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FAITH AND FANCY.



BY

JOHN SAVAGE,

AUTHOR OF "SYBIL, A TBAGEDY."



NEW YORK :
JAMES B. KIRKER,

699 BROADWAY.

WASHINGTON, D. C. : PHILP & SOLOMON.

1864.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863,

BY JAMES B. KIKKER,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the
Southern District of New York.



PS



By the same Author,

In Press. Library Edition.

SYBIL,

A TRAGEDY IN FIVE ACTS.



904257

-05



TO THE

HON. CHARLES P. DALY, LL.D.,

JUDGE OF THE COURT OF COMMON ELEA8, NEW YORK,
ETC., ETC., ETC.



MY DEAB FRIEND :

With great esteem for your many virtues and
accomplishments, I dedicate this book of " Faith and Fancy" to
you, and sincerely regret my inability to make it more worthy
of your acceptance. While, however, I am thus proudly eager
to let my readers know how I value private worth and public
integrity ; how in your person I honor purity of feeling, up-
rightness of character, and steadfast devotion to principle ; and
admire the variety of talent and intellectual resources which
illustrate the unceasing promptings of your heart to generous
efforts in behalf of Letters, Science, Humanity, and Justice ;
while I thus take advantage of this Publication to boast sincere
affection and respect for one so widely useful and so generally
beloved, let me, under cover of the indulgence your public
services will command, add a very few words touching the vol-
ume I offer you.

Prefaces, it would seem, are not so much the fashion now as
in days gone by, though I am glad to see that some of our best
aud most powerful writers do not ignore the good old sociable
custom. I confess to a feeling of self-respect which would com-
pel me to raise my hat, by way of prefatory courtesy, to the
person who, either at his own or my desire, was going to be
the confidant of my hopes, woes, experiences, or sensations.
Every person who writes poetry, is in such a position of self-
exposure. If he aspire at all to transcribe or embody the feel-
ings which evoke or prompt human action, he cannot help



6 DEDICATION.

writing largely from his own heart's blood, and in the hues it
has taken by contact with Men, Faith, and Nature. Hence, I
desire to appropriate a paragraph of this dedicatory epistle to
briefly convey to my kind readers what otherwise might be
stated in a Preface.

With few exceptions, the pieces herein collected have been
published some anonymously and a few as translations in
various periodicals, during the past thirteen years; and in
many instances received a degree of popular, and in some cases
critical attention. I did not anticipate. After reproduction in
various presses, some have found their way into collections;
others have been read by professional readers to large and ap-
proving audiences ; and others again in the earlier portion of
the volume have been quoted by eminent and popular speakers
on both sides of the Atlantic. The song at the opening of the
Book, is placed there out of respect, not only to the subject
which should be first in our hearts, but also to the gallant
soldiers who gave it its first eclat on the historical occasion de-
scribed in the note. However undue and unmerited the kind
approbation referred to, / cannot overlook it ; and in deeply
appreciating it, feel some justification in collecting the scattered
links of years between the Press, the Public, and myself; and
with the addition of a few others welding all into a chain
which, I trust, will bind me still more pleasantly and serviceably
to them.

Begging you to receive this dedication as an humble though
earnest tribute to good nature and great services,
I have the honor to be

Your friend and servant,

JOHN SAVAGE.

DECEMBER 13, 1863.



CONTENTS.



