John Evelyn.

Diary and correspondence, To which is subjoined the private correspondence between King Charles I. and Sir Edward Nicholas, and between Sir Edward Hyde, afterwards earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne (Volume 1) online

. (page 1 of 46)
Online LibraryJohn EvelynDiary and correspondence, To which is subjoined the private correspondence between King Charles I. and Sir Edward Nicholas, and between Sir Edward Hyde, afterwards earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 46)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


VALUABLE AND INTERESTING WORKS.

LATELY PUBLISHED BY MR. COLBURN.



HISTORY.

Evelyn's Diary and Correspondence, new edition, 4 v., each.

The Castlereagh Letters and Dispatches, 4 v

Pepy's Diary and Correspondence, 5 v

Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 1 v

Burke's Extinct, Dormant and Abeyant Peerage, 1 v

Burke's History of the Lauded Gentry, 3 v

Burke's Anecdotes of the Aristocracy, 2 v

Walpole's Reign of George II., 3 r

Thiers' History of the Consulate and Empire, vol. 8

D'Arblay's Diary and Letters, concluding vol. (7)

Story of the Peninsular War, 1 v

Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots, 2 v

Letters of Royal and Illustrious Ladies, 3 v

The Nemesis in China, a History of the War, 1 v

Lady Morgan's Woman and her Master, 2 v ,

Mackinnon's History of Civilization, 2 v

Townseud's Memoirs of the House of Commons, 2 v ,

Golovine'i Russia under Nicholas I., 2 v ,



10
2 16
2 12



14
07

10
07

1 1
18
10

16

1 1
11
16



BIOGRAPHY.

Strickland's Lives of the Queens, concluding vol. (12) 10 6

Lives of the Princesses of England, by Mrs. Green, 2 r 1 1

Sir R. M. Keith's Memoirs, 2 v 180

Lord Brougham's Lives of Men of Letters, vol. 2 1

Adventures of a Greek Lady, 2 v 1

Revelations of Prince Talleyrand, 2 r 1

Memoirs of Mademoiselle de Montpensicr, 3 v 1

Chateaubriand's Memoirs from 1768 to 1800, 1 v

Diary and Memoirs of Sophia Dorothea, 2 v. 1

Klose's Memoirs of Prince Charles Stuart, 2 r 1

Memoirs of Lady Hester Stanhope, 3 v 1

Memoirs of a Babylonian Princess, 2 v 1

Lady Morgan's Life of Salvator Rosa, 2 v 16

Mrs. Bush's Memoirs of the Queens of France, 2 T 12

Mrs. Elwood's Literary Ladies of England, 2 v 12

Campan's Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, 2 v 12

Life and Letter* of the Empress Josephine, 3 v 15

Bourrieune's Memoirs de Napoleon, (French) 5 v 1 5



1

1

1

11 6

5

1

1

1

1



HENRY COLBURN, PUBLISHER, 13, GT. MAELBOROUCK ST.



LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
RIVFRSIDF




Ex Libris
ISAAC FOOT



DIARY AND CORRESPONDENCE

OF

JOHN EVELYN, F.KS.

VOL. I.




. .

"x ' #






u



/' / /:' o^)



'7<>



A R Y



CORRESPONDENCE



JOHN EVELYN, F.R.S.,

AUTHOR OF THE " SYLVA."
TO WHICH IS 8UBJOJNBD

Efje Pribate (tarespontence

BETWEEN

KING CHARLES I. AND SIR EDWARD NICHOLAS,

AND BETWEEN

SIR EDWARD HYDE, AFTERWARDS EARL OF CLARENDON,
AND SIR RICHARD BROWNE.

EDITED FROM THE ORIGINAL MSS. AT WOTTON.

. BY WILLIAM BRAY, ESQ., F.A.S.
A NEW EDITION, IN FOUR VOLUMES.

CORRECTED, REVISED, AND ENLARGED.

VOL. I.

LONDON :
HENRY COLBURN, PUBLISHER,

GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.
1850.



J)Aii7

E3J3
1X50



LONDON :
BRADPURV AND EVANS, PRINTKRS, WHITKFKIAP.S.



CONTENTS.



. PAGB

ADVERTISEMENT TO THE PRESENT EDITION ..... vii

ORIGINAL DEDICATION ...... x j

- PREFACE ......... xili

- INTRODUCTION ...... t xv jj

DIARY; FROM 1620 10 1665 ....



ADDITIONAL NOTES
APPENDIX



ILLUSTBATIONS.



VOL. I.

PORTRAIT OP JOHN EVELYN, FROM THE PAINTING BY SIR

GODFREY KNELLER FuonTiimci.

