James Wayland Joyce.

England's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic online

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Online LibraryJames Wayland JoyceEngland's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic → online text (page 46 of 83)
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■" Hume,
e. xxxiii.
p. 348.
^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 872.

' 31 Hen.
VIII. e. 8.
" Rj-mer's
Feed, in loc.

Stat, at

large.

Hume,



420



ENGLISH SYNODS.



[chap.



A. D. 1545.

Aixlibps.,
Thomas
Ciannier,
Roberl Hoi-
gate.



* Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 877.



^ Sec 37
Hen. VHI.
c. IC.
y Coll. vi.
23.



2 Cone.
Mag. Biit.
iii. 877.



a Cone.

Mag. Brit.

iii. 877, and

Trevor, p.

95.

•> Trevor,

p. 95.



<= Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 877.



A.D. 154G.



The Canterbury Of the meeting of the Canterbury Convocation
'^■^"°^' on Nov. 24, 1545, to which day the synods of

both provinces were prorogued, no records remain.

The York Sy- At the appointed time however, Nov. 24,
"°''" 1 545, the day after the assembHng of the par-

Hament above alluded to, the northern synod " met at York.
Archbishop Edward Lee had lately departed this Hfe.
Though firmly and consistently opposed throughout the trying
times of his archiepiscopate to the usurped exercise of papal
supremacy, yet he bent too sparingly towards the principles of
the reformation in other respects. His successor was llobert
Holgate, a man of slender reputation'', but withal acceptable
to the king, as not being subject to scruples on the point of
preserving from sacrilegious invasion ^ consecrated property ^
committed to his care.

The York Convocation was opened according to tlie
then established practice'. The mass " de Spiritu Sancto"
w-as solemnly ^ celebrated, and the sermon preached in Latin
by Mr. JNIarshall. In the morning session the new archbishop,
Robert Holgate, took the presidential seat; but in the after-
noon session his commissioners appearing in his place con-
firmed and admitted as prolocutor Mr. George Palmes, who
had been elected by the clergy, and was now presented by Mr.
Durell. On the 14th of December following^ a session was
held in which matters of subsidy were treated of, and it was
agreed to assess the sum at the same rate as that settled in
the southern province. On this occasion the archbishop ^ first
addressed the synod in its united capacity, and then the lower
house, under the presidency of its prolocutor, held a separate
session.

Eight subsequent sessions " were held by this York Synod,
so that we may reasonably gather that some important busi-
ness was under consideration, though the nature of it is not
recorded ; and on the 25th February, 1546 n.s., the assembly
was prorogued.

During the year 15 46 the tsvo convocations
were summoned to meet respectively at S. Paul's



XVI. A.D. 1546.
The two provin-
cial synods meet.



' For a fuller account of this convocation than that given in the Cone. Mag.
Brit. iii. 877, see Trevor's Two Convocations, p. !>4. The documents there cited
are taken from the York records.



XI.]



ENGLISH SYNODS.



421



on the 5th '^ of November, and at York on the 24th ^ of the
same month. No matters of importance, however, appear
on the records which remain.

As this is the last year of K. Henry VIII.'s
all pubik^ecoids reign, and as it is and has been often stated
SfThe' ppd""- ^y Romanists on the one side, by Erastians on
piemacy to the the Other, and by a large number of persons

death of K.Henry ' -^ " . . , ,

VIII., shewing holding various shades of opmion between the
matters synodicai two, that the reformation in religion under that
ciTn enactoentf monarch's government was carried on by royal
letters, injunctions, proclamations, and acts of
parliament only, while the lawful authority of the Church in
her synods was not appealed to, it may be well here to take a
brief review of some of the historical facts which we have been
considering, so as to discover what such statements are worth.

