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History of York County Pennsylvania From the Earliest Time to the Present online

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sylvania as his private secretary, which position he tilled until
1718, when Penn died. He afterward filled the office of secretary
of the province, commissioner of property and chief justice. He
possessed uncommon ability and was a great friend of the In-
dians. He wrote two or three Latin works, and published an
excellent English translation of Cicero's "De Senectute." He
died at his home near Philadelphia, October 31, 1751.



east of the Codorus, did not return his
draft to the land office. It is not now
known to be in existence. In 1754 a survey
of York -was made by George Stevenson, who
became deputy surveyor of York County when
it was formed in 1749, and served for sixteen
years as the prothonotary, clerk of the courts
and register of the county. He married the
widow of Thomas Cookson, deputy surveyor
of Lancaster County, and thus became a large
land -owner.

The following is the full text of his letters
describing the town at the ds



York, 20th October, 1754.

Sear Sir:— I now answer yr repeated letters
about York Town, which I should have done long
since, if my other business had not frequently inter-
rupted me, whilst I was making the Draught of the
Town. The Tract of Land.whereon the Town stands,
contains 437^ acres, or near 413 acres & Allowance.
On the 1st of October, 1749 (the Time I came to
York), the Town consisted of sixty-three dwelling-
houses, of wood, which were not finished, and also a
Lutheran & a Calvinist Church. As the town was
then chiefly inhabited with Germans (as, indeed, it
now is), there was but one Room, with a fire Place
or Hearth in it, in the whole Town. All the Houses
in Town were accommodated with Dutch Stoves.
The Town now consists of 210 Dwelling-Houses,
near thirty of which are unfinished, and only three
are built of bricks, and two of Stones. Of the rest,
some are of Logs and some Framed, beside the
Court House, of Brick, not finished, and the Prison,
of Stone. The Lots on the East side of the Creek
were laid out by Mr. Cookson before I came here.
The Inhabitants, choosing to buy lots on High
(Market) Street and Water Street at a dear Rate,
rather than to take up vacant Lots, because there is,
as yet, very little Trade in the other streets, or even
in High Street, to the Eastward of Duke Street.

From an actual Survey of the Ground on tlie
West side of the Creek, I have drawn in the Plan
100 Lots, of the like Figure & Quantity of those
on the East, which is all the ground, in my opinion,
fit for Lots on that side of the Creek. The Land
described on the Plan, between the crooked doted
Line & the Creek is low, wet Ground in the driest
season. Greatest part of it is quite a swamp in wet
Weather, and at the breaking up of the Frost, and
at other times when there are heavy Rains, the
Creek overflows great part of it, especially that
North of the Bridge. Part of the Road through it is
a wooden causeway. For the foregoing natural
Reasons, 'tis unfit to build on, but if itwereclear'd,
well ditch'd & drain'd, it would make goodMeadow.
The Land, North of the 100 Lots, is broken with a
swampy valley, and if it were not so, the Country
North of it, is hilly, slony Ground, not thick inhab-
ited, but little Resort to Town from that Quarter,
and consequently, little Trade; & therefore, I think
Lots would not be taken up there, in this age, if
they were laid out. The Triangle, south of the 100
Lots, is good, level Land, but as the southward in-
habitants either come into Town on the East side
of the Creek, or come to the great Road, some Dis-
tance West of the Town, there is not like to be any
trade there, at least in a short Time. And, indeed,
to see but little probability of settling the Lots in
Queen Street & south of Prince Street, on the East
side of the Creek. The Inhabitants have neither
Meadow nor Pasture, but buy all their Hay, and
are obliged to stable their own Horses, as well as
those of Travellers, all summer, which is doubtless



HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY.



a great Damage to the Town. They complain of
this much, and say that Mr. Cookson, when he laid
out the Town, promised them out-Lots for these
uses. Upon the whole, I'm of opinion 'tis best to
lay out all the ground, appears to be vacant (except
the narrow Piece East of Queen Street), in Out-
Lots, and grant them to the Inhabitants for Pasture
& Meadow at the best Ground— Rent that can be
got, leaving proper streets or Lanes.
• The Timber of the Town Land was all destroyed
before I came here; the Inhabitants, ever since,
have bought all their timber for building & Fire-
wood very dear, of the adjacent Farmers, which is
very discouraging to poor settlers, and few Rich
People settle here.

