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GoB'iig!it>Jl:..



COFYKiGirr DEFOSm



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iiiCE. 25 CENTS



CQ5

ANDY
UIDETO








!)05T0N

\ND ENVIRONS



s-',NC> MCNALLY 5 CQ
iBLI^nERS
■'("AGO S NEVYORK









BEST ROUTE TO

SEA COAST AND INTERIOR RESORTS
OF NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND.

BY THE LINE OF FIRST-CLASS STEAMERS BETWEEN

BOSTON AND PORTLAND.

\ ■

Tlu' new and palatial steamers " BAT STATE," 2,215 tons, or " PORTLAND," 2,'<!r.:i tons,

ive India Wharf. Boston, every evening, Sundavs exctM>ted, at 7.(Xi o'clock. The trip Is

out eight hours long, and affords a fine view of Boston Harbor, Nahant, Thatcher's Island

il Cape Ann, the Isles of Shoals, Boone Island, Old Orchard Beach, Cape Ellzahctli, I'ort

iiind Harbor, etc., making one of the finest ocean trips on the Eastern Coast.

FARE BETWEEN PORTLAND AND BOSTON, St.OO.

This is an Ideal route to Old Orchard Beach, combining a dellgh+ful sea voyage
\N i( h a railway ride of thirty minutes from Portland.

Connecting, on arrival at Portland, with Maine Central R. R.", Grand Trunk liy., Port
l.iiid & Rochester R. li., and Portland & Rumford Falls Ry.

Thislineaffordsamostdeslrableroute^to Rangeley Tiakes, Tolaiid Spriue, Mt.
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Returning leave Franklin Wharf, Portland, every evening, Sundays excepted, at 7 ikj

•lock.

SUNDAY TRIPS — FROM MIDDLE OF JUNE TO MIDDLE OF SEPTEMBER.
THROUGH TICKETS AT LOW RATES. STATE ROOMS SECURED IN ADVANCE. -i

ATLLIAMS, Agent, BOSTON, Mass. J. B. COYLE, Manager, PORTLAND. M



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SEABOARD AIR LINE

THE POPULAR LINE

NORTH AND SOUTH

Double Daily Service.



The Famous Atlanta Special
Solid Vestibule Limited




^^■^"'".x.^^-THE CYCLONE"%^^^^



SOLID TRAINS FROM PORTSMOUTH TO ATLANTA.

lake Travel a Pleasure

and Use the Seaboafd Aif Line,

SOUTHERN PINES, ATHENS, RALEIGH,
ATLANTA, MACON, MOBILE, NEW
ORLEANS, AND PACIFIC COAST POINTS.

CKETS ON SALE AT ALL PRINCIPAL TICKET OFFICES IN UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

Ask Ticket Agent for Ticket via

SEKGOT^RD MIR L-INE.

$3 -SAVE $3.

or Time Tables, Information, Reservation, call on or address
A. B. FARNSWORTH, Genl Eastern Pass-r Agent.
371 Broadway. New York.

ST. JOHN, H. W. B. GLOVER, L.S.ALLEN,

Vice-Pres't and Gen'l Mgr.. Traffic Manager, Gen'l Pa8s'>r Agent.

PORTSMOUTH, VA.



'"'America'^ Greatest Water "




coin



toga Springs




Lincoln Spring Co.,



Branch House,

47 Cornhill, Boston, Mass.



Saratoga Springs, N. Y.




OPPOSITE THE TREASURY
01i^B,l.QCK FROM THE -JW KITE HOUSE.



The Hotel par excellence of the National Capital.



CABLE, ELECTRIC, AND HORSE CARS PASS THE DOOR
TO ALL PARTS OF THE CBTY.



The most central!}^ located
of any hotel in the cit}^



AMERICAN PLAN

$3 per Day and upwards



O. G. STAPLES



Proprietor.



IV



}

V



Rand, McNally & Co/s



/^



HANDY GUIDE



TO



BOSTON



AND



ENVIRONS.



WITH MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.



THIRD EDITION.



CHICAGO AND NEW YORK :

RAND, McNALLY & CO., PUBLISHER^.

