James Talboys Wheeler.

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COLLEGE HISTORY OF INDIA



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BY THE SAME AUTHOR.



MADRAS IN THE OLDEN TIME, as told in the records of the Madras Govern-
ment, 1639 — 1748. 3 vols. sm. 8vo. Madras, 1861 — 62.

EARLY TRAVELS IN INDIA. First Series, comprising Purchas's "Pilgrim-
age" and the *' Travels of Van Ldoschoten." 8vo. Calcutta, 1864.

EARLY TRAVELS IN INDIA. Second Series, comprising Sir Thomas Roe's
" Embassy to the Great Mogul " and Fryer's * ' Travels in India." 8 vo. London,
1873-

HISTORY OF INDIA FROM THE EARLIEST AGES. 5 vols. 8vo.
Vol. I. 1 he Mahi Bhiirata and the Vedic Period. 8vo. Map. 1867.
II. The R&m&yana and the Brahmanic Period. 8vo. Map. 1869.

III. Hindu, Buddhist, and Brahmanic Revival. 8vo.' Map. 1874.

IV. and V. Mohammedan Rule. 2 vols. 8vo. 1876—82.

INDIA UNDER BRITISH RULE, from the foundation of the East India Com-
pany. 8vo. Price 12s. td. MacmiUan and Co. x886.

SHORT HISTORY OF INDIA, and of the Frontier States of Afghanistan, Nipal,
and Burma. Crown 8vo, with Maps and Tables. MacmillanandCo. X2J. 1880.

HISTORY OF THE IMPERIAL ASSEMBLAGE AT DELHI, held on the ist
of January, 1877, to celebrate the assumption by Her Majesty Queen Victoria
of the Title of Empress of India; with Historical Sketches of India and her
Princes. Royal 4to, with 13 Portraits, Map, and 17 Illustrations, chiefly by
Photographs. 1877.

EARLY RECORDS OF BRITISH INDIA ; a Historyofthc English Settlements
in India. 8vo. Calcutta, 1878.

JOURNAL OF A VOYAGE UP THE IRRAWADDY TO MANDALAY AND
BHAMO. 8vo. Rangoon, 1871.

TALES FROM INDIAN HISTORY. i2mo. 1881.



GEOGRAPHY OF HERODOTUS, Developed, Explained, and Illustrated from
Modem Researches and Dbcoveries. 8vo, with Maps and Plans. 1854.

LIFE AND TRAVELS OF HERODOTUS. 2 vob. post 8vo. 1855.

ANALYSIS AND SUMMARY OF HERODOTUS. Post 8vo. Bohn's Philo-
logical Library. 1852.

ANALYSIS. AND SUMMARY OF THUCYDIDES. Post 8vo. Bohn's PhUo-
logical Library. 1852.



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With the Publishers'

COMPLIMENTa

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COLLEGE HISTORY



OF



INDIA



Bdiatic ant> j£uropean



BY

J. TALBOYS WHEELER

Late Assistant-Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department ^

and late Secretary to the Government of British Burma.

Author of *' History of India from the Earliest Ages"

including the **Maha Bharata" and *'■ Ramayana"

** A Short History of India,"

6r*c., &*c.



MACMILLAN AND CO.

AND NEW YORK
1888

The Right of Translation and Reproduction is Reserved



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HARVARD
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Richard Clay and Sons,
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CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE: ENGLAND.
I.— Eaxly Britisli Period.

Britain. — Koman invasion under Julius Caesar, b.c. 56. English invasion, a.d. 449 :

—Egbert, 800 ; Alfred, 871-901 ; Canute the Dane, 1017-35 ; Battle of

Hastings, 1066.
Norman Conquest, 1066-71 . — Great Charter, 1215. Wars with Scotland and France,

1296-1485.
Tudors, 1485-1603.— Henry VH., 1485; Henry VIII., 1509; Edward VI., 1547;

Mary, 1553-
Queen Elizabeth, contemponury of Akbar, the Great Moghul, x559~x6o3 ;

grants Charter to the East India Company, 1600.
European Towns in India '.—Portuguese at Goa, 15x0 ; Dutch at Pulicat, 16x0;

British at Madras, 1639 ; Bombay, X662 ; Calcutta, X690 ; French at Pondicherry,

X672.

II.-— Britisli Factories and Settlements in India.

