John Livingston.

Livingston's law register for 1852 : containing the post-office address of every lawyer in the United States online

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LIVINGSTON'S

LAW REGISTEE,

FOR 1852;

CONTAINING THE POST-OFFICE ADDRESS

OF

EVERY LAWYER IN THE UNITED STATES:



ALSO,



A IIST OP ALL THE COTOTEES, WITH THEIR SHIEE-TOWNS; THE LEGAL EATES
OP INTEREST, WITH THE PEIfALTIES POR USURY, IN EVERT STATE; THE LE-
GAL PORMS POR THE ACKNOWLEDGMENT OP DEEDS IN EACH STATE;
A PORTRAIT AND MEMOIR OP HON. JOHN WORTH EDMONDS:



TOGETHER WITH



A LIST OF NEWSPAPERS IN THE UNITED STATES, SHOWING HOW OPTEN EACH IS
PUBLISHED, AND THE LOCALITY, CHARACTER, AND CIRCULATION
OP EACH, COMPILED PROM THE U. S. CENSUS RETURNS
POR 1850, EXPRESSLY FOR THIS WORK.



BY JOHN LIVINGSTON,

Of the New-York Bar, Corconiesioner Besident in New-Tork, for every State in the Union,
and Notary Public.



NEW-YORK:

PUBLISHED AT THE OFFICE OF THE U. S. LAW MAGAZINE,

157 Broadwat.
1852.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in tlie year 1851, by

JOHN LIVINGSTON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District

of New-York.






CONTENTS.



Pag«.
Alphabetical Index of Towns contained in this work, and showing the page

on which the Lawyers' names are to be found 17

Introduction 1

Memoir of Hon. John Worth Edmonds, of New- York 11

Legal rates of Interest, and penalties for usury in every State 281



Lawyers in

Page.

Alabama 33

Arkansas 40

California 263

Connecticut 44

Delaware 47

Dist. Columbia 48

Florida 49

Georgia. „ 50

Illinois , 59

Indiana 67

Iowa , 76

Kentucky 79



Lawyers in i

Page. I

Louisiana 89

Maine 94

Maryland 100

Massachusetts 104

Michigan 114

Minnesota 119

Mississippi 120

Missouri 126

New-Hampshire 133

New- Jersey 137

New-Mexico 140

New- York 140



Lawyers in

Pa'^e.

North Carolina. 179

Ohio 184

Oregon , 202

Pennsylvania 202

Rhode Island 217

South Carolina 219

Tennessee 223

Texas 231

Vermont 237

Virginia 243

Wisconsin 258



List of the Counties, with their respective Shire-towns, in



Page.

Alabama 265

Arkansas 265

California 266

Connecticut 266

Delaware 266

District Columbia 266

Florida 266

Georgia 267

Illinois ^ 267

Indiana 268

Iowa 269

Kentucky 270



Page.

Louisiana 271

Maine ..., 271

Maryland 271

Massachusetts 271

Michigan 272

Minnesota 272

Mississippi 272

Missouri 273

New-Hampshire 273

New- Jersey 274

New-Mexico 274

New- York 274



Page.

North Carolina 274

Ohio , 275

Oregon 276

Pennsylvania 276

Rhode Island 277

South Carolina 277

Tennessee 277

Texas 278

Vermont 279

Virginia 279

Wisconsin 280



Legal Forms for the acknowledgment of Deeds, 4-c, in



Page.

Alabama 284

Arkansas 285

California 285

Connecticut 285

Delaware , 285

Florida 285

Georgia 286

Illinois 286

Indiana 286

Iowa 286

Kentucky 286



Page.

Louisiana 287

Maine 287

Maryland 287

Massachusetts 287

Michigan 288

Mississippi 288

Missouri 288

New-Hampshire 288

New- J ersey 288

New- York 288

North Carolina. 288



Pago.

Ohio 288

Pennsylvania 289

Rhode Island 289

South Carolina 289

Tennessee 289

Texas 290

Vermont 290

Virginia 290

Wisconsin 290



CONTENTS.



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS.

The page refers to the Catalogue at the end of the volume.



Newspapers in

Page.

Alabama 3

Arkansas 4

California 4

Connecticut 5

Delaware 6

Dist. Columbia 6

Florida 7

Georgia 7

Illiinois 8

Indiana 10

Iowa 12

Kentucky 13



Neivspapers'in

Page.

