John Booker.

A history of the ancient chapel of Birch, in Manchester parish, including a sketch of the township of Rusholme, for the convenience of which township the chapel was originally erected: together with notices of the more ancient local families, and particulars relating to the descent of their estates online

. (page 1 of 48)
Online LibraryJohn BookerA history of the ancient chapel of Birch, in Manchester parish, including a sketch of the township of Rusholme, for the convenience of which township the chapel was originally erected: together with notices of the more ancient local families, and particulars relating to the descent of their estates → online text (page 1 of 48)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project
to make the world's books discoverable online.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover.

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the
publisher to a library and finally to you.

Usage guidelines

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for
personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it.

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About Google Book Search

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web

at http : //books . google . com/|



Digitized by



Google




Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google^



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



REMAINS
HISTORICAL & LITERARY

CONNECTED WITH THE PALATINE COUNTIES OF

LANCASTEE AND CHESTEK,

PUBLISHED BY

THE CHETHAM SOCIETY.



VOL. XLVII.



PRINTED FOR THE OHETHAM SOCIETY.
M.DCCC.LIX.



Digitized by



Google



/ / ' /



.,/



Digitized by



Google



COUNCIL FOR 1858-59.

JAMBS CROSSLBT, Es^, F.S.A., Prbsidbnt.

REV. F. R. RAINES, M.A., F.&A., HOM. Camon OF Mancubstbb,

Vicb-Prbsidbiit.
WILLIAM BBAMONT.

THE YERY REV. aEORGE HULL BOWERS, D.D., Dbam OF Manchbstbb.
REV. JOHN BOOKER, MJk., F.S.A.
REV. THOMAS CORSER, M.A., F.S.A.
MATTHEW DAWES, F.&A.. F.O.S.
JOHN HARLAND, F.S.A.
EDWARD HAWKINS, F.R.a. F.S.A., F.L.S.
THOMAS HEYWOOD, F.SJk.
W. A. HTJLTON.
REV. JOHN HOWARD MARSDEN, B.D., Canok OP Mancubstbr,

DI8KBT PB0FB880B OF CLASSICAL AMTIQUITIBS, CAMBBIDOB.
ARTHUR H. HEYWOOD, Tbbasu&BB.
WILLIAM LANOTON, HON. Sbobbtabt.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google






^



Digitized by



Google






Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



o



A HISTORY



OT THS



9imtmt Cj^apel of IStrc]^,

IN MANCHESTER PARISH,



nroLUDora

A SKETCH OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ETJSHOLME, FOE THE CONVENIENCE

OF WHICH TOWNSHIP THE CHAPEL WAS

OEIGINALLY EEECTED:

TOG^XTHBB WITH

NOTICES OF THE MOKE ANCIENT LOCAL FAMILIES, AND PARTICULARS
RELATING TO THE DESCENT OF THEIR ESTATES.



BY THE REV. JOHN BOOKER, M.A., F.S.A.,

OF MAOOALBMS COLLSQB, CAMBRIDGB.
CURATE OF ASHURST, KENT.



PRINTED FOR THE CHETHAM SOCIETY.
M.DCCC.LIX.



Digitized by



Google






Digitized by



Google



PREFACE.



The following pages constitute the fifth in a historical
series of the more ancient Chapels within Manchester
parish, — the Chapels of Blackley, Denton, Didsbury and
Choriton, with their surrounding districts, having been
already described.

As in its arrangement the present volume so nearly
resembles those which have preceded it, nothing is re-
quired by way of explanation. One single deviation may
be noticed, namely the addition, in the present instance, of
an Appendix, containing copies in ea^tenso of the original
documents on which the early history of the township is
founded ; these, from their variety and interest, seem to
merit the space assigned to them.

The author has to acknowledge his obligation to Sir
John Willum Hamilton Anson, of Portland Place, Lon-
don, Bart., and Charles Carill Worsley of The Piatt,
near Manchester, Esq., for the valuable assistance they have
afforded in placing at his disposal the stores of information
contained in the evidences, &c., of their respective families,



Digitized by



Google



IV PREFACE.

and which are now for the first time made public. To the
latter gentleman the Members of the Chetham Society are
indebted for the accompanying portrait of Major-General
Worsley, which has been engraved expressly for this volume
from the original at Piatt, the entire cost of its preparation
having been defrayed by Mr. Worsley.

The remaining lithographic illustrations are from the
pencil of Mr. James Croston of Manchester, for whose
renewed kindness the author's best acknowledgments are
due.