VIEW OF WOTTON, IN SURREY, THE SEAT OF JOHN EVELYN To face Page 1.



VOL. II.

PORTRAIT OF MARY, WIFE OF JOHN EVELYN . . . FBOKTHPIECB.
PEDIGREE OF THE EVELYN FAMILY . . . At the end of the volume.



ADVERTISEMENT



PBESENT EDITION OF EVELYN'S DIAEY.

THIS work has been out of print for many years ;
and little more is necessary, in presenting to the
public an Edition which has been long required, than
to indicate such differences as will be found to exist
between the present and former publications.

The Dedication, Preface, and Introduction, are
reprinted from those which appeared in the Quarto
Editions of 1818, and in the Octavo Edition of 1827.

In compliance with a wish very generally ex~
pressed, the spelling of the Diary has been modern-
ized. No other change will be found in the text,
except such as a fresh examination of the original
manuscript had rendered essential to its correctness
and completeness.

The Diary of Evelyn does not, in all respects,
strictly fulfil what the term implies. Information is



Vlll ADVERTISEMENT.

continually found in it (introduced by such expres-
sions as "afterwards," "since," "now"), which it
could not have contained if written from day to day.
Mistakes are also made which the writer must have
escaped, if the record had been always entered on the
day, and in the place, to which it refers. In the
Additional Notes appended to the present Edition
particular mention is made of some few of these ; and
as a slight, but perfectly satisfactory, evidence that
the form in which we have received the work is not
that in which it was originally written, it may be
worth adding, in this place, that the notice of " Jeru-
salem Church" (vol. i., p. 32), slipped by accident
into the entries which refer to Antwerp, belongs to
those of Bruges, where the church, so called from its
containing a facsimile of the Holy Sepulchre, is still
shown, and the legend told of the citizen whose journeys
to the Holy Land enabled him to complete it.

The truth appears to be, that Evelyn's Diary, as
found among the papers at Wotton, had been copied
by the writer from memoranda made at the time
of the occurrences noted in it, and had received
occasional alterations and additions in the course
of transcription. Evelyn has himself told us in
what way the book originated. "In imitation of
" what I had seen my father do," he remarks, when
speaking of himself in his twelfth year, " I began to
" observe matters more punctually, which I did use
" to set down in a blank almanack." If we suppose



ADVERTISEMENT. IX



the matters thus observed to have been gradually
transferred by Evelyn from the blank almanacks to
the quarto volume in which they were found, and
from which the volumes before the reader are printed,
the circumstance will explain discrepancies otherwise
not easily reconciled, and will account for differing
descriptions of the same objects and occurrences
which have occasionally been found in the manuscript
thus compiled. The quarto, still at Wotton, consists
of seven hundred pages written clearly by Evelyn in
a very small close hand, and containing the continuous
records of fifty-six years.

The reader will observe, in the original preface to
the Diary, acknowledgments of the great and mate-
rial assistance rendered to its Editor by Mr. Upcott.
The interest taken by the latter gentleman in the pub-
lication of this delightful book, continued unabated
until his death ; and the latest literary labour in which
he was engaged, was the revision and preparation of
the present edition. He lived to complete, for this
purpose, a fresh and careful comparison of the edition
printed in octavo in 1827 (which he had himself,
with the exception of the earliest sheets of the first
volume, superintended for the press) with the original
manuscript ; by which many material omissions in
the earlier quartos were supplied, and other not
unimportant corrections made,

It is due to Mr. Upcott to add that these additions
would not so long have been withheld, if the early

VOL. T. b



X ADVERTISEMENT.

sheets of the first volume of the octavo edition had
not been printed off before its formal revision was
undertaken by him. The octavo and the quartos are
only in agreement at the outset. Many curious dis-
crepancies are afterwards observable, which resulted
from Mr. Upcott's anxiety, as soon as the opportunity
was offered him, to bring the text of the octavo into
more exact agreement with the original.

"While engaged in this labour he was permitted to
have access to the manuscripts preserved at Wotton ;
and, desiring to complete the selections from Evelyn's
Correspondence, originally published with the Diary,
he transcribed many new and hitherto unpublished
letters, also with a view to this edition, and added
several others derived from private sources. The
Evelyn Correspondence, thus enriched by many ori-
ginal letters of great interest, will occupy the same
space as the Diary.

January, 1850.



DEDICATION.

TO JOHN EVELYN, ESQ.

OF WOTTON, IN SUBBEY.