Upon due investigation, if the dates of records are care-
fully observed, it will appear on almost every occasion in this
reign when royal letters, injunctions, and proclamations were
issued, or statutes enacted on spiritual matters, that those
injunctions, proclamations, and statutes were consequent
upon the deliberations and decisions of our synods, and were
ancillary to them; or if not so were merely declaratory of the
existing ecclesiastical law. This is a point which depends
entirely upon dates, an element in history which it argues
the excess of prejudice, to say nothing of a less reasonable
quality, to disregard. The examination may be tedious, but
still, when truth is the object, the reader must not grudge
some exercise of patience in the pursuit.

Now the point is to shew that subsequent to the discharge
of the papal supremacy by synodicai authority in 1534, and
up to the end of the reign of K. Henry VII L, the delibera-
tions and decisions of our synods upon such matters as lay
within their proper jurisdiction preceded'^ the promulgation
! of royal letters, injunctions, and proclamations, and also pre-
ceded the enactment of statutes. For this purpose the fol-
lowing facts are suggested for the consideration of the unpre-
judiced and patient inquirer.

2 A contradictory statement is very broadly made, though slenderly sup-
ported by proof, in the Rev. R. I. Wilberforce's " Treatise on the Supremacy,"
p. 251.



A.D. 1546.
K. Henry
VIII.

J Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iv. 1.
•^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 877, and
vol. iv. 3.



422



ENGLISH SYNODS.



[chap.



A.D, 1546.

Archbi)s.,

Thomas

Crannicr,

Robert Hol-

gate.

fConc.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 772.
e Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 773.
'' Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 769.
> Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 783.
J 26 Hen.
VIII. e. 1.
■t Stat, at
large.
' Vid. Slip,
pp. 335, 336
™ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 725.
" Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 744-5.
° Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 776.
P Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 770-6,
and Strype's
Meni. Cran-
mer, p. 24.
<i Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 779.
'■ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 779.



s Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 769. 783.
' Vid. sup.
this page.

" Cone.
IVTag. Brit,
iii. 783.



V 27 Hen.
VIII. c. 1.5.
" Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

" Stat, at
Large.
y Hume,



" The king's proclamation ^ for the aboHshing of the usurped
power of the Pope"" was signed by his majesty on the 9th
day of June e, 1534.

But the papal supremacy had been synodically discharged
on the 31st day of March'* preceding by the province of Can-
terbury, and on the 5th day of May ' preceding by the pro-
vince of York.

The statute J authorizing the king's grace to be " supreme
head " was enacted in that parliament which met at West-
minster ^^5 Nov. 3, 1534.

But the title of " supreme head," with the qualification as
detailed in the last chapter', had been accorded to his majesty
in the Convocation of Canterbury on the 11th of February™,
1531 N.S., and in that of York on the 4th of ISIay" in the
same year.

Towards the end^ of the year 1534 "the king's proclama-
tion ° to bring in seditious books "" was Issued.

But the Convocation of Canterbury had previously, on the
19th of December P, addressed the king that such a course
might be pursued.

To the next proclamation i concerning heresies issued in
the same year the same argument wholly applies.

"The letters of K. Henry VIII. '^ for the ob.servation of
the reformed ecclesiastical laws " were issued subsequently in
1534, according to the records.

But these merely authorize the abrogation of laws which
had issued from the Pope, and transfer the promulgation of
ecclesiastical constitutions from papal to royal authority, a
necessary consequence of the discharge of the Pope's * supre-
macy as before referred ' to.

The last proclamation set out in this year 1534 by the
king was " an order " for a form of bidding prayers."

But here no new doctrine was involved, and only such per-
sons as should be prayed for were specified.

The statute^ gi^'ins the king authority "to nominate^''
thirty-two persons of his clergy and laity for making of eccle-
siastical laws " was enacted ^ in the parliament held between
Feb. 4y, 1536 n.s., and April 14 following.

' It must be remembered that according to the old style in which the records
are dated, the year ended March 24.



XI.]



E^TGLISH SYNODS.