FAOC

The Starry Flag 9

The Muster of the North 12

The Patriot Mother T. 22

Soldier's Song 23

God preserve the Union 26

A Battle Prayer 29

Requiem for the Dead of the Irish Brigade 81

Redemption 83

Flowereon my Desk 84

A Phantasy 88

Mina 40

"Remember we are Friends" 42

To an Artist 44

Lilla. 47

Haunted 49

Love's Imagination 61

" May God bless us" 53

Celia's Tea 58

A New Life 54

The God-Child of July 57

Breasting the World 60

At Niagara:

The Rapids 61

The Falls 62

Shane's Head... . 64



8 CONTEKTS.

PAOB

St. Anne's Well 68

Winter Thoughts :

I. The Dead Year 72

II. A Frosty Night 78

III. Snow on the Ground 74

IV. Summer always 75

V. Faces in the Fire 76

Washington 77

The Plaint of the Wild-flower 80

Game Laws .' 83

Dreaming by Moonlight 85

Effie Gray 107

The Parting of the Sun 109

He Writes for Bread 112

NOTES .. 115



FAITH AND FANCY.



THE STARRY FLAG. 1

AJ- Dteie't Land," Recitativo.



OH, the starry flag is the flag for me I
'Tis the flag of life ! the flag of the free !
Then hurrah ! hurrah !

For the flag of the Union !
Oh, the starry flag, &c.

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,

Hurrah ! hurrah !

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,
Where no "power in wrath can face it !

On town and field,

The people's shield,
No treason can erase it !

O'er all the land

That flag must stand,
Where the people's might shall place it.



10 FAITH AND FANCY.

II.

That flag was won through gloom and woe !
It has blessed the brave and awed the foe !

Then hurrah ! hurrah !

For the flag of the Union I
That flag was won, &c.
We'll raise that starry banner, boys,

Hurrah ! hurrah 1

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,
Where the stripes no hand can sever 1

On fort and mast,

We'll nail it fast,
To balk all base endeavor !

O'er roof and spire

A living fire
The Stars shall blaze forever !



'Tis the people's will, both great and small,
The rights of the States, the union of all 1

Then hurrah 1 hurrah !

For the flag of the Union !

'Tis the people's will, &c.
We'll raise that starry banner, boys,

Hurrah ! hurrah !

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,
Till it is the world's wonder !

On fort and crag

We'll plant that flag
With the people's voice of thunder I

We'll plant that flag

Where none can drag
Its immortal folds asunder !



THE STARRY FLAG. 11

IV.

We must keep that flag where it e'er has stood,
In front of the free, the wise, and the good 1
Then hurrah 1 hurrah 1

For the flag of the Union I

We must keep that flag, &c.

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,

Hurrah ! hurrah !

We'll raise that starry banner, boys,
On field, fort, mast, and steeple !

And fight and fall

At our country's call,
By the glorious flag of the people I

In God, the just, v

We place our trust,
To defend the flag of the people I

On board U. S. Transport " Jlarion," Monday, May 18, 1881.



12 FAITH AND FANCY.



THE MUSTER OF THE NORTH.

A BALLAD OF '61.
I.

" OH, mother, have you heard the news ?"

" Oh, father, is it true ?"
" Oh, brother, were I but a man"

" Oh, husband, they shall rue !"
Thus, passionately, asked the boy,

And thus the sister spoke,
And thus the dear wife to her mate,

The words they could not choke.
" The news ! what news ?" " Oh, bitter news they've

fired upon the flag

The flag no foreign foe could blast, the traitors down
would drag."

ii.
" The truest flag of liberty

The world has ever seen
The stars that shone o'er Washington

And guided gallant Greene !
The white and crimson stripes which bode

Success hi peace and war,
Are draggled, shorn, disgraced, and torn

Insulted star by star ;



THE MUSTER OP THE NORTH. 13

That flag which struggling men point to, rebuking kingly

codes,
The flag of Jones at Whitehaven, of Reid at Fayal

Roads."



" Eh, neighbor, can'st believe this thing ?"

The neighbor's eyes grew wild ;
Then o'er them crept a haze of shame,

As o'er a sad, proud child ;
His face grew pale, he bit his lip,

Until the hardy skin,
By passion tightened, could not hold

The boiling blood within ;

He quivered for a moment, the indignant stupor Stroke,
And the duties of the soldier in the citizen awoke.

rv.

