John W. (John Woolf) Jordan.

Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania (Volume v.1) online

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Thomas Stewart.

John Stewart, son of the above, married Eliza-
beth Green.

The family of Farmer, or Farmar, held their
estate of Easton Neston, Northampton county,
England, in 1480. Richard Farmar excited the
hostilitv of Henry \TII on account of his adher-
ence to the Pope of Rome. His estates were confis-
cated, but were partially restored by Edward VI,
including the county mansion of Easton Neston.
He married Anna, daughter of Sir William
Browne. Their eldest son was John, knighted by
Queen Mary in 1552. ' His eldest son was
George, knighted in 1536. He entertained King



GENEALOGICAL AND PERSONAL MEMOIRS.



45



James at Easton Xeston in 1603. The son of
George and Mary Curson, his wife, was Robert,
who went to Ireland in the army of Queen Eliza-
beth. Received estates in Cork and Tipperary,
Ireland, for service to the crown. Eldest son of
this Robert was called Robert, and his eldest son.
Major Jaspar Farmer. The eldest son of Senior
George was Sir Hatton, his eldest son was Will-
iam, his eldest son was William. The eldest son
of William was Thomas, made Earl of Pomfret
in 1721. ]\Iajor Jaspar Farmar was also a son of
Robert Farmar, and a brother of Sir Walter
Farmar. IVIajor Jaspar Farmer was the uncle
of Lady Juliana Farmar. His son, that is. the
son of Major Jaspar, was Edward, our ancestor,
and was therefore the cousin of Lady Juliana
Farmar, who married Thomas Penn.

Edward Farmar's daughter Rachel married
William Dewees (second), their daughter Rachel
Dewees married Thomas Stewart. Their son,
John Stewart, married Elizabeth Green : their son,
Clement Stewart, married Harriet Heist Drink-
house. Their children are !Marie, Ralph Tindall.
Clarence Dudley, and Rodney Long.

The town of Easton, Northampton county,
Pennsylvania, was named after the country seat
of Lord Pomfret, who was by birth a Farmar. As
early as 1480 the Farmars were living at their
country home at Easton Neston. Lady Juliana
Farmar married Thomas Fenn, hence Thomas
Penn, who ordered the plan of Easton, called
many of the streets after names in the Farmar
family — Second street was formerly Farmar
street ; Third street was Pomfret ; Fourth street
was Hamilton, and Fifth was Juliana. North-
ampton county was named after the county of the
name in England, where was situated the country
seat of Lord Pomfret.

The change of name from Farmer to Farmar
was made by a younger branch of the family.
]\Iy brother, Edward Farmar Stewart, of Easton,
Pennsylvania, has a commentary on the Hebrews
m which is the name of Edward Farmar, who
formerly owned the book ; thence it passed to his
daughter, Rachel Dewees. now Farmar. and then
to Rachel Stewart, now Dewees : thence to John
Stewart, her son, and thence to Edward F., son



of John Stewart. The family of Farmar derives
from one of the companions-in-arms of William
the Conqueror, and was at a very early period
seated on the lordship of Somerton, in O.xford-
shire, England.

DEWEES FA:\1 ILY. This family is believed
to be identical with the D'Ewees of French his-
tory, and is of Huguenot descent. In 1742 Will-
iam Dewees, Sr., owned and carried on one of the
paper mills in the neighborhood of Germantown,
Pennsylvania. He built a large stone mansion at
\\'hitemarsh, and on the gable end can be seen
the initials W. D. R.

William Dewees, Jr. married Anna Christian-
sen. Their son, William Dewees (second), mar-
ried Rachel, daughter of Edward Farmar. Their
children were Thomas Dewees, Colonel William
Dewees, and Rachel Dewees. Rachel married
Thomas Stewart, then a lieutenant in the contin-
ental army. Colonel Dewees married (first) j\Iiss
Potts : second, Sarah Waters, and by her had
^\'aters, Thomas ^^'., George, William, and Anne.
Colonel \\'illiam Dewees owned the Valley Forge
at the time of the revolution. This Colonel Will-
iam Dewees was the brother of Rachel Stewart.
iicc Dewees, and was living with her brother at
the time of the attack on the Manor House.

