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to be figured by the method of major fractions and by the method
of equal proportions. 9 "In 1931, both methods happened, by a rare
accident, to give the same result/' 10 The method of equal propor-
tions was designated when congress amended the 1929 act in
November, 1941. 11

When Alaska and Hawaii were added to the Union, they were,
of course, each entitled to one representative. Congress acknowl-
edged this with a provision that

such Representative shall be in addition to the membership of the House of
Representatives as now prescribed by law: Provided, That such temporary in-
crease in the membership shall not operate to either increase or decrease the
permanent membership of the House of Representatives . . . nor shall
such temporary increase affect the basis of apportionment established by the
Act of November 15, 1941. . . .12

3. Edward V. Huntington, "A Survey of Methods of Apportionment in Congress,"
Senate Doc. 304 (serial no. 10469), 76th Cong., 3d Sess.

4. Ibid., p. 1.

5. Hon. Emanuel Celler, in Congressional Record, Appendix, v. 97, p. A 1386.

6. By 1911 there was one for every 194,182.

7. U. S. Statutes at Large, v. 37, pt. 1, pp. 13, 14.

8. New Mexico was admitted January 6; and Arizona, February 14, 1912.

9. U. S. Statutes at Large, v. 46, pt. 1, p. 26.

10. Huntington, loc. cit., p. III.

11. U. S. Statutes at Large, v. 55, p. 762.

12. Ibid., v. 72, p. 345; U. S. Code, Supp. 1, 1959, Title 48, ch. 3, sec. 8.



KANSAS CONGRESSMEN AND REAPPORTIONMENT 347

Under existing law, the President must transmit to the congress
during the first week of its January, 1961, session a statement of the
population of each state and the number of representatives to
which it is entitled. Within 15 calendar days after such state-
ment has been received, the clerk of the house must send to the
executive of each state a certificate of the number of representatives
to which such state is entitled. 13

With the total number of representatives to be elected in 1962
set at 435, mathematicians in the census bureau have already
worked out the gains and losses on the basis of population esti-
mates; and before congress assembles next January, the final figures
will have been well publicized. So unless congress decides to
modify existing laws, the information on the certificates to be re-
ceived from the house clerk will surprise no one.

Kansas, it has been generally agreed, will find the number "five"
on its certificate. Many suggestions have been offered as to what
action the legislature will take to provide for electing the five.
Perhaps an examination of what has been done in the past will
best suggest what may be expected of the 1961 legislature.

Kansas did not feel the effect of apportionment laws until 1872.
Knowing that it would be entitled, under the constitution, to one
representative when it became a state, Kansas elected Martin F.
Conway, on December 6, 1859, along with the state officials pro-
vided for by the Wyandotte constitution. Conway was in Wash-
ington when Kansas was admitted to the Union, January 29, 1861,
and was seated in congress the following day. 14 Conway and his
immediate successors served the state at large.

The apportionment law, approved February 2, 1872, gave three
representatives to Kansas. 15 In November, 1872, therefore, Kansas
elected three representatives at large. By an act of the Kansas
legislature approved March 2, 1874, the state was for the first time
divided into districts "for the election of representatives to the
Congress of the United States," 16 In November, 1874, and again
in 1876, each of these three districts chose one representative to
congress.

The 1878 population of Kansas was almost double that of 1870,
yet the number of representatives remained fixed at three. 17 On

13. U. S. Code, 1958, Title 2, ch. 1, sec. 2a.

14. Congressional Globe, v. 30, p. 652.

15. U. S. Statutes at Large, v. 17, p. 28.

16. Laws of Kansas, 1874, p. 11.

17. The 1870 population was 364,399; the 1878 estimate by the state board of
agriculture was 708,497.



348 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

September 24 a three-column notice to the people of Kansas ap-
peared in the Topeka Commonwealth wherein Former Gov. Sam-
uel J. Crawford announced his independent candidacy for rep-
resentative at large, contending that the population had increased
so much that it "entitles us, by every rule of right and of justice,
to an additional representation in Congress." He stated that he
believed "if an additional Member should be elected from the
State at Large, that upon a proper showing he would be ad-
mitted. . . ."