As I am certain the vacant ground within the
Town Land, according to my Plan, if it were
granted for Out-Lots, is not sufficient to accommo-
date the Inhabitants would it not be for the Interest
of the Proprietaries (as well as for the good of the
People) to purchase some of the adjacent Planta-
tions for that Purpose, especially that of Harmanns
Bott, Quantity about 300 acres, and that of Barthol-
omew Maul, about ninety acres, which surrounds
the Northeast Corner of the Town Land, .& is so
near the Lots. I'm inform'd they will sell as soon as
they can, and I think cheaper now than they would
have done two years ago. West of and contiguous
to the town Land, Harmanns Bott has laid out some
Lots, which I have also described on my Plan: four
Houses are already built there. I'm told he lets
them at 7 per. Ster. p. Annum, and therefore I think
'tis now Time to grant the Lots West of the Creek,
& high Time to buy out Bott. I would have advised
to have' laid out the Lots on the West side of the
Creek two years ago, but that I thought it best to
defer it longer, expecting tlie People would have
taken up the Lots South of Prince Street, but as I
have now little Hopes of that, and find the People
incline to settle on the Road, in the West side the
Creek, Yea, West of the Limits of the Town, I con-
clude 'tis expedient to grant that side soon.

Two Fairs in the Year, viz . one the 17th day of
March, for selling & buying of Plough-Horses,
Milch Cows, i&c: another the second Tuesday of
November (to avoid the Courts), for selling Beef Cat-
tle, Butter, Cheese Winter Milch Cows.Baeon, Hogs,
Pork, & would be of great use both to Town &
Country. Two Market Days in the Week, viz. :
Wednesdays & Saturdays, for selling and buying
daily Provisions, would prevent Impositions from
Butchers. & Stop the Germans from their beloved
Practice of buying & selling on Sundays, which I'm
satisfied they continually do, tho' 'tis not easily de-
tected.

A Clerk of the Market, commissioned by the
Governor, would regulate Weights & Measures, &
prevent daily abuses of this sort.

A Corporation & Burgesses is not neccessary. I
need not offer one of the many Reasons which occur
to me against it, because I do not know of one good
Reason for it.

So much for York Town. There are several
Plantations within seven miles of York, for which
the Inhabitants have neither Grant nor Warrant.
Some of them I have survey'd for the use of the
Hon'ble the Proprietaries, to be holden by the
Tenants on such Terms and Conditions as the
pptaries shall be pleased hereafter to limit and ap
point. I design to survey the Rest as the People
apply. They often ask me if I know the pptaries
Terms, and I find they all expect to purchase at
some Rate.

I think it imprudent to say anything to them
about Terms till all are survey'd, which I think will
be in about a Year.

There are several Improvements made within
seven Miles of York Town,



I shall be .glad to see your answer to my several
late letters. Those of my Family who have been
sick are recovering. My wife and Miss Hannah are
well and join in Compliments to you.
I am.
Dr. Sr

Your most obedient

Hble Servt.
George Stevenson.

The draft made by George Stevenson,
in 1754, mentioned in the above letter, is
now in the laud office at Harrisbiirg. The
streets marked on it are High (Market), King,
Prince, Philadelphia, running east and west,
and Queen Street, the eastern limit of town,
Duke, George, Beaver and Water running
north and south. Philadelphia Street was
the northern limit, and Prince the southern
limit of the town. Lots west of Codorus
were not numbered. Lots number 1, 2, 3, 4,
were the present site of Samuel Stnall's gar-
den fronting on North Queen Street; Baltzer
Spangler, the village innkeeper then owned
that section of town around the Reservoir;
Bartholomew Maul, the Lutheran parochial
school- master, the land east of Queen Street,
now known as the " Hill; " John Hay, his son-
in-law, the land northeast of York; Bernhard
Lowman and Henry Spangler, the land south
of the town ; Hermanns Bott, the land west and
southwest, and John and James Wright, the
land north and northwest of the town. The
"swampy land unfit to build on," is now a
very important part of the town west of
Codorus.