SIR,

THE last sheets of this Work, with a Dedication to the
late LADY EVELYN, under whose permission it was to be
given to the Public, were in the hands of the Printer, when
it pleased God to release her from a long and painful
illness, which she had borne with the greatest fortitude
and resignation to the Divine Will.

These papers descended with the estate, from the cele-
brated JOHN EVELYN, Esq. (a relative of your immediate
ancestor) to his great-great-grandson, the late Sir Frederick
Evelyn, Bart. This gentleman dying without issue,
entrusted the whole to his Lady, whose loss we have now
to lament; of whose worth, and of the value of whose
friendship, I have happily had long knowledge and expe-
rience. Alive to the honour of the family, of which she
was thus made the representative, she maintained it in
every point, and with the most active benevolence ; and
her care extended to every part of the property attached
to the domain. Mr. Evelyn had formed in his own mind
a plan of what he called an " Elysium Britannicum,"
in which the Librar and Garden were intended to be



Xll DEDICATION.

the principal objects : could he return and visit this his
beloved Seat, he would find his idea realised by the
arrangement and addition which her Ladyship had made to
his library, and by the disposition of the flower-garden
and greenhouse, which she had embellished with the
most beautiful and curious flowers and plants, both
native and exotic.

In completion and full justification of the confidence
thus reposed in her, her Ladyship has returned the Estate
with its valuable appendages, to the family, in your
person.

I have, therefore; now to offer these Volumes to you,
Sir ; with a wish, that you and your posterity may long
njoy the possessions, and continue the line of a family so
much distinguished, in many of its branches, for superior
worth and eminence.

I am, Sir,
Your most obedient,

And most humble servant,

WILLIAM BRAY.
Shere. 2nd Jan., 1818.



PREFACE.

THE following pages are taken from the Journal of
JOHX EVELYN, Esq. author (amongst many other works)
of the celebrated Sylva, a Treatise on Forest-Trees, and
from which he has often been known by the name of
" The Sylva Evelyn." The Journal is written by him in
a very small, close hand, in a quarto volume containing
700 pages, which commences in 1641, and is continued
to the end of 1697; and from thence is carried on in a
smaller book till within about three weeks of his death,
which happened 27th Feb., 1705-6, in the 86th year of
his age.

These books, with numberless other papers in his hand-
Avriting, are in the valuable library at "VYotton, which was
chiefly collected by him. Lady Evelyn, the late possessor
of that very respectable old Mansion, after much solicita-
tion from many persons, consented to favour the Public



XIV PREFACE.

with this communication. The last sheets were in the
hands of the Printer, when the death of that Lady
happened.

The Editor who has been intrusted with the preparation
of the work for the Press, is fully diffident of his com-
petence to make a proper selection; and is even aware
that many things will be found in its pages which, in the
opinion of some, and not injudicious, Critics, may appear
too unimportant to meet the public eye. But it has been
thought that some information, at least some amusement,
would be furnished by the publication ; and it has been
supposed that some curious particulars of persons and
transactions would be found in the accompanying notes.
Though these papers may not be of importance enough
to appear in the pages of an Historian of the Kingdom,
they may, in some particulars, set even such an one right ;
and, though the notices are short, they may, as to persons,
give some hints to Biographers, or at least may gratify
the curiosity of those who are inquisitive after the mode
in which their ancestors conducted business, or passed
their time. It is hoped that such will not be altogether
disappointed.

Thus, when mention is made of great men going after
dinner to attend a Council of State, or the business of



PREFACE. XV

their particular Offices, or the Bowling-Green, or even
the Church ; of an Hour's Sermon being of a moderate
length ; of ladies painting their faces being a novelty ; or
of their receiving visits of Gentlemen whilst dressing,
after having just risen out of bed ; of the female attendant
of & lady of fashion travelling on a pillion behind one of
the footmen, and the footmen riding with swords ; such
things, in the view above-mentioned, may not be altogether
incurious.

For many corrections and many of the Notes the Editor
acknowledges, with great pleasure and regard, that he is
indebted to James Bindley, Esq.,* of Somerset-House, a
Gentleman who possesses an invaluable Collection of the
most rare Books and Pamphlets, and whose liberality in
communications is equal to the ability afforded by such
a collection.

He has also most cheerfully to acknowledge how much
he is obliged for many historical notes and elucidations
to a literary Gentleman very conversant with English
History, whose name he would gladly give, were it not
withheld by particular request, and whose research,



* Since the first edition of this Work, the Editor has to lament the loss of
this valuable Friend ; who died in the 81st year of his age, Sept. 11, 1818,
just as the printing of the Second Edition was begun.



XVI PREFACE.

through upwards of seven hundred contemporary volumes
of Manuscripts and Tracts, has doubtless given additional
interest to many of the Letters.

