children: John, deceased, and Joshua.

Joshua Hardin was born on the homestead in
Lafayette, Sept, 2(i, 1801. He attended school and
worked on the farm until he was sixteen years old,
when he removed to Stillwater township, and engaged
in agricultural labor until he was twenty-five years
of age. He then removed to Frankford township
and learned the trade of blacksmithing. After
gaining a knowledge of that business he went to

Newton, N. J., where he remai I fourteen years,

working at his trade. In 185S he removed i" Green
township, and purchased from Ralph Hildinc the
farm on which his family now reside. In 1830 he



married Eflie, daughter of Michael Roff, of Newton
township. Mrs. Hardin's grandfather was Chris-
topher Roff, who emigrated from Germany to this
country during the middle of the eighteenth century.
The children of this marriage are James C., of
Orange, N. J.; John R., living in Iowa; Matilda,
the wife of Peter Smith, of Yates Co., N. Y. ; Susan;
Marcus A., now living in Iowa; Mary A.; Thomas
W., deceased; Phillip R. ; Elizabeth S., married
Josiah Ketcham, editor of the BelvUlere Apnllo, Bcl-
videre, N. J. ; Rev. Oscar J., missionary at Tripoli,
Syria; Robert M., living at Fredon, N. J.; Amanda
O, married A. Crawn, of Newton, N. J.

Joshua Hardin always followed farming, and his
life was passed in a devout Christian manner. He
was a good neighbor and kind father, and was rc-
spected by all who knew him. He was a member
of the Presbyterian Church, Newton N. J., which
his family now attend. In politics he was a Demo-
crat, but never an aspirant for office. His death
occurred March lL', 18tj(>.

Mis. Hardin is now living on the old homestead
in Green; she is in her seventy-second year, kale
and In arty, and beloved by all who know her.



-;kki:n.



i:;t



hember of any church, he and his family attend the
gardwick Yellow Frame Presbyterian Church. Be
has always been a farmer, and hie property, which
Consists of several hundred acres, is beautifully situ-
ated in Green township, al the headwaters of the
Bequest River.

W. II. I1AUT.

The great-grandfather of the subjeel of our -ketch
was Nathaniel Hart, who came from South Jersey
and look up landa in whal is now Green township.
He married Lydia Redman. The children of this




marriage were Ami'-. William, Nathaniel, Phmbe,
Amy, and Elizabeth. This farm was occupied by
the American army as an encampment during the
Revolutionary war. It i- now ..war. I by John Cole-
man, one "i hi- descendants. William Hart. Sr., «;i-
born in Green township in 177*; married Mary,
daughter of John McEwen, of the same place. Oi
this union were born tin- following children: Lydia
(deceased , married Joseph Reed, of Knowlton, N. J. ;
George (deceased ; William deceased); Elizabeth
tscd), married .1. .1. Van Duren, of Newton,

N. .1.; Henry, living in Andover, N. .1.; Bailie A.

. ed), married W. Cortelyou, of Newton; Ste-
phen ii. (deceased); Matilda (deceased), married
Nathan Smith, of Waterloo, N. .1. William Hart,

Jr., was horn in Green township in 1800. He mar-
ried Sarah, daughter of Joseph I [ibler, of Springdale,
V .1. The children of this marriage were William
1.1. ; Samuel deceased ; Joseph deceased : Ellen,



married Rev. Alee Craig, now Living at Pat
N.J. William Hart, Jr., lived in that part of In

pendence township now called Allamuchey, where
he died in L851. William H. Hart was horn on the
home-lead, in Independence township, May 6, 1827,

where he attended school, and worked on the farm

until 1853, when he removed, to Green township and

settled on the farm where he now resides. He has
been twice married. Hi- first wife was Emeline S.,
daughter of Jonathan Shotwell, of Independence
township, whom he married in 1852. The children
of this marriageare Neldon W.; 8. Cecelia [di ceased),
married Dr. Clarence F. Cochran, of Michigan ; and
PhoebeS. His firsl wife died in 18C6. In 1867 he
married Lydia C, daughter of Jeptha Clark, of San-
dyston township, Sussex Co. In politic-. Mr. Man
ha- always been a Republican, and has never hern an
aspiranl tor office. He is a member of the Tranquil-
litj Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is a
t ni-tec and its steward. He has always followed