1899. .-^'.^ '^r-\ ^



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Copyright, 1895, by Rand, ]\IcNally & Co.
Copyright. 1897, by Rand, McNally & Co.
Copyright, 1899, by Rand, McNally & Co.



■^'^-tVcLi.



M .






TABLE OF CONTENTS.



I. AN INTRODUCTION TO BOSTON Page 7

Railway Stations, 7; Sound Steamers, 9; Steamship Landings, 10;
Baggage Transfers and Delivery, 11; Getting About the City, 12;
Hacks and Cabs, 12; Street Car Routes, 13; Ferries, 16; Hotels, 17;
Restaurants, 21: Apartment Houses or Family Hotels, 22; Boarding
and Lodging Hous'es, 23.

n. IN AND AROUND BOSTON 25

Localities, 25; The North End, 25; The Central District, 26; The West
End, 27; The South End, 28; The Annexed Districts, 28; Metropolitan
Boston, 34; Cemeteries, 38.

III. THE CITY'S PARKS AND SQUARES 42

The Common, 42; The Public Garden, 44; The New Ptiblic Park
System, 46; Charlesbank, 47; The Fens, 47; Leverett Park, 47; Jamaica
Park, 48; Arnold Arboretum, 48; Franklin Park, 48; Marine Park, 50.

IV. OLD LANDMARKS 52

Faneuil Hall, 52; Old vState House, 54; Old South Meeting House, 56-
Old Corner Book Store, 57; King's Chapel, 57; Chri.st Church, 58; Old
Burying Grounds, 59.

V. THEATERS AND OTHER AMUSEMENTS 64

Alphabetical Li.st of Theaters, 64; Museums and Collections, 69;
Music and Musical Societies, 72; Alphabetical List of Musical So-
cieties, 72; Athletics, 74; Field Sports, 74.

VL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, LIBRARIES, ETC 76

Public Schools, 76; Harvard University, 80; Other Institutions, 84;
Libraries, 87; Boston Public Library, 88; Other Libraries, 94; The
Museum of Fine Arts, 96.

VII. CHURCHES AND RELIGIOUS AND BENEVOLENT WORK.. 98

Sunday in Boston, 98; Protestant Churches, 99; Roman Catholic
Churches, 104; Other Religious Organizations, 106; Societies for
Social Improvement, 107; Charities and Hospitals, 108.

VIII. CLUBS, SOCIETIES, AND MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS 112

List of Leading Clubs, 112; Scientific and Learned Societies, 117;
Secret Orders, 118; Military Organizations, 118.

IX. A TOUR OF THE CITY .- 120

Washington Street, 120; Milk Street, 121; Custom House and Vicin-
ity, 122; State Street, 124; Newspaper Row, 125; School Street and
the City Hall, 126; Scollay Square and Vicinity, 127; Beacon Hill, 128;
Through the Common and Public Garden, 130'; Commonwealth Ave-
nue, 131; Copley Square, 131; To Cambridge, via Harvard Bridge,
132; CharlestOAvn and Bunker Hill, 133.

X. BOSTON HARBOR AND SEASIDE RESORTS 134

The Harbor, 134; The Islands, 135; The North Shore, 139; The South
Shore, 144.

(3)




HOTEL EMPIRE

BOULEVARD AND 63d STREET, NEW YORK CITY.

Patronized by travelers and tourists of the best class from all parts of the world.

A MODERN FIRE-PROOF HOTELOFTHE FIRST CLASS, CON DUCTED
ON THE AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLANS FOR THE ACCOMMO-
DATION OF THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST AT REASONABLE COST.

FAMOUS for the PERFECTION of its CUISINE and SERVICE,

Its Beautifvil and Homelike Appointments and Splendid Location.
Within 12 minutes of alltiie principal tfieatres and great department stores,

Electric cars running to all parts of the city pass its doors. 6th and 9th Avenue
Railroad stations one minute's walk from the hotel.

RATES MODERATE.

Music by the Empire Orchestra every Evening.

'Send address for our book, " The Empire, Illustrated."