East India Company : Northern India. — Factory at Surat, 16x2. Embassy of

Sir Thomas Roe from James I. to Jehang^r, x6i5-x8. Factory at Hooghly in

Bengal, about X640.
Southern India. — Hindu empire shattered at Talikota, 1565. Mysore revolts from

Vijayanagar, XS70. Royal house of Vijayanagar removes to Chandragheri in

the Camatic ; cedes Madras, 1639 ; expelled the Camatic by Sultan of Golkonda,

1646, Camatic conquered by Aurangzeb, 1690-X707.
Stuarts, X603-88. — ^James I., X603 ; Charles I., 1625 ; Commonwealth (Oliver

Cromwell), 1649 1 Charles II., 1660 ; James II., x68s. Revolution, x688.
Protestant Succession, i688-x 760. —William and Mary, 1689 ; Queen Anne, X702 ;

George I., 17x4 ; George II., X727 ; George III., X760-X820.

III.— Tliree Presidencies : Madras, Bengal, and Bombay.

Madras. — Earliest territorial settlement of East India Company, X639. War Math

France, 1745 : — Madras captured, 1746 ; restored at Peace of 1748. Wars between

rival Nawabs of the Camatic and rival Nizams of the Deccan : British and

French take opposite sides, X75X-55 and 1757-61.
Bengal. — Hooghly factory, 1640 ; war against the Moghul, 1685 ; flight firom Hooghly

to Madras, X687-89. Calcutta founded, X690. Mission from Calcutta to Delhi,

X7X5-X8.
Calcutta captured by Nawab of Bengal^ June 1756 : Black Hole disaster.
Colonel Clive^ i756-6a— Recaptures Calcutta, January 1757. Victory at Plassy,

May. All-powerful in Bengal : retiu^is to England, 1760. Bengal menaced by

Mahrattas and Afghans.
Nawabs of Bengal^ 1760-64. — Set up and deposed at will by the British at

Calcutta. Defeat of fugitive Padishah and Nawab Vizier of Oudh at Buxar,

1764. British masters of Oudh.
Lord Clive dictator, 1765-67. — Oudh restored to Nawab Vizier. Revenue of

Bengal ceded to the British. Puppet Nawab of Bengal at Murshedabad.

Puppet Padishah at Allahabad, 1765-71.
Padishah carried to Delhi by Mahadaji Rao Sindhia, X77X.
Bombay.— Ceded to Charles II. by Portugal, x66i. Embassy to Sivaji the Mahratta,

1674. ^ Blockaded by the Abyssinian fleet of Aurangzeb, X689. Salsette and

Bassein captured by the Mahrattas, 1737-39 *. a menace to Bombay. British

East India Company covets both places, 1772.



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CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE : INDIA.
I.— Hindn Period.



Punjab.— Aryan invasion.
. Greek Invasion : Alexander the
Great, B.C. 327-323.

GRyECO-BACTRIANS, B.C. 312-158.



North West Provinces and Behar.-
Gautama Buddha, b.c. 450-400.
Chandra-gupta, B.C. 312.
AsoKA : rock edicts, B.C. 260-258.



Mahd Bhdraia and Rdmdyana^ various dates.
Scythian Invasion, b.c 158 to a.d. 100.

Rajput and Gupta League : great battle of Kahror, a.d. 77.

Chinese Pilgrims : Fah Hian, a.d. 400 ; Htuen Thsang, a.d. 626-45.

Sila-dityay lord paramount of Indian contemporary with Hiiun Thsang.

II. — MohammedaiL Conquest.

Mohammed, Prophet of Arabia, a.d. 570-632.
Caliphs op Medina, 632-60. Damascus, 660-750 : Arab conquest of Sind, 712-14.
Bagdad, 750-1258: Mahmud of GhaznI conquers Hindustan, 1003-30.
Chenghiz Khan, the Moghul *'^ world-stormer*' founds his empire, 1154-1226.
t»lorthern India : conquered by Turk and Afghan Sultans, 1180-1350.

Deccan and Peninsula: Mohammedan raids and conquests, 1290-1316. Wars
between Mohammedan Sultans of the Deccan and Hindu Rajas of the Peninsula
(Vijayanagar), 1350-1565.

Western Coast : Malabar.— Portuguese maritime capital at Goa, 1512.

Eastern Coast : Coromandel.— British settlement at Madras, 1639.

III.-— Moghul Empire in India.

Moghul conquests in Northern India. — ^Timur's invasion, 1398 ; Baber's invasion,
1526 ; Humayun's wars vdth Afghans and exile in Persia, 1530-55.