The Editor returns his best thanks also to Mr. Upcott,
of the London Institution, for the great and material
assistance received from him in this Publication, besides
his attention to the superintendence of the Press.



INTRODUCTION.

MR. EVELYN lived in the busy and important times of
King Charles I., Oliver Cromwell, King Charles II., King
James II., and King William, and early accustomed him-
self to note such things as occurred, which he thought
worthy of remembrance. He was known to, and had
much personal intercourse with the Kings Charles II. and
James II. ; and he was in habits of great intimacy with
many of the ministers of these two monarchs, and with
many of the eminent men of those days, as well amongst
the clergy as the laity. Foreigners distinguished for
learning, or arts, who came to England, did not leave it
without visiting him.

In the first edition of the " Biographia Britannica," in
folio, Dr. Campbell has given a long article relating to this
gentleman. Dr. Hunter, in his edition of the " Sylva," in
1776, has copied great part of what Dr. Campbell had writ-
ten. Dr. Kippis added several particulars in the Second
Edition of the "Biographia," in 1793; and Mr. Chal-
mers gives some farther information in his " Biographical
Dictionary/' in 8vo. (1816). But the following pages will
still contribute more extensive and important particulars
of this eminent man. They will show that he did not
travel merely to count steeples, as he expresses himself in
one of his Letters : they will develop his private character
as one of the most amiable kind. With a strong predilec-
tion for monarchy, with a personal attachment to Kings



XV111 INTRODUCTION.

Charles II. and James II., formed when they resided at
Paris, he was yet utterly averse to the arbitrary measures
of these monarchs.

Strongly and steadily attached to the doctrine and
practice of the Church of England, he yet felt the most
liberal sentiments for those who differed from him in
opinion. He lived in intimacy with men of all persuasions;
nor did he think it necessary to break connexion with
any one who had even been induced to desert the Church
of England, and embrace the doctrines of that of Rome.
In writing to the brother of a gentleman thus circum-
stanced, in 1659, he expresses himself in this admirable
manner : " For the rest, we must commit to Providence
the success of times and mitigation of proselytical fervours ;
having for my own particular a very great charity for all
who sincerely adore the Blessed Jesus, our common and
dear Saviour, as being full of hope that God (however the
present zeal of some, and the scandals taken by others at
the instant [present] affliction of the Church of England
may transport them) will at last compassionate our infir-
mities, clarify our judgments, and make abatement for our
ignorances, superstructures, passions, and errors of corrupt
times and interests, of which the Romish persuasion can
no way acquit herself, whatever the present prosperity and
secular polity may pretend. But God will make all things
manifest in his own time, only let us possess ourselves in
patience and charity. This will cover a multitude of
imperfections ."

He speaks with great moderation of the Roman Catholics
in general, admitting that some of the laws enacted against
them might be mitigated ; but of the Jesuits he had the
very worst opinion, considering them as a most dangerous
Society, and the principal authors of the misfortunes which
befel King James II., and of the horrible persecutions of
the Protestants in France and Savoy.



INTRODUCTION. XIX

He must have conducted himself with uncommon pru-
dence and address : for he had personal friends in the
Court of Cromwell, at the same time that he was corre-
sponding with his father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne, the
ambassador of King Charles II. at Paris ; and at the same
period that he paid his court to the king, he maintained
his intimacy with a disgraced minister.

In his travels, he made acquaintance not only with men
eminent for learning, but with men ingenious in every art
and profession.

His manners we may presume to have been most agree-
able : for his company was sought by the greatest men, not
merely by inviting him to their own tables, but by their
repeated visits to him at his own house; and this was
equally the case with regard to the ladies, of many of
whom he speaks in the highest style of admiration, affec-
tion, and respect. He was master of the French, Italian,
and Spanish languages. That he had read a great deal is
manifest ; but at what time he found opportunities for
study, it is not easy to say. He acknowledges himself to
have been idle, while at Oxford ; and, when on his travels,
he had little time for reading, except when he stayed about
nineteen weeks in France, and at Padua, where he was
likewise stationary for several months. At Rome, he
remained a considerable time ; but, whilst there, he was so
continually engaged in viewing the great variety of inte-
resting objects to be seen in that city, that he could have
found little leisure for reading. When resident in England,
he was so much occupied in the business of his numerous
offices, in paying visits, in receiving company at home,
and in examining whatever was deemed worthy of curiosity,
or of scientific observation, that it is astonishing how he
found the opportunity to compose the numerous books
which he published, and the much greater number of
Papers, on almost every subject, which still remain in



XX INTRODUCTION.

manuscript ; * to say nothing of the very extensive and
voluminous correspondence which he appears to have car-
ried on during his long life, with men of the greatest
eminence in Church and State, and the most distinguished
for learning, both Englishmen and foreigners. In this
correspondence, he does not seem to have made use of an
amanuensis ; and he has left transcripts in his own hand of
great numbers of letters both received and sent. He
observes, indeed, in one of these, that he seldom went to
bed before twelve, or closed his eyes before one o'clock.