ASHURST, KbNT,

January, 1859.



Digitized by



Google



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



BiROH Chapbl - - - Frontispiece.

PoBTBAiT OF Major-Qbneral Wobslby - page 50
Sladb Hall - - - - - - 134

St. Jambs' Church, Biboh - - - - 158



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



BIRCH CHAPEL.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



A HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT CHAPEL
OF BIRCH,

(within rusholme.)




j us HOLME township lies to the soath-soath-east
of Manchester, distant from it about two miles and a
quarter. Its boundaries are, on the norths Chorlton-
upon-Medlock and a small detached portion of Moss-
Side; on the south, Withington and Bumage; on
the east, Newton, Gorton and Levenshulme; and on the west,
Moss-Side and Withington.

In was anciently written without much regard to an uniform
standard of orthography, the several variations Biseholme, Bushe-
olme, Eushulme, Rusholme, Busheholme, Byshome, Bisshome,
Bissehome^ Byssum, Bussum and Buschun occurring, with doubt-
less other modifications of the word unrecorded. It derives its
name &om the well-known aquatic plant the Rushy the latter syl-
lable holffie signifying in the Anglo-Saxon a flat area of damp
ground by a river side; and like its neighbour Withington it
marks by its name the low level of the adjacent lands. Busholme
is situated upon the new red sand stone formation, the rock being
generally covered with alluvium varying in depth from a few feet
to many yards ; the average depth of the rock throughout the
township is said to be about seven yards, the subsoil of the greater
portion of the area consisting of brick-clay. The township of
Busholme contains the several hamlets of Busholme, Piatt, Birch,
and Longsight.



Digitized by



Google



2 A HISTORY OF THE

As a member of Withington manor Eusholme was held in the
reign of Edward I. by the family of Grelle, lords of Manchester,
who in turn held the same of Ferrars, Earl of Derby, himself
tenant in chief of the king.*

From the inquisition of Robert Grelle in the 10 Edward I,
(1281) we learn that he died seised of Withington manor, and also
of Manchester and its church. It appears that sometime pre-
viously the Grelles had granted to the Hathersage family, in con-
sideration of one knight's fee, the manor of Withington including,
as already intimated, the township of Rusholme.

Matthew, son of Matthew de Hathersage, conveyed a portion of
this recent grant to Richard de Trafford, namely, the twenty acres
bordering on Tollache,^ beginning at the Great Moss in the going
up to Goslache as far as the boundary of Piatt, and so crossing
from the bounds of Piatt towards Grenclow-lach, together with the
right of common pasture in Wyddine, to hold the same of the said
Matthew to himself, his heirs and assigns, Jews and Ecclesiastics
alone excepted,^ by the annual payment of one iron spur or three-
pence at the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the said
Matthew reserving to himself and his heirs the right of traversing
the customary road towards Manchester. The date of this deed is
not given, but as it is clear from the prohibitory clause that the
statute of mortmain had not then been passed, the time of its exe-
cution must have been before the year 1224.

On the death of Matthew de Hathersage -the manor of Withing-
ton passed to Nigel de Longford and Simon de Gousiil, in right of
their respective wives, Maud and Cecilia, daughters and coheir-
esses of Matthew de Hathersage. In the 11 Edward II. (1317)
Nicholas de Longford, lord of Withington, confirms to Sir Henry

* Mathas de Hay'seg tenet unu feodQ milit* in Wythinton de feodo Thorn' le GreUej,
et ip*e de feodo com' de Ferrar et ip*e in capite de d'no Bege. — Testa de NeviU,

^ The word lachcy of such frequent occurrence in the geographical rehitions of the
township, signifies a marshy hollow.

' For the cause of this prohibition (exceptis riris religiosis et Judseis) ride History
ofDidebufy Chapel^ Chetham Society's Publications, toI. xlii. p. 121, Note,



Digitized by



Google



ANCIENT CHAPEL OF BIBCH. 3

de Trafford the grant of his predecessor. It is described in -the
deed as '' a certain tract of waste land/' and the boands are more
distinctly specified, beginning at the Goslache to the Hant Lane
in Platt^ following the king's highway towards the north as far as
Grenlow-lache^ and so descending G-renlow-lache towards the west
as far as Kemlache^ and from Kemlache crossing towards the
south by the wells and ditch as far as the Yhildhouse ditch, thence
going np as far as GoslachCj and along Goslache as far as the
aforesaid Hunt Lane in Flatt, which was the boundary first named,
to hold the same to himself and his heirs by an annual payment
to the said Nicholas de Longford of seventeen shillings, in equal
portions at the feast of the Annunciation and on the feast day of
St. Michael.

