Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain.

Universities and their sons; history, influence and characteristics of American universities, with biographical sketches and portraits of alumni and recipients of honorary degrees (Volume 1) online

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UNIVERSITIES



AND



THEIR SONS

HISTORY, INFLUENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES

WITH

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES AND PORTRAITS OF ALUMNI
AND RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
GENERAL JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN, LL.D.

EX-PRESIDENT OF BOWUOIN COLLEGE AND EX-GOVERNOR OF MAINE

SPECIAL EDITORS

Approved b'^ Authorities of the respective Universities



HARVARD


1636


PRINCETON


1746


WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, A.M.




JOHN DeWITT, D.D., LL.D.
JESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS, A.M.




YALE


1700


COLUMBIA .


• 1754


CHARLES HENRY SMITH, LL.D.




J. HOWARD VAN AMRINGE, Ph.D.


L.H.U., LL.D.



BIOGRAPHICAL EDITORS

CHARLES E. L. WINGATE, Harvard '83 JESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS, Princeton '92

ALBERT LEE, Yale '91 HENRY G. PAINE, Columbia "So

INTRODUCTION BT
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D.

UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION



ILLUSTRATED

Vol. I



BOSTON
R. HERNDON COMPANY



Copyright, i8g8, by
R. HERNDON COMPANY



The Vniversitf Press

CamhriJgt, U.S.A.



PREFACE



The Concord, Washington, D. C, April i, li
R. IIkrndon Company,

Sirs, — Your plan for " Universities and their Sons " greatly interests me. An
effort was made by the United States Bureau of Education in preparing for the
exhibition at the Centennial in Philadelphia to arouse among these institutions an
interest in their own history and in the work accomplished by their alumni ; plans
were carefully prepared and circulars issued, and gentlemen specially qualified were
employed to visit and confer with trustees and faculties of a considerable number
of institutions. This effort, in connection with that previously made, to make such
study of the lives of the alumni as would enable us to find the true value of this
grade of instruction, brought out surprising deficiencies in the records of many
institutions. Some had no complete set of their catalogues, much less could they
give any satisfactory account of the lives of their alumni.

Much has been done since, by the publishers of college books and journals,
and specially by the issue of college histories by the Bureau, to disseminate this
information. These results have been increased by the multiplication of alumni
associations. But all that has been done does not set forth the needs which
remain, which your plan will so far meet. The struggle to do the most imperative
work has forced omissions which it would seem should now cease.

How often do both the faculty and the students of a generation fail to gain
the inspiration justly theirs, by reason of the lack of knowledge of the sacrifices
and triumphs of those who have gone before them ? How many fail to bestow their
wealth in aid of this instruction, and how many sons fail to take advantage of it,
because they, or those advising them, do not know what those receiving it have
thereby gained to themselves, or what they have contributed to the uplift of man-
kind and the advancement of civilization? If every man is a debtor to his pro-
fession, how much more is every "University Son" indebted to his education?

May the whole body of " Universities' Sons " respond in the fullest measure of
co-operation to the promotion of your purpose so well planned, and whose execution
is so well assured by the character of your Editor-in-Chief and his associates.

Sincerely yours.



yhr-'^'~^~y^'n^ «2-5
19
36
157
272



4

60

6



4
39
50
;r,2



Post-
graduates.



122
56

23
76
9-



162
142



60
47







51
I -'4



45'
",346



'35



366



'theology.



153

400



47
'4



75



1,707

2-943

42

109

664

737

IS

5

391

9

3

42

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89

266

1,626



THE PRE-EMINENCE OF THE COLLEGE GRADUATE

President Charles F. Thwing, of Western Reserve University at Cleveland, Ohio, has taken
some pains ("Within College Walls," pp. 156 to 184) to ascertain the facts with regard to the
proportion of men of directive power who have come into the community from the college or
university. Taking the si.x x'olumes of Appleton's Cyclop;\idia of American Biograph\- he finds
sketches of 15,138 persons; of these 5,322 are college men. One out of every three persons of
sufficient distinction to claim a place in a biographical cyclop;edia is a college graduate. These
5,322 form, according to his estimate, one out of each fort_\- graduates now li\ing; while onK'
one out of ten thousand of the [)opulation that has not received higher education has found a
])lace in the C\cl(ii)a.'ilia nameil. " Into one group gather together ten thousand infants and send
no one to college ; one person out of that great group will attain through some work a certain
fame ; into another group gather fort\' college men on the da_\- of their giaduation and out of
these fort)-, one will attain recognition. The proportion is in fa\-or of the college men two
hundred and fift)- times." .See Dr. Thwing's table cui page 6.

In \-iew of the influence of higher etlucation to secure success in life, it is of gre.it interest
to inquire what it is that gi\-es higher education this \'alue. Is it the branches of stud\' chosen.



8 UNIJ'ERSiriES JND THEIR SONS

or is it the association with learned men as professors and with one's fellow-students in early



Online LibraryJoshua Lawrence ChamberlainUniversities and their sons; history, influence and characteristics of American universities, with biographical sketches and portraits of alumni and recipients of honorary degrees (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 87)