On every side the crimson tide

Ebbs quickly to and fro ;
On maiden cheeks the horror speaks

With fitful gloom and glow ;
In matrons' eyes their feelings rise,

As when a danger, near,
Awakes the soul to full control

Of all that causes fear ;
The subtle sense, the faith intense, of woman's heart and

brain,

Give her a prophet's power to see, to suffer, and main-
tain.



Through city streets the fever beats
O'er highways byways, borne
2



14 FAITH AND FANCY.

The boys grow men -with madness,
And the old grow young in scorn ;

The forest boughs record the vows
Of men, heart-sore, though strong ;

Th' electric wire, with words of fire,

The passion speeds along,
Of traitor hordes and traitor swords from Natchez to



And like a mighty harp flings out the war-chant to the



And into caverned mining pits
' The insult bellows down ;
And up through the hoary gorges,

Till it shouts on the mountain's crown ;
Then foaming o'er the table-lands,

Like a widening rapid, heads ;
And rolling along the prairies,

Like a quenchless fire it spreads ;
From workman's shop to mountain top there's mingled

wrath and wonder,

It appalls, them like the lightning, and awakes them like
the thunder.



The woodman flings his axe aside ;

The farmer leaves his plough ;
The merchant slams his ledger lids

For other business now ;
The artisan puts up his tools,

The artist drops his brush,



THE MTTSTER OF THE NORTH. IS

And joining hands for Liberty,

To Freedom's standard rush ;
The doctor folds his suit of black, to fight as best he

may,
And e'en the flirting exquisite is " eager for the fray."



The students leave their college rooms,

Full deep in Greece and Rome,
To make a rival glory

For a better cause near home ;
The lawyer quits his suits and writs,

The laborer his hire,
And in the thrilling rivalry
The rich and poor aspire !

And party lines are lost amid the patriot commotion,
As wanton streams grow strong and pure within the
heart of ocean.



The city parks are thronged ;
In country stores there roars and pours

The means to right the wronged ;
The town halls ring with mustering ;

From holy pulpits, too,
Good priests and preachers volunteer

To show what men should do
To show that they who preach the truth and God above

revere,

Can die to save for man the blessings God has sent down
here.



16 FAITH AND FANCY.



And gentle fingers everywhere

The busy needles ply,
To deck the manly sinews

That go out to do or die ;
And maids and mothers, sisters dear,

And dearer wives, outvie
Each other in the duty sad,

That makes all say " Good-by"
The while in every throbbing heart that's pressed in fare-
well kiss

Arises pangs of hate on those who brought them all to
this.



The mustering men are entering
For near and distant tramps ;
The clustering crowds are centering

In barrack-rooms and camps ;
There is riveting and pivoting,

And furbishing of arms,
And the willing marching, drilling,

With their quick exciting charms,
Half dispel the subtle sorrow that the women needs must

feel,

When e'en for Right their dear ones fight the Wrong with
steel to steel.



With hammerings and clamorings,

The armories are loud ;
Toilsome clangor, joy, and anger,

Like a cloud enwrap each crowd ;



THE MUSTER OF THE NORTH. 17

Belting, buckling, cursing, chuckling,

Sorting out their " traps" in throngs ;
Some are packing, some knapsacking,

Singing snatches of old songs ;

Fifers finger, lovers linger to adjust a badge or feather,
And groups of drummers vainly strive to reveille to-
gether.



And into many a haversack

The prayer-book's mutely borne
Its well-thumbed leaves in faithfulness

By wives and mothers worn
And round full many a pillared neck,

O'er many a stalwart breast,
The sweetheart wife's the maiden love's

Dear effigy's caressed.
God knows by what far camp-fire may these tokens

courage give,

To fearless die for truth and home, i not for them to
live.



