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took the field, and this officer served as cantonment Adj. to Col.
Cooke till its return in Feb. 1809? vvhen he marched with the batt. to
Bombay ; and on promotion to a company was again transferred to the
2nd batt. ; with which, in Nov. 1810, he marched to Poonah ; accom-
panied the flank companies in May 1812, which joined the field force
under Col. Montresor at Pundtrpoor, and returned to Poonah in
December.

In Feb. 1813 he was appointed by the resident at Poonah (Mr.
Elphinstone) to command a battalion of the Peishwa's regular brigade,
then about to be formed. In Sept. 1815 he marched in command of
a detachment from the brigade to receive charge of a state prisoner
(Trimbuija Dinglea) from the Killedar of Wussunda Ghur, who was
delivered over to the British government. In March' 18 17 he marched
in command of part of the brigade, and joined the force under Col.
(now Maj.-Gen.) Smith in the field ; returned to Dapoone canton-
ment in July 1817; in October proceeded to Bombay on sick cer-
tificate; and in August 1818 to sea, for the recovery of his health.
He reached Bombay in Jan. 1819 ; again took the command of the
battalion, and in Dec. 1819 marched with it to Poonah.

The 12th reg. was in orders to be raised on the 1st Jun^ 1820,
and the Ist batt, at Poonah, by volunteers from the auxiHaries (late
Peishwa's brig.), to which this oflScer was placed in the command by



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MILITARY CALENDAR. 113

Maj.-Gen. Smith, and continued by the Com.-in-Chief, Sir C. Col-
ville.

In Oct. he left the batt. for Bombay, and in Nov. embarked for
Malwah, to take the command of the 2nd bat. 2nd reg. ; with which
he remained till April 1821, when he embarked with it for Bombay ;
and in May following returned to England, in consequence of hiA
health having severely suffered from a service in India of nearly twenty-
three years.



COLONEL SIR MARK WOOD, BART.

(Bengal Establishment.)

Entered the corps of engineers in the East India Company's ser-
vice, Bengal establishment, in 1770; in 1778 attained the rank of
capt. ; in 1786, on the arrival of the late Marquess Comwallis in
India, he attained the rank of maj. of engin. and surv-gen. ; in 1787
that of col. and chief engin., in which situation he continued till
1793, when ill health obliged him to return to England. The l6th
Feb. 1795 he was promoted to the rank of col. in His Majesty's ser-
vice*.

* It may here be observed, that our late august sovereign George III. arraoged a list
of the army^ including the officers of His Majesty's army and those of the East India
Company, at a time when that excellent monarch had much at heart the union of both
services. Sir Mark Wood presented to His Majesty in 1795 a model in ivory of Fort
William, Bengal, one of the most complete fortresses in the world; and on that occasion
the King produced the above-mentioned list.



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114 THB £A8T INDIA

THE LATE COLONEL JOHN COCKERELL.

(Bengal Establishment.)

This much-distinguished officer went to India in 1763 under the
immediate protection, and in the family, of Gen. Caillaud, appointed
Com.-in-Chief at Madras. Col. Cockerell, then scarcely fourteen
years of age, and a cadet in the East India Company's service, was
received into the family of Gen. Sir Robert Barker, Com.-in-Chief at
Bengal, to whose staff, young as he was, he was immediately attached-
At the age of eighteen he became military sec. to Sir Robert ; an ap-
pointment in which he continued until Sir Robert returned to England
*in 1774, when Col. Cockerell, then a capt. in the army, accompanied
him. In the spring of 1776 he again went out to India ; and in the
following year Mr. Hastings (then Gov-Gen.) appointed him to his
military staff, intending that he should succeed to the situation of
military sec. ; but it being found expedient in 1799 to send an expe-
dition from the upper provinces to Bombay, across the peninsula,
Capt. Cockerell was fixed upon to accompany it as quart-mast. -gen.,
and in that capacity displayed talents of the highest order. The de-
tachment* was commanded by Col. Leslie, who was succeeded in

* At the commencement of the year 1778 the presidency of Bombay having been se-
riously embarrassed by the pressure of the M ahratta war which then prevailed, the Gov.-
Gen. felt the necessity for effectual saccour, both in specie and troops, being afforded to
that quarter of the Hon. Company's possessions, with as little delay as possible. Supplies
of the former had been, and would again be sent by sea, in the course of a six weeks or
two months voyage (as well as by bills through the native bankers of Benares), but no such
resource presented itself with regard to troops. On this emergency the comprehensive
mind of Warren Hastings formed the resolution (on his own responsibility, when opposed,
as it was understood, by a majority of his colleagues in the government) to order a compact,
yet efficient detachment, of Native troops from the Bengal army, to march across the con-
tinent of India, '' through the hostile and unknown regions from the banks of the Ganges
to the western coast of India,'' to create a division in the councils and operations of the