Louisiana 14

Maine 15

Maryland 16

Massachusetts 17

Michigan 21

Minnesota 52

Mississippi 22

Missouri 23

New-Hampshire 24

New-Jersey 25

New-Mexico 52

New-Yorkl 26



Neivspapers in

Page:

North Carolina 34

Ohio 35

Oregon 52

Pennsylvania 40

Rhode Island 46

South Carolina 46

Tennessee 47

Texas 48

Vermoot 49

Virginia 50

Wisconsin 51



K7F0R NEWSPAPER TABLES AND STATISTICS, SEE PAGE 53.



INTRODUCTION.



The following pages contain the names of twenty -five thousand Law-
yers. In a nation of freemen, where the government is supposed to
be the expression of the popular will, the influence of such a vast
body, whose study leads to a correct understanding of the nature,
principles and machinery of the civil compact, cannot be over-rated.
Towards forming a lofty public sentiment, a just, reasonmg patriotism,
and correct ideas of the duties we owe to government, from whom, in
this age of radicalism, of " higher law" men and " lower law" men,
can more be rec[uired or expected than from this great multitude,
whose every-day pursuit is fraught with the most enlarging, correcting
and humanizing tendencies ?

The American lawyer, not content with the routine of courts and
professional services, directs his efforts to a wider field ; following the
path to which his position, acquii-ements and tastes strongly tend, he
eagerly enters the political arena, searching assiduously the honors of
the legislative hall ; with what success, our histoiy plainly testifies.

From the commencement of our government, four-fifths of the
highest offices have been filled by lawyers. An elevation of the morals
of the bar is one of the many advantages which has resulted from this
intimate connection with politics. The custom which prevails among
us of discussing the worthmess and qualifications of candidates for
office, and the value, which, in this country more than in any other, is
attached to character for its innate excellence, hold out the strongest
inducements to such as design becoming aspirants for political honors,
to preserve their reputation in all its purity. There can be no stronger
proof of the truth, so frequently uttered — " though the people may
often be mistaken, they are seldom corrupt," — than the fact, that, with
a large majority of our citizens, an unspotted reputation has always
been held among the prerequisites for public office. So long, then, as
the present connection exists between the bar and the political arena,
we may hope that the best and highest influence, mentally and morally,
will be brought to bear upon the profession.
The bar stands high in public estimation. The time has seldom been



2 INTROBUCTION.

when political office or influence was more liberally accorded to its
members. In the most important trusts they are to be found ; the
national legislature and the executive departments are filled with men
whose claims to distinction, to a great extent, originated in legal excel-
lence and acquirements. The several state governments are in the
same hands. All the acknowledged party-leaders, and nearly all who
are thought of as candidates for high political places, have been edu-
cated in the same great school.

That the law is a profession of duplicity ; that a different code of
morals and honor is recognized in professional practice than would be
allowed in the private dealings of man with man ; that chicanery and
falsehood are not only considered allowable, but, in some measure, es-
sential to success, are vulgar notions not now entertained, except to a
very limited degree. It is admitted the law does open avenues where
an evil-disposed practitioner may sometimes take unjust advantage ;
and it speaks highly for the materiel of the profession, that mal-prac-
tice is almost banished from the bar, and cases of undue advantage or
extortion seldom occur.

The lawyer who prides himself in his profession, cannot avoid a
feeling of complacency as he surveys its present condition in the
United States ; always prominent and always honored, and, as we be-
lieve, more at the present time than ever before, it occupies a position
and wields an influence such as no other profession can for a moment
aspire to. Indeed, our laws being acknowledged nearly as perfect as
the fallibility of human intellect will admit, the purity of our judicial
tribunals being unquestioned, it is but natural that the highest respect
and regard should be granted to those most nearly connected with their
execution — to those who may be considered the true exponents of the
just and beneficent system of jurisprudence under which we live. No
one has paid a nobler tribute to " the natural guardians of the rights of
the community," than the distinguished lawyer who said : " It is the
nature of the profession of the law, when pursued by congenial minds,
and in accordance with its inherent spirit, to elevate and liberalize the
social principle. Those who attain eminence in that profession, neces-
sarily take deep and wide views of human conduct ; not by cloistered
contemplation, but by living, practical observation of the motives of
men, the objects they pursue, and the uses of those objects. Hence re-
sult a juster estimate of the real value of those things which men most
ardently seek and highly appreciate, and more elevated apprehensions
concerning the proportions of their worth. Hence, also, it is that men
of that profession are ever found in the front rank of those who devote
themselves to the interests of the age, evidenced by noble exertions



INTRODUCTION. 3

and personal sacrifices in support of the great principles upon wliich the
rights of liberty and- of property depend. The history of the times
antecedent to the American revolution — of those during which the
struggle was pending — of those during the forming of the federal con-
stitution, and of those occupied subsequently in the defence of it, down
to the present day — constitutes one line of successive monuments of
the labors, the sacrifices, and the self devotion of the men of that pro-
fession to the best interests of their country.