This plot of land, situated near the boundary line which sepa-
rates the townships of Busholme and Moss-side, but in the first
named township, is known as the Healdhouses or Yieldhouses, a
corruption of Guildhouses, from its former connexion with some
ancient Guild long since forgotten in its association with the local-
ity indicated. The unsettled orthography of the name, or rather
the settled incorrectness it has now assumed, may be traced to the
variable use of the initial letters G and Y in early times, examples
of which we have in the words " yeven '' for " given," " j9ie^' for
''gate,'' &c. In the reign of Henry I II. the name of Boger de Penil-
bury occurs as lessee of Hathersage and Gousul in respect of this
estate, whose under-tenant was Henry de Trafford. In a deed
undated, Roger de Penilbury conveyed to Henry de Trafford, the
true and lawful attorney of Sir Simon de Gousul, the homage and
service of three shillings, being an annual rent arising from a cer-
tain tenement in Withington manor called the Gyldehousis, which
tenement the said Boger holds from Sir Simon. On receiving the
estate. Sir Simon made an immediate grant thereof to Henry de
Trafford on the consideration of like services to those rendered by
the family of Pendlebury. It is described in Sir Simon's grant as
''le Gyldehousys" lately relinquished by Eoger de Penilbury ; and
the services agreed upon were identical with those formerly ren-



Digitized by



Google



4 A HISTORY OF THE

dered by "Henry de Trafford and his ancestors to Roger de Peml-
bury, who then held the tenement from me and my ancestors/'
The bounds of the estate are defined by Elias de FenUbury in a
contemporaneous deed wherein it is designated " Gildehusestide,"
from Goselache as far as the saplings (pullum), where Matthew^
the son of William, formed the ditch to convey the water to his
mill, and descending alongside the said saplings as far as the ditch
which I myself made, and so alongside that ditch to the moss,
and from the moss again to the Goselache. Other privileges are
included, namely those which the free tenants of the aforesaid
Matthew [de Hathersage] the lord have, as they are found enu-
merated in the charter received from him touching the lands in
question. A reservation is made to Matthew and his heirs of a
right of road to the land of the said Henry for the purpose of
leading hay.

In the 11 Edward IT. (1317) Nicholas de Longford, as lord of
the manor of Withington in succession to Matthew de Hather-
sage, grants to Sir Henry Trafford and his heirs a right for him-
self and tenants to dig turves on the Yhildhous Moor, so that
it may be lawful for him and them to dig and carry away turf
without hindrance or molestation. From the inquisition post
mortem of Sir Edmund de Trafford in the 21 Henry VIII. (1629)
the estate is found still vested in the family, and also at a yet
later date, the 32 Elizabeth (1589), from the inquisition of his
grandson.

Towards the middle of the following century "the Yieldhouses'*
is found in the possession of the Warden and Fellows of Man-
chester, as appears by indenture dated April 7, 1645, in which
Richard Heyrick, warden, and the Fellows of the College of Christ
lease for a term of twenty-one years to Ralph Worsley of Piatt,
Gent., all that and those their messuage and tenement with the
appurtenances, called the Yeildhowse, situate in Rusholme, ex-
cepting therefrom one cottage and two closes of land commonly
called the Gorse Crofts ; which lease was afterwards renewed from
time to time, the last grant being dated June 4, 1709. Mr.



Digitized by



Google



ANCIENT CHAPEL OF BIRCH. 6

Worsley's tenants for several generations were a family named
Travis. It is now held on lease by Thomas Holford Esq. from
the Dean and Canons of Manchester. It consists of farm-build-
ings^ two detached houses (one of which is called Heald House),
six cottages, and about twenty-two acres of land, Lancashire
measure.

The family of Trafford held lands in the township by grant also
of Matthew de Cissor of Manchester. The conveyance is dated
the 9 Edward II. (1315), and is to Nicholas, son of the above-
mentioned Sir Henry de Trafford; the lands and tenements
therein conveyed are given with remainder, in case of failure of
issue, to Geoffrey, Thomas, Robert, Richard and Henry, his bro-
thers, in succession. John Cissor de Mamcestr is an attesting
witness to a deed conveying the Piatt estate in Busholme, dated
1288.