Future events proved how wrong this reasoning was, but it was
enough to convince and worry the Republican party. Ten days
later the state central committee met and nominated James R.
Hallowell as the Republican candidate. 18 Hallowell was elected
in November, receiving 73,978 votes to 60,158 for Crawford. 19
But on March 18, 1879, in the U. S. house of representatives,
When the State of Kansas was reached and the names called, The Clerk said:
The Clerk begs also to remark, with the permission and indulgence of the
Representatives-elect, that he has received a certificate accrediting an additional
Representative from the State of Kansas as elected from the State at large;
but as he is not aware of any law authorizing that State to have more than
three Representatives, he has not placed the name of the person who is claimed
to have been elected for the State at large upon the roll. 20

Thus ended the attempt to force congress to grant Kansas more
representation.

The census of 1880 assured Kansas of seven congressmen. In
1882 three were elected from the old districts and four from the
state at large, but in 1883 the legislature created seven districts
for the 1884 and following elections. 21

On the basis of the 1890 census Kansas was allotted eight rep-
resentatives. The legislature, however, did not create an additional
district until March 9, 1905. 22 Until after the 1906 election, seven
representatives served their own districts and one served the state
at large.

No further changes in Kansas' congressional districts were neces-
sary until after the 1930 census was taken, showing Kansas entitled
to seven instead of eight representatives. The 1931 legislature
set up seven districts for the 1932 election. 23

Again after the 1940 census, Kansas lost one seat in the house,

18. The Commonwealth, Topeka, October 5, 1878.

19. Secretary of State, Appendix to the First Biennial Report, 1878, p. 8.

20. Congressional Record, v. 9, pp. 4, 5.

21. Laws of Kansas, 1883, pp. 1, 2.

22. Ibid., 1905, pp. 212, 213.

23. Ibid., 1931, pp. 31, 32.



KANSAS CONGRESSMEN AND REAPPORTIONMENT 349

and the 1941 legislature reorganized the state into the present six
districts. 24

According to law, the certification of the number of represent-
atives Kansas will have in 1963 should reach the governor in Janu-
ary, 1961. The legislature will be in session and may redistrict
the state as it did in 1931 and 1941. If the legislature prefers to
wait, the federal statute provides that "if there is a decrease in
the number of Representatives and the number of districts in such
State exceeds such decreased number of Representatives, they
shall be elected from the State at large." 25

II. KANSAS CONGRESSMEN, 1861-1960

Political affiliation has been indicated in the following list by (R) Repub-
lican; (D) Democrat; (I) Independent; and (P) People's party. In 1890
the People's party was commonly known as the Alliance; later it was better
known as the Populist.

AT LARGE

CONWAY, MARTIN FRANKLIN, Lawrence. (R) Elected Dec. 6, 1859; served
Jan. 30, 1861-Mar. 3, 1863; d. Washington, D. C., Feb. 15, 1882.

WILDER, ABEL CARTER, Leavenworth. (R) Mar. 4, 1863-Mar. 3, 1865; d.
San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 22, 1875.

CLARKE, SIDNEY, Lawrence. (R) Mar. 4, 1865-Mar. 3, 1871; d. Oklahoma
City, Okla., June 19, 1909.

LOWE, DAVID PERLEY, Fort Scott. (R) Mar. 4, 1871-Mar. 3, 1875; d. Fort
Scott, Apr. 10, 1882.

COBB, STEPHEN ALONZO, Wyandotte. (R) Mar. 4, 1873-Mar. 3, 1875; d.
Wyandotte, Aug. 24, 1878.

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM ADDISON, Salina. (R) Mar. 4, 1873-Mar. 3, 1875; d. Fort
Gibson, I. T., Nov. 30, 1893. (Also 1st dist.)

HALLOWELL, JAMES REED, Columbus. (R) Elected Nov. 5, 1878; refused a
seat in the house Mar. 18, 1879, since Kansas was entitled to only 3 mem-
bers; d. Crawfordsville, Ind., June 24, 1898.

PETERS, SAMUEL RITTER, Newton. (R) Mar. 4, 1883-Mar. 3, 1885; election
unsuccessfully contested by Samuel N. Wood; d. Newton, Apr. 21, 1910.
(Also 7th dist.)

MORRILL, EDMUND NEEDHAM, Hiawatha. (R) Mar. 4, 1883-Mar. 3, 1885;
d. San Antonio, Tex., Mar. 14, 1909. (Also 1st dist.)