Great as is the fame of many who, in ages past, have won them-
selves renown by their attainments, the power of their reason and
their eloquence as advocates, we believe their equals are now among
us. We are not of those who are ever deifying the past, — who fix their
eyes so steadfastly upon the great namas that fill the pages of history,
as to be unable to recognize any merit or ability in the present age.
Though none are more willing to pay tribute to the well-earned fame
of those who have been the glory of the American bar in periods that
are gone ; yet, while we give the fathers all just praise, we would not
depreciate their sons. It is well to reverence and respect the past, but
no good can come from wilfully depreciating the present ; and because
some of the great lights of our jurisprudence are now the subjects of
history, we see no reason to forget those who are present with us.
Many whom the bar is still proud to number among its members, will
stand none the less surely in the niche of fame than the brightest names
of by-gone days ; foremost among the many, will be the learned
and distinguished jurist, whose likeness appears in this work.

The multiplied and increasing business relations between the differ-
ent portions of this great Republic, render an annual catalogue of the
profession a convenient and useful manual, not only to those who are
engaged in the practice, but to bankers, merchants, manufacturers, in-
surance companies — in short, to all who are employed in active busi-
ness, and have occasion to make inquiries appertaining to matters at
remote places, in which they have no acquaintance, or who desire to
conduct affairs at a distance by correspondence with gentlemen of the
law. Every practising lawyer must perceive the utility of this list for
occasional reference, and as a most effective means for establishing a
correspondence with all points. Those who may desire to transact
important professional business with safety and facility at distant
points, are informed that the editor will, without charge, furnish the
names of the most prompt and reliable practising lawyers at any town
or city in the United States.

As the value of the law list must depend upon its correctness, the



4 INTRODUCTION.

purchaser is informed that the entire catalogue contained in the follow-
ing pages, has been compiled from official returns obtained from the
clerks, recording officers, and sheriffs of the various counties. To all
who are familiar with undertakings of this nature, it will be evident
that great labor and expense have been encountered in the preparation
of this list. Though the utmost pains have been taken to avoid mis-
takes, it would be presumptuous to assert, that none have occurred in
a work containing such an immense number of names. A reference to
the work will show that every effort has been made to attain the most
perfect classification.

In the volume will be found other useful matters, not the least im-
portant of which are the various legal forms for the authentication of
instruments of writing in every state. To commissioners, judges,
county clerks, and other officers whose duty it is to take the acknow-
ledgment of conveyances of real estate, these forms will be found
most convenient, and an observance of them will avoid much expense
and trouble. Insufficient certificates, made by acknowledging officers, have
unsettled the title to much property,"and originated no inconsiderable
amount of litigation. Officers should remember that the forms and
solemnities required to pass the title to real estate, must be in confor-
mity with the local laws of the country in which the land is situated.

According to this work, the whole number of lawyers in the United
States is twenty-four thousand nine hundred and forty-eight. Sup-
posing that of the above number 948 have retired from practice,
and that the annual emoluments of each practising lawyer average
$1,500, (which, we think, is nearly correct,) the total income of the
profession would be 136,000,000.

The number of lawyers in each state is as follows : —
Alabama, 827 ; Arkansas, 309 ; Connecticut, 369 ; Delaware, 58 ;
District of Columbia, 69 ; Florida, 142 ; Georgia, 908 ; Illinois, 862 ;
Indiana, 851 ; Iowa, 303 ; Kentucky, 1,066 ; Louisiana, 510 ; Maine,
559; Maryland, 577 ; Massachusetts, 1,132; Michigan, 490; Min-
nesota, 37 ; Mississippi, 694 ; Missouri, 692 ; New-Hampshire, 335 ;
New-Jersey, 317 ; New-Mexico, 21 ; New- York, 4,740 ; North Caro-
lina, 482 ; Ohio, 2,031 ; Oregon, 35 ; Pennsylvania, 1,848 ; Ehode
Island, 127; South Carolina, 512; Tennessee, 852; Texas, 638; Ver-
mont, 471 ; Virginia, 1,420 ; Wisconsin, 599 ; California, (incomplete,)
65.



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS.