W. JOHNSON QUINN, Proprietor.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



Southern Passenger Station (frontispiece),
Main Entrance Union Station,
Hotel Vendome, - - -
Bunker Hill Monument, - - -

Statue of Minute Man, - - - -
Beacon Street Mall, - - . .
Interior View of Hitler's, Boston,
Agassiz Bridge, - - -
The Old State House, - - - -

Christ Church,

Tremont Temple, - - -
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Memorial Hall, Harvard College,
Law Library, - - -

New England Conservatory of Music,
Boston Public Librar}-, - - - -
Grand Staircase, Public Library, -
Museum of Fine Arts, - - - -
Arlington Street Church,
King's Chapel, - - -
Trinity Church, - - -
Boston Chamber of Commerce,
Massachusetts State House,
Commonwealth Avenue,
The Harbor Steamboats at Rowe's Wharf,
Nantasket Beach, - _ - -



Opposite page



1 6
32
36
42
46
48

54

58
68
76
80
82

84

88

92

96

100

102

104

122

128

130

134
146



(5)



Rand> McNally & Co.'S

SERIES OF



This new series of American Guide Books gives, in volumes of "handy"
size, the information generally desired by travelers seeking pleasure, health, or
business. The books are uniform in size and general arrangement. Places or
objects of particular importance or interest are noted in black-faced type, and
those of less importance in italics. Care has been taken to present everything
in the most candid and helpful light, saying little or nothing about that which
is deemed worth little attention. Numerous illustrations from photographs,
and colored maps supplement the text.

PRICE OF EACH GUIDE.
In Paper Binding, - - - - 25 Cents.

In Flexible Cloth Binding, Rounded Corners, 50 Cents.

The following are now ready and will be revised annually:

NEW YORK CITY, including Brooklyn, Staten Island, and other suburbs.
2IO pages; 44 illustrations. Maps of New York City, 28x17; Central Park,
10x28, and New York and New Jersey Suburbs, 28x26.

BOSTON AND ENVIRONS. 154 pages ; 24 illustrations. Maps of Boston,
28x21; Environs of Boston, 11 x 13^4, and Business Portion of Boston, gV^xg.

PHILADELPHIA AND ENVIRONS, including Atlantic City and Cape
May. 126 pages; 32 illustrations. Maps of Philadelphia, 28x22, and One
Hundred Miles Around Philadelphia, 28 x 21.

WASHINGTON AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 161 pages;

40 illustrations. Map of Washington, 21 x 28.

CHICAGO. 215 pages ; 46 illustrations. Map of Chicago, 31 x 33.

HUDSON RIVER AND CATSKILL MOUNTAINS. 249 pages; 18 illus-
trations. Five large scale sectional maps showing both sides of the river
from New York to Troy.

SOUTHEASTERN STATES. Includes Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas,
and the Gulf Coast; 246 pages ; illustrations. Map of Southeastern States,

2J.X28.

NEW ENGLAND STATES. 260 pages; nnmerous illustrations. Maps ot
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Con-
necticut, printed in colors, each n x 14 in size.

COUNTRY AROUND NEW YORK. iSopages. Describing resorts and
routes in Westchester County on Staten Island and Long Island, and in
Northeastern and Seaside Newjersey. Forty half-tone illustrations. Twelve
route maps in black and white and map of region around New York, north to
Hastings-on-the-Hudson; east to Garden City, Long Island; south to South
Amboy, N. J.; west to Lake Hopatcong.

Our publications are for sale by booksellers and newsdealers generally, or
will be sent postpaid to any address on receipt of price.

RAND, McNALLY & CO., Publishers,

142 Fifth Ave., N. W. Cor. 19th St., NEW YORK. '
166-168 Adams Street, CHICAGO. ILL.



I.

AN INTRODUCTION TO BOSTON.



Boston, the beautiful Puritan city, has many gateways through
which the pilgrims, upon whatever errand bent, may enter her
goodly precincts. And she has much to offer, to all who will come to
her, in the way of historic relics, treasures of literature and art, and
facilities for study or business. Her older streets may be winding
and narrow, but they are picturesque and full of suggestions of that
past in which all Americans have an interest, and of which they have
a right to be proud. Many of these quaint old thoroughfares lead to
shrines which, as long as they exist, will attract tourists and will help
to keep alive feelings of patriotism and loyalty. There is no city in
the world where the spirit of hospitality is more boundless, or where
all that pertains to the comfort of the guest is more accessible.