In 1783, at the close of the Revolution, the
county commissioners ordered a special assess-
ment and census of the entire county to be
taken. York then contained 293 houses, 866
male and 913 female inhabitants, or a popula-
tion of 1,779 ; there were thirty-eight negro
slaves, and twenty-three negroes under
twelve years. Newberry Township, the same
year contained the largest number of inhabi-
tants of any district in the county, and but
seventy less than York. The list of taxable
inhabitants for 1783 is given below, together
with the occupation, number of members in
each family, and valuation. They are nearly
all the names of the ancestors of people now
living in York. The word "chair" means a
pleasure carriage and "plate" means silver-
ware. The valuation given is on a specie
basis. The continental currency had become
worthless in 1781.

The population for the first century in
York was largely German, and that language
predominated. Some Quakers resided in the
west end of town. There were quite a num-
ber of English in 1783, as the following list
will indicate :




•' ^^^. -^-^^^



BOROUGH OF YORK.



Valuation.

William Ashby, laborer, 2 persons £ .50

Phillip Albrecht, 10 persons 403

Hugh Alexander, clerk, 1 horse, 1 person 15

Nicolas Anthony, 3 persons, £134 10s.

Joseph Adlum, skin-dresser, 12 persons 130

Thomas Armor, Sr., plate, £5, 1 person 50

Thomas Armor, Jr., 3 persons 260

Anthony Anecker, barber, 2 persons 158

Charles Barnitz, Sr., brewer, 1 horse, 1 brew.

house, 9 persons 998

Charles liarnitz, Jr., 1 horse, 1 person, tax,
£1 14s. 6d.

Joshua Bennit, card-maker, 5 persons 48

John Brown, laborer, 4 persons 35

Frederick Bringman, cordwainer, 3 persons

"Stone Cutter" Beck, 2 persons

William Baily, brazier, plate, £20, 7 slaves, 4

horses, 9 persons 1016

Enoch Bennit, carpenter, 8 persons 80

Nicholas Brand, barber, 1 horse, 2 persons 195

Henry Bentz, butcher, 1 horse, 4 persons 235

Peter Bilo, carpenter, 3 persons 40

John Bar, joiner, 4 persons 113

Ludwig Beltzhuber, locksmith, 3 persons 40

John Brooks, joiner, plate, £10, 1 horse, 6 per-
sons 200

George Beck, laborer, 6 persons 58

Lorentz Boley, laborer, 2 persons 43

Abraham Blymyer, tailor, 6 persons 93

Peter Berger, tobacconist, 3 persons .... 70

Martin Breneisen, tailor, 6 persons 160

Michael Billmeyer, storekeeper, plate, £1, 1

horse, merchandise, £5, 5 persons 349

Andrew Billmyer, storekeeper, plate, £10, 1
chair, 1 horse, merchandise, £5, 4 persons. 60

Widow Billmyer, 2 persons 203

Henry Bender, hosier, 3 persons 20

Widow Baird, 1 distillery, 3 persons 113

John Brobst, rope-maker, 5 persons 113

Widow Bentz, 1 person 103

Abraham Pike, 7 persons

Nicholas Bernhard, laborer, 3 persons 60

Jacob Bernhard, blacksmith,! person,tax£l 10s.

John Collins, mason, 4 persons 826

Edward Crawford, storekeeper, 1 horse, 6 per-
sons 945

John Collins, singletree-maker, 4 persons 50

David Candler, plate, £1, 1 horse, 3 persons 599

Joseph Chambers, plate. £1, 4, slaves, 5 persons, 189

Jacob Cramer, nailsmith, 4 persons 50

Gen. Michael Doudle, tanner, plate, £1, 2 slaves

3 horses, 1 tanyard, 7 persons 1117

Killian Dibbinger, storekeeper, £10 merchan-
dise, 3 persons. . . 328

Martin Danner, tobacconist, 3 persons 150

Widow Doudle, 1 chair, 1 slave, 1 horse, 5 per-
sons 353

Jacob Doudle, tanner, 1 horse, 1 tanyard 130

James Dobbins, waggoner, 4 horses, 4 persons. 103
Robert Donn, innkeeper, 1 horse, 8 persons. . . . 668