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MILITARY CALEdTDAR. 115

the comtiMiQd by CoI.» afterwairds Gea- €oddan]. The detachment
marched across the peninsula ta £oonah and Bombay, where this
part of the Bengal army remained^ and Col , then Maj. Cookerell, was
present at several sieges, and of sowse of which he had the' conduct
On the termination of the war he marched back with the army to
Bengal. Subsequent to his return, Lord CornwaUis, on his arrival to
take charge of the supreme government of India, had appointed
Maj. Cockerell to his staff; and upon it being found necessary to
augment the army of the Carnatic, on the first Mysore war against
Tippoo Saib, by a very strong reinforcement, Lord CornwaUis ap-
pointed Col. Cockerell to the command of the troops sent from Bengal
in this year ; and which mardbing through the Nizam's country,
joined that part of the Madras army under the command of CoL
Maxwell, and subsequently joined the grand army under Lord Corn-
walHs. Col. Cockerell was present at the siege and capture of Ban-
' galore, the siege of Seringapatam, and, preparatory thereto, attached
to, and second in command of, that part of the army which was
ordered to the attack and capture of a strong fort, preparatory to
the night attack against Tippoo himself, with his army under the walls
and in front of Seringapatam. After the peace with Tippoo, Col.
Cockerell marched back with the Bengal detachment to Calcutta, and
immediately on his arrival embarked for Europe : he had not been
in England more than two years when his health began to decline,

enemys ^^^ event aally to co-operate with the Bombay government and forces in the prose-
cution of the war in which they were involved.

Its first rendezvous was Culpee, a town on the right hank of the Jumna, near Caunpoor,
whence it commenced its march on the 12th June 1778. It reached Rajgurh, a town in
Bundlecund, on the IJth Aug. ; where it halted so much longer than Mr. Hastings thought
necessary, that he removed Col. Leslie, the commanding officer, and appointed Lieut.-Col.
Goddard to that charge. Under this active and enterprising officer it continued its route
through Malwah and Candesh to Surat ^ presenting the extraordinary spectacle of a corps
of the natives of Hindostan, under the guidance of a few English officers, marching from
the banks of the Ganges to the westernmost shores of India. During the five years that they
were absent from their home, the men of this detachment conducted themselves in the^nost
exemplary manner, and acquired distinction in every service in which they were employed.
(See fVUliaims's Historical /tccount qf the Bengal Native Infantry,)



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116 TUB EAST IKDIA

and after kaviog gone to Lisbon, at tiie advice of his physicians, and
returned to London, he died in July 1796.

CoL Cockerell was a Persian scholar, profoundly versed in idl the
politics of India ; a good man, and an excellent officer.



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL DONALD MACLEOD, C. B.

(Bengal Establishment.)

This officer joined as a cadet the 1st Europ. reg. in 1781 ; was
appointed ensign in the 3d Europ. reg. on the 13th March in the same
year ; lieut., on the 9th July 1783 ; removed to the 29th reg. N. I. in
1785; and, on being supernumerary, to the 6th Europ. reg, in 1786; ap-
pointed to the 13th batt. N. I. in 1790, on its march to Madras; adj.
to the 25th bat. N. I. in 1796; adj. to the 2d bat. 11th N. L in 1799 ;
brevet capt. in 1795, and capt. in the reg. in Aug. 1800; appointed
to the 1st bait, of the 11th in May 1807 (which corps he commanded
until he went on furlough to Europe in 1810) ; brev.-maj. in 1808 ;
maj. in the reg. in 1810 ; returned to India in 1813, and joined the
2d batt. 11th reg. N. I. which corps he commanded until July
1819, when he was appointed commandant to the garrison of Agra ;
brev. lieut.-col. 4th June 1814; lieut.-col. in the reg. 15th May 1815.
On the commencementof hostilities with Tippoo Sultaun in 1789-90,
a detachment, as stated in previous services, marched from Bengal
to Madras, to form part of the army to be employed against the enemy.
Lieut. Macleod joined the ISth batt. which corps formed part of this
detachment, and remained with it during the whole of the war. How-
ever actively the troops were employed after the campaign begun, no-
thing decisive was effected until Lord Cornwallis joined and assumed



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MILITARY CALENDAR. 117

tiie command in person* The succcssfiil operations that followed,
until the conclusion of the peace at Seringapatam in March 179S,
have been already stated. Lieut* Macleod met the approbation of
his superiors on every occasion.

