John Harvey Kellogg.

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B. Foods which Encourage Asepsis of the Stomach ami Intestines.

All the articles named in the preceding list of ster-
ilized foods prepared without milk or eggs, with the
addition of the following :

Kumyss. Floated eggs. Soft boiled eggs.

Kumyzoon. Poached eggs. Beaten whole eggs.

Medium boiled eggs. Curdled eggs. Cottage cheese.

Beaten whites of eggs. Hard boiled yolks of eggs.

C. Foods which do not Ferment in a Stomach of
Moderate Digestive Vigor.

All the preparations of grains, fruits, milk, eggs,
and easily digested vegetables in Diet Lists Nos. 1 to
10, only raw milk excepted.

With this list it is necessary for many patients who
have long suffered from dilatation of the stomach, to
employ some intestinal antiseptic, of which the best is
charcoal, in the form of antiseptic charcoal tablets (49).

DIET LIST SO. 2. DRY DIETARY.

A dry dietary is indicated in cases in which there is
dilatation of the stomach, with slow absorption. In



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 229

cases of this sort, liquid foods remain too long in the
stomach.

The chief purpose of a dry dietary is to secure thor-
ough mastication of the food ; hence the articles in the
following lists should be taken without water, milk, or
other liquid. Granose is an ideal article of food for a
dry diet, as it stimulates the flow of saliva to a greater
extent than any other food with which we are ac-
quainted. Granose, combined with nuts, nut meal,
bromose, or the yolks of hard boiled eggs, may often
be eaten with advantage almost exclusively for a few
days at the beginning of a course of dry dietary.

A. Dry Diet.

This list includes all the unfermented breads ( Diet
List No. 13), and in addition,

Yolks of hard boiled eggs. Bromose ( dry ). Nut butter.

Granose. Popped corn. Nut meal.

Steamed figs. Sterilized butter. Roasted almonds.

Raisins.

B. Modified Dry Diet.

This list includes all the preceding list ( A ), and in
addition the following :

Poached eggs. Beaten whole eggs. Popped corn.

Curdled eggs. Nuts. Mashed peas.

Floated eggs. Granose grits. Mashed beans.

Beaten whites of eggs. Browned rice. Stewed prunes.

DIET LIST NO. 3 NITROGENOUS DIETARY.

The nitrogenous elements of food are also pepto-
gens ; that is, they stimulate the secretion of gastric
juice, and hence foods of this class are especially
adapted to cases of hypopepsia and apepsia, in which



230



THE STOMACH.



the production of gastric juice is always deficient. Al-
bumen and casein are the most important nitrogenous
elements. Eggs consist chiefly of albumen ; milk con-
tains casein in abundance ; nuts are rich in albumen
and vegetable casein ; peas, beans, and lentils contain
a very large proportion of vegetable casein. At the
beginning of a course of treatment, in extreme cases of
apepsia and hypopepsia, it is sometimes necessary to
confine the diet to a single nitrogenous food, as kumyss
or kumyzoon. Later, eggs may be added advanta-
geously, then some farinaceous food, as granose, with
nuts, and still later the various unfermented breads and
soft grain preparations ; but dry foods are to be pre-
ferred.



Beans pure"e.

Peas puree.

Nuts puree.

Milk (Diet List No. 5).



Almond meal.
Lentils with nuts.
Peas with nuts.



Gluten biscuit, 1, 2. Beans.

Gluten meal. Peas.

Eggs (Diet List No. 6). Lentils.



NUT PREPARATIONS.

Beans with nuts.
Nuts puree.
Bromose.

DIET LIST SO. 4.



Nut porridge.
Nut butter.
Nut meal.



This list consists exclusively of farinaceous prepara-
tions of a character easy of digestion.

BREADS.

(Diet List No. 13.)

TOASTS.
Cream toast. Snowflake. Gravy toast. Dry toast with hot milk.

SOUPS.
Cream rice soup. Oatmeal soup. Cream barley soup. Corn soup.



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA.



231



Gluten mush.
Oatmeal mush.
Graham mush.
Granola mush.
Mixed mush.
Corn-meal.
Barley gruel.
Graham grits gruel.
Gluten water gruel.
Oatmeal gruel.
Milk gruel.
Graham gruel.
Corn-meal gruel.
Oatmeal porridge.
Oatmeal blanc-mauge.



GRAINS.

Macaroni baked with

granola.
Macaroni with cream

sauce.