John Dallman, carpenter, 7 persons 110

Abraham Danner, tobacconist, 1 horse, 7 per-
sons 238

Peter Dinkle, storekeeper, plate, £5, 1 chair, 4

horses. 10 persons 934

Jeremiah Decker, carpenter. 3 persons 69

Michael Dellerack, tailor, 2 persons 30

Phillip Decker 30

Frederick Dambach, blacksmith, 5 persons. ... 30
Christopher Eply, laborer. 5 persons £58 15s.

.Jacob Eichinger, hatter. 3 persons 213

Phillip Endler, butcher, 1 horse, 4 persons. . . . 365

Jacob Endler, breeches-maker, 4 persons 325

John Ehrman, 1 horse, 4 persons 343

Widow Eichelberger, storekeeper, plate, £10,

merchandise, £15, 8 persons 338

Jonas Edward, carpenter, 1 person, tax £1 10s.



Jacob Erion, tailor, 4 persons £ 80

George Etter, 3 persons 50

Michael Edward, 3 persons 33

Samuel Fisher, blacksmith, 7 persons 88

John Fissel, 3 persons 30

John Friesner, tailor, 5 persons 48

Widow Fry, 4 persons 70

Benedict Funk, carter, 1 horse, 5 persons 133

Jacob Frankelberger, weaver, 4 persons 90

Conrad Frankelberger, weaver, 1 person

William Fornshild, barber, 4 persons 73

John Flender. cutler, 9 persons 303

Jacob Funk, joiner, £234, 10s.
John Fisher, clock-maker, plate, £1 10s., 1
horse, 6 persons, £309 10s.

Jacob Fackler, hosier, 3 persons 63

George Fry, innkeeper, plate, £3 10s. 1 horee, 7

persons, £321 10s

George Fritzle, baker, 5 persons 173

John Filby, cordwainer, 7 persons 35

George Gees, mason, 5 persons 38

Michael Gerber, silversmith, 1 horse, 6 persons 175
Jacob Gardner, tanner, plate £3, 3 ^ horses, 1

tanyard. 8 persons 699

Benjamin Gorgas, skindresser, 2 persons 50

Aaron Goats, tinman, 1 horse, 5 persons 33

George Gyer, 3 persons 50

George Gump, 3 persons^ 126

George Gutjahr, cordwainer, 6 persons 133

Abraham Grafius, tinman, 3 persons 370

Joseph Garretson, tallow chandler, 3 persons . . 50

John Quckes, 3 persons 40

George Gerber 133

Phillip Gossler, joiner, 6 persons 143

Martin Grafins, 3 persons 43

John Grafius, waggoner, 4 horses, 6 persons. . . 63

Phillip German, glazier, 5 persons 63

David Grier, Esq., lawyer, plate £13, 1 chair, 4

slaves, 2 horses, 4 persons 838

Henry Greenwald, butcher, 1 horse, 6 persons.. 123
Isaac Gardman. Sr., innkeeper, 1 horse, 4 per-
sons 398

Isaac Gardman, .Jr. , weaver, 7 persons 123

John Goho, laborer, 5 persons 40

Widow Gardner, innkeeper, 2 persons 153

Paul Gemberling. butcher, 5 persons 80

William Gilbert, 2 persons 40

John Heckendorn. 3 persons 143

Christian Heckendorn, weaver, 1 horse 39

Jacob Holtzinger, 1 slave, 1 horse, 1 person 40

Ludwig Hietig, tailor, 1 horse, 10 persons 195

Everett Harr, weaver, 1 chair, 5 persons 118

Michael Hahn, storekeeper, plate, £9, 1 chair, 2

horses, merchandise, £450, 6 persons 1035

Frederick Housman, innkeeper, 1 horse, 7 per-
sons 2.31

Peter Hawk, doctor, 1 horse, 4 persons 81

John Hay, storekeeper; 3 horses, merchandise

£200, 8 persons 936

Col. Thomas Hartly, lawyer, £28 plate, 1 chair,

1 servant 6 yrs., 6 persons 711

Christian Herman, joiner, 8 persons 163

Jacob Helman, bluedier, 3 persons 103

Phillip Heckert, gunsmith, 3 persons 80

George Heckert, saddler, 1 person, tax £1 10s.