Another of the early proprietors in the township was Henry de
Busholme, who lived about the middle of the thirteenth century,
deriving his name from the place of his residence, and holding his
lands of Matthew de Hathersage.

By a deed undated, but executed probably about the year 1260,
Henry de Busholme conveys to Geoflfirey, son of Luke de Man-
chester, certain lands in Busholme, which are thus described : —
One messuage &c. situated at the end of his (Henry de Busholme' s)
meadow towards the north, near to the Hutte [Hunt] Lane, in
length fifteen perches and in breadth four perches; also an acre
of land, one end of which lies contiguous to the messuage just
referred to, and the other end stretches towards the orchard of
the said Henry ; an acre of meadow land in Busholme Meadow ;
an acre of land, one end of which adjoins the Busholme Meadow^
and the other end extends westward to Le Menegate ; half an
acre of land lying between the parcel just referred to and the
Goselache ; a ridge or narrow slip of land, called Le Qwikehagged-
londe, lying between the Goselache and Le Menegate ; half an acre
of land lying between the Hutte [Hunt] Lane and Goselache; six
acres of land adjoining the land of Hugh de Asselum, and bounded



Digitized by



Google



6 A HISTORY OF THE

at either end by Goselache aud the old ditch ; — to have and to
hold the same to the said Geofirey and his heirs by the annual
payment to Henry de Busholme of a pair of white gloves on
Christmas Day. — By another deed in the same series^ also with-
out date^ but subsequently executed^ Henry de Busholme remises
and quitclaims to Matthew de Hathersage his lord the homage
and service due to him firom .6eoffi*ey, son of Luke de Manchester,
in respect of the aforesaid lands. The name of Henry de Bush-
olme occurs moreover in another deed of the same period, wherein
he quitclaims to Geoffrey, son of Luke de Manchester, all his right
in twenty acres of land in Busholme, which acres he the said
Geoffi*ey then held of Bobert de Hiilton. And there is a farther
record of this same Henry, as granting to Hugh de Haselum in
return for certain homage and service all that his land which lies
between the highway in Bushford and the land of the said Hugh,
together with half a bovate of land in Busholme ; the service to
consist of an annual tribute of sixpence, to be rendered in two
equal payments, at the nativity of John the Baptist and the feast
of St. Michael.

Lands in the township were also conveyed about this time to
the neighbouring family of Manchester, whose members were
grantees of the Hathersages and also intermediately of Henry de
Busholme. To the conveyance of the latter family reference has
been already made. In the 29 Edward I. (1300) William, son of
Henry, son of Houlot de Manchester, grants to Jordan, son of
William de Fallowfield, and his heirs a portion of his lands in
Busholme, namely, the three acre^ bounded on both sides by the
lands of Henry de Trafford, and extending lengthwise from the
land of Matilda del Holt to the highway leading to Stockport;
the same to be held by Jordan and his heirs of the chief lord, on
payment of three pence annually in two stated payments, namely,
three halfpence at the feast of the nativity of our Lord, and a like
sum at the feast of St. John the Baptist, which said sum of three
pence is part of the annual tribute of fourpence in which the afore-



Digitized by



Google



ANCIENT CHAPEL OF BIRCH. 7

said William is bound to the chief lord for the lands he possesses.
An adjacent parcel of land formed the subject of another covenant
between the contracting families named in the deed just recited.
It is a grant from John de Annacotes [Ancoats] son of Robert de
Manchester^ to Jordan^ son of William de Fallowfield. The lands
conveyed are described as '^ all that his part of one plough-land
called Grendowe-field lying between the land of Henry de Trafford
on the one side, and that of William, son of Henry de Manchester
on the other side, of which said plough-land one end reaches to
the king^^s highway leading to Ince (?), and the other end reaches
to a plough-land called Le Somer Werkeddeffeld, and also half an
acre of meadow land situated in Le Brodemedowe bounded on both
sides by the land of Henry de Trafford, one end of which extends
to the bank or boundary of the wood called Le Birchenewode and
the other end extends to Clayffeld.''

