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I

60th CONGRESS : : 1st SESSION

DECEMBER 2, 1907-MAY 30, 1908



HOUSE DOCUMENTS



IN 108 VOLUMES



Vol 19



WASHINGTON:: GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:: 1908

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CONTENTS

No.

57. Examination of Deckers Creek, W. Va.

58. Examination of Beech River, Tenn.

69. Examination of Blaine Harbor, Wash.

70. Examination for ship canal connecting Paget Sound with Grays Harbor.

71. Examination of Au Sable River, Mich.

72. Examination of Grand River, Mich.

73. ^Examination of Menominee Harbor, Mich.

74. Examination of Coscob Harbor, Conn.

75. Examination of Niagara River from Tonawanda to Gill Creek, N. Y.

76. Examination of Lower Thoroughfare, at Wenona, Deal Island, Md.

77. Examination of Islais Creek, Cal.

78. Examination of Little River, Del.

79. Examination of Minisceongo River, N. Y.

80. Examination of Branford Harbor, Conn.

81. Examination of Dunkirk Harbor, N. Y.

82. Examination of Newport Harbor, Cal.

83. Examination of Erie Harbor, Pa.

216. Examination of Cheat River, W. Va. and Pa.

217. Examination of Big Sandy River, Tenn.

218. Surplus water over Govt dams in Miss. R. between St Paul and Minneapolis.

219. Examination of Boyce Landing, Red River, La.

220. Examination of Caddo Lake, Tex. and La.

221. Examination and survey of Duluth Harbor, Minn.

222. Examination of headwaters of Big Sandy R., including Pound R. & Russell Fork.

223. Examination of Richland Creek, Tenn.

224. Examination and survey of Shem Creek, S. C.

324. Examination of Kewaunee Harbor, Wis.

325. Examination of eastern entrance to Keweenaw Canal, Mich.

326. Report regarding? wharfage privileges at Brunswick Harbor, Ga.

327. Examination and survey of Eight Mile River and East Branch, Connecticut R.

328. Examination and survey of East Pearl River, Miss, and La.

329. Examination and survey of Shaws Cove, New London Harbor, Conn.

330. Examination of Youghiogheny River to Connellsville, Pa.

346. Examination and survey of Toms River, N. J.

347. Examination of Caloosahatchee and Orange rivers, Fla.

348. Examination of Duck River, Tenn., from its mouth to Centerville.

349. Examination of Calumet River, ill.

350. Examination of Rahway River, N. J.

351. Examination of Tenants Harbor, Me.

395. Examination of Crystal River, Fla.

396. Examination at mouth of Horn Harbor, Va.

397. Examination of Pagan River, Va.

398. Examination and survey of harbor at Duck Is., including Kelseys Pt., Conn.

399. Examination and survey of Coquille River, Oreg., at and near mouth.

400. Examination of Red River of the North, Minn, and N. Dak.

20 564 5 digitized by Godgle



IV CONTENTS

No.

401. Examination of White Oak River, N. C, from its month to Maysville.

402. Examination of channel from Galveston Harbor to Texas City, Tex.

403. Examination and survey of Forked River, N. J.
444. Examination of Ontonagon Harbor, Mich.

446. Waterway connecting Swan Quarter Bay with Deep Bay, N. C.

446. Examination of Queens Creek, Va., from mouth to Capital Landing Bridge.

447. Examination of channel from Peters Neck Point to Horn River, N. Y.

448. Examination of channel from Palacios to Matagorda Bay, Tex.

449. Examination of channel from Jamaica Bay to Peconic Bay, N. Y.

450. Examination for harbors of refuge on north shore of Lake Superior.

451. Examination of Totuskey River, Va.

452. Examination of Shipyard Creek, S. C.

453. Examination and survey of channel in St Clair River, Mich.

463. Examination of Hempstead Harbor, N. Y.

464. Examination of St Josephs Bay, Fla.

465. Statement of civilian engineers employed on rivers and harbors, 1907.

478. Examination of Bayou Courtableau, La.

479. Examination of Munising Harbor, Mich.

490. Examination of Sabine R. from mouth to Logansport, La., and Belzora, Tex.

491. Examination of shoal off Stuyvesant Harbor, Hudson River, N. Y.

493. Examination of Bois De Sioux River, Lake Traverse, and Big Stone Lake, etc.
603. Examination of channel between Threemile Harbor and Gardiners Bay, N. Y,

