James Wayland Joyce.

England's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic online

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Online LibraryJames Wayland JoyceEngland's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic → online text (page 83 of 83)
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of synods, 20 ; authority possessed by them
of deciding questions on matters spiritual, 23 ;
diocesan synods, 30; English diocesan synods,
36; ancient form of holding them in Eng-
land, 37; their disuse in latter times, 38;
list of those held between the Conquest and
the Reformation, ib. (note) ; difficulty of de-
fining between a "s3'nod" and a "council,"
160.^

, Cardinal Pole's legatine, 525 ; heads of

business in it, 526; prorogued, 531.

, of bishops only, (1561), 549

Synodical deliberation, tiie principle of enforced
by our Lord Himself, 4.

decisions, historical proof that they

preceded civil enactments, 421 — 431.

Synods, early British, 102^110; Anglo-Saxon,
125 — 127 ; changes effected in by the Con-
quest, 211; synods and great councils some-
times held concurrently, 213; and sometimes
separately, 214; Anglo-Saxon arrangements
generally imitated in these points. 215 ; con-
stitution of national and provincial synods
soon after the Conquest, 223; constituent
members — archbishops and bishops, 224 ;
deans, i6. ; abbots, 225 ; priors, 226 ; arch-
deacons, 228; chosen presbyters, 229; form
of a provincial synod in the eleventh century,
242 ; general remarks on the constitution of
national and provincial svnods. 244 ; list of
Enclish synods from ( 1279'to 1 500),248— 2,i6 ;
and from (1500 to 1.534), 323, 324 ; the only
rightful authority for effecting a reformation
of religion, 324; circumstance now tending
to promote such reformation, 325 ; final re-
jection of the papal supremacy by the Synod
of Canterbury, 351; and York, il).; list of
English synods from (1.534 to 1,553), 35,5 — 357;
national synod (1537), 387 ; Cromwell's speech,
388 ; Cranmer's, 389 ; Bishop Fox's, il,. ;
" The Institution of a Christian Man," 390;
practice of appointing select committees, 400;
synods assembled on the day after the meet-
ing of parliament, 419; servile character of
that wliuii met in (1545), lYi.; provincial synods
reduced in numbers, 434; rediution of the
number of members, 449; list of from (1559
to 1604), 549; York provincial Synod, 554;
dioccs.in Svnod of S. Asaph, tV).; Canterbury
(1563), ,5,50; forms observed in it, j'A. ; thirty-
nine articles established, 5.58; controvcrsv on



the twentieth article, 561 ; Nowell's Cate-
chism, 562; attempts in the upper house to
alter the ceremonies of relidon, 563; tem-
poral business transacted in this synod, 566 ;
two bills prepared for parliament on the sub-
ject of discipline, 567; homilies revised by
the upper house, ilt. ; articles for the better
regulation of the (jhurch propounded by
Archbishop Parker, 568; consultation among
the bishops, 569; provincial synod of (1566),
570 ; and of 1571, 571; Dr. Ailmer chosen
prolocutor, ib.; Cheyney, bishop of Glou-
cester, excommunicated for non-attendance,
572 ; the thirty-nine articles published under
the editorship of Bishop Jewel, ib. ; Book of
Canonsagreed on, 573; synod of (1572), Arch-
bishop Parker's opening speech, 574; Dr.
AVhitgift chosen prolocutor, 576; convoca-
tional privilege of freedom from arrest granted,
ib. ; synodof (1576), 579; fifteen articles on ec-
clesiastical reforms,5o0; observations on them,
582; synodof (1581), 583; Dr. Day elected
prolocutor, ib. ; provisions for cheeking the
"Familist" (family of love) heresy, 584;
five articles agreed to respecting ecclesiastical
discipline, 586; subject of penance introduced,
587 ; form of penance pro|)osed by Archbishop
Grindal, 587 ; synod of (1584), 588 ; Dr. Red-
man chosen prolocutor, ib. ; six articles pass-
ed by the synod, 590; synod of (1586), 592;
orders for the increase of learning among the
inferior clergy, 593; complaints of Norwich
diocese and of the archdeaconry of Suffolk,
594, 595 ; controverted election of a proctor,
595 ; right of curates to vote, 596 ; petition to
the queen, 597 ; an exhortation of the arch-
bishop, ib.; schismatical endeavours of the dis-
senters, 598; "The Book of the Holy Dis-
cipline," ib.; synodof (1,58.9), 600; Mr. Styll
chosen prolocutor, ib. ; orders for the province
of Canterbury, 602.