The Catalogue of Newspapers in the United States was prepared for
this work from the Census returns of 1850, by A. E. Kennedy, Esq.,
of the Census Office, under the supervision of Hon. J. C. G. Kennedy,
the gentlemanly superintendent. When we inform publishers that our
printer has strictly "followed copy," giving every figure and letter
of the Catalogue as it came from the Department, we trust no blame
will be attributed to us for any inaccuracies or omissions that may be
discovered. Such as find their papers misreported, are at liberty to
examine the original statistics now in our possession.

The following testimonials prove that the list is probably more cor-
rect and complete than any ever before published.

" Census Office, Washington,
''1th Nov. 1851.
" Joiix Livingston, Esq.

" Dear Sir — I believe the Lists I have now furnished, are very full and
accurate, great pains having been taken in their preparation. Where
omissions or errors may he observed, they should be attributed to the
neglect of the assistants who took the Census. There were over three
thousand assistant marshals in the United States, each of whom made
a separate return. Each of these three thousand returns (which form
large books, carefully labelled and fastened) had to be opened and ex-
amined page by page. " Truly yours,

" A. E. Kennedy."

Hon. J. C. G. Kennedy, in a letter dated November 14, 1851,
regarding the preparation of the Lists, says : —

"The work was one of great labor, much more than I supposed,
under the impression that the List had been perfected, and that what
was necessary was a mere copy. I was mistaken, and to make from
the returns a perfect List for you, it was necessary to go over the
entire work, de novo."" The Catalogue has been obtained by us at no
small expense.

Eegarding Newspapers throughout the world, it may not be amiss
here to present a few facts, for most of which we are indebted to the
Encyclopoedia Americana.

: The origin of Newspapers, like that of many institutions impor-
tant to modern civilization, is to be referred to Italy. The war which
the Eepublic of Venice waged against Solyman II., in Dalmatia, gave
rise, in 1563, to the custom in Venice of communicating the militar

y



6 Newspapers and Periodicals.

and commercial information received, by written sheets {notizie scritte)
to be read at a particular place by those desirous to learn the news, who
paid for this privilege in a coin, not any longer in use, called gazetta —
a name which, by degrees, was transferred to the Newspaper itself in
Italy and France, and passed over into England.* A file of these
Venetian papers, for sixty years, is still preserved in the Magliabecchi
Library at Florence. The first regular paper was a monthly, written,
government paper at Venice ; and Chalmers, in his life of Ruddiman,
informs us that "a jealous government did not allow a printed Nq\ys-
paper ; and the Venetian Gazetta continued long* after the invention of
printing, to the close of the sixteenth century, and even to our own
days, to be distributed in manuscript." Those who first wrote News-
papers were called, by the Italians, menanti, because, says Vossius,
they intended commonly, by these loose papers, to spread about defa-
matory reflections, and were therefore prohibited in Italy, by Gregory
XIII., in a particular bull, under the name of Menantes (from the Latin
minantes, threatening). Menage derives the name, with more proba-
bility, from the Italian menare, which signifies " to lead at large' ' or
" spread afar." Perhaps it will not be irrelevant, however, for the
writer to remark, that it is common for the Meclvlenburg peasantry, as
he knows from experience, to call the newspaper de Logenhlad (the
lying paper) ; and the German proverb in use to this day, " He lies
like print," (" er lugtwie gedruclct,^^) is probably connected with this view
of early newspapers.

The first English genuine newspaper appeared under Elizabeth, in
the epoch of the Spanish Armada, of which several, printed when the
Spanish fleet was in the English Channel, during the year 1588, are
preserved in the British Museum ; and it is very curious how much the
mode of communicating certain kinds of intelligence in these early
papers, resemble the forms in use at present. The earliest newspaper
is entitled ' The English Mercuric,' which, by authority, ' was im-
printed at London, by her highness's printer, 1588.' These were,
however, but extraordinary gazettes, not regularly published. Pe-
riodical papers seem first to have been more generally used by the
English during the civil wars of the time of the Commoiawealth, to
disseminate sentiments of loyalty or resistance. They were called

* Some etymologists have thought the name gazetta is to be derived from gazzera,
a magpie, or, in this case, a chatterer; others from the Latin gaza, which, being
colloquially lengthened into gazetta, ■wr)\i\6. signify a little treasury of news. The
Spanish derive it, indeed, from the Latin gaza (Greek. yaX,a), though their news-
papers, least of all, deserve the name of treasure. They have a peculiar word,
wanting in our \d\om, gazetista, a lover of the gazette. The German zeiUing is
from the ancient theidinge or theidung (the Englisla, tiding, the Swedish, iidingar.)