Jellied oatmeal.
Barley milk.
Milk panada
Bran jelly.
Kice.

Eice molded.
Browned rice.
Eice water.
Grain jelly.
Cracked wheat.
Molded wheat.
Boiled wheat.



Rolled wheat.
Wheat goflo.
Graham grits.
Gluten.
Granola.
Eolled oats.
Rolled rye.
Pearled wheat.
Hulled corn.
Popped corn.
Hominy.
Hominy flakes.
Corn gofio.
Grains of gold.
Crystal wheat.



DIET LIST NO. 5. MILK.



Hot milk.
Buttermilk.



Boiled milk.
Sterilized milk.



Cream.
Cottage cheese.



Kumyss.
Kumyzoon.



DIET LIST NO. G.

A



This list is composed entirely of preparations of
eggs.

Medium boiled eggs. Soft boiled eggs. Curdled eggs.

Hard boiled yolks of eggs. Poached eggs. Beaten whites of

Beaten whole eggs. Floated eggs. eggs.

B

The articles in this list contain milk or some cereal
preparation in addition to eggs.



Gluten custard.
Gluten meal custard.
Bread custard.
Farina custard.



Granose custard. Cream toast with
Rice custard. poached eggs.

Eice with egg. Poached eggs on
Cracked wheat custard. toast.



DIET LIST NO. 7.

Foods which are easily disintegrated, and hence
adapted to cases of dilatation of the stomach.



UNFERMENTED BREADS.

(Diet List No. 13.)



232



THE STOMACH.



Gluten mush.
Granola mush.
Granose.



Strawberries.



Baked apples.



GRAINS.
Granola.
Gluten.
Rice.

FRESH FRUITS.

Grapes. Oranges.

FRUITS WITHOUT SUGAR.
Stewed prunes. Prune dessert.
FRUITS COOKED WITH GRAINS.



Browned rice.
Corn gofio.
Popped corn.



Ripe sweet apples.



Fruit juice.



Graham peach mush.
Grape mush.
Granola grape mush.
Oatmeal fruit mush.
Granola fruit mush.
Granola peach mush.
Graham apple mush.
Blackberry mush.
Raspberry granola

mush.

Granola apple mush.
Lemon barley gruel.
Raspberry grits gruel.
Raisin gruel.
Grape gruel.
Lemon gluten gruel.
Lemon oatmeal gruel.
Boiled wheat.



Peas pure'e.
Lentil puree.
Split peas.



Macaroni with tomato

sauce.

Rice with fig sauce.
Farina with fig sauce.
Pearled barley.
Grape toast.
Prune toast.
Banana toast.
Tomato toast.
Apricot toast.
Berry toast.
Peach toast.
Farina fruit mold.
Red rice mold.
Pearled wheat with

raisins.
Pearled barley with

raisins.

VEGETABLES AND LEGUMES.
Green peas.
Vegetable broth.
Corn pulp.



EGGS.

Medium boiled eggs. Poached eggs.

Beaten whites of eggs. Curdled eggs.
Hard boiled yolks of eggs. Floated eggs.



New Era Kumyss.
Kumyss nog.
Kumyzoon.



MISCELLANEOUS.
Sterilized butter.
Caramel-cereal .



Graham grits with
raisins, dates, or
figs.

Rice with raisins.

Wheat with berries.

Farina with fresh
fruit.

Rice and stewed
apple dessert.

Cracked wheat with
steamed apple.

Apple macaroni.

Stewed fruit puddi'g.

Wheat with peaches.

Rice with peaches.

Prune pie with gra-
nola crust.

Granose shortcake.



Kornlet.
Asparagus.
Nuts with lentils.



Soft boiled eggs.
Beaten whole eggs.



Bromose.
Nut butter.
Nut meal.



DIET LIST NO. 8. ANTI-FAT DIETARY.

An anti-fat dietary need not necessarily exclude all
starchy foods. The most important points to be ob-
served are



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 233

1. Limitation of food to the smallest amount with
which the strength can be maintained.

2. Restriction of the diet to one article, or at most
to two or three.

3. Avoidance of fats.

4. Avoidance of liquid foods of all sorts. If ku-
myss or kumyzoon is used, it should be made the chief
dietary.

Kumyss. Beaten whole eggs. Grapes.

Kumyzoon. Vegetable broth. Lemons.

Granose (eaten dry). Gluten. Celery (cooked).

Hard rolls. Gluten biscuit. Asparagus.