Widow Heckert, 2 persons 103

John Hess, waggon-maker, 3 persons 30

Jacob Heckert,'waggon-maker, 1 person 123

John Herman, nailer, 2 persons 30

Henry Haffner, mason. 5 persons 90

Andrew Johnston, innkeeper," 4 persons 345

Christain Ilgenfritz, cordwainer, plate £15, 6

persons 153

James Jones, mason, 8 persons 53

George Irwin, storekeeper, 1 chair, 4 slaves, 2

horses £450, 8 persons 1396

George Ilgenfritz, 1 horse, 7 persons 210



518



HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY.



Valuation.

Simon Jager, laborer, 3 persons £ 30

Thomas Irons, hatter, 6 persons

John Jones, innkeeper, 4 horses, 5 persons 253

Isaac Jones 30

Michael Krebill, goalkeeper, (jail) 1 horse 8

persons 140

Jacob Krebill, joiner, 5 persons 80

Adam Kreber, blacksmith, plate, £10, 1 horse, 6

persons . . '. . . 340

Phillip Kreber, waggon-maker, plate, £1, 4 per-
sons 236

Elisha Kirk, clock-maker, 1 horse, 7 persons. . . 248
William Kersey, card-maker, 1 horse, 6 persons 98

Caleb Kirk, storekeeper, 1 horse, 1 person 105

Jacob Kern, tailor, 8 persons 323

Jacob Korrel. 3 persons 73

Widow Keifler, 5 persons

.Samuel Kuntz, laborer, 3 persons 30

Timothy Kirk, joiner, 5 persons 73

Barbara Krafft, innkeeper, 4 persons 153

George Krafft, hatter, 1 person, tax, £1 10s.

Nicholas Kurtz, 8 persons 123

John Kunkel, cooper, 4 persons 133

Valentine Krantz, brewer, 2 slaves, 2 horses, 1

distillery, 5 persons 1026

Widow Kronmiller, 5 persons 100

Martin Kronmiller, blacksmith, 1 person, tax,£2.

Henry Kreber, 1 horse, 3 persons 113

•John Kreber, joiner, 1 person, tax, £1 10s.

Francis Kuntz, hatter. 4 persons 113

John Keller, saddler, 1 horse, 3 persons 196

Martin Kraber, blacksmith, 4 persons 53

John Kurtz, blacksmith, 1 person, tax, £2.
Peter Kurtz, 1 horse, 1 person, tax, £3.

John Love, tanner, 1 horse, 7 persons 398

George Lewis Lefler, clerk, 4 persons 199

John Leisser, laborer, 5 persons 43

Godfrey Lonberger, cryer, 4 persons 70

William Lanius, tailor, plate, 7s. 6d., 1 horse. 6
persons, £170 7s. 6d.

William Love, 1 chair, 1 horse, 6 persons 313

Ignatius Leitner, gunsmith, 3 persons 143

Widow Lauman, plate, £1, 5 persons 64

Conrad Letherman, storekeeper, plate, £3 10s., 1

horse, £200 merchandise. 3 persons 675

Godfry Lenhard, clock-maker, l.horse, 7 persons 418

Conrad Laub, clerk, 1 horse, 7 persons 83

Edward Langwonhy, storekeeper, 1 horse 333

Christian Lemy, cordwainer, 5 persons 30

Adam Leitner, gunsmith, 1 person 3.53

Charles Ludwig, doctor, 1 person, tax £3.
Ignatius Leitner, skin-dresser, 3 slaves, 3 horses,