farming, and his property is situated in Green town-
ship, near the ninety-nine mile tree, which served as a
landmark in the times of the "Proprietors" of Easl
and West Jersey. He is a man highly respected in

the i munity in which he has passed his life, and

hear- a reputation for integrity ami uprightness that
all may envy.

B.UUth'TT PHILLIPS.
The Phillips family is of Wel-h atice-try. The

grandfather of the subject of this sketch was David
Phillips, who lived in Frankford township, Sussex
Co.. N. J. He was twice married. His first wile
was Miss Barber, of Crccuwieh town-hip. Warren
Co.; his second was Mrs. Roll. David Phillips
wa- a farmer, ami during the war of the Revolution
was a wagonmaster in the American army. John
Phillips, a son by the first marriage, was horn in
Frankford town-hip ; married Elizabeth, daughter of
Andrew Dalrymple. of the same place. Of this union
were born the following children : Eleanor (deceased),
was the wife of J. W. Reamer, of Frankford; Sarah
(deceased), married J. Chymer, of Wantage, N. J.;
Margaret (deceased), married Jesse Hunt, of Frank-
ford; Andrew (deceased) ; Ann deceased), wife of E.
Lewis, of Frankford; Huldah (deceased), married
Peter Lewis, of Frankford; David deceased ; Dorcas
(deceased), married M. T. Johnson, of Frankford;
James deceased); andRarrett. Barrett Phillips was

horn Nov. 6, 1S13. He remained on the old home-
stead until 18-1(5, when he removed to Green town-
ship and purchased the old Buchner farm, where

lie remained -even year-. In 1854 he bought the

farm from Aaron lllaiiehard on which be ha- since

resided. In 1844 he married Mahala, daughter of
Matthias Heminover, of Byram township ; her grand-
father wa- Anthony lleniinoycr, one of the carlie-t
Settlers of Byram, and a soldier in the Continental

army. The children of this marriage were Selina



438



SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY.



(deceased) ; Frances, married John Wilson, of. Green
township; Clarinda (deceased); Andrew (deceased);
Clementine, married Daniel Roy, of Ohio Centre,
Kan.; Boyd (deceased); Elvira, married John Phil-




Ringwood, Morris Co., N. J. The children of this
marriage were Elizabeth (deceased), married P. B.
Primrose, of Stillwater, N. J. ; Samuel (deceased) ;
Martha (deceased), married B. Edwards, of Warren




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lips, of Green township ; Rosanna, Julia, and Win
field Scott. In politics, Mr. Phillips was formerly
a Whig, and when the Republican party formed
joined it. He has since been a consistent supporter
of its principles. He has never sought political po-
sition, but has held some township offices, — school
trustee, etc. Though not a member of any church,
he attended the Tranquillity Methodist Episcopal
Church, of which the children are members. Mr.
Phillips has always been a successful farmer. He is
a man of quiet and unassuming ways, and has tried
at all times to fulfill the duties of a good citizen.



RALPH DILDINE.

The Dildine family is of French ancestry. The
grandfather of the subject of this sketch was Samson
Dildine, who came into what is now Green township,
Sussex Co., N. J., when the country was a wilderness,
and settled there. He married Martha Hunt, of
what is now Lawrenceville, N. J. Of this union were
born the following children : Abigail, Uriah, Abram,
Samuel, John, Richard, Thomas, Ralph, and Sarah.
The first three named sons were soldiers in the Amer-
ican army during the Revolutionary war, and partici-
pated in several general engagements.