Water biscuit. Gluten wafers. Tomatoes.

Medium boiled eggs. Gluten custard. String beans.

Beaten whites of eggs. Sour apples. Green peas.

Poached eggs. Oranges. Greens.

Curdled eggs. Strawberries. Sticks.

Floated eggs. Bananas. Zwieback.
Soft boiled eggs.

DIET LIST NO. 9. FAT AND BLOOD DIETARY.

Those foods which abound in starch, sugar, dex-
trin, and easily digested fats, are the most conducive
to fattening. At the head of the list stands bromose,
which contains one fourth its weight of emulsified, or
partially digested, nut fat, and nearly forty per cent, of
digested starch. The following articles are fattening
in character :

Milk (Diet List No. 5). Fruits and Nuts (Diet Diet List No. 7.

Grains (Diet List No. 4). List No. 10). Diet List No. 13.

Diet List No. 6. Bromose.

DIET LIST NO. 10. FRUITS AND NUTS.

A.- FRESH FRUITS.

Grapes. Oranges. Peaches. Pears. Berries.

Melons. Pineapples. Bananas. Figs. Dates.

Raisins. Apples. Cherries. Currants.



THE STOMACH.



B.- FRUITS COOKED WITHOUT SUGAR.

Baked apples. Stewed prunes. Cranberries and

Stewed raisins. Apple jelly without sweet apples.

Apples stewed withraisins. sugar. Baked apple dessert.

Stewed tomato. Prune dessert. Baked tomato.

Baked pears. Prune marmalade. Stewed prum-s.

C.- FRUITS WITH SUGAR.

Unfermented wine. Grape jelly. Lemon apple.

Stewed fruits. Fruit juices. Citron apple.

Canned fruits. Baked quince. Bananas in fruit

sirup.
D.-NUTS.

Almonds. Chestnuts boiled or Nut meal.

Hickory nuts. roasted. Nut porridge.

Filberts. Almond meal. Nut butter.



DIET LIST NO. 11. LIQUID DIETARY.

A liquid dietary is especially indicated in fevers,"
and in some cases of painful dyspepsia, especially cases
of hyperpepsia accompanied by much irritation, as in-
dicated by pain on pressure over the pit of the stomach
and pain after eating. The purpose of a liquid diet is
to present nutriment in a form which will tax the stom-
ach as little as possible, and secure the early emptying
of the stomach by the passage of its liquid contents
into the small intestine.

Gluten gruel. Fruit juices. Kumyss.

Malted gluten gruel. Barley water. Kumyss nog.

Fruit and nuts gruel. Nut porridge. Kumyzoon.

Nuts and gluten gruel. Cream. Cottage cheese.

Vegetable soup(pea, lentil, Hot milk. Curdled eggs.

bean, tomato, rice, bar- Boiled milk. Beat'n whitesof eggs.

ley, and corn). Buttermilk. Beaten whole eggs.

Vegetable broth. Custard. Bromose.

DIET LIST NO. 12. FEVER DIET.

In fever the digestive powers are feeble. With the
exception of boiled rice, only liquid food should be



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 235

taken. Gruels and similar farinaceous preparations are
most suitable, and they should be boiled several hours.

A. To be used during the active period of the fever,
while the temperature is high :

Barley water. Granola gruel. Prunes puree.

Barley gruel. Gluten gruel. Bromose.

Strained oatmeal gruel. Fruit and nut gruel. Kumyss.

Boiled rice. Unfermented grape Kumyzoon.

Corn-meal gruel. juice. Buttermilk.

Fruit juices.

B. During convalescence, in addition to the above,
the following may be used :

Milk porridge. Whipped egg. Peaches.

Cream toast. Kumyss nog. Grapes.

Granola mush. Stewed fruit. Zwieback.

Granose. Baked apples. Unfermentedbreads.

Poached eggs. Strawberries. Toasted whole-wheat

Custard. wafers.

DIET LIST NO. 13. UNFERMENTED BREADS.

Whole-wheat puffs. Snow gems. Beaten biscuit.

Corn puffs. Whole-wheat gems. Fig sandwich.

Graham puffs. Gluten wafers. Apple sandwich.

Rolls. Whole-wheat wafers. Graham flakes.

Toasted rolls. Toasted wafers. Gluten.

Fruit rolls. Dyspeptic wafers. Granola.

Breakfast rolls. Crisps. Crusts.

Graham gems. Graham crisps. Zwieback.