I copy the following from a letter to me froiu
Howard Wood, grandson of Colonel William
Dewees : "When Washington intrenched the army
at Valley Forge, Colonel Dewees' family were re-
siding there, and many' instances have come to
my notice of the intercourse of this family with
the General and his wife during the terrible win-
ter of 1777. The Valley Forge was burned by the
British in September of that year. The proof
that the ^'alley Forge belonged to Colonel De-
wees is the following order from Washington,
taken from the orderly book of General Irvine,
April 29, 1778 : '"Complaint having been made by
Mr. Dewees, jjroprietor of the \'alley Forge 'that
the soldiers pull down the houses and break up
the timber of the buildings which is called ^'alley
Forge :' the commander-in-chief strictly forbids
all persons from damaging the said buildings and
works, which he hopes will be particularly at-



46



HISTORIC HOMES AND INSTITUTIONS.



tended to, especially when they consider the great
loss that j\Ir. Dewees has already suffered, and
the great waste our army has been under the
necessity of committing upon the wood and other
improvements."

Many years after the war, the family of Col-
onel Dewees through his son, William, a lawyer
at Washington, D. C, presented a claim for
indemnity. About the year 1820 government al-
lowed them a sum not even equivalent to the
interest on the amount of loss.

The Mansion House of the Iron Works is on
the Chester county side of the Valley Creek, and
stands about five hundred paces beyond the
bridge. It is a fine large house, and shows un-
mistakable signs of age, and it is certain that Col-
onel Dewees's family resided there while the army
was encamped at Valle}- Forge. In 1824 the
works were discontinued, and nothing now re-
mains but an immortal name.

BENJAMIN RUSH FIELD, M. D., of Fas-
ten, Pennsylvania, physician and author, comes
•of a long line of honorable ancestry whose history
. is interwoven with that of England and the
United States, and it is a noteworthy fact that
among his ancestors in both lines were a num-
ber of his own profession.

The ancient historA- of the Field family was
exhaustively written by one of its members, the
Rev. Henry M. Field, D, D., of New York City,
(a brother of Cyrus W. Field, the projector of
the first Atlantic telegraph cable), in a volume
which he wrote and distributed privately. In
this the author quoted Osgood Field, Esq., an
American gentleman long resident in London,
England, as follows :

"Hubertus de la Feld was in England within
a year or two of the Conquest, and in all prob-
ability came over with the Conqueror. He was
of the family of the Counts de la Feld of Colmar,
in Alsatia, on the German border of France, who
trace back to the darkest period of the middle
ages, about the si.xth century. Probably not a
dozen families in Europe can prove so high an
antiquity. The ancestors of the English de la
Felds had been seated at the Chateau de la Feld
for centuries before, and so early as the gloom-



iest times that followed the fall of the Roman
Empire. They held lands (according to the
feudal system) probably granted to them for
military services by William the Conqueror — the
original spelling of the family name 'Feld' being
derived from the verb to fell, field land being op-
posed to wood land, and meaning land where the
trees have been felled."

According to the authority above quoted, a
branch of the family probably went from Saxony
through France to England. The first appearance
of the Field family without the prefix "de la,"
was in that part of the West Riding of Yorkshire
which borders upon Lancashire. John Field, pa-
ternal great-grandfather of Dr. B. Rush Field,
said to have been a centenarian, went from Sax-
ony to Yorkshire, England, taking with him his
infant son Richard. Richard Field was brought
up at Dudley Hill, Bradford, Yorkshire, and after
graduating from the LTniversity of London, be-
came a member of the Royal College of Surgeons.
He spent the latter years of his life in America.
His wife, Phoebe Crldland, was born in Leicester-
shire, England ; her father was an extensive wool
manufacturer. The Cridland family have held
positions of trust in England, and several British
consuls in America were of that stock.

Cridland Crocker Field, son of Richard and
Phoebe (Cridland) Field, was born February 18,
1819, on board the American ship "Ann," upon
which his parents came to this country. The birth
occurred just as the vessel had come into Long
Island waters, within the bounds of Queens
county, and the captain wrapped a L^nited States
flag about the infant, who received from him his
middle name, Crocker. The parents went to
Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and thence
to Philadelphia, where the father practiced med-
icine in association with Dr. Physick, Dr. McClel-
lan, and others. He also held close personal and
professional relations with Professors William
E. Horner. William Gibson, D. Hayes Agnew,
and Samuel Gross. These gentlemen exercised a
potent influence over young Field, who entered
upon the study of medicine with all of them as
his friends, and some of the number as his instruc-
tors, notably Professor Horner, an accomplished





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GENEALOGICAL AND PERSONAL MEMOIRS.



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anatomist, and author of a standard work upon
his particular subject.

