John; Arrol Arrol.

The Arrol, Arroll and Arrell families online

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Guernsey in June of 1 940 and ' Anthony Arrol' wrote of the events during the five years
of enemy occupation, including two years in occupied Guernsey and three years in
internment camps in France and Germany. (3)

There is a family of Arrolls on Long Island, New York who do not have a Scottish
ancestry. Henry Arroll was bom circa 1891 in Russia. When he immigrated to the
United States through Ellis Island, the immigration officer is alleged to have spelled
Henry's surname Arroll. Henry raised at least two sons, Roy Irwin Arroll, bom in 1925,
and Mark Edward Arroll, bom 1935. Roy Arroll and his family resided in Roslyn, Long
Island. He was listed in Who's Who in the East 1974. His brother, Mark Edward Arroll,
resided in Queen's, New York City. Mark was an attomey who was listed in Who's Who
in American Law (1978-1979).

An unusual sidelight to Mark Arroll being an attomey is that there are no Arrols or
Arrolls of Scottish heritage that were ever attorneys or solicitors. There have been a
number of individuals with the surname Arrell who were attorneys. (4)

There are also Arrolls in Newport News, and Hampton, Virginia who do not have a
Scottish ancestry. These Arrolls are descendants of Rumanian and Austrian immigrants
from prior to the end of the nineteenth century. The immigration officer is alleged to
have spelled the name Arroll when the families immigrated to the United States.

John Errol was a black American writer. (5) There was a motion picture actor named
Leon Errol in Hollywood, California who played supporting roles for many years during



the 1930-1950 era. (6) A. Campbell Erroll of England wrote, "A History of Sheringham"
(7)

Members of Parliament

There have been two Arrols and an Erroll who have been Members of Parliament. Sir
William Arrol was elected to the House of Commons from South Ayrshire in 1895 and
served as a Member of Parliament in London for the period 1895-1906. (8) Ian
MacLachlan Arrol was elected to the Canadian Parliament for the Progressive
Conservative Party in 1972 from York East, Toronto. He served for the period
1972-1973. (9) Frederick James Erroll was a Member of Parliament during the
1945-1964 period. Frederick James Erroll was bom 27 May 1914, the son of George
Murison Erroll and Kathleen Donovan Edington of Glasgow and London. He attended
Trinity College, Cambridge University. During World War II he saw military service in
India and Burma (1940-1943). While in Parliament he represented the districts of
Altrincham and Sale. He served on many committees during his years in Parliament. In
addition he was a director of many firms including: Consolidated Gold Fields Ltd., F.C
Construction Holdings, and Norwest Hoist Ltd. He was President, London Chamber of
Commerce (1966-1969); Deputy Chairman, Decimal Currency Board, Chairman,
Committee on Liquor Licensing (1971-1972), President, Electrical Research Association
(1971-1974), and Chairman of the Automobile Association,(1974). Frederick was
Chairman of the Bowater Corporation for a period commencing in 1973. He married
Elizabeth Sowton Barrow in December 1950. Elizabeth was from Exmouth, Devonshire,
England. (10)

Arrol and Erroll Authors

Henry Erroll was an author shortly prior to the end of the nineteenth century. He wrote
such books as the three volume. The Academicians', the three volume. The Ugly
Duckling', and the three volume. By Woman's Favour'. (11) James Erroll is mentioned
in The Corgi Book of Problems' which was published in 1964 in London. (12) Robert
Arrol, the schoolmaster of the Grammar School of Greenock, wrote and had published
two volumes in Latin with English translations. These books were written in the
1750-1770 time period and are in the library of the British Museum. These volumes are
a review and critic of Cornelius Nepos's, "The Lives of the Excellent Commanders". The
period covered by the books are the years 507 B.C. to 183 B.C. Robert Arroll wrote his
editions of Cornelius Nepos, or Arrols Nepos', to give his viewpoints on the subject that
differed from that of the author and some of his sources. He preferred to follow the
reasoning of the learned Staveren '. (13) There is a copy of Robert Arrol's edition of
Ovid's "Metamorphoses", 1787, located at the Garrett Theological Seminary in Evanston,
Illinois. William John Arrol, Ph.D., Director of Research for Joseph Lucas, Ltd., in
Birmingham England in the 1950-1970 period wrote a number of technical manuscripts.
Four of these manuscripts are in the library of the British Museum. These manuscripts
deal with the means of the extraction of Phosphorus 32 from Pile-Irradiated Sulphur and
the Production of Iodine 131 from Pile Irradiated Terrurium. These manuscripts were



written while Dr. Arrol was at Harwell in charge of radioisotopes for medical and
industrial use. The manuscripts were published in conjunction with the Atomic Energy
Research Establishment. (14)