HANBACK, LEWIS, Salina. (R) Mar. 4, 1883-Mar. 3, 1885; d. Kansas City,
Sept. 6, 1897. (Also 6th dist.)

PERKINS, BISHOP WALDEN, Oswego. (R) Mar. 4, 1883-Mar. 3, 1885; d. Wash-
ington, D. C., June 20, 1894. (Also 3d dist.)

HARRIS, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Linwood. (P) Mar. 4, 1893-Mar. 3, 1895;
d. Chicago, III, Dec. 20, 1909.

24. Ibid., 1941, p. 25. The apportionment after the 1950 census did not affect Kansas.

25. U. S. Code, 1958, Title 2, ch. 1, sec. 2a.



350 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

BLUE, RICHARD WHITING, Pleasanton. (R) Mar. 4, 1895-Mar. 3, 1897; d.
Bartlesville, I. T., Jan. 28, 1907.

BOTKIN, JEREMIAH DUNHAM, Winfield. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3, 1899; d.
Liberal, Dec. 29, 1921.

BAILEY, WILLIS JOSHUA, Baileyville. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 3, 1901; d. Kan-
sas City, May 19, 1932.

SCOTT, CHARLES FREDERICK, lola. (R) Mar. 4, 1901-Mar. 3, 1907; d. lola,
Sept. 18, 1938. (Also 2d dist.)

FIRST DISTRICT

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM ADDISON, Salina. (R) Mar. 4, 1875-Mar. 3, 1879; d. Fort

Gibson, I. T., Nov. 30, 1893. (Also at large.)
ANDERSON, JOHN ALEXANDER, Manhattan. (R) Mar. 4, 1879-Mar. 3, 1885;

d. Liverpool, Eng., May 18, 1892. (Also 5th dist.)
MORRILL, EDMUND NEEDHAM, Hiawatha. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 3, 1891; d.

San Antonio, Tex., Mar. 14, 1909. (Also at large.)
BRODERICK, CASE, Holton. (R) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3, 1899; d. Holton, Apr.

1, 1920.

CURTIS, CHARLES, Topeka. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Jan. 28, 1907; resigned to be-
come senator; d. Washington, D. C., Feb. 8, 1936. (Also 4th dist.)
ANTHONY, DANIEL READ, JR., Leavenworth. (R) Elected May 23, 1907; vice

Curtis; served Dec. 2, 1907-Mar. 3, 1929; d. Leavenworth, Aug. 4, 1931.
LAMBERTSON, WILLIAM PURNELL, Fairview. (R) Mar. 4, 1929-Jan. 3, 1945;

d. Hiawatha, Oct. 26, 1957.

COLE, ALBERT MCDONALD, Holton. (R) Jan. 3, 1945-Jan. 3, 1953.
MILLER, HOWARD S., Morrill. (D) Jan. 3, 1953- Jan. 3, 1955.
AVERY, WILLIAM H., Wakefield. (R) Jan. 3, 1955-

SECOND DISTRICT

GOODIN, JOHN RANDOLPH, Humboldt. (I) Mar. 4, 1875-Mar. 3, 1877; d.
Wyandotte, Dec. 18, 1885.

HASKELL, DUDLEY CHASE, Lawrence. (R) Mar. 4, 1877-Dec. 16, 1883; d.
Washington, D. C., Dec. 16, 1883.

FUNSTON, EDWARD HOGUE, lola. (R) Elected Mar. 1, 1884, vice Haskell;
served Mar. 21, 1884-Aug. 2, 1894, when contested 1892 election was de-
cided in favor of H. L. Moore; d. lola, Sept. 10, 1911.

MOORE, HORACE LADD, Lawrence. (D) Aug. 2, 1894-Mar. 3, 1895; d. Law-
rence, May 1, 1914.

MDLLER, ORRIN LARABEE, Kansas City. (R) Mar. 4, 1895-Mar. 3, 1897; d.
Kansas City, Sept. 11, 1926.

PETERS, MASON SUMMERS, Kansas City. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3, 1899;
d. Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 14, 1914.

BOWERSOCK, JUSTIN DE WITT, Lawrence. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 3, 1907;
d. Lawrence, Oct. 27, 1922.

SCOTT, CHARLES FREDERICK, lola. (R) Mar. 4, 1907-Mar. 3, 1911; d. lola,
Sept. 18, 1938. (Also at large.)