Thomas Dildine, one of the sons, was born in 1763,
in Green township. He married Doratha Divers, of



Co., N. J.; Henry; Abigail (deceased), married L.
Hill, of Newton township, now Andover ; Ralph ;
Abram T., now] residing in Iowa. Thomas Dildine
died in Greenjtownship in 1822.

Ralph Dildine was born in Green township, May
28, 1815. He acquired such an education as the town-
ship school then afforded, and worked on the farm
until he was twenty-one. Then he commenced busi-
ness for himself as a merchant, first having a store at
Springdale, and then at Sparta, N. J. In 1843 he
sold out and returned to Green township, and bought
the " Kirker" farm, where he remained some years.
In 1850 he purchased the farm on which he now re-
sides ; it is located to the east of Hunt's Mills, near
the old homestead. In 1840 he married Eunice,
daughter of Samuel Wells, of Mendham, Morris Co.,
N. J. The ancestors of Mrs. Dildine were among the
first settlers of Morris Co., N. J. Of this union were
born the following children : Mary P., married L.
Horton, of Chester, Morris Co., N. J. ; Samuel W.
(deceased) ; Sarah E., married John C. Howell, of
Newton, N. J. ; Henry and Ralph W., now living at
Jefferson City, Montana Territory.

In politics, Mr. Dildine has been an independent,
supporting those who in his estimation best serve the
country. He attends the Hardwick Yellow Frame
Presbyterian church, of which his wife is a member.





SOLOMON ROE.



MRS. SUSAN ROE.



SOLOMON ROE.



The Roe family is of English ancestry. The name
is mentioned among the early settlers of Long Island,
N. Y.

David Roe, father of the subject of this sketch,
lived at Chester, Orange Co., N. Y., where he
followed farming. He married Miss Carpenter, of
the same place. The children of this marriage were
Amasa, deceased; Solomon, deceased; Lewis O, de-
ceased; Hannah, deceased, married Jennings, of

Florida, Orange Co., N. Y. ; Phcbe, deceased, the
wife of William Schoficld, of Lafayette township;
Maria, married Beers, of Northern New York.

Soloniou Roe was born at Chester, Orange Co.,
N. Y., where he remained during his minority. He
removed to Frankford township, Sussex Co., N. J.,
remained there for several years, and in 1862
removed to Green township, and purchased from
William Hunt the farm, .situated to the south of the
village of Hunt's Mills, on which his family now re-
side. In 1826 he married Susan, daughter of
James Canfield, of Ridgebury, Orange Co., N. Y.
The ancestors of Mrs. Roe were among the first
English settlers of the province of the New Nether-
lands. The children of this anion were William
T., now living at Newton, N. .1. ; Mary E., married
Thomas Schoficld, deceased, of Lafayette township;
Phehe A., the wife of 0. N. Wells, of Connection! ;
David C. ; .lane, deceased, married William West



brook, of Independence township; Maggie, became
the wife of Austin Carpenter, of Frankford.

In politics, Solomon Roe was always a Democrat,
and held several township offices. He was a member
of the Hardwick "Yellow Frame" Presbyterian
Church, and was a liberal supporter of church and
kindred interests. His death occurred in 1872. He
was a man who always tried to fulfill the duties of
a good neighbor and citizen, and his death was a
serious loss to the community in which he lived.

David C. Roe, his son, was born in Frankford
township, Jan. 9, 1S32. As before stated, in 1862
the family removed to Green township, where he
has since resided. In 1872 he married Sarah J.,
daughter of Joseph Pierson, of Sparta. The grand-
father of Mrs. D. C. Roe was Thomas Dunlap, a
Revolutionary soldier. The children of this marriage
are Roswcll P., Sanford L, and Charles L.

In politics, Mr. Roe has always been a Democrat,
has occupied several positions of trust in connection
with township affairs, and has been justice of the
peace for five years. He and his wife are members of
the Bardwiok " fellow Frame" Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Solomon Roe is now residing on the old
homestead in Green township; she is in her eightieth
year, hale and hearty. To her is due the credit of
placing herein the above portrait and biography of
her honored husband.