Arrol and Arroll Physicians

There have been four Arrols who have been medical doctors. Charles Arrol was bom 1 3
October 1 846 at Paisley. He attended the University of Glasgow and graduated as an MD
in 1885. George Arroll in 1988 was a physician in Lynnfield, Massachusetts. Bruce
Arroll was bom 15 August 1952 in New Zealand. He attended the Auckland Medical
School and took post graduate work in family medicine at McMasters University in
Hamilton, Ontario. He received his Ph. D. in community health from the University of
Auckland in May 1993. Robert Norman Arrol was bom 19 November 1939 in Kokomo,
Indiana. Robert N. Arrol attended Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisana and
graduated with an MD in 1964. In 1993 he was a family practice physician in Areola,
Illinois. (15)

Health of the Arrols and Arrolls

Just as the health and longevity of the general population has improved, so also has the
health and longevity of the Arrols and Arrolls Infant mortality (infants who died before
their sixth birthday) in Scotland for the Arrols and Arrolls during the period 1855 to 1899
was an astounding 37.4%. For the forty year period 1900 to 1940 this figure dropped to
12.2%. For the forty-seven year period 1941 to 1987 the infant mortality for the Arrols
and Arrolls in Scotland dropped to 1.7%. For the Glasgow population as a whole, infant
and todler' mortality amounted to 39.2 per 1,000 population for the year 1900. For the
year 1955 infant mortality dropped to 13 per 1,000 population for the Glasgow
papulation as a whole. (16)

The average longevity of 696 Arrols and Arrolls around the world since 1855 is 47 9
years. However, for the period 1855-1899 in Scotland, the average death age of the
Arrols and Arrolls was a low 36. 1 years. For a similar period in England the average age
was 32.8 years, but climbed to 64.7 years in the 20th centur\'. For the fortv year period
1900-1940 the average age of death of Arrols and Arrolls in Scotland was 53.4 years.
For the forty -seven year period 1941-1987 the average age at death in Scotland increased
to 69.1 years

A review of the principal causes of 433 ARROL deaths in Scotland and 72 ARROL
deaths in England, as printed in the table on the following page, indicates that the
majority of deaths prior to 1900 was due to conditions of age and infectious diseases.
Even though it is recognized that the accuracy of diagnoses appearing on any death
certificate should be questioned well into the twentieth century, a thread of tmth still
surfaces in these figures.



AVERAGE AGE OF DEATH OF ARROL AND ARROLLS IN SELECTED







COUNTRIES








Number of
Individuals


Countrv


Years


Average
Age


Number of
Infant Deaths


15


Australia


1892-1986


51.9


(a)


2


11


Canada


1935-1982


52.5




1


28


England


1847-1899


32.8




12


55


England


1900-1987


64.7




2


10


New Zealand


1891-1989


66.6




_


203


Scotland


1855-1899


36.1




76


181


Scotland


1900-1940


53.4




22


176


Scotland


1941-1987


69.1




3


17


United States


1906-1987


52.4




1


696






47.9




IM



(a) Five years of age or younger.
CAUSES OF ARROL AND ARROLL DEATHS IN SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND







Scotland






England




Principal Cause


of


Number of






Number


of




Death




Deaths


Percent


Deaths


! ]


-"ercent


Heart




61




14.1




16


22.3


Cancer




45




10.4




1


1.4


Cerebral Hemorrhage


36




8.3




10


13.9


Pneumonia




30




6.9




10


13.9


Accidental




28




6.5




4


5.5


Tuberculosis




27




6.2




1


1.4


Other




206




47.6




30


41.6


Total




433




100.0




11


100.0



Antibiotics were unknown prior to 1900 and they only gained notable use in the 1940's
and 1950's. Prior to antibiotics most young people died of infections and old people died
because of their age, usually complicated by a terminal infection.

With the advent of antibiotics, and the accurate reporting of the cause of death in the
latter part of the twentieth century, the statistics reflect what is anticipated. People still
die of infections, but antibiotics have permitted most people to survive them and have
enabled them to live long enough to die from other diseases, i.e., arteriosclerosis, heart
disease, cerebral hemorrhage and cancer.