KANSAS CONGRESSMEN AND REAPPORTIONMENT 351

MITCHELL, ALEXANDER CLARK, Lawrence. (R) Mar. 4-July 7, 1911; d. Law-
rence, July 7, 1911.
TAGGART, JOSEPH, Kansas City. (D) Elected Nov. 7, 1911, vice Mitchell;

served Dec. 4, 1911-Mar. 3, 1917; d. Wadsworth, Dec. 3, 1938.
LITTLE, EDWARD CAMPBELL, Kansas City. (R) Mar. 4, 1917- June 27, 1924;

d. Washington, D. C., June 27, 1924.
GUYER, ULYSSES SAMUEL, Kansas City. (R) Elected Nov. 4, 1924, vice Little;

served Dec. 1, 1924-Mar. 3, 1925; d. Bethesda, Md., June 5, 1943.
LITTLE, CHAUNCEY BUNDY, Olathe. (D) Mar. 4, 1925-Mar. 3, 1927; d. Olathe,

Sept. 29, 1952.
GUYER, ULYSSES SAMUEL, Kansas City. (R) Mar. 4, 1927- June 5, 1943; d.

Bethesda, Md., June 5, 1943.
SCRIVNER, ERRETT POWER, Kansas City. (R) Elected Sept. 14, 1943, vice

Guyer; served Sept. 28, 1943-Jan. 3, 1959.
GEORGE, NEWELL A., Kansas City. (D) Jan. 3, 1959-

THIRD DISTRICT

BROWN, WILLIAM RIPLEY, Hutchinson. (R) Mar. 4, 1875-Mar. 3, 1877; d.
Kansas City, Mo., Mar. 4, 1916.

RYAN, THOMAS, Topeka. (R) Mar. 4, 1877-Mar. 3, 1885; d. Muskogee, Okla.,
Apr. 5, 1914. (Also 4th dist.)

PERKINS, BISHOP WALDEN, Oswego. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 3, 1891; d. Wash-
ington, D. C., June 20, 1894. (Also at large.)

CLOVER, BENJAMIN HUTCHINSON, Cambridge. (P) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3, 1893;
d. Douglass, Dec. 30, 1899.

HUDSON, THOMAS JEFFERSON, Fredonia. (P) Mar. 4, 1893-Mar. 3, 1895; d.
Wichita, Jan. 4, 1923.

KmKPATRiCK, SNYDER SOLOMON, Fredonia. (R) Mar. 4, 1895-Mar. 3, 1897;
d. Fredonia, Apr. 5, 1909.

RIDGELY, EDWIN REED, Pittsburg. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3, 1901; d. Girard,
Apr. 23, 1927.

JACKSON, ALFRED METCALF, Winfield. (D) Mar. 4, 1901-Mar. 3, 1903; d.
Winfield, June 11, 1924.

CAMPBELL, PHILIP PITT, Pittsburg. (R) Mar. 4, 1903-Mar. 3, 1923, d. Wash-
ington, D. C., May 26, 1941.

SPROUL, WILLIAM HENRY, Sedan. (R) Mar. 4, 1923-Mar. 3, 1931; d. Kansas
City, Mo., Dec. 27, 1932.

McGuciN, HAROLD CLEMENT, Coffeyville. (R) Mar. 4, 1931-Jan. 3, 1935; d.
Hot Springs, Ark., Mar. 7, 1946.

PATTERSON, EDWARD WHITE, Pittsburg. (D) Jan. 3, 1935- Jan. 3, 1939; d.
Weir, Mar. 7, 1940.

WINTER, THOMAS DANIEL, Girard. (R) Jan. 3, 1939-Jan. 3, 1947; d. Pitts-
burg, Nov. 7, 1951.

MEYER, HERBERT ALTON, Independence. (R) Jan. 3, 1947-Oct. 2, 1950; d.
Bethesda, Md., Oct. 2, 1950.



352 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

GEORGE, MYRON VIRGIL, Altamont. (R) Elected Nov. 7, 1950, vice Meyer;

served Nov. 27, 1950-Jan. 3, 1959.
HARGIS, DENVER D., Coffeyville. (D) Jan. 3, 1959-

FOURTH DISTRICT

RYAN, THOMAS, Topeka. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Apr. 3, 1889; announced his

resignation to become minister to Mexico; d. Muskogee, Okla., Apr. 5, 1914.