And men who've passed their threescore years,

Press on the ranks in flocks,
Their eyes, like fire from Hecla's brow,

Burn through their snowy locks ;
And maimed ones, with stout hearts, persist

To mount the belt and gun,
And crave, with tears while forced away

To march to Washington.
2*



18 FAITH AND FANCY.

" Why should we -not ? We love that flag 1 Great

God I" they choking cry
" We're strong enough 1 We're not too old for our

dear land to die I"



xv.

And in the mighty mustering,

No petty hate intrudes,
No rival discords mar the strength

Of rising multitudes ;
The jealousies of faith and clime

Which fester in success,
Give place to sturdy friendships

Based on mutual distress ;
For every thinking citizen who draws the sword, kno^

well
The battle's for Humanity for Freedom's citadel I



XYI.

0, Heaven 1 how the trodden hearts,

In Europe's tyrant world,
Leaped up with new-born energy
When that flag was unfurled !
How those who suffered, fought, and died,

In fields, or dungeon-chained,
Prayed that the flag of Washington
Might float while earth remained 1
And weary eyes in foreign skies, still flash with fire anew,
When some good blast by peak and mast unfolds that
flag to view.



THE MUSTER OF THE NORTH. 19

XVII.

And they who, guided by its stars,

Sought here the hopes they gave,
Are all aglow with pilgrim fire

Their happy shrines to save.
Here Scots and Poles, Italians, Gauls,

With native emblems trickt ;
There Teuton corps, who fought before

Far Freiheit undfitr Licht ; 9

While round the flag the Irish like a human rampart go !
They found Cead mille failthe* here they'll give it to
the foe.



From the vine-land, from the Rhine-land,
From the Shannon, from the Scheldt,
From the ancient homes of genius,
From the sainted home of Celt,
From Italy, from Hungary,

All as brothers join and come,
To the sinew-bracing bugle,

And the foot-propelling drum t

Too proud beneath the starry flag to die, and keep secure
The Liberty they dreamed of by the Danube/Elbe, and
Suir.



From every hearth bounds up a heart,
As spring from hill-side leaps,

To give itself to those proud streams
That make resistless deeps !

No book-rapt sage, for age on age,
Can point to such a sight



20 FAITH AND F4.NCY.

As this deep throb, which woke from rest

A people armed for fight.
Peal out, ye bells, the tocsin peal, for never since the

day

When Peter roused the Christian world has earth seen
w such array.

xx.

Which way we turn, the eyeballs burn

With joy upon the throng ;
Mid cheers and prayers, and martial airs,

The soldiers press along ;
The masses swell and wildly yell,

On pavement, tree, and roof,
And sun-bright showers of smiles and flowers

Of woman's love give proof.
Peal out, ye bells, from church and dome, in rivalrous

communion

With the wild, upheaving masses, for the army of the
Union!

XXI.

Onward trending, crowds attending,

Still the army moves and still :
Arms are clashing, wagons crashing

In the roads and streets they fill ;
O'er them banners wave in thousands,

Round them human surges roar,
Like the restless-bosomed ocean,

Heaving on an iron shore :
Cannons thunder, people wonder whence the endless river



With its foam of bristling bay'nets, and its cataracts of
drums.



THE MUSTER OF THE NORTH. 21



" God bless the Union army 1"

That holy thought appears
To symbolize the trustful eyes

That speak more loud than cheers.
" God bless the Union army,

And the flag by which it stands,
May it preserve, with freeman's nerve,

What freedom's God demands 1"
Peal out, ye bells ye women, pray ; for never yet went

forth

So grand a band, for law and land, as the muster of the
North.



22 FAITH AND FANCY.



THE PATRIOT MOTHER.