423



But the provisions of this act were merely ancillary to
25 Hen. VIII. c. 19, s. 2, and the authority specified in both
was accorded in convocation on the 15th ^ of May, 1532.

" The royal letters ^ to the Archbishop of Canterbury
against preachers " were signed by his majesty on July 12 '',
1536.

But these were to order such doctrines to be enforced as
were contained in the ten articles (familiarly known as the
articles of 1536) subscribed on the previous day, that is to
say, on the 11th of July, 1536'', by both houses of the Canter-
bury Convocation. Nor did his majesty forget to recite their
synodical authority, for in the body of the document these
words occur: "We have . . . caused"^ all you, the bishops
with the clergy of our realm, in solemn convocation delibe-
rately disputing and advising the same, to agree to certain
articles most catholic, conceived," &c.

"The king's proclamation^ for uniformity in religion" next
follows in 1536.

But this document states upon the face of it that the king
intendeth " by advice ^ of his prelates and clergy (a term
notoriously signifying synodical authority) to enforce uni-
formity."

The statute s concerning the "succession of the crown,"
made in consequence of Q. Anne Boleyn's divorce, was enacted
in that session of parliament which ended '^ July 18, 1536*.

But the divorce was formally ratified by convocation pre-
viously, on June 21, in that year'.

In the same session of parliament the statute J for "ex-
tinguishing'' the authority of the Bishop of Rome" was
enacted.

But that authority had been synodically extinguished two
years previously, in the months of March and May, 1534, by
tlie Convocations of Canterbury ^ and York ™ respectively.

In the same session the act" "for the release of such as
have obtained pretended licences, &c. from the see of Rome "

* By 33 Hen. VIII. c. 21, passed five years after this date, the king was em-
powered to give his assent to bills by letters patent. But at this time acts did not
come into force until the king had come into the House of Peers, and, sending for
the Commons to the bar, assented to the bills in a mass which had passed both
-Blackstone's Com., vol. i. pp. 183-4.



A.D. 1546.
K. Henry
VIII.

^ Sup. ch. X.
p. 347. Cone.
Mag;. Brit.
iii.749.
Att. Rights,
p. 94.
* Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 807.
•> Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 808.
<^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803. 817.
Sup. p. 384.

^ Cone.
JNIag. Brit,
iii. 807.



« Cone.
Mag. Biit.
iii. 810.



f Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 811.



g 28 Hen.
VIII. c. 7.



h Stat, at
Large.

' Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803.
Sup. p. 382.
J 28 Hen.
VIII. e. 10.
k Stat, at
Large, index
in loe.



' Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 769.
™ Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 782-3.
n 28 Hen.
VIII. c. 16.



424



ENGLISH SYNODS.



[chap.



A.D 1546.

Archbps.,

Thomas

Cranmer,

Robert Hol-

gate.

° Cone.
Mas. Brit,
iii. 813.



P Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 813.
q Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803.
Sup. p. 384.
■" Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803. 8-23.
Sup. p. 385.
8 Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 821.
» Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 815.



" Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 776.
Sup. p. 380.

^ Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 803. 8-23.
•Sup. p. 384.
" Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 817.
^ Cone.
MaiT. Brit,
iii. 817.
y Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 817.
^ Prcamb.
25 Hen.
Vin. e. 19.
» 25 lien.
VIII. e. 1.0.
b Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803, and
822-3.
« Vid. sup.
pp. 383-4.
<• Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 823. See
Hcylin's
Hist.Tiaets,
p. 17.



was passed °. But in this case the last argument wlioUy
applies.

In the year 1.536 "the king's injunctions" were put forth,
desiring that certain articles should be declared, that certain
holidays should be abrogated, and that certain restraints should
be placed on the devotions paid to images.

But the articles referred to had been previously ratified by
convocation (a fact to which, indeed, these injunctions p them-
selves bear testimony) on the preceding llthi of July; the
question of holidays had been previously settled in the same
assembly'' on the 19th of July; and devotions to images had
been previously restrained, under the same authority, by the
sixth ^ of the articles aforesaid.