Four "Great Moghuls '* :—
(i) Akbar, 1556-1605 : conquers Northern India and Northern Deccan (Ahmed-
nagar and Berar), 1556-1605. British explore India.

(2) Jehangfr, 1605-27. Mission of Sir Thomas Roe, 1615-18.

(3) Shah Jehan, 1627-56. British found Madras, 1639 ; trade with Bengal, 1640.

(4) Aurangzeb, 1659-1707. Moghul empire at its zenith : Mohammedan ascend-
ancy. Conquest of Southern Deccan (Bijdpur and Golkonda), 1686-89.
Conquest of the Camatic, 1690-1707.

Mahratta Hindus of W^estern Deccan : revolt under Sivaji, 1659-80.
Sambhaji, king of the Konkan, 1680-89, captured and executed by Aurangzeb.
Sahu, vassal king of the Konkan, 1707-48. Rise of the Peishwas of Poona, 1748.
Moghul Empire : decline and fall, 1707-50.
Nadir Shah's invasion, 1738-39 ; massacre at Delhi.

Mahrattas invade the Csmiatic, 1740-43 ; yearly invasions of Bengal, 1742-50.
Afghans from Central Asia : invade Northern India under Ahmad Shah

Abdali, 1748-61. Defeat and massacre of Mahrattas at Paniput, 1761.
Fugitive Padishah and Nawab Vizier of Oudh threaten Bengal, Behar, and

Orissa, 1758-64. Battle of Buxar, 1764 : British conquest of Oudh.



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CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE: ANGLO-INDIA.



I.— Intermittent Waxs, 1772-98.

Mahrattas.— Normal wars, domestic
and predatory. Rival Peishwas,
177a. Bombay interferes to get
Salsette and Bassdn, X772-76 :
stopped by Calcutta.
French intrigues at Poona : first Mah-



TVarren Hastings, Governor of Ben
gal, X772. — British administration:
collectors, magistrates, circuit judges.

Warren Hastings^ Governor-Gene-
ral, 1774-85 : with political control
of Bombay and Madras ; new Mem-
bers of Council ; and Supreme Court
of barrister judges at Calcutta.
Philip Francis: — Charges against
Warren Hastings ; execution of
Nundkomar, 1775. t)uel between
Hastings and Francis, 1780.



Lord Comwallis, 1786-93.— Reforms.

Perpetual Settlement, t793.
Sir John Shore, 1793-98.



George III. : Board of Control^ 1784.



ratta War, X778-82.
Hyder All and Tip^u of Mysore,

invade the Camatic. 1780.
First Mysore TVar, 1781-82 : death of

Hyder, 178a : peace with Tippu,

1784.



Second Mysore War, 1789-91.

Tippu submits, 1792.
Nizam, prostrate, 1794-95.



II.-~Paxamount Power, 1798-1836.



Lord Wellesley, 1798-1805.
Subsidiary Alliances : British

Government arbiter of peace and

war.
Second Mahratta ^Var: campaigns

of Wellesley in the Deccan^ and

Lake in Northern India^ 1803.



Third Mysore "War, 1798-99.
Death of Tippu at Seringapatam, 1799.
Partition of Mysore.
Peishwa accepts British alliance.
Second Mahratta War : submission
of Sindhia, Bhonsla of Berar and
Gaekwar of Baroda, 1802-4.



Madras Presidency extended over the Camatic and part 0/ Mysore, 1801.



Sir George Barlow, 1805. Lord

Minto, 1807.
Marquis of Hastings, 1813-23.—

Suppression of predatory powers.



Nipal War, 1813-16.— Permanent peace.

Pindhari War; Third Mahratta
War : deposition of the Peishwa,
1818 ; defeat of Holkar at Mehidpur.



George IV., 1820-30 : Bombay Presidency extended over Mahratta Deccan,

First Burmese War, 1824-26.



Lord Amherst, 1823-28.
Lord William Bentinck, 1828-35.—
Suppression of Suttee and Thuggee.



Central Asia : alleged advances of
Russia towards the Oxus.



William IV., 1830-37: last Charter Act of iZ^^.
Sir Charles Metcalfe, 1835-36.



III. — ^Victorian Era : Queen and Empress, 1837-87.

First Afghan War, 1838-42.
First Sikh War, 1845-46.