Rye gems. Graham crackers. Sticks.

Blueberry gems. Toasted beaten biscuit. Hoe cake.

DIET LIST NO. 14. FOR A BOTTLE-FED INFANT
UNDER SIX MONTHS OF AGE.

Sterilized cow's milk properly diluted with boiled
water, barley water, or oatmeal water. Under three
months of age, use one third milk ; three to six months,
one half milk ; after six months, two thirds milk.

Barley Water. Boil one tablespoonful of whole barley in an
enameled sauce-pan or a double boiler for five minutes, and throw
the water away ; then add one and one-half pints of water, slowly
simmer down to one pint, then strain. To be used for diluting



236 THE STOMACH.

milk, or as a substitute for it when cow's milk does not agree, and
in cases of vomiting.

Oatmeal Water. One tablespoonful of fine oatmeal, one pint
of boiling water. Boil for one hour, keeping the quantity of wa-
ter good ; strain. To be used instead of plain water for diluting
milk.

Barley Water and Cream. Five parts of barley water made
as directed above, to one part of sterilized cream.
Substitute for Mother's Milk :

Milk 1 oz.

Cream 2 oz.

Bicarbonate of soda 1 gr.

Milk sugar 3 dr.

Water to make S ox.

Gradually increase the quantity of cream and milk as the
child advances in age.

DIET LIST NO. 15. FOR A TEETHING INFANT.

As soon as a child begins to cut its teeth, it should
begin to use them. In addition to Diet List No. 14,
the child may be fed stewed fruits in small quantities,
those being avoided which require much sugar for sweet-
ening. Such fresh fruits as strawberries, grapes (ex-
cluding the seeds and skins), ripe peaches, and very ripe
sweet or subacid apples may be given, also baked
sweet apples and pears. Granose eaten dry, or granose
and granola eaten with milk or fruit juice, are perhaps
the best of all cereal foods for an infant. Zwieback
softened with milk or cream, and gluten gruel (Sani-
tarium Infant Food) are also excellent.

DIET LIST NO. 16. FOR A CHILD FROM ONE TO
FIVE YEARS OF AGE.

The most suitable foods are those in Diet Lists
Nos. 1 and 2, which a child from two to five years
of age may eat without injury, provided, of course, that



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 237

the food is properly masticated. Vegetables should be
avoided until the second teeth begin to make their ap-
pearance, with the exception of the following : Aspara-
gus, green peas, and baked sweet potatoes. Children
subject to colic or other forms of indigestion should
avoid potatoes. Purees of lentils, peas, and beans,
and bean porridge may be allowed.

The articles included in Diet Lists Nos. 22 and 23
should never enter into the dietary of children, being still
more unwholesome for them than for adults.

DIET LIST NO. 17. EATING FOR STRENGTH.

Those articles are most useful in developing nerv~
ous and muscular energy which are the most easily
digestible, while at the same time possessed of the
highest nutritive value. The nutritive value of the
following articles is, on an average, with the ex-
ception of eggs, about three times that of beefsteak,
while they tax the digestive organs less : Peas, beans,
lentils, whole-grain preparations, bromose, granose,
granola, unfermented bread. The food preparations
mentioned in Diet List No. 1 are especially to be com-
mended for producing strength.

DIET LIST NO. 18. DIET FOR DIABETES.

An exclusive meat diet was formerly recommended
for diabetes, but it is now known that such a dietary
does not give the most satisfactory results, and in-
volves the danger of sudden death from an excessive
accumulation of tissue poisons which the kidneys are
unable to eliminate.

Gluten biscuit. Asparagus, Kumyss. Nuts.

Lettuce. Spinach, Cottage cheese. Nut butter.

Celery. Greens, Buttermilk Nut meal.



238



THE STOMACH.



DIET LIST NO. 19. FOR RHEUMATISM AND GOUT.

It is especially important to avoid an excess of ni-
trogenous food ; hence meats of all kinds must be
avoided. In cases of dilatation of the stomach, milk
must also be avoided. In most cases the articles in-
cluded in the following diet lists are to be preferred :

Dry foods (Diet List No. 2). Fruits and nuts (Diet List No. 10).

Aseptic dietary (Diet List No. 1) and Diet List No. 6.

DIET LIST NO. 20.

For gastritis, gastric catarrh, and ulceration of the
stomach.



Liquid foods (Diet List

No. 11).
Nut puree.



Nut meal.
Nut porridge.
Gluten custard.