On the return of the detachment to Bengal in 1793, the 13th batt.
was ordered to the upper provinces, and were stationed at Caunpoor
in 1794: in this year the Rohilla chieftain Tyzoolah Khan died,
leaving his eldest son, Mahomed Ally, heir to the Musnud, under the
protection of the British government. Golaum Mahomed, another
iion of Tyzoolah Khan, found means to confine his eldest brother in
prison, where he afterwards died. He then seized the treasure, which
had been accumulating for many years, and being very active, as*
sembled in a short time an army.

All the Company's troops at the stations of Caunpoor and Futteh-.
gurh formed immediately under the personal command of Gen. Sir
Rob* Abercromby, Com-in-Chief in India, and on the general's ar-
rival on the borders of their country, the Rohillas were prepared to
meet him in great force. A battle took place on Oct* 26, 1794, in
which the British troops were ultimately victorious, but with- very
great loss. The ISth batt. from its situation in the reserve, and other
causes, suffered more than any other corps. Of eight officers, in-
<;Iuding the commandant, present with the corps, five were killed, and
one wounded ; Lieut. Macleod, the officer wounded, had four sabre-
cuts, three of which were slight and one severe. The casualties
among the native officers and Sepoys were in equal proportion.

The Rohillas were followed to the foot of the hills, or as far as they
could go, without any attempt being made by them to oppose the
Ccnn-in-Chief, after that action : they submitted in the end to ^uch
terms as were dictated to them, and which deprived them of the
power of again opposing the British government.

In Aug. 1800, Lieut. Macleod, after serving twenty years and four
months, was promoted to the rank of capt-lieut and to that of capt. ;
and a new arrangement took place in the Bengal army, by which he
was appointed to the 2nd batt. 11th N. I.



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118 THE EAST INDIA

On war being dtedarad against the Mahratta states- in ISOSy the Sad
))att.. llth reg* jomed a detachment sent into the Bundlecund country.
The troops that were. prepared to resist this detachment, when drawn
out for action, made no stand ; they contented themsdvra with a dis-
tant canoonade before they went off the field. The service was next
Qonfined to the redaction of mud forts, of which there were many ;
but few of them gave much trouble before they surrendered. The
d^tacho^nt proceeded thence to Culpee, where, on the day of its
arrival, a wing of the 2nd batt. was sent with a detachment of artil-
lery, to prepare and open a battery on the fort. Capt. Macleod fe-
ceived a severe wound from a matchlock shot on the same evening ;
and the battwy having opened early next morning, the fort was given
up before noon.

Immediately after this occurrence^ the 2nd batt. was removed from
the Bundlecund detachment, and ordered to join another detachment,
then on its march with a battering train to besiege Goalior. On ar-
jtiving before that place, the siege was carried on regularly, and with
so much success, that a breach was at last supposed to be practicable,
notwithstanding the elevation of the rock. The besieged were of this
opinion, and capitulated. The 2nd batt. formed part of the gamson
placed in the fort

From various successes of the British troops over those of the Mah*
rattas in every quarter, the war was now consid^ed to be at an end ;
and all the troops, with the excq)tion of one detachment, returned into
cantonments. Capt. Macleod obtained permission to repair to £u«
rope on furlough ; but accounts having been afterwards received that
the detachment left in the field was retreating before Holkar with his
whole force, he withdrew his application, and obtained permi^on to
rejoin his corps. On his return he found that the corps had unfortu-
nately left the garrison of Gualior too early in the rainy season, fi^r the
purpose of bringing to obedience some refractory Zemindars, who
did not submit to the Rannah of that country. J'hey had been, for
some time before, in a fort in a very unhealthy situation, and most of
the officers and of the European artillerymeil were laid up with fevers;