A feeling of uncertainty and dread is apt to possess the mind of
one who is entering a strange city, and the friendly words of direc-
tion and caution given in this chapter are intended to remove, as far
as may be possible, the embarrassment and discomfort which are
natural to inexperienced travelers. There are six railway stations in
Boston and many landing places for passengers from trans-Atlantic
and coastwise steamers.

Kailway Stations.

The Boston & Albany Railroad makes use of the Southern
Union Station, the point of departure for through trains for the West,
via the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad. It also has an
accommodation station near Copley Square.

The Boston & Maine Railroad System uses the Northern Union
Station on Causeway Street, between Nashua and Haverhill streets.

(r)



8 HANDY GUIDE TO BOSTON.

This system, in addition to its main line, comprises the Boston &
Lowell division, the Eastern division, and the Central Massachusetts
division.

The Fitchburg Railroad — Hoosac Tunnel Route — also occupies
the Northern Union Station on Causeway Street ; but its general
offices remain in the old Fitchburg Station a few steps east.

The New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad occupies the
Southern Union Station for all its trains except a few now using the
Park Square Station.

The Park Square or ''Providence^' Station will probably be
abandoned during 1899.

The Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad has its ferry
station at 350 Atlantic Avenue, foot of High Street.

Remarks on the Various Railway Stations.

Much of the traveler's comfort depends upon the railway stations
with which he has to do m making a journey. Those of Boston will
compare favorably with the stations of other great cities of the
United States. The waiting-rooms are spacious and comfortably
furnished; the toilet-rooms and barber shops are neat and orderly,
and the attendants are obliging and civil when giving information.
In each one of the stations will be found lunch rooms or counters, as
well as restaurants, where well-cooked meals, at reasonable prices,
may be had at any hour of the day.

Telegraph and telephone offices, news-stands, flower and fruit
stands, and information bureaus are also located in all stations.

Ladies arriving alone in Boston will always find a matron in
charge of the waiting-room who will answer questions and give infor-
mation and suggestions which it will be quite safe to follow.

The Southern Union Station, or "Southern Terminal," is on
Dewey Square at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue, Summer and
Federal streets, and is jointly occupied by the New York, New Haven
& Hartford and the Boston & Albany Railroad Companies. Here
arrive all passengers from New York and the South or West except
those coming over the Hoosac Tunnel Route or through Canada.

This magnificent station, opened Jan. i, 1899, is the largest rail-
way terminal in the world, exceeding the St. Louis LTnion Depot by
about ten per cent of capacity and size. It is an imposing structure
of pink Connecticut granite, six stories in height, the upper floors




MAIN ENTRANCE, UNION STATION.



C The New Summerland

COOL, RESTFUL

Nova Scotia




i



t
t
t



The Beautiful Acadian Province
By the Sea

HEALTHFUL, RESTFUL, DELIGHTFUL—
AND THE EXPENSE SO VERY SMALL.

FAST MAIL EXPRESS STEAMERS

Sail from Lewis Wharf at 2 p. ni., every Tuesday and Friday during
the year, and from July to October, every Monday, Tuesday, Thurs-
day, and Friday, reaching Yarmouth early next morning and making
close connections for all points of the Provinces. Returning leave for
Boston in the evening.

Tickets sold and ba^g^age checked throug^h to all points.

The handsomely illustrated Guide Book, " Beautiful Nova Scotia"
(1899), sent on receipt of 6 cents to cover postage. For descriptive
folders* staterooms, and other information, address