Cridland C. Field graduated from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania at the early age of eigh-
teen, and entered upon a professional career which
covered the long period of fiftv years, and was
marked by conspicuous usefulness in both the
fields of medicine and surgery. His surgical
operations were frequently referred to in lec-
tures in the University, and were favorably com-
mented upon by the "London Lancet," which
made him the subject of a highly appreciative
obituary notice. "His name became widely
known for the successful performance of many
of the most difficult operations in surgery. Those
which made him most famous were the removal of
a cervical tumor with ligation and excision of a
considerable part of the jugular vein; excision of
the entire femur, an operation unique in the an-
nals of surgery ; excision of the entire radius ;
and extirpation of the parotid gland, which dif-
ficult operation he performed several times.
These operations placed him in the front rank of
modern surgeons. His favorite region for oper-
ations was the neck, from which he removed
tumors that encompassed the carotid artery.
As a teacher, Dr. Field has not been surpassed, he
having sent more students to his favorite institu-
tion, the L'niversity of Pennsylvania, than any
physician in the Lehigh \'alley." — A'czc York
Herald, December 4, 1886. His death occurred
December 3, 1886.

In 1837, the year of his graduation, he mar-
ried Susannah Freeman, who was educated in the
iNIoravian schools of Bethlehem. She was a wo-
man of most amiable disposition, and was held in
afifection by all who knew her for her open-handed
benevolences. She was a native of Freemans-
burg, Xorthampton county, Pennsylvania, a
daughter of Jacob and Susannah (Butz) Free-
man. The village which witnessed her birth
was named for her father, who was a man of
ability and means. He was owner of most of
the land in the vicinity, and was elected to vari-
ous public offices. He was a descendant of Rich-
ard Freeman, who came from England about
1660, settling in Maryland, whence he removed



to Northampton, Pennsylvania. In the maternal
line Mrs. Field (mother of Dr. B. Rush Field),
was descended from Michael and Elizabeth
Messinger, and Michael Messinger was a mem-
ber of the "committee of observation" of North-
ampton county, formed at Easton, December 21,
1774, with the view of furthering the cause of
American independence.

Cridland and Susannah (Freeman) Field
were the parents of seven children, and among
whom were two — William Gibson Field and Ben-
jamin Rush Field — who attained distinction in
letters as well as in their respective professions.
The former named, residing in Enfield, Connecti-
cut, was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, October
25, 1 84 1. He graduated from the Easton high
school in 1858, from Lafayette College in 1862,
and from Harvard in 1863. He at once entered
the Harvard Law School, from which he grad-
uated in 1865. In the same )-ear he entered upon
practice at Easton, and was so occupied until
1887, when he removed to Brooklyn, New York,
and ten years later to his present home. While a
resident of Easton he was active in public and
educational aiTairs. He was founder and editor
of the Easton Daily Dispatch, for five terms sec-
retary of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Institute
of Northampton county, for several years a mem-
ber of the board of education, and for a time its
president. He was a frequent contributor to lead-
ing newspapers and magazines upon educational
and literary topics, and he often delivered ad-
dresses upon these subjects before various socie-
ties and public assemblages. Another brother,
Dr. George B. Wood Field, graduated from the
Easton high school in 1876, and from the IMedi-
cal Department of the L'niversity of Pennsylvania
in 1 88 1. He practices medicine and surgery
in Easton, Pennsylvania.

Benjamin Rush Field was born in Easton,
Pennsylvania, November 3, 1861. He began his
education in the public schools, and completed his
literary studies in Lafayette College. He studied
for his profession in the Medical Department of
the University of Pennsylvania, from which he
received his degree in 1883, just after attaining
his majority. He at once entered upon practice



48



HISTORIC HOMES AND INSTITUTIONS.



in his native city, in which he has been actively
and successfully engaged to the present time. In
1886-87 hs was the official physician of the
Northampton county prison, and he served for ten
years as physician for the coroner. He is fre-
quently called upon to give expert evidence in
important law cases.

A man of marked public spirit, Dr. Field has
been chosen to various important public positions
in which his excellent executive ability and talent
for organization proved most advantageous in the
promotion of community interests. In 1890-93,
as a Democrat, he sat as member and president
of the civic council, and discharged his duties with
such signal ability and high integrity that his
conduct was unstintingly commended even by his
political opponents. In the last year of his term
he was elected to the mayoralty for a term of
three years, and his administration was entirely
beneficial to the city. In February, 1899, he was
again elected to the same position by an increased
vote, in face of an adverse political majority.
His official term expired in 1902.