WHEN o'er the land the battle brand

In freedom's cause was gleaming,
And everywhere upon the air

The starry flag was streaming,
The widow cried unto her pride,

" Go forth and join the muster ;
Thank God, my son can bear a gun

To crown his race with lustre !
Go forth ! and come again not home,

If by disgrace o'erpowered ;
My heart can pray o'er hero's clay,

But never clasp a coward 1"

n.
"God bless thee, boy, my pride, my joy,

My old eyes' light and treasure
Thy father stood 'mid flame and blood

To fill the freeman's measure.
His name thy name the cause the same,

Go join thy soldier brothers !
Thy blow, alone, protects not one,

But thousands, wives and mothers.
May every blessing Heaven can yield

Upon thy arms be showered !
Come back a hero from the field,

But never come a coward."



SOLDIER'S SONG.



SOLDIER'S SONG.



I'D rather be a soldier

In a gallant, glorious cause,
To uphold a people's honor,

Their liberty and laws,
Than wearily and drearily

To pass my life away,
Living but for living's sake,
/ And dying ev'ry day.

Chorus. I'd rather be a soldier I

A tramping, camping soldier 1
A soldier away to the field
Where the God of right above,
Smiles upon the flag we love,
As we fight, fall, but never yield.

n.

I'd rather be a soldier

In the watchful bivouac,
'Mid night alarms, and calls to arms,

To meet the dawn's attack,
Than slumber hi the city's heart,

In callous, blank repose,



24 FAITH AND FANCY

When every man should be awake
To face the nation's foes.

I'd rather be a soldier, etc.



I'd rather be a soldier,

In the flashing, crashing van,
And win the love of mankind,

By the blow I strike for man,
Than mope in subtle selfishness,

With empty pleas for " Peace,"
While each delay to win the right

But makes the wrong increase.

I'd rather be a soldier, etc.

IV.

I'd rather be a soldier,

'Mid the battle's rage and ire,
With heart that mocks the sabre thrust,

And soul that scoffs the fire,
Than live to feel no glory

In my nation, flag, and race
Oh, better fall to crown them all,

Than live to their disgrace 1
I'd rather be a soldier, etc.



Then forward, gallant comrades !

Welcome any fate that comes ;
We rise to freedom's bugle-blast,

We step to freedom's drums :



SOLDIER'S SONG.

The God that gave us liberty,
Will see us through the foam

Of battle, while we bravely fight
For our dear ones at home.

I'd rather be a soldier, etc.
3



FAITH AND FANCY.



GOD PRESERVE THE UNION.

i.

BROTHERS, there are times when nations

Must, like battle-worn men,
Leave their proud, self-builded quiet

To do service once again :
When the banners blessed by fortune,

And by blood and brain embalmed,
Must re-throb the soul with feelings

That long happiness hath calmed.
Thus the Democratic faith that won

The nation, now hath need
To raise its ever stalwart arm,

And save what twice it freed.

So friends fill up

The brimming cup
In brotherly communion

Here's blood and blow

For a foreign foe,
And God preserve the Union.



There are factions passion-goaded,
There are turbulence and wrath,

And swarthy dogmas bellowing
Around the people's path ;



GOD PRESERVE THE UNION. 21

There are false lights in the darkness,

There are black hearts in the light,
And hollow heads are mimicking

The Jove-like people's might.
But, ah ! the Democratic strength

That smote an empire's brow,
Can with its regnant virtues tame

Mere home-made factions now.

So friends let's band

For fatherland
In brotherly communion,

Let every mouth

Cry " North and South,"
And God preserve the Union.



While the young Republic's bosom

Seems with rival passions torn
Growing from the very freedom

Of the speech within it born ;
Europe, in its haggard frenzy

To behold no earthly sod,
Where its white slaves may unbend them,

Orl)end but to Freedom's God
Europe madly hails the omen

Strains its bloodshot eyes to view
A native treason toiling at

The work it strove to do.

So, friends, let's all
Like a rampart wall
In granite-built communion,



28 FAITH AND FANCY.

Stand firmly proud,
'Gainst the kingly crowd
And God preserve the Union.