Newspapers and Periodicals. 7

weekly netvshoohs. Though Mercury was the prevailing title of most,
the quaintness which marks the titles of books in that age, is found also
in the names of the ' news books' ; for instance, the Secret Owl^ Heror-
clitus Ridens, the Weekly Discoverer^ and the Discoverer Stript Naked,
&c. A catalogue of the Mercuries would exhibit a curious picture of
those singular times.

We learn from Buckingham's specimens of newspaper literature, that
the earliest newspaper established in North America was the Boston
News-Letter, the first number of which was issued April 24, 1704.

A comparison of the number of periodicals and inhabitants of differ-
ent countries, gives the following results : —

In 1827, there appeared in Great Britain, 483 different newspapers
and other periodicals to 23,400,000 inhabitants ; in Sweden and Nor-
way, 82 journals to 3,866,000 inhabitants ; in the States of the Church,
6 newspapers to 2,598,000 inhabitants, (Stockholm, with 78,000 inha-
bitants, has 30 journals ; Rome, with 154,000, only 3,) Denmark, to
1,950,000 inhabitants, has 80 journals, of which 71 are in the Danish
language ; 23 are devoted to politics ; 25 to the sciences. Prussia has
12,410,000 inhabitants, and 288 journals and periodicals. (Berlin has
221,000 inhabitants, and 53 periodical works ; Copenhagen has 109,000
inhabitants, and 57 journals.) The Netherlands have 6,143,000 inha-
bitants, and 150 journals. In the Gei-man confederation, (excluding
Austria and Prussia,) there are 13,300,000 inhabitants, and 305 jour-
nals ; in Saxony, to 1,400,000 inhabitants, 54 newspapers ; in Hanover,
to 1,550,000 inhabitants, 16 newspapers; in Bavaria, to 3,960,000 in-
habitants, 48 newspapers. France, with a population of 32,000,000,
has 490 periodical works, (660 printing establishments, 1,500 presses ;
in Paris, 81 printing establishments, or 850 presses). In Paris alone,
containing 890,000 inhabitants, there are 176 periodical works.

The following table, arranged for the American Almanac of 1830, is
corrected from the Traveller, and contains a statement of the number
of newspapers published in the colonies at the commencement of the
revolution, and also the number of newspapers and other periodical
works in the United States in 1810 and 1828.

States.
Maine, .....

Massachusetts, ....
New-Hampshire, ,

Vermont, .....
Rhode Island, ....
Connecticut, . , . .

New- York, ....

New-Jersey, ....

Pennsylvania, ....
Delaware, , . . . .
Maryland, .....



75.


1810.


1828.








29


7


32


78


1


12


17





14


21


2


7


14


4


11


33


4


66


161





8


22


9


71


185





2


4


2


21


37



8



Newspapers and Periodicals.



Slates.
District of Columbia,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
South Carolina,
Georgia,
Florida,
Alabama,
Mississippi
Louisiana,
Tennessee,
Kentucky,
Ohio,
Indiana,
Michigan,
Illinois,
Missouri,
Arkansas,
Cherokee Nation,

Total, .... 37 358 802

The following is the state of the newspaper press in the United
States in 1810, as extracted from a number of the National Intelli-
gencer.



75.


1810.


1828.





6


9


2


23


34


2


10


20


3


10


16


1


13


18





1


2








10


_


4


6


_


10


9





6


8





17


23


-


14


66

17

2








4








5


_





I








1





P




l^


^


o


*3 ;= O

o s g


New-Hampshire,











12


12


624,000


Massachusetts,








9


23


32


2,873,000


Rhode Island,








1


6


7


332.800


Connecticut,











11


11


657,800


Vermont,











14


14


682,400


New- York,


7





9


50


QQ


4,139,2 00


New-Jersey,











8


8


332,800


Pennsylvania,


9


I


3


58


71


4,542.200


Delaware,








2





2


166,400


Maryland, .


5


5


1


10


21


1,903,200


District of Columbia,


1


3


1


1


6


686,4 00


Virginia,





1


6


16


23


1,289,600


North Carolina,











10


10


416,000


South Carolina,


3





2


5


10


842,400


Georgia,





1


2


10


13


707,200


Kentucky,











17


17


618,800


Tennessee,











6


6


171,600


Ohio,











14


14


473,200


Indiana Territory,











1


1


15,600


Mississippi Territory,











4


4


83,200


Orleans Territory,


2


4


2


2


10


748,800



Online LibraryJohn LivingstonLivingston's law register for 1852 : containing the post-office address of every lawyer in the United States → online text (page 1 of 36)