Curdled eggs.

Egg-nog.

Kumyzoon.



DIET LIST NO. 21. FOR CONSTIPATION.



Unfermented graham

breads.

Cracked wheat.
Grits.
Oatmeal mush.



Apples.
Peaches.
Most raw fruits.
Stewed fruits.
Crystal wheat.



Bromose.

Granose.

Zwieback.

Goflo.

Pop-corn.



DIET LIST NO. 22. ARTICLES DIFFICULT OF DIGESTION.

ANIMAL FOODS.



Pork.

Veal.

Goose.

Liver.

Kidney.

Heart.

Sausage.

Hard boiled eggs.



Warm bread, espe-
cially when eaten
with butter.

Muffins.

Buttered toast.

Pies, cakes, and all
sorts of pastry.



Scrambled eggs.

Cheese.

Hashed and stewed

meats.
Salted and smoked

meats.
Melted butter and all

animal fats.

VEGETABLE FOODS.

Griddle-cakes.

Fried bread and vege-
tables.

Onions.

Mushrooms.

Pickles.

Tea, coffee, cocoa,
chocolate.



Mackerel and all oily fish.
Salt fish.

Dried and smoked fish.
Sardines and other fish

preserved in oil.
Lobster, crabs, etc.
Cooked oysters and clams.
Fried meats of all sorts.



Mustard, pepper, spices,

'and other condiments.
Sugar, preserves.
Raw grains or vegetables.
Raw or imperfectly cooked
grains and vegetables.
Ice-cream.



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 239

FOODS NOT EASY OF DIGESTION.

The following articles are much more digestible than
those just named, but are nevertheless so difficult of
digestion that persons with dilated stomachs or weak
digestive powers are compelled to wholly abstain from
their use to avoid inconvenience from indigestion :

ANIMAL FOODS.

Animal soups of all sorts. Tripe. Codfish.

Beef. Turkey. Oysters, raw.

Lamb. Duck. Butter.

Game. Pigeon. Roast meats.

VEGETABLE FOODS.

Potatoes. Plums. Salads of all

Turnips. Cherries. sorts.

Cabbage. Pineapples. Currants.

Tomatoes. Beets. Gooseberries.

Peas (whole and dried). Carrots. Raspberries.

Beans (whole and dried). Spinach. Blackberries.

Raisins and most dried Parsnips. Rhubarb,

fruits. Vegetable soups. Jellies.

DIET LIST NO. 23. FOODS WHICH PROMOTE FERMENTA-
TION AND DECOMPOSITION IN THE STOMACH.

These are of three classes : A. Foods which are fer-
menting or decomposing when taken into the stomach ,
B. Foods which readily undergo fermentation in the
conditions present in the stomach when the digestive
vigor is somewhat impaired ; and C. Foods which fer-
ment in a dilated stomach.

A. Fermenting or Decomposing Foods.

Cheese. Wine. Wild game and meat

Sour milk. Cider. which has a gamey

Sauerkraut. Beer. flavor.

B. Foods which Readily Undergo Fermentation.

Sugar. Sirups. Meat.

Honey. Preserves and other. Fish.

Candy. sweets. Oysters.

16



240 THE STOMACH.

C. Foods which Ferment in a Dilated Stomach.

Mushes. Sonps. Other soft or liquid farina-

Gruels. Potatoes and other vege- ceous foods,

tables.

DIET LIST NO. 24. NUTRITIYE EM3MATA.

1. Bromose and Egg. Dissolve two ounces of bromose (Diet
List No. 25) in two ounces of water. Mix with a beaten egg and a
half teaspoonful of salt, and add water sufficient to make eight
or ten ounces. Mix well, and administer with a suitable syringe
at one feeding. Repeat five times in twenty-four hours, at in-
tervals of four hours. This is the best material for rectal ali-
mentation with which we are acquainted. Bromose may be
obtained from the Modern Medicine Co., Battle Creek, Mich.

2. Egg Enema. To two well-beaten eggs add half a teaspoon-
ful of common salt, and water enough to make twelve ounces
after thorough mixing. This quantity is sufficient for one feed-
ing. Use five times a day, at intervals of four hours. This prep-
aration is less valuable than the preceding, but may be used in
an emergency.

DIET LIST W. 25. HEALTH FOODS.

The following foods are prepared by the Battle
Creek Sanitarium Health Food Company, Battle Creek,
Mich. , IT. S. A. They are of great service in the treat-
ment of many disorders of the stomach :

Zwieback. Ordinary fermented bread cut into, thin
slices and baked a second time until lightly browned
throughout.