, Englisli, a list of pretended ones, 491 ;

pretended synod in (15.58), 532 ; heads of busi-
ness in it, ib.; articles proposed in it, 534;
pretended synod in (1559), .537; articles
sketched out by the lower house, ib.



Taylor, Bishop Jeremy, condemns the intro-
duction of lay judges in matters spiritual, 11 ;
and the confounding of things temporal and
spiritu.al, 19.

"Tell it to the Church" explained, 15, 16;
exemplifications of the observance of the pre-
cept, 17.

"The Book of the Holy Discipline," 598; its
authorship mainly .attributed to Travers, ib.

Theodosius the Great distinguishes between
the ecclesiastical and civil power, 10.

Transubstantiation, disputation on the doctrine
in the pretended provincial s'Miod of (1553),
.500—506.

Tunstal, Bishop, his protest against the claim
of suprem.acy on tne part of Henry VIII.
337.



V.



Valentiman the Elder clearly distinguished
between the ecclesiastical and civil power, 10.



INDEX.



751



Victory, or Victoria, provincial Synod of, 106 ;
origin of the designation, 107.



W.



Warham, William, arclibishop of Canterbury,
accession to that see, 324; presents the Arti-
cles of Submission to Henry VIII., 346;
dies, and is succeeded by Cranmer, 348.

West Saxons, their conversion to tlie Christian
faith, 141.

Westminster, place of meeting of convocation,
removed thither from S. Paul's, 297.

'■ Assembly, 687 et seq.

protest, 298.

Weston, Hugh, prolocutor of the lower house of
convocation in (1533), 497 ; his speech, 498 ;
ill behaviour in his olFice, 502. — 5(15.

Whitgift, Dr., chosen prolocutor of the pro-
vincial Synod of Canterbuiy (1571), 576 ;
succeeds Archbishop Grindal in the see of
Canterbury, 588; letter on the payment of
subsidies, 605; attends the death-bed of
Elizabeth, 614; crowns James I., ih.\ his
death, 615.

Wilberforce, the Rev. R. I., erroneous statement
in his " Treatise on the Supremacy," 421, note.

Willinms, John, archbishop of York, succeeds
Richard Neile, 685; his character i>nd learn-
ing, 686 ; his attack on Aberconway Castle,
ib. ; his death, ib.

Winchester, wittena-gemoteheld there in (1033),
183; first great Anglo-Norman council held
there (1070), 207; deposition of Archbishop
Stigand, 154. 156—160.
Windsor, work of deprivation carried on at the
great council there, 210.



Wittena-gemote (micel-gemote, or micel-
getheaht), meaning of the term, ^6. 157;
proceedings of in matters spiritual, 12 ; form
of holding the assembly, 172.

Wolsey, Thomas, archbishop of York, convenes,
as legate, a national synod of bishops at West-
minster (1519), 297; affects a superiority over
Archb. Warham, ib. ; incurs the displeasure of
K.Henry VIII., 331; dies, 332; embarrassment
of the English clergy in consequence of their
acknowledgment of liis legatine authority, ib.

Writ, royal, for summoning convocations, its
origin, 259, 260 ; for a time abandoned, 263 ;
matter finally arranged in Edward III.'s time,
269 ; necessity for this document dates from
(1534) only, "272. 363; distinction between
the royal writ which is a summons for delibe-
ration and a royal licence for the enactment
of canons, 374. 664, 665. 729.



York, provincial Synod in 1310, 293; in 1424,
289; in 1426, 299. 304. 313; in 1531, 336.
350 ; in 1532, 324 ; in 1536, 387 ; in 1542,
411; in 1.545, 315; in 1.546, 4.53; in 1561,
554 ; in 1563, 570 ; in 1585, 591 ; in 1605,
639; in 1606, ih. 642; in 1610, 645; in
1624, 650 ; in 1625, 651 ; in 1626, 654 ; in
1628, 6.55; in 1629, 656 ; in 1640, 672.

Young, Dr., preaches before the provincial
synod of Canterbury (1571), 574.

, Thomas, archbishop of York (1561),

548 ; subscribes the Thirty-nine Articles, 559,
560. 570 ; is succeeded by Edmund Grindal,
572.



GILBERT AND RlVlNGTOiN, PRINTERS, ST. JOH.n'S SQUARE^ LONDON.



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Online LibraryJames Wayland JoyceEngland's sacred synods : a constitutional history of the convocations of the clergy, from the earliest records of Christianity in Britain to the date of the promulgation of the present Book of common prayer; including a list of all councils, ecclesiastical as well as civil, held in England, in whic → online text (page 83 of 83)