Second Sikh W^ar, 1848-49.
Second Burmese War, 1852.



Lord Auckland, 1836-42.
Lord Ellenborough, 1842-44.
Lord Hardinge, 1844-48.
Lord Dalhousie, 1848-56 : roads,
canals, telegraphs, railways.
Annexation of Punjab, 1849; Pegu,
1852 ; Nagpore, 1853 J Oudh, 1856.
-4^^/^1853: Legislative Councils. Competitive Examinations. State Education.
Lord Canning, 1856-62.— Sepoy Mutinies, 1857-58. Reconquest of North-West
Provinces and Oudh.

India under the Crown: Royal Proclamation, 1858.

Lords Elgm, 186a; Lawrence, 1864; Mayo. i86p; Northbrook, 1872; Lytton,

1876 ; Ripon, 1880 ; Duffenn, 1884.

Visit of His Royal Highness the Prince of IVales, 1875.

Her Majesty Queen victoria proclaimed Empress of India, 1877.

Jubilee of Her Majesty, 1887.



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CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
HINDUS AND GREEKS.

Ante B.C. 250.

! I. Hindus and Greeks contrasted. § 2. Aryan or Persian inva-
sion : Vedic worship. § 3. Gautama Buddha and his teaching,
about B.C. 450-400. § 4. Invasion of Alexander the Great,
B.C. 327: old Hindu life in the Punjab. §5. Sandro-cottus,
or Chandra-gupta, king of Magadha : description of India
by Megasthenes. §6. Reign of Asoka, about B.C. 250 :
proclamations of Buddhism Pages i — 17

CHAPTER II.
SCYTHIAN CONQUEST: THE MAHA-BHIrATA AND

rAmAyana.

B.C. 250— A.D. 645.

\ I . Scythian invasion : Guptas and Rajputs. § 2. Pilgrimages of
Chinese Buddhists to India. § 3. Lord Paramount of India.
§ 4. Maha-Bharata : feud between Pandavas and Kauravas :
archery match for a bride : gambling match for a Raj : the
great war. § 5. Ramayana : Rama, the first-bom : marriage ;
exile : war against Ravana Pages 18 — 37



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: CONTENTS.

CHAPTER III.

MOHAMMEDANS : ARABS, TURKS, AND AFGHANS.

A.D. 570—1565.

ii. Mohammed and his teaching, A. D. 570-632. §2. Caliphs of
Medina and Damascus : Arab conquest of Sind, 712-714.
§ 3. Religious equality : parliament of Mohammedan divines.
§4. Caliphs of Bagdad: Persian revolt against the Arab.
§ 5. Turkish Sultans in Central Asia. § 6. Mahmiid of
Ghazni i conquest of Northern India. § 7. Afghan dominion :
Moghul invasions. § 8. Conquests of Ala-ud-din. § 9.
Tughlak Sultans. § 10. Timur the Tartar : invasion of India,
1 398-1 399. § II. Sultans of the Deccan and Rajas of the
Peninsula Pages 38 — 62



CHAPTER IV.

MOGHULS; BIbER, HUMAYUN, AKBAR, JEHANGIR.

1526— 1627.

\ I. Moghul conquest of Hindustan : Baber. § 2. Afghan uprising :
HumAyun's exile. § 3. Akbar, 1556 — 1605 : founds the
Moghul empire : Persian and Rajput. § 4. Intermarriages :
Rajput and Moghul. §5. Religious vagaries. §6. Popularity
and publicity. § 7. Europeans and Christianity. § 8. Tartar
camp life and chronicles. § 9. Lahore : sun worship. § 10.
Death and character. § 11. JehangIr, 1605 — 1627, four sons :
Deccan affairs. § 12. Mission of Sir Thomas Roe from
James I. § 13. Court intrigues : Niir Mahal and Shah Jehan.

Pages 63—78



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CONTENTS. xi

CHAPTER V.

MOGHULS ; SHAH JEHAN AND AURANGZEB.

1627— 1707.

1 1. Shah Jehan, 1627—59. Splendid architecture at Delhi and
Agra. § 2. Four princes : Dara, Shuja, Aurangzeb and
Murdd, § 3. Fratricidal war : Bemier*s experiences at Delhi.
§4. Aurangzeb, 1659— 1707. §5. Mahratta history : Sivaji,
1627 — 80. §6. Persecution of Hindus: Rajputs hostile:
rebellion of Prince Akbar. § 7. Wars and conquests of
Aurangzeb : death and character. § 8. Moghul Civilisation. § 9.
Decline of the Moghul empire, 1707 — 48. § 10. Nadir Shah,
the "world stormer." §11. Mahratta invasion, 1 740— 50.