Graiwse. A preparation of wheat in which the
grain is first thoroughly cooked, then compressed into
extremely thin flakes, which are afterward baked until
slightly brown. This food can be eaten and digested
by many persons who can digest nothing else.

Granola. A preparation of wheat, corn, and oats,
mingled in such proportions as to render the mixture a
perfect food, and treated in such a manner as to partly



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 241

digest it. This food is capable of sustaining life any
length of time.

Gluten Biscuit. A small biscuit made of wheat
flour from which the starch has been carefully sepa-
rated by washing. From this biscuit, carefully dried
and browned, gluten meal is produced.

Caramel- Cereal. A. substitute for coffee, having a
pleasant, aromatic flavor, and free from the unwhole-
some properties of tea and coffee.

Bromose. This is a preparation having for its basis
carefully selected and prepared nuts. It contains about
forty per cent, of digested starch, twenty-four per cent,
of digested fats, and twenty per cent, of finely divided
albuminoids. It is one of the most valuable of all the
fat- and blood-making foods.

Nut Meal and Nut Butter. These are nut prod-
ucts of a very palatable, wholesome, and highly digest-
ible character, and valuable substitutes for animal fats.

Gofio. This is a preparation of parched grain much
employed by the natives of the Canary Islands. After
being parched, the grain is ground, and mixed with
milk or water.

Kumyzoon. This is a lactated preparation of milk
prepared by first sterilizing the milk, and then subject-
ing it to the action of a special lactic acid by which is
produced a ferment whereby the sugar of milk contained
in it is converted into lactic acid. It is a very easily
digestible and highly nourishing article of food, and is
of great service in certain forms of indigestion, as well
as in diabetes and general malnutrition. Ordinary ku-
myss and buttermilk, though somewhat inferior, are
useful substitutes.



242 THE STOMACH.

When kumyzoon is made the sole article of diet, it
should be taken in quantities of two to ' three quarts
daily and at intervals of four or five hours during
the day.

Flesh Food. It will be noticed that meats of all
kinds are omitted from these lists. The reason for this
is that flesh foods require strong digestive powers to
disinfect and digest them, since they are not naturally
adapted to the human stomach ; hence, while they are
apparently well tolerated by persons in health, a person
whose stomach is in a diseased condition will do better
to adhere as closely as possible to the natural diet orig-
inally intended by the Creator for the sustenance of hu-
man beings, as indicated by the command to Adam : " I
have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon
the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which
is the fruit of a tree yielding seed ; to you it shall be
for meat." According to the most eminent compara-
tive anatomists, the anatomical structure and digestive
functions of man agree entirely with those of such
purely frugivorous animals as the chimpanzee, the
orang-outang, and the gorilla.

Antisepsis of the Mouth. So long as the
mouth is swarming with microbes, which is always the
case when the tongue is coated, and the teeth uncleanly
and presenting unfilled cavities, thousands of germs are
carried down into the stomach with every mouthful of
food or drink swallowed. The first step toward asep-
sis of the stomach, and a most essential thing in the
treatment of indigestion, is mouth cleanliness.

Modern researches have shown that nearly all dis-
eases of the mouth, as well as a large share of the dis-



TREATMENT OF DYSPEPSIA. 243

eases of the stomach, are due to the action of germs
which find lodgment there. The mouth is peculiarly
exposed to the attacks of germs, as it is located at the
very entrance of the body, and a portion, at least, of the
respired air passes through it, and the germs readily
find lodgment about the tongue, cheeks, between the
teeth, and elsewhere. The mucus secreted by the
glands of the mucous membrane lining the mouth, is, to
some degree, antiseptic in character, and possesses
germicidal, or germ-destroying, properties to some ex-
tent. When the mouth is kept clean, this disinfecting
mucus is capable of thoroughly protecting the struc-
tures of this portion of the body against the attacks of
microbes ; but when particles of food are left to lodge
between the teeth, the germs, finding abundant soil in
which to grow and multiply, become so numerous that
the poisonous substances which they produce neutral-
ize the antiseptic mucus so that it becomes powerless
for protection.

Meat, more than all other foods, is injurious in this
respect, for the reason that its fibers readily lodge be-


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Online LibraryJohn Harvey KelloggThe stomach: its disorders and how to cure them → online text (page 16 of 25)