615. Examination of North Fork of Edisto River, S. C. , from mouth to Orangebuiig.

616. Examination of South Fork of Edisto River, S. C, from mouth to Scotts Bridge.

630. Examination of Little River, S. C, at its mouth.

631. Examination of Patuxent River, Md. •

632. Examination of Wekiva River, Fla.

633. Examination of Arthur Kill, N. J.

656. Examination of Dry Straits, Alaska.

657. Examination of Lake Pontchartrain, La., from west end to Milneburg.

658. Examination of Guyandot River, W. Va.

659. Examination of Rocky River Harbor, Ohio.

660. Examination and survey of Black River, Lorain Harbor, Ohio.

650. Examination of Congaree and Broad rivers, S. C.

651. Examination of Saluda River, S. C, between Columbia and Hollow Creek.

652. Examination and survey of Onancock River, Va.

653. Examination of Matinicus Harbor, Me.

654. Examination and survey of Potomac River at Mount Vernon, Va.

665. Examination of channel from Pensacola Bay to Santa Rosa quarantine station.

666. Examination of Hatchee River, Tenn., up to town of Brownsville.
G02. Examination of Homochitto River, Miss.



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^ te^ } HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES { IXx^^ent



DECKERS OBEEK, WEST YIBGIXIA

LBTTEB FBOIC THX SSCBSTABT OF WaB TBANSMrrriNG, WITH A LETTEB

nom the ohier of engineers, sepobt of examination of deckers
Greek, West Viroinia

Dbcbmbeb 3, 1907. — ^Referred to the Ck>ininittee on Riyera and Harbors and

ordered to be printed



War Department,
Washington^ December 2^ 1907.
Snt: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from the Chief
of Engineers, U. S. Army, dated November 25, 1907, together with
copy of a report from Maj. H. C. Newcomer, Corps of Engineers,
dated October 4, 1907, of a preliminary examination of Deckers
Creek, West Virginia, made by him in compliance with the provisions
of the river and narbor act of March 2, 1907.
Very respectfully,

SoBERT Shaw Oliver,

Acting Secretary of War.
The Speaker of the House of Kepresentatives.



War Department,
Office of the Chief of Engineers,

Washington^ November ^5, 1907.
Sir : I have the honor to submit herewith for transmission to Con-
gress report of October 4, 1907, by Maj. H. C. Newcomer, Corps of
f^ngineers, on preliminary examination authorized by the river and
haroor act of March 2, 1907, as follows :

Deckers Creek, West Virginia, with a view to securing for a distance of
two thousand feet up from its mouth a channel and harbor with the same
depth of water as in the Monongahela River where said Deckers Creek empties
into said river.

From the facts and for the reasons given I concur in the opinion
expressed by the local officer, the division engineer, and the Board
of Engineers for Eivers and Harbors that this locality is not worthy
of improvement by the General Government.
Very respectfully,

A. Mackenzie,
Brig. Gen.^ Chief of Engineers^ U. S. Army.

The Secretary of Wab.



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Z EXAMINATION OF DECKERS CREEK, WEST VIRGINIA.

PBELIMINABY EXAMINATION OF DECKERS CREEK, WEST VIRGINIA.

Engineer Office, United States Army,

Pittsburg, Pa., October 4, 1907.
^ General: I have the honor to submit the following report of pre-
liminary examination of —

Deckers Creek, West Virginia, with a view to securing for a distance of
two thousand feet up from its mouth a channel and harbor with the same
depth of water as in the Monongahela Riyer where said Deckers Creek empties
into said river —

as provided for in the river and harbor act of March 2, 1907.

A former preliminary examination of this locality was made in
1905 in pursuance of a provision of the river and harbor act of March
3, 1905, and report published in House Document No. 193, Fifty-
ninth Congress, first session. This report pronounced the place un
worthy of improvement by the United States, for the reason that the
work proposed would practically amount to providing wharfage
facilities for private interests.

Deckers Creek is a small tributary of the Monongahela River on
its right bank at Morgantown, W. Va. It has a drainage basin about
15 miles long, with area of approximately 60 square miles. The
course of the stream is shown on the topographic sheet of Morgan-
town Quadrangle United States Geological Survey. It is wholh'
unnavigable in its natural condition, except during higher stages of
the Monongahela River, when backwater from that stream would
enable boats to ascend the creek a short distance. It has compara-
tively little slope for 1,000 feet from its mouth, but then becomes
steeper, rising about 8 feet altogether in the first half mile. The
low-water depths are quite small, so that the proposed channel
and harbor would have to be formed mainly by dredging and rock
excavation. The Morgantown and Kingwood Railroad runs along
the right bank of this portion of Deckers Creek, making a junction
at its mouth with a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,
which follows the right bank of the Monongahela River.