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MILITARY CALBl^DAR. 119

the Sepoys also were in a deplorable state irom the same cause. They
had however made progress in breaching the fort; and it beii^g
nearly practicable, that evening the place surrendered. On the same
evening also, orders arriv^ed for the battalion to join the army forming
under the Com.-in-Chief ; but on its sickly state being discovered, it
was ordered into cantonments. The men who were able to parform
their duty, and could be spared, were however required to join a de-
tachment employed in suppressing insurgents within the provinces,
who began to rebel when the army crossed the Jumna river. Two
companies had marched for this service, and Capt. Macleod obtained
the Com. -in-Chief s permission to join them. He found the detach-
ment before a fort, with very little equipment for a siege. One or
two mines were sprung; and after tome days the fort was evacuated
at night, although a very strong place. The next fort, td which the
detachment marched, was not so easily taken : no impression was
made on it during a month, and it held out until Meer Khan, with all
his force, crossed the Jumna river, on his way towards his native
country Rohilcund. Commonah, the fort that was besieged, being
on his route, the commanding-officer of the detachment thought proper
to raise the siege, and retire under the walls of Allygurh, a distance of
about seven coss. Maj.-Gen. Smith, with all the cavalry, was in
pursuit of Meer Khan, and arrived on the next morning^ at Allygurh :
he ordered the infantry detachment to cross the Ganges into Rohil-
cund, to co-operate in protecting the principal places from the cfepre-
dations of the enemy, and also to pt^vent insurrection in his favour.
Meer Khan was howevef too quick. He was a whole day at Me-
radabad before Maj.-Gen. Smith came up, as he had to take the
ammunition out of the tumbrils in crossing the Ganges, and the enemy
had no incumbrance of the kind. The infantry came up at last, and
were ordered to Bareilly. Soon after arriving at this last place CapU
Macleod was ordered \^ith a Small detachment, against insurgents that
had assembled in the western part of these districts. He had the good
fortune to reach their vicinity before they were aware that any troops
were nearer to them than Bareilly, but the sudden alarm caused an



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130 THE EAST INDIA

immediate dispersion^ which prevented his being able to come up
with any of the rebels afterwards. One chieftain of another party
at some distance from this place made a stand, but when the de-
tachment came up to them, they gave way and fled.

Maj.-Gen. Smith had now forced Meer Khan to recross the Ganges
and Jumna ; and the country being in a state of tranquillity, Capt.
Macleod rejoined his corps in cantonments, where he arrived in May
1805, and found it recruited and fit for the service that was required
of it in Dec. following.

To conclude a peace with the Mahratta states, became the next ob-
ject, and to this end it was stipulated, that all the Rannah of Gohud's
country, should be again delivered over to Scindia. Gualior was still
garrisoned by the British troops, but Gohud the capital was, ft*om the
lime it was taken possession of, delivered over to the Rannah. He lost no
time in repairing the works, and putting it in a proper state of defence,
with a sufficient number of troops, under the direction of his own ad-
herents. The Ranny and his son, a young boy, took up their resi-
dence in the palace* Having made these preparations, he represented
to the officer conmianding at Gualior, that he had no authority over
the Ranny or the garrison of Gohud, nor could they be prevailed upon
to give up the place. A siege became necessary, and the 2d batt. 11th
reg. was ordered to join the detachment intended for that service. On
forming this detachment five companies of Native grenadiers, being
one from each batt- were placed as a reserve under the command of
Capt. Macleod. The siege was carried on until the engineers re-
ported the breach practicable. Towards the evening of that day the
other five grenadier companies were ordered to join the reserve, making
it ten companies of 800 privates, with their proportion of European
and Native officers. Capt. Macleod was to attack the place with them
on the same evening. Accordingly as soon as it was sufficiently dark
the party was put in motion, and it arrived near the edge of the ditch
in perfect silence, before any challenge was made. The immediate
discharge from the whole face of the works, however, was a convincing
proof that the attack was expected, and that they were prepared for it



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MILITARY CALENDAR. 121

The Havildar and twelve sepoys, who volunteered to precede the head
of the reserve, rushed forward, but Capt. Macleod observing that they
were retarded by turning out of their way to return the fire that was
upon them, he ran to the Havildar and succeeded in wheeling them
round, and leading them up the breach. The officer of the leading
company followed, but only one or two sections of that company
would come up the breach. The Native officers, instead of preventing
the company from breaking, made themselves busy among the men
who carried ladders, and before Capt. Macleod could attend to them,
they had got the ladders so as to obstruct the passage. He exerted
himself in throwing down the ladders, and expostulated with those who
were backward, but which had no effect for a long interval, during
which the troops were exposed to a destructive fire from under cover
of the works. At length, by reminding them of the stigma their con-
duct would stamp upon them for ever, one man moved up first, then
two and three followed together, until a path was clear for the head of
the column. He then gave the signal for the breach being carried, and
the sections moved rapidly, but in good order up to the breach. A
vc?ry considerable extent of ruins and broken ground lay between this
place and the town, which by the difficulty of getting over it caused
heavy loss to the Rannah's troops, as the sepoys were able to come up
with them in their retreat. The reserve had, out of the officers, two
killed and three wounded, and of 800 privates about 100 killed and
wounded. A breach was soon made in the inner walls of the town,
and the whole capitulated.