It does not appear from these statistics that the ARROL family in Scotland developed any
rare or unusual health conditions. They merely developed the same health problems of
the time period in which they lived and died.

Religion

The Arrols and Arrolls in general do not have one dominant religious heritage Rather,
the Arrols and Arrolls belong to most of the Christian religions just as the general
population of the urban centers of Scotland, principally Glasgow and Paisley. There are
more Protestant Arrols and Arrolls than Roman Catholic. The majority of Protestant
Arrols and Arrolls belonged to the Free Church of Scotland. The Free Church of
Scotland was formed in the early 1800's by those who wanted to choose their own
ministers and not be dictated to by the denomination. The Free Church of Scotland in
the 1950's had a membership of approximately 23% of the population in Glasgow. The
Presbyterians in total had a membership of approximately 25% of the adult population
of Glasgow. (The Free Church of Scotland's membership is included in the 25%.) In
total, the Protestants, including the Episcopal and Methodist Churches and all other
Protestant religions, had about 28.5% of the population who were church members.
Presbyterianism was by far the dominant Protestant religion in Glasgow during this
period.

26.5%) of the adult population of Glasgow was Roman Catholic during this same period
(1950's). Total membership of the Christian Churches in Glasgow in 1954-55 was 55.0%).
(17) Based on these statistics it would appear that 45.0%) of Glaswegians were not
church members The principal Roman Catholic Arrol and ArroU families in Scotland
live primarily in Paisley and the surrounding areas, including Renfrewshire. Paisley has
a rich and early Roman Catholic heritage. A church and monastery were built and
inhabited by monks in 1163. The monastery was dedicated to St. Marin, St. James and
St. Mary. St. Mann was the Patron Saint of Paisley. In 1246 the priory of Paisley was
raised to the status ("dignity") of an abbey.

In 1560 the Roman Catholic Church was declared to be abolished in Scotland and
Protestantism was established in its stead. (18) The secular clergy, like the monks of
Paisley, were forbidden to practice their calling. However, in Paisley there was not any
determined effort to put the law into force. The monks were left almost undisturbed for
many years, saying mass and performing all the other rites and ceremonies of their
church, with little protest from the government The Reformers were completely in
control of the neighboring city of Glasgow. Paisley was accepted as a "nest of papistrie"
and no attempt was made for many years to wean the inhabitants of Paisley from "their
ancient ways." (19)

Even seventy years after the reformation, and while Roman Catholism had been abolished
in Scotland, it still had determined adherents in Paisley. (20) By 1755 it was estimated
that there were only some 16,500 communicant Catholics in all of Scotland. (21) It was
not until after the resolution of the crisis created by the Covenant that freedom to practice



10



one's own faith in Scotland was restored. It is believed that the first Roman Catholic
place of worship built in Scotland after the reformation was the Roman Catholic Chapel
built in East Buchanan Street in Paisley in 1808. This is now the site of St. Mirin's
Church so well known to many Arrols. (22)

In the United States the Roman Catholic Arrols and Arrolls are centered primarily in the
Boston area of Massachusetts. However, there are Arrol and Arroll Roman Catholics
located in other parts of the country. The Protestant religions in Scotland have undergone
great change and pressures down through the centuries. During the reign of Mary Queen
of Scots son, James VI of England and James 1 of Scotland, both England's and
Scotland's political and religious institutions remained separate in the two countries.
However, his son, Charles 1, wanted to reorganize the Presbyterian Church. Civil war
took place when, in 1638, the Scots signed a National Covenant to keep the Presbyterian
Church as it was. In 1649 there appeared to be a resolution of the differences. However,
when Charles was restored to the throne he threw off previous promises made to the
Scottish people and rescinded certain previous Acts drawn in favor of Presbyterianism.
When many mmisters objected, a number of them were imprisoned or subjected to
penalties. (23) In December of 1733 the Succession Church was founded, and it grew
very quickly.