Since the opening of the Spanish-American
war. Dr. Field has been prominently identified
with military affairs. At the outset of the strug-
gle he assisted actively in recruiting and organ-
izing Company E, Eleventh Regiment Pennsyl-
vania National Guard, of which he was commis-
sioned captain by Governor Hastings, July 12,
1898. At the regimental election at Harrisburg
he was elected (August 20th) major of the Second
Battalion. After the close of the war, the Elev-
enth and Thirteenth Regiments were consoli-
dated under the -latter number, and he was again
elected major of the regiment, and so commis-
sioned by Governor Stone, and assigned to the
command of the First Battalion, with companies
in Scranton, Easton, Honesdale and ]\Iontrose.
August 25, 1904, he was promoted to lieutenant-
colonel, commissioned to that rank by Governor
Pennypacker.

Dr. Field occu]Mes a unique position in the
field of authorship, his works exhibiting a curi-
ously interesting study of Shakespeare from the
standijoint of a medico. His "Medical Thoughts



of Shakespeare," published in 1884, reached a
second edition in 1885, and a third edition is now
(1903) in preparation. This was followed by
"Shakespeare and Byron on Man, Woman and
Love," (1887), "]\Iedico-Shakespearian Fanati-
lism," (1888), and "An Argument refuting the
claim that Shakespeare possessed knowledge of
the circulation of the blood prior to Harvey's dis-
covery," (Loudon Lancet, November 17, 1888).
In 1892 he published "Fielding's Unconscious
Use of Shakespeare." In 1889 the Shakes-
peare Society of New York requested him
to edit volume five ("Romeo and Juliet''),
which was published in the "Bankside Edi-
tion of Shakespeare'' under the auspices of
the society. Besides these numerous works, ne-
cessitating persistent and industrious research.
Dr. Field has contributed numerous critical ar-
ticles on his favorite subject to "Shakespeariana,"
and for ten years he was dramatic critic for news-
papers of his city.

Dr. Field's excellent attainments as a Shakes-
pearian scholar have found recognition in his
election as honorary librarian of the New York
Shakespeare Society of New York City, a posi-
tion which he has occupied for the past seventeen
years, and in May. 1904, he was elected vice-
president. He is a member of numerous other
literary and social bodies. He is a member of the
board of trustees of the Easton Free Public Li-
brary, of the finance committee of the Organized
Charities of Easton, of the executive committee
of the Municipal League of Easton, of the Mili-
tary Service Institution of the United States, of
the Pennsylvania German Society, of Chi' Phi
Fraternity (Rho chapter of Lafayette College
and Nu chapter of University of Pennsylvania)
and of the Order of the Sons of the American
Revolution, in descent from his illustrious ma-
ternal ancestor, IMichael ]\'[essinger. He is also a
foremost member of the Easton Medical Society,
of which he was the founder, in 1890; and a
member of the Country Club of Northampton
count\', and of the Pomfret Club of Easton. In
the prime of his physical manhood, his intellectual
powers have not reached their zenith, and his



GENEALOGICAL AND PERSONAL MEMOIRS.



4g'



career thus far affords high promise of even
greater usefulness in his profession and in hter-
ature in the future.

Dr. Field was married, April 9, 1902, in Xew
York City, to ^liss Xan Edna Rounsavell, a
daughter of John Davis and j\Iary A. (de Hart)
Rounsavell, of Washington, New Jersey.

GEORGE J. KOEHLER, Jr., one of the
leading coal dealers on the south side of Easton,
Pennsylvania, handling the best Lehigh \'alley
coal; is descended from a good old German
family. His paternal grandfather was George
Koehler, who was born in Saxony, Germany, in
1820, and in early manhood married Catherine
Gundleheimer, also a native of that coimtry, where
they continued to make their home until after the
birth of their first child. In 185 1, when their
son, George J., Sr., was but two years old, they
emigrated to the United States and settled in
what is now known as W'eissport, Pennsylvania,
where they spent several years. From there the}'
removed to Berlinsville, where the grandfather
purchased a farm of one hundred and fifty-five
acres and turned his attention to its cultivation
and improvement. He was a man of sterling in-
tegrity, thrifty and honest, and prospering in his
undertakings, he accumulated a good portion of
this world's goods and was able to rear his family
in comfortable circumstances. He passed from
this life in 1902, at the ripe old age of eighty-two
3'ears, having survived his wife for five years,
her death occurring in 1897. The four children
born to them in this country are: William, Lucy,
Lizzie and Emma, all still living.