Pages 79—101



CHAPTER VI.

EUROPEANS : PORTUGUESE, DUTCH, BRITISH, FRENCH.

15CX) — 1756.

I I . Europeans in India. § 2. Portuguese in Malabar : Goa.
§ 3. Portuguese life and rule in India. § 4. Dutch in India.
§ 5. East India Company : Hindus and British contrasted.
§ 6. European factories at Surat. § 7. Madras : British city and
fortress. § 8. Camatic affairs. § 9. Bengal : British factory
at Hooghly, 1640 : Calcutta founded, 1690. § 10. Bombay :
unhealthy Island. §11. Three Presidency towns. §12, French
in India: war between France and Britain, 1744 — ^48. § 13.
Dupleix : ideas of French empire, 1 748 — 55. § 14. Capture
of Calcutta by the Nawab of Bengal, 1756 . . Pages 102—120



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[i CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.

BENGAL PROVINCES : MOGHUL AND BRITISH.

1748-1772.

I. Bengalhistory: Hindu, Mohammedan, Portuguese. §2. Akbar:
conquest of Bengal, 1580 : land revenue system. § 3. Bengal,
Behar and Orissa. §4. Murshed Kuli Khan, 1 700-1725 ;
revenue changes. §5. Plots and Wars for the succession,
1725-56. §6. Nawab Suraj-ud-daula : Calcutta and Plassy,
1756-57. §7. Mahratta history, 1707-57. § 8. Afghan history :
rise of the Abdali empire, 1747-57. §9. CIive*s first admin-
istration, 1757-60. §10. Wars against France in India:
Count de I^ally. § 11. Revolutions in India : changing Nawabs
in Bengal. § 12. Lord Clive's second administration, 1765-67 :
policy of non-intervention and isolation . . . Pages 121 — 139

CHAPTER VIII.

BENGAL: BRITISH RULE.

1772— 1798.

I. Warren Hastings, 1772-85 : British sovereignty in Bengal.
§ 2. Civil administration : zemindars and ryots : collectors and
magistrates. § 3. Parliamentary interference : quarrels between
Company's officials and Crown officials. §4. First Mahratta
war, 1 775- 1 782 : jealousy of France. §5. Mysore: Hyder
Ali and Tippu. §6. Trial of Warren Hastings. §7. Lord
Comwallis, 1786-93: perpetual settlement and balance of
power. § 8. Sir John Shore, 1793-98 : Mahratta supremacy.

Pagis 140 — 151

CHAPTER IX.

BRITISH EMPIRE; PARAMOUNT POWER.

1798— 1828.

i I. Marquis of Wellesley, 1 798- 1805 ; alarm at France. §2. Fall
of Tippu of Mysore, 1799: Camatic affairs. § 3. Subsidiary
system and paramount power. § 4. Mahratta factions : flight



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CONTENTS. xiii

of the Peishwa : treaty of Bassein, 1802. § 5. Campaigns
against Sindhia and the Bhonsla. § 6. War against Holkar :
British disaster. § 7. Non-intervention under Lord Comwallis,
Sir George Barlow, and Lord Minto, 1805-13. § 8. Marquis of
Hastings, 1813-23: Nipal war, 1814-16. §9. Pindhari and
Mahratta wars : fall of the Peishwa, 181 7-18. § 10. Treachery
at Nagpore, 1817-18. § 11. Settlement with Holkar and the
Peishwa. § 12. Lord Amherst, 1823-28 : Burma and Bhurt-
pore Pages 152 — 165



CHAPTER X.

BRITISH EMPIRE: CONSOLIDATION.

1828— 1857.

§ I. British rule in India, 1600-1833. § 2. Lord William Bentinck,
1828-35 • administrative changes. § 3. Land revenue systems :
village communities, zemindars, joint village proprietors, ryots.
§ 4. Political changes. § 5. Central Asia : Punjab, Sind,
Afghanistan, and Persia. § 6. First Afghan war, 1838-42.
§ 7. Lord Ellenborough, 1842-44 : conquest of Sind and
Gwalior. § 8. Lord Hardinge, 1844-48 : first Sikh war.
§ 9. Lord Dalhousie, 1848-56 : conquest of the Punjab and
Pegu. § 10. Material progress : three Indian reforms, 1853.
§11. Lord Canning, 1856 Pages \^ — 183

CHAPTER XI.