There were two conflicting approaches to religion. One was the liberal view that doubted
that the restrictions upon life imposed in the name of piety were really justified. This
group of believers was found in the universities and with easy-going" people who felt
that the severe discipline of the Church was part of an old superstition that might well
be discarded. The other view revered the severe discipline of the Church and the
Covenanters and regarded most forms of pleasure as sin For the most part these devout
folk belonged to the humbler classes and, though not active politically, their religious
expressions gave them a feeling of superiority in spiritual things Those ministers who
taught freewill' as opposed to predestination' were attacked by the General Assembly
and were often replaced or suspended. The state also dispensed patronage' to its
favorites in order to keep control over the Church Continued dissension in the Church
led, in 1843, to what is termed the Disruption'. 451 ministers out of a total of 1,200 left
their parishes and set out to establish the Free Church. (24)

The Free Church became a force in politics and the Free Church came to believe that it
was by spiritual right the Church of Scotland. However, by 1955 the Free Church had
a membership of only 34 percent of the adult population of Glasgow. The United Free
Church had a membership of .67 percent. The Church of Scotland had a membership of
23.4 percent of the adult population in Glasgow in 1955. (25)

The Protestant religions of the Arrols and Arrolls include the Church of Scotland, the
United Free Church of Scotland, the Free Church, the Free Presbyterian Church, the
Episcopal Church, the United Original Secession Church and the Reformed Presbyterian
Church, in addition to the Methodists, the Congregational Church, the United Church of
Canada and a number of other religions.



11



Of the Arrols and Arrolls who were church members it is estimated that approximately
20-25% were Roman Catholic and 75-80% were members of the various Protestant
religions.

Education

Although the general assumption can be that the Arrols and Arrolls were better educated
in the latter half of the twentieth century than previously, it is a fact that the Scottish
people during the eighteenth century were far better educated than those of most other
lands. There was an act enacted in 1696 compelling the parishes to provide a
"commodious house for a school and a small salary for a schoolmaster." This legislation
was not designed to establish new schools; it was aimed to provide for the masters
teaching in the already numerous schools. By 1690, Scotland, at least in the Lowlands,
appears to have had extraordinarily good provisions for schooling. Of a total of 179
parishes in the Lothians, Fife, and Angus, at least 137 supported schoolmasters and at
least 156 had either Latin or Scots' schools. (26)

During the eighteenth century three Arrolls are known to have been schoolmasters in
Scotland. John Arroll, who was baptized in 1709, was a schoolmaster in Row,
Dumbartonshire to the year 1760. He was succeeded by his son, James Arroll, who was
also schoolmaster in Row. The son, James, was bom circa 1741/44 and died in 1823
(See page 137). Robert Arroll was the schoolmaster of the Grammar School in Greenock
during the period 1750-1770.

The Scottish Universities were known to be efficient during this early period. Through
the nineteenth century they produced good scholars, good teachers, and good doctors. (27)
Charles Arrol, bom in 1846, graduated from the University of Glasgow with a M.B. in
1869, an M.D. in 1885, and a CM. in 1885.

There is little in the way of information as to the educational level of the Arrols and
Arrolls down through the centuries. A fairly large percentage of the Arrols and Arrolls
were weavers in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. We have the comment of one
author who writes that "Weavers have always been noted throughout Scotland for their
intelligence, possibly more than those of any other occupation; eager for knowledge, great
readers — especially of newspapers..." (28)



12



ATTENDENCE AT INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING BY
ARROLS AND ARROLLS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
BY COUNTRY OF BIRTH



Selected


Eligible


Number


Number


Percent


Countries Ca)


Population


Attended


Graduated


Attended


Canada


22


7


6


31.8


England


19


6


3


31.6


New Zealand


11


3


2


27.3


United States


21


14


_S


66.6


Total


11


30


19


41.1



(a) There is insufficient information for the other countries to include them in this
table. The above mformation understates the actual level of attendance at schools above
the high school level

As the opportunity to attend institutions of higher education has increased for the general
population, an ever mcreasmg number of Arrols and Arrolls have attended and graduated
from such institutions.

Some of the colleges, universities and other mstitutions of higher learning attended by
Arrols and Arrolls include:

In Canada: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia; Calgary Normal
College, Calgary, Alberta, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario; Royal Conservatory of
Music, Toronto, Ontario; Malaspino, College, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island; and York
University, Toronto.

In England: Clare College, Cambridge University, Cambridge; University of Manchester,
Manchester, England; London University, London; Oxford University, Oxford.

In Ireland and New Zealand: Auckland Medical School, Auckland; and Cork University,
Cork, Ireland.

In Scotland: Edinburgh University, Edinburgh; University of Glasgow, Glasgow;
Moreyhouse College of Education, Edinburgh; Open University, Aberdeen.