The " injunctions ' by Thomas Lord Cromwell, his majesty"'s
vicar-general,"" published later in this year, 1586, were chiefly
supplementary to the last injunctions. The principal points
contained were that the translation of the Bible should be
set up in every church, and that superstitious regard to images
should be suppressed.

But the translation of the scriptures had been previously
requested by convocation on the 19th" of December, 1534,
and was now lately completed in accordance with that re-
quest. And the question of images had been previously
settled by synodical authority on the llth^ of July in this
year 1536.

"Articles'^ about religion .... published by the king's
authority" were issued in 1536.

But their very heading states that they were " set ^ out by
the convocation." In the preamble his majesty himself bears
this testimony to their synodical authority : We " have ^
caused our bishops, and other the most discreet and best
learned men of our clergy of this our whole realm, to be as-
sembled in our convocation for the full debatoment and quiet
determination of the same." And, moreover, that this state-
ment of his majesty is "according'' to the truth" (which by
the way the preamble of one " of his acts of parliament is not),
we have been assured by the synodical records '' of this year
above'' considered.

The king's " strait "^ commandment . . . for the abrogation of
certain holy days, sent to all bishops," was issued in 1536.



ENGLISH SYNODS.



425



But these documents were only transcripts of the decree ®
made by convocation on the 19th ^ of July previously.

" The ^ king's letter against too many holidays ■" was signed
by his majesty August 11, 1536.

But this document^ merely desired that the late decree of
convocation agreed' to on the 11th of July should be en-
forced ; and, moreover, the instrument declares upon the face
of it that " the J superfluity of holidays we have, by the assents
and consents of all you the bishops and other notable person-
ages of the clergy of this our realm, and in full congregation
and assembly had for that purpose, abrogated."

"A letter'^ written by the king to his bishops, directing
them how to instruct the people," was pubhshed^ on the 19th
of November, 1536.

But this document™ is simply a declaration of episcopal
duties, in accordance with the then existing ecclesiastical law,
some references being also made to the ten articles previously
agreed upon by the Canterbury provincial Synod on the 11th"
of July, 1586.

"A proclamation" concerning rites and ceremonies to be
used in due form in the Church of England " was the next
issued.

But this instrument declares upon its face that all such
rites and ceremonies are enjoined "as"" have been laudably
accustomed in the Church of England."

The act of the six articles p, "for abolishing pp diversity
of opinions," &c. was the last statute enacted in that session
of parliament which rose on the 28th i of June, 1539.

But the whole '^ of the doctrinal matter which that act
respected had been previously submitted to the Canterbury
Synod for their decision on the second day ^ of that month,
and answers to the several points proposed having been re-
turned in detail, the act was framed in parliament upon
them.

In 1539 certain injunctions were set forth "by the autho-
rity ' of the king against English books, sects, and sacramen-
taries, also the putting down the day of Thomas Becket." A
perusal of these injunctions shews that they were intended to
stop the publication of heretical books, to promote the ob-
servance of certain doctrines" and ceremonies \ to settle a



A.D. 1546.
K. Henrv
VIII. '

« Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 823-4.
f Cone.
Mag;. Brit,
iii. '803.
g Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 824.
h See Hey-
liu's Hist.
Tracts, p.
17.

' Cone.
.Mag. Brit.
iii. 803.
J Cone.
]\Iag. Brit,
iii. 824.
k Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 825.
' Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 826.
"' Vid. in
loco,
n Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803—
817.
" Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 842.



"o Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 842.

P 31 Hen.
VIII. c. 14.

PP Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

1 Stat, at
Large.
■■ Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 848.
^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 845-6.
Sup. pp.
395-6.



' Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 847.



Item 5.
Item 6.



426



ENGLISH SYNODS.



[chap.



A.D. 1546.