GREEN.



439



WILLIAM KYLE.

The subject of this sketch is of Seuteli-I ri-h extrac-
tion, i I is father, .lames Kyle, was horn All}.'. 1's,
18(11, in the County Tyrone. Ireland. In L829 he
came to America, landing at Philadelphia, Pa. He




first ivent to Orange IV, X. V., where he worked on
a farm for a shorl time, but soon rente.] one lor
himself, ami liveil on it until 1*.'!7. In that year lie
removed to Sussex Co., N. .1., and purchased a farm
in Stillwater township, on which he remained until
1848. In addition to farming, he also kept a public-
house in the a township. In the year above men-
tioned he sold oul his properties and removed to
Green township, Sussex Co., and bought a farm sit-
uaied about a mile to the east of Hunt's Mills, fr

lialph Ibldine. Ilelbre 1 « - : i \ in- Ireland he married

Margaret Gilleland, ol the Countj Tyrone. Of this
union were born the follow ing children : John, living
at Hot Springs, \H-..; William: Thomas, residing at

OwegO, N. Y. ; Mary Ann, the wife of William ( '.

Gray, of Green township ; Elizabeth deceased, 1842 ;
.lames 1 [enrj , li\ ing at Stillwater, \. .1. James Kyle
was a very energetic and industrious man ; landing in

this country comparatively i \ he was able to accu-
mulate a < tpetence, and at the time of his death was

the owier of four hundred acres of as p>uil land as

there is in Green township. In politics he was a
Democrat, but he never sought office, though he filled
several positions of trust in connection with the man-
agement of his township affairs. He was a regular at-



U lelani of the " Yellow frame" Presbyterian church,
which he liberally supported. He died in Green
township in 1859. William Kyle was born in Or-
sinjre Co., X. Y., May 17. 1831. Hi- facilities
quiring an education were limited to the Stillwater

township school, which he attended and worked on
his father's farm until he wa- twenty-One. In 1865
he bought the farm on which he now resides from A.

Pickney. It is situated in Green township, near

Hunt's Mills, ami consists of two hundred acres of

land, with ;j I buildings, and under a high state of

cultivation. Mr. Kyle ha- been twice married ; his

lirst wife was Sarah A., daughter of W. S. Ilibler, id
Springdale, X. J. The children of this niarri

William llibbr ami Floyd .1.. both residing at New-
ark, N. J. His first wife died in |s7ii. His second
wife is Anna 0., daughter of A. T. Hill, of Freling-
huysen township, Warren Co., X. •!.. whom be mar-
ried in 1878. Mr. Kyle has always been a Democrat,
and has ] i<-i . ] several township offices. He attend- the
Yellow Frame Presbyterian church, id' which he ami

his wife are members.



G. B. DRAKE.

The father of the subject of our -ketch wa- Joseph
Drake, who was born in 1761. He was twice mar-
ried; hi- first wife was Miss Desire. The children of




®44su



(



this marriage were Nathaniel (deceased); John (de-
ceased I ; Sarah deceased . married \. Penny : Martha
(deceased : Alexander I'. \ deceased : Margaret, mar-



440



SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY.



ried W. Young, now living in Canada. His second
wife was Mrs. Susannah Ayres. Of this union were
born the following children : Mark L. (deceased) and
George B. Joseph Drake died in 1813.