(Also 3d dist.)
KELLEY, HARRISON, Burlington. (R) Elected May 21, 1889, vice Ryan; served

Dec. 2, 1889-Mar. 3, 1891; d. Burlington, July 24, 1897.
OTIS, JOHN GRANT, Topeka. (P) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3, 1893; d. Topeka, Feb.

22, 1916.
CURTIS, CHARLES, Topeka. (R) Mar. 4, 1893-Mar. 3, 1899; d. Washington,

D. C., Feb. 8, 1936. (Also 1st dist.)
MILLER, JAMES MONROE, Council Grove. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 3, 1911; d.

Council Grove, Jan. 20, 1926.
JACKSON, FRED SCHUYLEH, Eureka. (R) Mar. 4, 1911-Mar. 3, 1913; d. Topeka,

Nov. 21, 1931.
DOOLITTLE, DUDLEY, Strong City. (D) Mar. 4, 1913-Mar. 3, 1919; d. Em-

poria, Nov. 14, 1957.
HOCH, HOMER, Marion. (R) Mar. 4, 1919-Mar. 3, 1933; d. Topeka, Jan. 30,

1949.
CARPENTER, RANDOLPH, Marion. (D) Mar. 4, 1933- Jan. 3, 1937; d. Topeka,

July 26, 1956.
REES, EDWARD H., Emporia. (R) Jan. 3, 1937-

FIFTH DISTRICT

ANDERSON, JOHN ALEXANDER, Manhattan. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 3, 1891;
d. Liverpool, Eng., May 18, 1892. (Also 1st dist.)

DAVIS, JOHN, Junction City. (P) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3, 1895; d. Topeka, Aug.
1, 1901.

CALDERHEAD, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Marysville. (R) Mar. 4, 1895-Mar. 3,
1897; d. Enid, Okla., Dec. 18, 1928.

VINCENT, WILLIAM DAVIS, Clay Center. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3, 1899; d.
St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 27, 1922.

CALDERHEAD, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Marysville. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 3,
1911; d. Enid, Okla., Dec. 18, 1928.

REES, ROLLIN RAYMOND, Minneapolis. (R) Mar. 4, 1911-Mar. 3, 1913; d.
Anaheim, Cal., May 30, 1935.

HELVERING, GUY TRESBLLIAN, Marysville. (D) Mar. 4, 1913-Mar. 3, 1919;
d. Washington, D. C., July 4, 1946.

STRONG, JAMES GEORGE, Blue Rapids. (R) Mar. 4, 1919-Mar. 3, 1933; d.
Washington, D. C., Jan. 11, 1938.

AYRES, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Wichita. (D) Mar. 4, 1933-Aug. 21, 1934; an-
nounced his resignation to accept appointment on federal trade commis-
sion; d. Washington, D. C., Feb. 17, 1952. (Also 8th dist.)



KANSAS CONGRESSMEN AND REAPPORTIONMENT 353

HOUSTON, JOHN MILLS, Newton. (D) Jan. 3, 1935-Jan. 3, 1943.

HOPE, CLIFFORD RAGSDALE, Garden City. (R) Jan. 3, 1943-Jan. 3, 1957.

(Also Tthdist.)
BREEDING, J. FLOYD, Rolla. (D) Jan. 3, 1957-

SIXTH DISTRICT

HANBACK, LEWIS, Salina. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 3, 1887; d. Kansas City,
Sept. 6, 1897. (Also at large.)

TURNER, ERASTUS JOHNSON, Hoxie. (R) Mar. 4, 1887-Mar. 3, 1891; d. Los
Angeles, Cal., Feb. 10, 1933.

BAKER, WILLIAM, Lincoln. (P) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3, 1897; d. Lincoln, Feb.
1, 1910.

McCoRMicK, NELSON B., Phillipsburg. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3, 1899; d.
Phillipsburg, Apr. 10, 1914.

REEDER, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Logan. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 3, 1911; d.
Beverly Hills, Cal., Nov. 7, 1929.

YOUNG, ISAAC DANIEL, Beloit. (R) Mar. 4, 1911-Mar. 3, 1913; d. Beloit, Dec.
10, 1927.

CONNELLY, JOHN ROBERT, Colby. (D) Mar. 4, 1913-Mar. 3, 1919; d. Con-
cordia, Sept. 9, 1940.