Archbps.,

Tliomas

Cranmer,

Robert Hol-

gate.

«■ Item 7.
" Items 9,
10, 11.
y Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 770 —
776.
^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 803.820,
821-2.
a Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 845-6.
•> Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 848.
c Vid. sup.
p. 351.
d 32 Hen.
VIII. c. 15.
Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

e Stat, at
Large.
f31 Hen.
VIII. c. 14.
e Vid. sup.
pp. 395-6.
'• Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 845-6.



i 32 Hen.
VlILc. 25.

" Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

J Coll., vol.
V. pp. 64, 65.

" Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 852.
' Vid. sup.
pp. 401—
403.

"•Vid. Coll.,
vol. V. p. 65.
n 32 Hen.
VIM. c. 38.
o Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.



point ^ of discipline, and to obliterate from the calendar'^
Thomas a Beckefs day.

But convocation had applied to the king on the 19th 5" of
December, 1584, on the subject of restraining suspected
books. As to the doctrines, cei-emonies, and point of disci-
pline alluded to, they had severally been synodically settled
previously, that is to say, on the llth^ of July, 1536, and on
the second day^ of June in the year 1539 respectively.
And as to the "putting down the day of Thomas Becket,"
his canonization, "made'' only by the Bishop of Rome,"
seems necessarily to have been extinguished by the discharge
of the papal supremacy under the synodical authority of the
provincial synods of the English Church in 1534, as above
specified ^.

The statute ^ " concerning archbishops, bishops, &:c. to be
in the commission of the act concerning the abolition of
erroneous opinions in the Christian religion" was enacted
between April 28 « and July 24, 1540.

But this act was merely ancillary to the act^ of the six
articles, in respect of which ^ we have seen that the whole
doctrinal matter contained was previously submitted ^ to con-
vocation ; and that the synod returned specific answers,
on which the statute was framed. Moreover, the pro-
visions of our present act, that archbishops, bishops, and
other ecclesiastics should be charged with the execution of
such spiritual matters as arc glanced at appears no more
than seemly.

The statute' "for" di.ssolution of the king's pretensed mar-
riage with the Lady Anne of Cleve" was passed July 12^,
1540.

But the divorce had been determined upon in a national
.synod on the preceding ninth'' day of July, and that in a most
solemn manner, the highest notabilities of the land having
been examined upon oath before the synod, as previously'
described. Moreover, the act before us recites"' the judg-
ment of the national synod.

A subsequent* act", "concerning pre-contracts" of mar-
riages," was made in this same session of parliament.

* Tliis act, it is curious to observe, was to take effect from July 1, 1540, though



KNGUSH SYNODS.



427



But it was framed upon the principle acted upon by the
national synod on the 9th of July previously p, in the matter
of Anne of Cleves'' divorce, viz. that pre-contracts did not
render marriages void in cases where they had been consum-
mated, for on this point the greatest stress was laid in the
synod.

A proclamation for the " Bible ^ of the largest and greatest
volume to 1}e had in every church " was issued on the 6th of
May, 1541.

But, as has been before remarked, a translation of the
Bible had been previously requested by convocation on the
19th "^ of December, 1534. That translation had subsequently
appeared, and had been set up ^ in the churches. An improved
translation had more recently come out under the auspices * of
Archbishop Oranmer in 1539, and this last edition was now
to be substituted in place of the earlier one.

"The king's letter" for taking away shrines and images,"
dated from Hull, is attributed to October 4, 1541.

But the reforms of such abuses as were here ordered to be
removed had been initiated^ by the sixth of the articles^
agreed to in convocation on the 11th of July ^, 1536. Further-
more, it is not clear that this letter does not belong to the
year 1542; at any rate, it is dated "the thirty-fourth yere^
of our reign.'' In this case our position is fortified, as the royal
letter was then consequent upon the debate which took place
on this subject in convocation on Feb. 24^, 1542 n.s.