H. F. HAMMOND, Agent,

Yarmouth Steamship Co. (Limited),

43 Lewis Wharf, BOSTON, I>1/VSS.



AN INTRODUCTION TO BOSTON. 9

accommodating the business offices of the various railway companies
interested. It is the property of the Southern Terminal Company,
which uses thirty-five acres of very valuable ground, the buildings
alone covering about thirteen acres. The cost of land and buildings
is said to have already approached $14,000,000. It was necessary to
drive 43,000 spruce piles, and to use in the structure, besides cut stone
enough to cover a front 3,300 feet in length, and to appear elsewhere,
about 16,500,000 bricks, 30,000,000 pounds of steel, 5,000,000 feet of
lumber, 150,000 square feet of wire-glass, 10 acres of gravel roofing,
and other materials in equally vast amounts. The broad corner
entrance admits the traveler to the Midway — an open space between
the waiting rooms and train-shed large enough for the maneuvering
of a regiment. Inmense and comfortable waiting rooms, baggage
rooms, ticket offices, restaurants, a covered carriage stand, etc.,
open off from this, with the most complete modern appliances of all
sorts. The train-shed, outside of this, is a space 600 feet square,
spanned by a steel and glass roof supported upon three arches of steel
trusses, the middle one of 22S feet span. This shed contains 28
tracks side by side, and can accommodate at once 344 sixty-five foot
passenger cars, able to seat 28,000 persons. Over 700 trains will
regularly use the station daily, when all are arranged for. In addi-
tion to this main floor there is a basement, or subway floor, intended
mainly for suburban and excursion traffic, wdiere four tracks are laid
in loops, so that trains can follow one another with great rapidity,
enabling crowds to be handled with greater celerity than anywhere
else in the countr}'. The vast yard beyond the station terminates
at the Fort Pond Channel, which is crossed upon the greatest steel
roll-lift bridge in the world.

The NortJicrii Uni'ojt Stat /on, on Causeway Street, between
Nashua and Haverhill streets, is almost the equal in size and magnifi-
cence of the Southern Terminal. It is occupied jointly by the Boston
& Maine and the Fitchburg systems of railroad, and hither come all
passengers from the North and many from the West. The grand
entrance is under the largest arch, but one, in the country. The
main waiting room will seat several hundred people, and the marble
toilet rooms and special waiting rooms will all meet with approval.
The hack stand at this station is 100 feet square, and is under the
station roof, a fact which will be appreciated by travelers in stormy
weather.

Soiiiicl Steamers for New York.

People journeying between Boston and New York will often find
it pleasant and convenient to patronize one of the lines of Sound
steamers. The advantages which these boats offer, especially in
warm weather, are freedom from the heat and dust of the railway,
and a clean, luxurious stateroom, insuring a good night's rest.



13 HANDY GUIDE TO BOSTON.

to the place of call. The owner of baggage forwarded to a station or
steamboat landing is given the company's claim check on the baggage-
room of the station or landing, by which his property is at once iden-
tified for checking.

This company will also check baggage through to destination,
from a hotel or residence, if the parties desiring it have their railroad
tickets. It has offices in all railroad stations, in all the principal
hotels, and in different parts of the city.

Caution. — Never give up your checks to any but a uniformed train
solicitor, or a regular office agent, or porter of either the transporta-
tion company which holds the baggage, or of the express company to
which you intend to intrust it, and always take a receipt; and never
give up 3^our checks, if you claim your baggage yourself, to any per-
son except the uniformed baggageman of the railway or steamboat
line by which you have traveled. If you expect to meet or visit
friends in the city who are residents, the best way, probably, is to
keep your checks and let your friends manage the delivery of the
baggage for you.

Getting- About the City.

If one has but a short time to stop in the city, and desires to cover
as much ground as possible in that time, it will be wise to engage a
cab by the hour (on cab rates) and drive from point to point; but if
several days can be devoted to " doing" the city such expense will be
unnecessary.

Hacks and Cabs. — The hackney-carrzage and cab system of the
city is under the control of an official connected with the police de-
partment, the rates of fare being established by the city author! cies,
and varying according to the distance. Disputes about fares are
unnecessary, as the drivers are required to display a rate sheet when
asked, and rates are published in detail in the city directory. The \
fare for an adult for short distances, within specified limits in the city |
proper, is 50 cents; no charge is to be made for one trunk, but 25 cents
is charged for each additional trunk.