In response to circular letters requesting information concerning
the various interests involved and the character and value of the
present and prospective commerce, a number of replies have been
received advocating the proposed improvement as a means of provid-
ing additional transportation facilities for the products shipped from
Deckers Creek valley and other territory tributary to the Morgan-
town and Kingwood Railroad. This line extends from Morgantown
through Kingwood to Rowlesburg, traversing a region rich in coal,
limestone, fire clay, glass sand, and building stone. A large produc-
tion of coke and cement is expected, and there are already several
manufacturing plants located on the railroad. None of these indus-
tries are in the vicinity of the proposed improvement, however, so
that its only function would be to provide a navigable water front for
the Morgantown and Kingwood llailroad, connecting with pool 9,
Monongahela River, and mus facilitate transshipment from rail to
water and vice versa. It appears that when the part of this railroad
first built was put in operation satisfactory freight contracts could
not be made wifli the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, and its
owners therefore did some dredging in the creek, put in chutes, and
transferred sundry materials to barges for river smpment. This was

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XLKAHIKATIOK OF BECKEBS OBEEK, WEST VIBQINIA. 3

later discontinued, and the channel then excavated has become filled
with sediment from the stream.

The Morgantown and Kingwood Bailroad Company has been re-
quested to furnish information as to the amount ana character of
its freight movement and the proportion that might be shipped by
water if a suitable harbor were provided, but it has not yet supplied
any such data. One party states that there is an average of about 50
cars of freight per day. He also says that the Morgantown and
Kingwood Railroad Company has a contract with the Baltimore and
Ohio Bailroad Company that provides for delivery to the latter of
all freight that the former can control, and that this arrangement
inures to the benefit of the Morgantown and Kingwood Railroad
Company by reason of the fact mat it receives a relatively larger
percentage of the joint tariff. It is therefore claimed that the pro-
posed improvement is not in the interest of the railroad, it is
evident, however, that all commerce through the proposed harbor
would have to be to or from the railroad, and the transfer could not
be made except by the railroad company or some other company or-
ganized for the purpose.

The United States has assumed the cost of canalizing the entire
Monongahela River, thus greatly increasing its navigable capacitv
at pubuc expense. It is not understood to be the Government's
pohcy, however, to excavate harbors for railroads or other private
interests, and I have therefore to report that in my opinion this
locality is not worthy of improvement by the General Government.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. C. Newcomer,
Major ^ Corps of Engineers.

Brig. Gen. A. Mackenzie,

Chief of Engineers^ U. S. A.
(Through the Division Engineer.)

[First indorsement. J

Engineer Office, U. S. Army, Central Division,

Detroit^ Mich,, October 16, 1907.
Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army,
concurring in the views and opinion of the district engineer.

G. J. Lydecker,
Colonel, Corps of Engineers,
Division Engineer, Central Division.

[Fifth indorsement.]

Board of Engineers for Kivers and Harbors,

Washington, D. C, November 18, 1907.

Kespectfully returned to the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army.

Deckers Creek is a tributary of the Monongahela River, which it
enters at Morgantown, W. Va. In its present condition the stream
is wholly unnavigable except during high stages of the Monongahela
River, when bactwater from that stream provides a navigable depth
for a short distance up the creek. The improvement of the stream
for a distance of 2,000 feet, as specified in the act, would have no
bearing upon the establishment of a competitive water route for



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4 EXAMINATION OF DE0KEB8 OBBEK, WEST VIBOINIA.

products of the territory tributary to Deckers Creek. Its office
would be to afford water communication between the Monongahela
Kiver and ttae railroad near the mouth of the creek.

The only preliminary examination heretofore made of this stream
was one ordered by uie act of March 3, 1905, of the " mouth of
Deckers Creek^ West Virginia, at its confluence with the Mononj^a-
hela River, with a view to securing for a distance of 1,600 feet
a channel with the same depth of water as in said Monon^hela
River, and restoring and improving the harbor destroyed by flood."
In conformity with law, that report came before the Board of Engi-
neers for Rivers and Harbors for consideration, and after carenil
study of available data the Board reached the conclusion that the
improvement contemplated by the act would be equivalent to building
a wharf or slip for the benefit of private interests, and would not ben-
efit general commerce. At that time the invitation extended by the
district officer to interested persons to submit statements and argu-
ments to the Board met with no response; nor has the Board in the
case now under consideration received any communications from
interests invited by the district officer to submit their views in regard
to the commercial necessity for the improvement. w

As far as the Board has been able to determine, then>has been no
change in the conditions reported in 1905 which would warrant a
reversal of the opinion then expressed, and in view of those condi-
tions, which indicate that the benefits of the work inure solely to cer-
tain private or corporate interests and would have no influence upon
general commerce, the Board unites with the district officer and the
division engineer in the opinion that Deckers Creek is not worthy of
improvement by the United States.