He was happy in a wife of congenial dispositions with
his own, of an enlightened mind, who had read much, and
was skilled in etching and painting, yet attentive to the
domestic concerns of her household, and a most affec-
tionate mother. Of her personal attractions an idea may
be formed from the print accompanying this work,
engraved from a most exquisite drawing, in pencil, by
that celebrated French artist, Nanteuil, in 1650.

So many particulars of Mr. Evelyn have been given in
the " Biographia Britannica/'f and in Mr. Chalmers's
valuable memoir in the " Biographical Dictionary/' that it
is unnecessary to repeat them ; but some circumstances
have been there omitted, and others, which are mentioned,
admit of elucidation, or addition. Such it is proposed to
notice here, in addition to the foregoing personal sketch.

His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family
who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was
of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David
Vincent, Esq., Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near
Kingston, which afterwards came into the hands of
George, who there carried on the manufacture of gun-

* Amongst these is a Bible bound in three volumes, the pages filled with
notes. See Appendix to the Second Volume of this Edition for a list of
Evelyn's published and unpublished writings, as far as it has been possible
to ascertain them. f Second Edition, 1793, vol. v.



INTRODUCTION. XXI

powder. He purchased very considerable estates in
Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three
families, viz., Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton ;
John at Godstone, and Richard at Wottou. Each of
these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on
them at different times, viz., at Godstone, in 1660; Long
Ditton, in 1683 ; and Wotton, in 1713.

The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at God-
stone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear
that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the pur-
chase of that place was made with such a view. Nor does
it appear, from the words quoted in the " Biographia,"
that Mr. Evelyn's grandfather planted the timber, with
which Wotton was, and always has been, so well stored.
The soil produces it naturally, and, in addition to what has
been planted, it has at all times been carefully preserved.

It may be not altogether incurious to observe that,
though Mr. Evelyn's father was a man of very considerable
fortune, the first rudiments of this son's learning were
acquired from the village schoolmaster over the porch of
Wotton Church. Of his progress at another school, and
at College, he himself speaks with great humility; nor
did he add much to his stock of knowledge, whilst he
resided in the Middle Temple, to which his father sent
him, with the intention that he should apply to what he
calls " an impolished study/' which he says he never liked.
More will be said of this in a subsequent page.

The " Biographia " does not notice his tour in France,
Flanders, and Holland, in 1641, when he made a short
campaign as a volunteer in an English regiment then in
service in Flanders.*

* This expression is, perhaps, hardly applicable to the fact of Evelyn's
having witnessed a siege merely as a curious spectator. He reached the
camp on the 2nd, and left it on the 8th of August, 1641. It is certain, how-
ever, that during these six days he took his turn on duty, and trailed a pike.
See Diary, v. i., p. 19. [u.]



XX11 INTRODUCTION.

Nor does it notice his having set out, with intent to
join King Charles I. at Brentford ; and subsequently
desisting when the result of that battle became known, on
the ground that his brother's as well as his own estates
were so near London as to be fully in the power of the
Parliament, and that their continued adherence would
have been certain ruin to themselves without any advan-
tage to his Majesty. In this dangerous conjuncture he
asked and obtained the King's leave to travel. Of these
travels, and the observations he made therein, an ample
account is given in this Diary.

The national troubles coming on before he had engaged
in any settled plan for his future life, it appears that he
had thoughts of living in the most private manner, and
that, with his brother's permission, he had even begun to
prepare a place for retirement at Wotton. Nor did he
afterwards wholly abandon his intention, if the plan of a
college, which he sent to Mr. Boyle in 1659, was really
formed on a serious idea. This scheme is given at length
in the " Biographia/' and in Dr. Hunter's edition of the
"Sylva" in 1776; but it maybe observed that he pro-
poses it should not be more than twenty-five miles from
London.

As to his answer to Sir George Mackenzie's panegyric
on Solitude, in which Mr. Evelyn takes the opposite part,



Online LibraryJohn EvelynDiary and correspondence, To which is subjoined the private correspondence between King Charles I. and Sir Edward Nicholas, and between Sir Edward Hyde, afterwards earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 46)