The statute^ for uniting the diocese of Chester and the
diocese of INIan to the province of York was enacted in the
spring of 1 542.

But such territorial distributions have always been con-
sidered to come within the partial cognizance of the civil
power ; and so long as that power is exercised in concord
with the Church, great benefits may be expected to ensue
from such arrangements.

The statute ^ " for '^ the advancement of true religion, and for

it is subsequent to 32 Hen. VIII. c. 25, which was passed * July 12, 1540. For
the disentanglement of any apparent difficulty involving retrospective legislation
we must look to that learned profession whose studies are particularly directed to
such inquu-ies.



A.D. 1546.
K. Henry

vin.

P Cone.
Mag. Brit.



q Cone.
Mag. Brit.



' Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 776.
5 Vid. sup.
p. 405.
' Hartwell
Home, vol.
ii. app. 62.
Sup. p. 405.
" Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 857.



" Coll. iv.
360.
"■" Cone.
jNIag. Biit.
iii. 821.
X Cone.
Mag. Brit.
iii. 803.
y Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 858.
^ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 861.
Sup. p. 408.
^ 33 Hen.
VIII. c. 31.



Coll. V. 64-5.



b 34 & 35
Hen. VIII.
c. 1.

c Stat, at

Large,

inde.x.



428



ENGLISH SYNODS.



[chap.



A.D. 1546.

Archbps.,
Thomas
Cranmer,
Robert Hol-
gate.

" Stat, at
Large,
d 34 & 35
Hen. VIIL
0. 1, ad
init.
«: Couc.
Ma?. Brit,
iii. 860-1.
Slip. p. 406.
f Cone.
jNlag. Brit,
iii. 868,



s 35 Hen.
VIIL e. 3.

eg Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

h Stat, at
Large.



' Vid. sup.
chap. X. pi).
335-6.

J Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 725.
•t Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 744-5.
1 35 Hen.
VIIL e. 5.
» Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.

»' Stat, at
Large, in
loco.



" Vid. sup.
p. 395.
<» Cone.
Mag. Biit.
iii. 845-6.
P Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 845-6.
1 35 Hen.
VIILc. 16.
I'l Stat, at
Large, in-
dex.
■■ Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 749.
» Cone.
Mag. Brit,
iii. 863.



the abolishing of all false doctrines" was enacted <='= in the
spring of 1543 n.s.

But the very first section of the act gives us this correct
information : " Recourse <^ must be had to the catholic and
apostolic Church for the decision of controversies." This
statute, therefore, very justly directs that TindaPs translations
should be forbidden, in accordance with the decision arrived
at in the Canterbury Convocation, Feb. 8, ]542 n.s. '^

The king's letters to the Archbishop of Canterbury, de-
siring " that ^ general rogations should be made for the cessa-
tion of rain," was signed Aug. 20, 1543.

But here is no challenge of spiritual authority higher than
should be accorded cheerfully in fulfilling so pious a request.

The statute s " for ss the ratification of the king's majesty's
stile" was enacted in the spring of 1544"^ n.s. Here, to
mention the point in which it alone concerns our present
inquiry, the title of "supreme head" on earth of the Church
of England and Ireland was ratified by parliament.

But that title had been accorded with a qualification ', as
we have seen, thirteen years before, by the provincial Synods
of Canterbury on the 11th of Februarys, 1531 n.s., and of
York on the 4th of May\ 1531, respectively.

The act' "concerning" the qualification of the statute of
the six articles" was passed in the spring of 1544 n.s.

But this statute was merely "' declaratory of certain modes
of proceeding to be taken under the provisions of 31 Henry
VIIL c. 14; and upon the doctrinal matter contained in the
last mentioned act (though, I trust, not upon its cruel pro-
visions) the decision of convocation had been given, as we
have "seen above, on the 2nd of June", 1539; and that at



Online LibraryJames Wayland JoyceEngland's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic → online text (page 46 of 83)