WHITE, HAYS BAXTER, Mankato. (R) Mar. 4, 1919-Mar. 3, 1929; 1926 elec-
tion unsuccessfully contested by W. H. Clark; d. Mankato, Sept. 29, 1930.

SPARKS, CHARLES ISAAC, Goodland. (R) Mar. 4, 1929-Mar. 3, 1933; d. Good-
land, Apr. 30, 1937.

MCCARTHY, KATHRYN (O'LOUGHLIN), Hays. (D) Mar. 4, 1933- Jan. 3, 1935;
elected as Kathryn O'Loughlin, she married Daniel M. McCarthy, Feb. 4,
1933; d. Hays, Jan. 16, 1952.

CARLSON, FRANK, Concordia. (R) Jan. 3, 1935-Jan. 3, 1947.

SMITH, WINT, Mankato. (R) Jan. 3, 1947- ; 1958 election unsuccessfully
contested by Elmo J. Mahoney.

SEVENTH DISTRICT

PETERS, SAMUEL RITTER, Newton. (R) Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 3, 1891; d. New-
ton, Apr. 21, 1910. (Also at large.)
SIMPSON, JEREMIAH (JERRY), Medicine Lodge. (P) Mar. 4, 1891-Mar. 3,

1895; d. Wichita, Oct. 23, 1905.
LONG, CHESTER ISAIAH, Medicine Lodge. (R) Mar. 4, 1895-Mar. 3, 1897; d.

Washington, D. C., July 1, 1934.
SIMPSON, JEREMIAH (JERRY), Medicine Lodge. (P) Mar. 4, 1897-Mar. 3,

1899; d. Wichita, Oct. 23, 1905.
LONG, CHESTER ISAIAH, Medicine Lodge. (R) Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 4, 1903;

resigned to become senator; d. Washington, D. C., July 1, 1934.
MURDOCK, VICTOR, Wichita. (R) Elected May 26, 1903, vice Long; served

Nov. 9, 1903-Mar. 3, 1907; d. Wichita, July 8, 1945. (Also 8th dist.)
MADISON, EDMOND HAGGARD, Dodge City. (R) Mar. 4, 1907-Sept. 18, 1911;

d. Dodge City, Sept. 18, 1911.



354 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

NEELEY, GEORGE ARTHUR, Hutchinson. (D) Elected Jan. 9, 1912, vice Madi-
son; served Jan. 29, 1912-Mar. 3, 1915; d. Hutchinson, Jan. 1, 1919.

SHOUSE, JOUETT, Kinsley. (D) Mar. 4, 1915-Mar. 3, 1919.

TINCHER, JASPER NAPOLEON, Medicine Lodge. (R) Mar. 4, 1919-Mar. 3,
1927; d. Hutchinson, Nov. 6, 1951.

HOPE, CLIFFORD RAGSDALE, Garden City. (R) Mar. 4, 1927-Jan. 3, 1943.
(Also 5th dist.)

EIGHTH DISTRICT

MURDOCK, VICTOR, Wichita. (R) Mar. 4, 1907-Mar. 3, 1915; d. Wichita, July

8, 1945. (Also 7th dist.)
AYRES, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Wichita. (D) Mar. 4, 1915-Mar. 3, 1921; d.

Washington, D. C., Feb. 17, 1952.
BIRD, RICHARD ELY, Wichita. (R) Mar. 4, 1921-Mar. 3, 1923; d. Long Beach,

Cal., Jan. 10, 1955.
AYRES, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Wichita. (D) Mar. 4, 1923-Mar. 3, 1933; d.

Washington, D. C., Feb. 17, 1952. (Also 5th dist.)



The Early Careers of William Bradford Waddell and
William Hepburn Russell: Frontier Capitalists

RAYMOND W. SETTLE and MARY LUND SETTLE

(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)

THE story of the early life and career of Alexander Majors,
partner of William B. Waddell and William H. Russell in the
great freighting firm of Russell, Majors & Waddell, is not included
in detail herein because it is fully told elsewhere. 1 Little, however,
has been known or told about the other two. To begin with, it is
significant that to a very great degree the business careers of Wad-
dell and Russell, even when they were not partners in the same
undertaking, always ran parallel to each other. Living as they did
in the pioneer town of Lexington, Mo., the metropolis of western
Missouri for many years, it was inevitable that they should be more
or less involved in the same social, civic, and business enterprises
from 1836, the year of Waddell's settlement in the community. Al-
though they differed greatly in racial ancestry, background, and
environment, each seems to have been so irresistibly drawn to the
other that a kind of Damon and Pythias relationship existed between
them. While they were intimate, just and fair in their dealings
with Majors, neither of them felt toward him as they did toward each
other.