In the United States: Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts; California State University,
Hay ward, California, University of California, Santa Barbara, California; Eastern Illinois
University , Charleston, Illinois; Eastern Michigan University , Ypsilanti, Michigan; George
Washington University, Washington, DC; Harper College, Hoffman Estates, Illinois;
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois; Indianapolis College of Pharmacy,
Indianapolis, Indiana; Lawrence Institute of Technology , Southfield, Michigan; University



13



of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan;
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan; Millikin University , Decatur, Illinois;
New York University, New York City; Parkland University, Champaign, Illinois; Santa
Fe Community College, Gainsville, Florida; University of South Hampton, Long Island,
New York; Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana; Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
Tennessee; University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Wayne State University,
Detroit, Michigan; Wentworth University, Massachusetts; University of Wisconsin,
Madison, Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Xavier
University, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Although the information is not complete, we know that in the United States, Canada,
England, and New Zealand over 40 percent of the Arrols and Arrolls bom in the
twentieth century have attended school beyond high school. This figure is conservative
as there is limited information on the other 60 percent. It is quite possible that many of
them also attended a school of higher learning.

There is more complete information on those Arrols and Arrolls bom in the United
States. Over two-thirds of them have attended school beyond high school and almost 40
percent have graduated from an institution of higher learning.

Arrol and Arroll twins

The birth of twins is somewhat rare among the Arrols. Charles Arall and Agnes Heart
had twins, Ann and William, on 22 May 1786 in Paisley, Scotland. Three years later
there was bom to David Cargill Arrol and his wife, Jane, in Perth, Scotland, Robert and
his sister, Elizabeth Burden, who were christened on the 20th March 1789. Twins, Kate
and Laurel, were bom to Robert Arroll and Mar>' Nevelle in Connecticut in August of
1887. The father, Robert, had been bora in Scotland in June of 1854. William and Sarah
McMeekin, who were married on 23 December 1849 in Kirkintilloch, Dumbartonshire,
Scotland, had twins that were bom on different days. Their daughter, Jane, was bom on
12 May 1863 at 12 o'clock midnight in Old Monkland, Glasgow. Their son, Robert, was
bom shortly thereafter, but on 13 May 1863. James Arroll and Mary Gray had two sets
of twins. Walter and Barbara Arrol were bom on 5 May 1883 in Parkhead, Glasgow and
seven years later Ann and John Arroll were bom on 11 October 1890 in Camlachie,
Glasgow. Jane Arrol had twins, James and Jane, bom on 30 January 1897, in Glasgow.
It is not known who the father was.

Number of Arrols and Arrolls Living in 1993

It is estimated that there were approximately 415 Arrols and Arrolls of Scottish heritage
living in 1993. While a majority of these Arrolls lived in Scotland, there was a growing
number of Arrols and Arrolls living in other countries, most notably New Zealand,
England, Canada, and the United States. The table below gives the estimated number of
individuals with the name Arrol and Arroll in the various countries in 1993.



14



NUMBER OF ARROLs AND ARROLLS LIVING IN 1993
(Of Scottish Descent)





Females who had


name


Individuals who




Arrol or Arroll prior to


now have Arrol




marriage




or Arroll Name


Australia




1


7


Canada




10


28


England




17


88


India




-


2


Jamaica




1


-


New Zealand




6


37


Scotland




39


121


United States




9


48


Zambia




1


-


Total




84


331


Other Miscellaneous









Total

8

38

105

2

1

43

160

57

L

415



The tallest Arrol may have been Martin Campbell Arrol. Martin was bom in
Cambuslang, Scotland on 18 November 1950 and grew to be six foot seven inches tall.
Martin's grandfather, William Arrol, may have been the oldest Arrol to get married.
William Arrol was bom 20 August 1874 in Glasgow. He married his nurse on 30
September 1952 in Cambuslang, Scotland. William was 77 years of age. The longest
living Arrol was Isabella Arrol. Isabella was bom in 1767 and died in 1869 in High
Church, Glasgow. She was 102 years old at her death.

Duncan Arrell, cordiner in Drumlegark, Scotland was put to the hom along with
Macfarlanes of Kepnoch for raiding in 1619. (29) Under Scots law, letters of homing
ordered a person to pay or perform as ordered by the court. (30)

Arrol and Arroll as a Given Name

Arrol and Arroll has been used as a given name by several families who are descendents
of the Arrols and ArroUs. Examples of this include the Lamson family of Connecticut.
This family is descendent from Robert Arroll who immigrated from Helensburgh,



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