Since that day, when frantic people

Round the State House rose and fell,
Like an angry ocean surging

Round some rock-reared citadel
When the Quaker City trembled

'Neath the arming people's tramp,
And the bell proclaimed to iron men
Each house in the land a camp
Democracy has kept that bell

Still ^pealing sound on sound,
Until its potent energy
Haa throbbed the wide earth round.
So let it ring,
So let it bring
Us brotherly communion ;
Here's heart and hand,
For life and land I
And God preserve the Union !



A BATTLE PRAYER. 29



A BATTLE PRAYER.



GOD of the righteous, God of the brave !
Strengthen our arms our country to save ;
Lead us to victory's peace-giving charms :
God of the righteous, strengthen our arms !



God of the people's cause, God of the free !
From hearth and hill-side we look up to Thee ;
Make us, when battle-clouds thunder and roll,
Titans in body, and true men in soul.



God of our hopefulness, God of the right I
Be to us armor and courage in fight I
Lift us on valorous fervor to be
Terror and wrath to the foes of the free 1

IV.

God of humanity, God of the heart 1
Let not the man in the soldier depart ;
And when beneath us the ruthless foe reels,
Teach us the mercy the true hero feels.
3*



FAITH AND FANCY.



Gird up our loins then, O Lord ! for the truth,
The safety of age, and the freedom of youth ;
Leads us to victory's peace-giving charms :
God of the righteous strengthen our arms !



REQUIEM FOB THE DEAD OF THE IRISH BRIGADE. SI



REQUIEM FOR THE DEAD OF THE IRISH
BRIGADE.

COME, let the solemn, soothing Mass be said,
For the soldier souls of the patriot dead.

Let the organ swell, and the incense burn,
For the hero men who will ne'er return.

Men who had pledged to this land their troth,
And died to defend her, ere break their oath.

But if high the praise, be as deep the wail
O'er the exiled sons of the warlike Gael.

From their acts true men may examples reap ;
And women bless them, and glorying, weep.

Proud beats the heart while it sorrowing melts
O'er the death-won fame of these truthful Celts.

For the scattered graves over which we pray
Will shine like stars on their race alway.

Oh, what doth ennoble the Christian man,
If not dying for truth in freedom's van 1

What takes from Death all its terrors and gloom ?
Conscience to feel Justice blesses the tomb I



32 . FAITH AND FANCY.

And oh! what doth build up a nation's weal
But courage to fight for the truths we feel !

And thus did these braves, on whose graves we wait,
Do all that make nations and races great.

I

OBEMTJS.

Ye living, your hearts combine
In praise and prayer, to the heavenly shrine :

Ye widowed and stricken,

Your trustfulness quicken
With faith in the Almighty Giver ;

And may blessed repose

Be the guerdon of those
Who fell at Antietam and James's river,
By the Rappahannock and Chickahominy ;
Requiem (sternum dona eis dominet

May their souls on the Judgment-day arise ;

Et lux perpetua luceat eis.



BEDEMPTION.



REDEMPTION.

A sound heart la the life of the flesh. "-Proverbs.
I.

MISER, see that hoard of gold

Mistress, view that dower
Artist, look at yon fair mould

Beauty, wealth, and power :
There they are but what are these ?
False leaves decking sapless trees.

n.

Honesty for him hath naught

Truth for her no use
Yon fair shape no virtue brought

All are life's abuse :
But like Christ, one pure heart's birth
Brings redemption to an earth I



34 FAITH AND FANCY.



FLOWERS ON MY DESK.

YE tiny queens, lift up your pensive heads,

And fear not that a magic feeling weds
The air about the student's chamber ;

'Tis true those books inoculate the air

With their intense divinity,

And measure in the rhythm of each mystic prayer

The hopes and blessings of infinity :
But ye may into all their secrets clamber,

As little stars may wander through the skies,

And find out all the bliss of Paradise.

The poet and the plant are near allied ;

Nature's best offspring, she of both the pride :

So, fear thee not, nor fail to number,

Amongst thy friends those stately quartos which


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