The Waddell family originated in Glasgow, Scotland, where John,
I, the immigrant ancestor of the American branch, was born in 1724.
As a boy he was apprenticed to a man by the name of Carter, but
in what trade or occupation he was trained is not known. In view
of the youth's later life it is probable that he was a merchant. In
1735, when he was 11 years of age, Carter brought him to Fauquier
county, Virginia, where the lad grew to young manhood. 2

In 1757, at 33 years of age, John, I, married Elizabeth Green,
also of Virginia. Their eldest child was William, who was a soldier
in the Revolutionary War. He served seven years in the army,

MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND W. SETTLE of Monte Vista, Colo., have written several Western
books, including March of the Mounted Riflemen (1940), Empire on Wheels (1949), and
Saddles and Spurs ( 1955 ) . They have also collaborated on numerous magazine articles.

1. Alexander Majors, Seventy Years on the Frontier (Chicago and New York, 1893);
Hildegarde Hawthorne, Ox-Team Miracle (New York, 1942); Raymond W. Settle and Mary
Lund Settle, Empire on Wheels (Stanford, 1949) pp. 12-14; Settle and Settle, Saddles and
Spurs (Harrisburg, Pa., 1955), pp. 6-15.

2. Henry C. Chiles, "William Bradford Waddell, 1807-1872." Ms. copy in author's
library. "Waddell, Phillips, Byram, Bradford Families" Ms. This extensive genealogy is
typewritten and in the possession of Mrs. W. B. Waddell, Lexington, Mo.

(355)



356 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

was made sergeant in the Pennsylvania volunteers, and participated
in the Battles of Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, and others. Patrick
Henry gave him a black and white striped blanket, which was kept
in the family for many years. In that conflict he lost an eye in
battle. He also served in the War of 1812. 3

The seventh child of John Waddell, I, and Elizabeth Green was
John Waddell, II, who was born in 1779. John, II, first married
Catharine Bradford, a descendant of Gov. William Bradford, of
Plymouth colony. Their eldest son, William Bradford, was born
in Fauquier county, Virginia, October 14, 1807. 4 When he was
four years of age his mother died, his father married Sarah Crow
in 1813, and two years later the family migrated to Mason county,
Kentucky. 5

By the time young William Bradford Waddell was 17 Kentucky
had been a state 15 years. Evidence that it had once been a crude
raw frontier was rapidly disappearing, and immigrants from the
east no longer came in huge numbers. The new Meccas toward
which home-seeking pilgrims now bent their steps were Missouri
and Illinois. Living as he did upon the romantic highroad to the
newest frontier, the Ohio river, Waddell saw the great flatboats
loaded with men, women, children, horses, cattle, and household
possessions floating boldly downstream. It was therefore natural
that an urge to join them and "Go West" should seize him.

In 1824, at 17 years of age, Waddell yielded to the impulse, joined
the stream of travelers, and went to Galena, 111., where he found em-
ployment in the old lead mines. Family tradition holds that he ran
away from home. 6 Perhaps he did, then again it is more than likely
that he did not, for in those days it was customary for young men to
leave the older communities and follow the moving frontier toward
the setting sun. After a short stay at Galena he went to St. Louis,
Mo., where he clerked in the Berthoud & McCleery store. 7 Here on
the very threshold of the illimitable, still mysterious West, he found
the type of life and people he had always known. In fact it is not
impossible that he found old neighbors and friends from Mason
county in the city, for many from that area had gone to Missouri.

Having become the farthest Western state three years before
WaddelFs arrival, Missouri was rapidly forging ahead in the devel-

3. Grace M. Cheatham, "Genealogy of John Waddell." Ms. copy in author's library.

4. Chiles, op. cit; Lexington (Mo.) Intelligencer, April 10, 1872, William B. Waddell
obituary.

5. Mrs. Alonzo Slayback, "Genealogy of the John Waddell Family." Ms. copy in



Online LibraryKansas State Historical SocietyThe Kansas historical quarterly (Volume 26) → online text (page 40 of 59)