Upersons 156

Samuel Leedy, cordwainer, 10 persons 340

•John Myer, locksmith, plate, £15, 7 persons. . . 163

•John Mclntire, hatter, 1 horse, 7 persons 183

Casper Miller, innkeeper, 1 horse, 7 persons. .. 508

John Morris, clerk, 6 persons 80

Godfrey Miller, waggoner, 4 horses, 5 persons. . 40
Francis Jacob Miller, tanner, 3 horses, 8 per-
sons 223

William Matthews, surveyor, 5 persons 73

Solomon Miller, 1 stage, 3 horses, 3 persons 353

William McMunn, tailor, 1 horse, 5 persons 113

Henry Miller, breeches-maker, 3 persons 30

James McLawchlin, tailor, 9 persons 33

George Moul, storekeeper, 1 horse, merchandise,

£50 ,528

Robert McCorly, storekeeper, plate, £15, mer-
chandise, £50, 5 persons 345

David Maulsby, joiner, 2 persons 130

Widow McCommon, storekeeper, merchandise,

£30, 2 persons 130

Peter Mundorff, apothecary, plate, £6, 10 per-
sons £154

James Miller, innkeeper. 1 horse, 7 persons 418



Valuation.
*Archibald McLean, clerk, plate, £4, 1 slave, 2

horses, 6 persons £631

James McCommon, brazier, 1 person, tas,£l 10s

Widow Myer, 2 persons 100

William Miller, sugarbaker, 2 persons 160

Joseph Myer, tobacconist, 4 persons

Henry Marshall, saddler, 2 persons 80

Widow Moore, innkeeper, 1 slave, 4 persons. .. 373

John Miller, 6 persons 53

George Mack, weaver, 9 persons 63

Abraham Nunemacher, 3 persons 80

Rev. Neisser, 4 persons

John Neebel. tailor, 5 persons 83

George Nebbinger, nailer, 1 horse, 5 persons. . . 258

John Neuman, butcher, 1 horse, 3 persons 40

William Norris,saddletree-maker, 6 persons. 83

Thomas Owings, tailor, 1 horse, 4 persons 113

Ephraim Pennington, cordwainer, 8 persons. . . 113

John Patterson, breeches-maker, 3 persons 30

Peter Peel, tobacconist, 3 persons 120

Elisha Quarry, laborer, 3 persons 30

John Rothrock, saddler, 10 persons 143

Peter Reel, saddletree-maker, 1 chair, 1 slave, 1

horse, 7 persons 391

Widow Reel, 3 persons

John Rudisill, saddler, 6 persons 203

Frederick Rummel,innkeeper,lhorse,9 persons, 213

Godfrey Rehm, potter, 4 persons 233

James Robb, saddler, 3 persons 40

Joseph Rothrock, silversmith, 1 person, tax, £2

Anthony Ritz, laborer, 6 persons 153

Widow Rudisilly, 4 persons 83

Thomas Randolf ; cordwainer, 5 persons 30

Christian Rubb, waggoner, 1 person, tax, £1 10s.

Widow Ryon, 5 persons

Henry Rudisill, cordwainer, 5 persons 93

John Reisinger, tailor, 5 persons 83

tSiraon Snyder, tanner, 1 person, tax, £1 10s.

John Shultz 40

George Ernst Shlosser, hosier, 7 persons 123

Jacob Stuck, distiller, 1 distillery, 5 persons... 243
William Scott, Esq., 1 chair, 1 horse, 9 persons. 368