George J. Koehler, Sr., was born in Saxony,
Germany, in 1849, and during his infancy was
brought to this country by his parents. After
his school days were over he chose as a vocation
mining, which he followed for many years,
although all of the time he was not under ground.
as he held various positions, such as fireman and
engineer, in this way gaining a general knowledge
of the business in all its departments. For three
years he was also a locomotive engineer on the
Lehigh \"alley Railroad, and discharged his



duties to the entire satisfaction of the company.
In 1888 Mr. Koehler embarked in the coal busi-
ness on his own account, for which his mining
experience had so well fitted him, and to that
business he still devotes his time and attention^
having met with good success in the enterprise.-
In 1868, he married Miss Ella A. Brown, a-
daughter of Jonas and JNIaria Brown, and they;
now have two children: Clinton A., and George'
J., Jr., born in 1869 and 1870, respectively. The-'
wife and mother was born in Northampton:
county, in 1 85 1. She and her husband are active
and prominent members of Christ's Lutheran
church, of which he is a member of the council,
and he is also connected with the Independent
Order of Odd Fellows.

The gentleman whose name introduces this
sketch passed his boyhood and youth in Easton
and here attended school. He also obtained a
good musical education, and has since engaged
in teaching that art to some extent, having been
an instructor on the piano and organ for twelve
years. He finally formed a partnership with his
father in the coal business, in which he has been
eminently successful, and is to-day one of the
leading dealers of the city.

In 1894 was celebrated the marriage of
George J. Koehler, Jr. and iNIiss J\Iary Bossard,
and by this union three children have been born,
but Kenneth, born in 1899, is the only one living.
I\Irs. Koehler was born in 1870, and is a most
estimable lady. Air. Koehler and his wife are
members of Christ's Lutheran church and he has
served as its organist for six years. He is a
prominent member of the Odd Fellows Lodge of
Easton, in which he has held all the offices of
honor and is now past chief patriarch. He is a
young man of much natural ability, and will
undoubtedly rise to an enviable positioin both as
an artist and business man.

JEFFERSON TAYLOR. Throughout the
greater part of his life this gentleman has been a
resident of Easton and is to-day numbered '
among its most highly esteemed citizens. He was '•
born in this city on the 14th of April, 1836, and."



so



HISTORIC HOMES AND INSTITUTIONS.



is a son of RIahlon and Elizabeth (Overfield)
Taylor, the latter a representative of an old and
prominent famil_v of Northampton county.

Mahlon Taylor was also born in Easton, and
in early life learned the trade of boot and shoe
making. Later he became an extensive dealer in
that line of goods, and in the business accumu-
lated considerable wealth. He was a man of
sterling worth and exceptional business ability
and was also quite prominent in social circles.
His fellow citizens recognizing his worth and
ability called upon him to serve in several official
positions of honor and trust, including that of
city councilman. After a useful and well spent
life he passed away in 1885. but his widow is still
living at this writing in 1903. She is a native
e£ Monroe county, Pennsylvania, and the mother
of ten children, of whom five are still living, but
Jefferson is the only son now living in North-
ampton county.

Jefferson Taylor was reared and educated in
his native city, and like his father he learned the
shoemaker's trade during his youth. Removing
to Philadelphia, he spent a few years in that city,
working at his trade, but the greater part as well
as the best part of his life has been passed in
Easton, where he now lives, enjoying the high
regard of all who know him.

In 1857 Mr. Taylor was united in marriage
to Miss Ella A. Smith, a daughter of Tobias and
Anna (Ackerman) Smith, and to them have been
bom eight children, those still living being Alice
Hartzell, Emil>' J. McPherson, Thomas J.,
Charles R.. Annie Lilly, Sarah Burt and How-
ard.

MAHLON TAYLOR was born October 21,
1807, in Bucks county, on the Delaware river,
near Easton. He established himself in the boot
and shoe business in Easton at the age of twenty-
three years. He was elected sergeant of the
Washington Grays in 1831, of which military
organization the late Colonel Samuel Yohe was
captain, and was made second lieutenant of the
Easton Fencibles in 1845, 'li* commission, which
is still in possession of the family, being signed



by Governor Shunk. The late Andrew Reeder,



Online LibraryJohn W. (John Woolf) JordanHistoric homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania (Volume v.1) → online text (page 9 of 92)