Cabs furnish a cheap and brisk means of getting about the city.
The charge is but 25 cents for transporting one person from any rail-
road station to a hotel, or from one railroad station to another. For
one or more passengers from one point to another, within specified
limits, the fare is 25 cents each. Cabs may also be hired by the hour



AN INTRODUCTION TO BOSTON. 13

for service within or about the city at the following" rates:. To or from
any point within the limits of the city the rate shall be made on the
basis of $1 per hour for one, two, three, or four passengers. The time
shall be reckoned both going to and coming from any point, whether
the cab returns empty or otherwise. Fractions of an hour shall not
be charged after the first hour.

Cabs may be hailed anywhere on the street, when without a pas-
senger, for any desired service. When " roaming " on the return from
an engagement to the regular stand, it is customary for the driver to
throw out a sign by the side of his seat with the suggestive words,
" Not Engaged."

The following regulation applies to carrying children by carriage
or cabs : For children under foiu' years of age, with an adult, no
charge shall be made. For a child between four and twelve years
of age, when accompanied by an adult, the fare shall be half the
price charged for an adult ; but when not so accompanied, or when a
child carried in a cab is over twelve 3'ears of age, the charge will be
for an adult fare.

Street-Car Routes.

By referring to the street-car routes, it will be seen that it is possi-
ble to visit all points of interest in Boston and the suburban districts
without discomfort or great expense. The spacious open cars used
in the summer, and the comfortable and equally roomy closed cars
used in the winter and stormy seasons, afford a safe and pleasant
means of transit. Now that the subway is finished, and the congested
condition of Washington and Tremont streets in their narrowest parts
is relieved, transit is much quickened. Nearly all the street-car
routes have their points of attraction, and it would be impossible to
give them all in a work of this kind. But in the following list an
effort has been made to point out the way to those localities which
are recognized as especially interesting and important:

A Few Attractive Routes. —

DorcJiester via Grove Hall. — Green car marked "Dorchester"
on dasher and end signs. Take car at corner Franklin and Washing-
ton streets.

Dorchestc7' via Meeting House Hill. — Blue car marked " Meeting
House Hill" on dasher and " Dorchester" on end signs. Take car
at corner Franklin and Washington streets or at Union Station.



14 HANDY GUIDE TO BOSTON.

Forest Hills. — Green car marked " Forest Hills" on dasher and
" Forest Hills " on end signs. Take car at Union Station or at any
subway station. Forest Hills Cemetery is near the terminus of
this route.

Franklin Park. — Green car marked " Grove Hall " on dasher and
" Franklin Park " on end signs. Take car at Northern Union Station
or at any subway station.

Blinker Hill. — Green or yellow car marked " Roxbury and
Charlestown " on dasher and " Bunker Hill " on end signs. This car
may be taken at Scollay Square, or any subway station east of that
point.

Cypress Street, Brookline. — Blue car marked " Brookline " on
dasher and " Cypress Street " on end signs and top of car. Take car
at Park Street Subway Station. Back Bay Fens and Brookline Park
are on this route.

Janiaiea Plain. — Yellow car marked "Jamaica Plain'' on dasher
and end signs. Take car at Northern Union Station or any subway
station. This car passes near Jamaicaway and the Arnold Arboretum

Dai/is Square, West Somerville. — Yellow car marked "Charles
town" on dasher and " Clarendon Hill " on end signs. Take car at
Scollay Square or any subway station.

Magoiin Square, Somerville. — Yellow car marked "Charlestown"'
on dasher and " Magoun Square" on end signs. Take car passing]
through the subway at Scollay Square.

Milton. — Blue car marked " Field's Corner" on dasher and " Mil
ton " on end signs. Take car at corner Franklin and Washingto
streets, Northern Union Station.

Field's Corner. — Blue car marked " Field's Corner Crosstown '
on dasher, "Ashmont and Milton " on end signs. Take car at Par
Street Subway Station.

Neponset. — Blue car marked "Field's Corner" on dasher an
" Neponset " on end signs. Take car at Northern Union Station an
Franklin, corner Washington Street.

City Poijit.—^e([ car marked "South Boston" on dasher and
" City Point " on end signs. Take car at either Union Station or on
Washington Street, between Adams Square and Boylston Street
This car goes to Marine Park.

City Point to Harvard Square. — Red car marked "South


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Online LibraryJohn PitmanRand, McNally & Co.'s handy guide to Boston and environs .. → online text (page 1 of 16)