BRITISH EMPIRE : SEPOY REVOLT.

1857.

§ I. Sepoy mutiny against greased cartridges : Barrackpore and
Berhampore. § 2. Oudh and North- West Provinces : dis-
affected talukdars. § 3. Bengal, Bombay, Madras, and Pun-
jab : loyalty and content. §4. *'Kmg" at Delhi: British
force at Meenit : mutiny and revolt. § 5. British advance
from Calcutta : Neill at Allahabad. § 6. Revolt of Nana
Sahib : Cawnpore massacres. § 7. Havelock's advance to
Cawnpore and Lucknow : restoration of peace.

Pages 184—195



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dv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII.

BRITISH EMPIRE: QUEEN AND EMPRESS.

1858— 1888.

J I. From Company to Crown. § 2. Lord Canning : peace, 1858-62.
§ 3. Lord Elgin, 1862-63. § 4* Lord Lawrence, 1864-69
Bhutan war. § 5. Oudh land settlement. § 6. Central Asia
non-intervention in Afghanistan. § 7. Lord Mayo, 1869-72
assassinated. § 8. Lord Northbrook, 1872-76 : visit of the
Prince of Wales. § 9. Lord Lytton, 1876-80 : proclamation
of .Queen Victoria as Empress of India. § 10. Famine of
1876-77. § il. Second Afghan war, 1878-79: massacre at
British Residency. § 12. Lord Ripon, 1880-84 : peaceful
policy. § 13. Lord Dufferin, 1884-88. § 14. Zemindari
legislation, 1859: Bengal Tenancy Act, 1885. §15. Burma,
1878-84 : growing hostility of Theebaw t war and annexation,
1885-86. § 16. Peace in Central Asia, 1887-88.

Pages 196 — 207

CHAPTER XIII.

INDIA : PRESIDENCIES AND PROVINCES. ,

1833-1888.

I I. Four areas : Northern India, Deccan, Peninsula, and Burma.
I 2. Growth of Presidencies and Provinces.

(i) Northern India or Hindustan,
I 3. Bengal Presidency and Assam. § 4. North-West Provinces
and Oudh. § 5. Punjab.

(2) Deccan or Middle India,
I 6. Bombay Presidency. § 7. Central Provinces.
(3) Southern India or Peninsula.
\ 8. Madras Presidency.

(4) Eastern India.
\ 9. Lower and Upper Burma.



i 10. British administration : Districts and Divisions : Regulation
and non-Regulation provinces Pages 208 — 217



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CONTENTS. XV

CHAPTER XIV.

ASIATIC STATES: RAJPUT, MOHAMMEDAN, MAHRATTA.

1817-18— 1887-88.

1 1. Three extinct Asiatic empires. §2. Rajput Empire: Oodey-
pore, Jodhpore, and Jeypore. §3. Rajput feudal S3rstem.
§4. Rajput decline: troubles in Jeypore, 1818-35. § 5. Modem
Rajputana. § 6. Mohammedan Empire of the Moghul :
Nizam of Hyderabad. § 7. Mahratta Empire : rise and
fall. § 8. Central India : Sindhia and Holkar : Mahrattas and
Rajputs. § 9. Miscellaneous principalities.. § 10. Progress,
1857-88 Pages 218—232



LIST OF MAPS.



INDIA, showing political DIVISIONS, i388 . . . To face Title.

INDIA, showing physical FEATURES AND THE

EXTENT OF akbar's EMPIRE To face page 68

RAJPUTANA AND MALWA ,, „ 224



Digitized



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GOVERNORS GENERAL.



1. Right Honourable Warren Hastings 1774

2. Lord Cornwallis 1786

3. Sir John Shore (Lord Teignmouth) 1793

4. Marquis of Wellesley 1798

5. Lord Cornwallis (Second Time) 1805

6. Sir George Barlow 1805

7. Lord Minto 1807

8. Marquis of Hastings 1813

9. Lord Amherst 1823

10. Lord William Bentinck 1828

11. Sir Charles (afterwards Lord) Metcalfe .... 1835

12. Lord Auckland ^ 1836

13. Lord Ellenborough 1842


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Online LibraryJames Talboys WheelerCollege history of India: Asiatic and European → online text (page 1 of 21)