George B. Drake was born Sept. 28, 1812, near
Tranquillity, Green township. His opportunities for
acquiring an education were very limited, as, his
mother being poor, he was obliged to support himself
at an early age. He worked for his uncle, John
Drake, until he became of age. Then he rented a
farm from Samuel H. Hunt for eleven years ; after
that he bought the farm on which he now resides
from Timothy H. Cook. Besides erecting commodi-
ous buildings, he has made such other improvements
as denote thrift and prosperity. He has been twice
married. His first wife was Mary Ann, daughter of
Jacob Potts, of Marksboro', N. J. The children of
this marriage were Joseph M. ; Almeda, married A.
K. Wildrick, of Paulina, N. J. ; Roxanna, married
Henry Space, of Green township, N. J. His second
wife is Sarah A., daughter of Nicholas Crisman, of
Hardwick, N. J. Her grandfather was John Cris-
man, who came from Philadelphia, Pa., prior to the
Revolutionary war, and was a soldier in the American
army during that momentous struggle. The children
of this union are Harry (deceased, 1865), Samuel H,
Anna E., and Emma J. In politics Mr. Drake has
always been a Democrat. He has been freeholder,
member of the town committee, and has held other
town offices. He attends the Christian church in
Johnsonsburg, of which Mrs. Drake is a member.



MARSHALL S. HIBLER.
The Hibler family are of German ancestry. The
grandfather of the subject of our sketch was Corne-
lius Hibler, who came from South Jersey and settled
in what is now Green township. He married Mar-
garet Amerman. The children of this marriage were
William (deceased) ; John (deceased in Michigan) ;
Anne (deceased), married Jos. Hunt, of Green town-
ship; Jane (deceased), the wife of R. Conant, of
Connecticut; Mary (deceased in Michigan); Adam
(deceased) ; Philip (deceased in Michigan). Adam
Hibler was born on the old homestead, in Green town-
ship, July 9, 1801. He married Elizabeth, daughter
of John Young, of Newton, now Andover township.
Of this union were born the following children :
Margaret A., the wife of George Greer, of Green,
township; John (deceased); Cornelius (deceased);



Marshall S. ; Rebecca I. (deceased), married Clinton
Vass, of Green, and G. W. Kennedy, of Green town-
ship ; G. W. living in AVarren Co., N. J. Adam Hibler
always followed farming. He was a man who com-




manded the respect of the community in which he
lived. His death occurred April 17, 1864. Marshall
S. Hibler was born on the homestead in Green, April
28, 1827. He attended school in his native township,
and worked on the farm where he has since resided.
He married Augusta, daughter of John and Susan
Vassbinder, of Frelinghuysen township, Warren Co.,
N. J. The great-uncles of Mr. Hibler were soldiers
in the American army during the war of independ-
ence. The children of this marriage are Susie B.,
Elwood A. (deceased), and Wilfred.

In politics Mr. Hibler has always been a Republi-
can, and has never sought office. He has always fol-
lowed farming, which business he has carried on in
a successful manner. Though not a member of any
church, he attends the Methodist Episcopal church,
of which his wife is a member. His mother is living
on the old homestead, hale and hearty, and in her
seventy-fifth year.



ANDOVEE.



I.— DESCRIPTIVE.
Andover, one of the southern towns of Sussex, con-
taining, in l.ssii, 1 1 .").'! inhahitant-, measures in its terri-
tory about live miles From north to south and four
from easi to west. It is bounded north by Lafayette,
Hampton, and Newton, south by Green and Byram,
,;i-t by Sparta, west bj Green and Hampton. Its

surface is dotted with ponds and streams. Big Muck-

shaw and Btruble's are among the largest of the for-
mer, and the Pequesl Creek of the latter. Water-
power is abundant, but mills are few. The only vil-
lage is Andover, on the Sussex Railroad, where there
are important iron-mining and limestone-quarrying

that i tribute largely to the tow n's substan-

tial prosperity.

The Sussex Railroad passes through Andover town-
ship in an almost straight line between north and
South, and provides, of course, an appreciated and
valuable convenience.

The mining region in Andover is confined to the
range of hills lying northeast from Andover vil] Igi ,

where, since early in the eighteenth century, iron-
mining bas been carried on, and where it i- now pur-
ued to a liberal extent.

There are -one rich farms in the township, and
from some points agricultural products are freely

shipped to market, hut as a rule -toek-rai-ing and the

production of milk and butter comprise the husband-



Online LibraryJames P SnellHistory of Sussex and Warren counties, New Jersey : → online text (page 112 of 190)