Frederick Shetly, turner, 3 persons 123

John Shreck, hosier, 2 persons 30

Joseph Shank, 3 persons 113

Jacob Sneider, wagoner, 5 persons 103

Jacob Shrom, weaver, 1 horse, 4 persons 104

George Sefrentz, brazier, 4 persons 63

John Sefrentz, 3 persons

Peter Slimmer 100

Adam Stehr, potter, 3 persons

Phillip Spickerd, 8 persons 153

Widow Silvers, 1 horse, 6 persons 103

Mathias Stoehr, pottiT, 2 persons 130

Rudolph Spangler, storekeeper, plate, £1 10s., 2

horses, 10 persons 579

Jacob Sittler, 2 horses, 8 persons 348

Christian Sinn, butcher, 3 horses, 6 persons 350

Peter Sensing, doctor, 1 chair, 1 horse, 8 persons. 443

Martin Sugars, innkeeper, 4 persons 363

Widow Smuck, 4 persons 103

Jacob Shreiber, wagon-maker, 7 persons 343

George Michael Spangler, innkeeper, 1 horse,

9 persons 348

Joseph Smith, 3 persons 253

Martin Snyder, mason, 3 persons 30

Lawrence Small, locksmith, 6 persons 113

Widow Stillinger, 6 persons 50

Jacob Snierer, blacksmith, 7 persons 23

Jacob Siecrist, laborer, 5 persons 43

Col. Michael Swope, storekeeper, plate, £33, 1

chair, 1 slave, 3 horses, merchandise, £350,

5 persons 1119

*Tlie distinguished surveyor wlio assisted in running Mason
and Dixon's line; he was then prothonotary.

fAfterward governor of the State of Pennsylvania.



BOROUGH OF YORK.



Valuation.

Christopher Stoehr.potter, 8 persons £243

Ludwig Sheip. barber, 4 persons 93

Baltzer Spangler, innkeeper, plate, £3, 1 chair,

1 horse, 1 slave, 10 persons 541

George Stake, Esq., storekeeper, plate £3, 1
stage, 1 slave, 3 horses, merchandise, £350,

8 persons 1101

Christian Stake, 1 slave, 1 horse, 1 person 310

John Strohman, cordwainer, 8 persons 83

Peter Swartz, clock-maker, 4 persons 93

Zachary Sugars, innkeeper, plate, 9s. lOd, 1

horse, 6 persons. £373 10s.
Daniel Spangler, saddler,! person, tax $1 13s. 6d,

Phillip Stenlz, 1 horse, 7 persons 343

Widow Spickert, 4 persons 103

Tobias Seibart, bluedier, 4 persons 1£0

Jacob Shafer, Sr., cordwainer, 3 persons 113

John Shaal, butcher, 1-horse, 6 persons, £134 15s.
Christopher Sheely, butcher, 3 horses, 7 per-
sons 158

Conrad Stanzenberger, cryer, 1 horse, 7 persons 131
Jacob Shafer, Jr., cordwainer, 1 horse, 3 per-

George Stoll, cooper, 1 person, tax £1 10s.

Jacob Shenck, cordwainer, 7 persons 50

Adam Sneider, laborer, 1 person 50

Andrew Sulsberger, poor, 3 persons

Jacob Shuck, innkeeper, 1 horse, 10 persons.. 333

Patrick Sulevan, 1 horse, 8 persons 118

Jacob Streebig, cooper, 5 persons 113

Henry Shotter, potter, 3 persons 80

Killian Small, joiner, 3 horses, 8 persons 349

Jacob Small, joiner, 1 person, tax £1.

*James Smith, lawyer, plate, £73, 3 horses, 8

persons 715

Peter Straber, joiner, 3 persons 33

Martin Shroeter, weaver, 6 persons, tax £3.

George Shuck, joiner, 6 persons 173

John Smuck, cordwainer, 5 persons 118

George Test, saddler, plate, £10, 2 horses, 5 per-
sons 343

Francis Thomas, mason, 7 persons 83

William Thomson, joiner. 7 persons 68

Samuel Updegraff, breeches-maker, 1 horse, 9

persons . 348

Ambrose Updegraff, hatter, 9 persons 313

Nathan Updegraff, hatter, 1 horse, 6 persons. . 335

Jacob Upp, cordwainer, 1 horse, 8 persons 43

Herman Updegraff, storekeeper, 1 chair, 1 horse,

merchandise. £35, 6 persons 170

Joseph Updegraff, hatter, 1 horse, 10 persons. . 398

Joseph Updegraff, saddler, 5 persons 33

Jacob Updegraff, heel-maker 8 persons 386

Jacob Updegraff, Jr., heel-maker, 1 horse, 1 per-
son, tax, £1. 13s. 6d.

Joseph Updegraff,' heel-maker, 4persons 33



Online LibraryJohn GibsonHistory of York County Pennsylvania From the Earliest Time to the Present → online text (page 106 of 218)