Other contemporaneous names are those of Henry de Mosedon
(? Moston) who about the year 1270 conveyed to Matthew de
Byrches and his heirs certain water privileges in the Gore brook
from Halegateford to Bushford ; and Agnes de Honford (Hand-
ford of Handford in the county of Chester) wife of Henry de Hon-
ford, who in the 3 Edward II. (1309) made a grant to her son of
lands in Eusholme, &c., being the same lands which Matilda de
Holt held in the name of dowry, with remainder to GeoflBrey his
brother. "The marsh of William the Honford" is given as one
of the boundaries of the Piatt estate some time before the year
1190, thus indicating a much earlier association with the township.
The names of Hulton and Haslam also occur in the annals of
Bushome, but too incidentally to claim further notice.

From the rental of Thomas West, Lord de la Warre, dated May
1st 1473, we learn that Barton de Bamford held one messuage, &c.,
called '* le fforty acres^' in Eyssun of the said lord in socage and
by a yearly rent of one shilling. His descendant John Bamford
£squire, described as of Bamford near Middleton and of Holt Hall
in Withington, died also seised of lands in Bysshome, as appears



Digitized by



Google



8 A HISTORY OF THE

jGrom an inquisition post mortem dated the 6 Elizabeth (1563).
He left an only daughter, Anne, his sole heiress, the wife of Qeorge
Birch of Birch Esquire, by whom the Busholme and Withington
estates of the Bamfords were conveyed to the Birch family, the
Bamford Hall estate descending to a collateral branch and being
continued to the male line. To this family a more extended refer-
ence has been made under the head of Withington township.^

In the reign of Henry YIII. certain lands in Busholme were
held by the family of Beswick. By deed dated 28th June, 22
Henry VIII. (1530), Boger Beswick grants to Miles Beswick his
son all those his lands, tenements, &;c., situated in Grindlow and
Busholme which he lately received from William Heylde, to hold
the same to him the said Miles, his heirs and assigns, for ever
from the chief lord, rendering the customary services.

In the following reign the name Strangeways occurs in the
annals of the township, though the family never resided there,
living at Strangeways in Manchester, where they are found as
early as the reign of Bichard II. An indenture made the syxte
daye of Aprill in the fyfte yere of the regne of o' sovayne Lord
Edward the Syxte (1552) by the grace of God kyng of England,
ffraunce and Ireland, Defendo' of the fPaithe, and of the churche
of England and also of Ireland in erthe supreme head — betwene
William Strangwayes gentylman son and heyre apparant of Phel-
lippe Strangwayes of Strangwayes in the countie of Lancaster
escuyer on the one parte and Thomas Byrche of Byrche Hall w*in
the towne of Wythyngton gentylmaii upon th'oder partye, witness-
eth that wheare Kataryn late wyflFe of Thomas Strangwayes de-
ceased hathe holdethe or enjoyethe for terme of her lyffe one
messuage or tenemente w^ th'appurtennances and buyldynges
thereapon made and all the landes, tenementes, medowes, pastures,
woodes to the same messuage or tenemente belongyng, sett, lyeng
and beyng in Bisshehulme w*in the towneshippe of Wythyngton

* HUtory oflHdthury Chapely Chetham Society's Publications, vol. xlii. pp, 115-
120.



Digitized by



Google



ANCIENT CHAPEL OF BIRCH. 9

in the conntie of Lancastre aforesaid and nowe beyng in the
tenare and occupieing of one Richard Dyconson and John Dyeon-
son son of the said Richard or of eyther of theym^ the revercion or
remaynder thereof ys to the said Willyam Strangwayes and his
heyres; the said William Strangwayes for the some of seven
powndes of lawfull money of England to hym beforehand paid by
the said Thomas Byrche, dothe bargayne, sell, gyffe and graunt by
these presentes to the said Thomas Bryche his heyres and assignes
the forsaid messuage or tenemente and all oder the premisses and
all the right remaynder of the said messuage or tenemente and all
the right, ty tle^ interest and demaunde that the said William hathe
in the same messuage^ to have and to holde the forsaid messuage
&c. of the said William Strangwayes to the said Thomas Byrche his
heyres and assignes for ever. In 1575 Katharine Davenport wife of
Robert Davenport of the New Pale in the county of Chester gent,
late widow and sometime wife of Thomas Strangweis son and heir
apparent of Philip Strangweis of Strangweis in the county of
Lancaster Esquire, for good and lawful considerations, bargained,



Online LibraryJohn BookerA history of the ancient chapel of Birch, in Manchester parish, including a sketch of the township of Rusholme, for the convenience of which township the chapel was originally erected: together with notices of the more ancient local families, and particulars relating to the descent of their estates → online text (page 1 of 48)