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JAMES NAGLE.

(Madras Establishment.)

This officer sailed from England early in 1781, in the fleet com-
manded by Commodore Johnstone, and was in the engagement at



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188 THE EAST INDIA

Port Praya with the French fleet : shortly after his arrival in India he
was made a prisoner^ when under the command of Sir Eyre Coote, and
remained such until 1784. In 1789 he served under Lieut-CoL
James Stuart in subduing the Colingoody Poligars; in 1790, under
Gen. Medows, in the reduction of the strong forts of Dindigul and
PaUcaudcherry,the districts of Coimbetoor, Caroor, Errode, and all the
other strong places below the Ghauts ; in 1791 he entered the Mysore
country, under Lord Comwallis, and was present at the siege of Ban-
galore, battle of Seringapatam, and every other service the army was
employed on. In the latter part of 1792 he was employed under Lieut.
Col. Maxwell in the Tinnevelly district, against the ShevegurryandCho-
cumpetty Poligars ; in 1793 at the siege of Pondicherry, under Gen.
Braithwaite ; in 1794 he was stationed by Col. Dugald Campbell in
the Nagpoor district, to check the predatory spirit of the Poligars,
in the vicinity of his post. In the same year an expedition was fitting
out at Madras to attack the Isle of France, and this ofiScer volunteered
his services, which being accepted, he joined Maj. Urban Vigors's flank
corps of Europeans. The expedition was countermanded, and he
returned to his corps in the Tinnevelly country. Early in 1795, his
corps, with the 3d reg. of N. Cav. under Maj. Stevenson, were ordered
to suiprise the Ramuad Rajah ; which they effected by severe night
marches. In Oct. of the same year, he embarked at Ramisseram, under
Col. Dugald Campbdl, to attack Menar, and subdue the western posts
of Ceylon, belonging to the Dutch. In Nov. he embarked at Menar,
with three companies, for the reduction of Calpentine and Putelang,
and to garrison these two posts, being the most advanced towards Co-
lumbo. In Jan. 1796, a division of the army for the attack of Co-
lumbo, consisting of the 7th, 9th, and 35th baits, embarked at Menar
with the flank companies of the 73d reg. under Maj. Barbet, and pro-
ceeded to the rendezvous of Niagumbo, where they were joined by
the other troops, destined for the same service. After disembarking,
the whole proceeded by land to Col umbo ; the corps to which this
officer belonged formed part of the advance under Maj. Pelre : dur-
ing the whole march they were constantly skirmishing with the enemy.



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MILITARY CALENDAR. IJIS

On the 14th Nov. this officer received instructions from Col. Stuart
to proceed back to Niagumbo with the force to command that post^
for the purpose of covering the disembarkation of stores, ammunition,
and provisions, that were coming from the coast for the use of the
army ; also to receive supplies of provisions from the king of Candy
for the same purpose, and furnish guards for the convoy of them to
the army.

After the fall of Columbo, he was ordered to proceed to Trineomale
by land, with a small reinforcement for that garrison ; he was sixteen
days performing the march, without a single tent for the detachment,
during almost incessant rains, and often obliged to make rafts of the
branches of the trees for conveying the detachment across the rivers.

In 1797 he received orders from Col. Champagn6, 80th reg., then
commanding Trineomale, to proceed to Batticoloa, and take upon
himself the command of the fort and its dependencies. In July
1797 he quitted Ceylon with his corps for Pondicherry. An expedi^
tion was then embarking at Madras and Pondicherry for the attack
of Manilla, and this officer applied to Gen Braithwaite to be employed :
the General appointed him to his own reg., the 3d Europ. i he em-
barked with it at Pondicherry, and sailed with the first division of the
fleet for Prince of Wales's island, where the remaining part of the ex-
pedition, under the command of Adm. Renief, arrived : in a few days
afler orders arrived from Madras countermanding the expedition,
and the troops returned to their respective destinations, except the 3d