For the Board:

R. L. HoxiE,
Colonel^ Corps of Engineers^

Senior Member Present.
O



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^9t ^ST" } HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES | I>o<3^mekt



BEEOH BIYEB, TEXXESSEE

LeTTBB FBOIC THK SkCBETABT OF WaB TBANSMITTINO, WITH A LETTEB

FBOM THE Chief of Engineers, bepobt of examination of Beech
RiTEB, Tennessee

December 8, 1907.— Referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors and

ordered to be printed



Wab Department,

Washington^ December 2^ 1907.
Sib: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from tlie Chief
of Engineers, U. S. Armjr, dated November 25, 1907, together with
copy of a report from Maj. W. W. Harts, Corps of Engineers, dated
October 28, 1907, of a preliminary examination of Beech River, Ten-
nessee, made by him in compliance with the provisions of the river
and harbor act of MarcK 2, 1907.

Very respectfully, Bobert Shaw Oliver,

Acting Secretary of War.

The Speaker of the House of Eepresentatives.



War Department,
Office of the Chief of Engineers,

Washington^ Novemher 25, 1907.
Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith for transmission to Con-
mss report of October 28, 1907, bjr Maj. W. W. Harts, Corps of
Engineers, on preliminary examination of Beech Kiver, Tennessee,
auworizea by tne river and harbor act approved March 2, 1907.

From the facts and for the reasons given, I concur in the opinion
expressed by the local officer, the division engineer, and the Board of
Engineers tor Rivers and Harbors that Beech River is not worthy
of improvement by the Federal Government at the present time.
Very respedifully,

A. Mackenzie,
Brig. Gen.^ Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. Army.
The Secretary of War.



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2 PEELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF BEECH EIVEE, TENNESSEE.



PBBLIMINABY EXAMINATION OF BEECH RIVER, TENNESSEE.

Engineer Office, Unitbd States Army,

Nashville^ Tenn.^ October S8, 1907.

General: In accordance with the instructions of your letter of
March, 14, 1907, 1 have the honor to submit the following preliminary
report on Beech Eiver, Tennessee, as required by the provisions of
the act of Congress approved March 2, 1907. Beech River was
examined by me at several points in October, 1907.

Location and description. — Beech River is a small, unimportant
creek rising in Henderson County, Tenn., near Lexington, flowing
southeasterly through Henderson and Decatur counties, and empty-
ing into the Tennessee River near Perryville, Tenn., about 135 miles
above Paducah, Ky.

The elevation of low water at the railroad bridge near Lexington is
reported by the railroad company to be 415 feet. The elevation of
low water in the Tennessee River at Perryville is 323 feet. The fall
from Lexington to Perryville is thus seen to be 92 feet. The entire
length of the river is reported to be about 125 miles. The average
fall is probably much less than 1 foot to the mile, especially in its
lower reaches, where it is very flat. Its drainage basin covers an
area of approximately 270 square miles. Its low-water flow is esti-
mated at not to exceed 50 cubic feet per second at the mouth. Its
average low-water width in the lower portions, where it is affected by
the backwater of the Tennessee River, varies from about 30 to 100
feet, and in the shoal places the depth of water is often but a few
inches.

Its course is very winding. It is reported that occasionally bends
are found where the distance across by land is but a mile or two,
whereas the distance by river is perhaps half a day's journey by skiff.
It flows through a rolling country, much of which is unimproved and
still covered with timber. The main obstructions in the river to any
navigation are the excessive bends and the large number of snags.

The records do not show that any former examination has been
made of this stream.

Counties affected. — Beech River flows through Henderson and
Decatur counties. The population of these counties, as given by the
census report of 1900, is as follows :



County.



Area,
eqaare
miles.



Popula-
tion.



Average

density of

population

per square

mile.



Henderson.
Decatur



515
287



18,117
10,489



86.1
86.0



The density of population of New York in 1900 was 152.6; of Pennsylvania, 140.1; of Tennesseeu
48.4.



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PBEUHINART EXAMINATION OF BEECH BITER, TENNESSEE. 3

The total assessed wealth, including real, personal, and other prop-
erty, was as follows:



County.


Wealth*


Per capita
wealth.


Henderson


$1,640,424
853,327


190.00


Decatur


81.74







The per capita assessed wealth of the United States is given as $448.33 in 1900.

The main towns along the river are Perry ville (at the mouth),
Decatur ville (county seat of Decatur County), Darden, and Lexing-
ton (county seat oi Henderson County). The population of these
towns is approximately 200 for Perry ville, 600 for Decaturville, 300
for Darden, and 1,332 for Lexington.

The country through which Beech River flows is still sparsely
populated and undeveloped. The only use that could be expected of
this stream, if improved, would be confined to the rafting of timber
products, as no steamboats have ever been able to enter the river on
account of its narrowness and excessive bends.

Commercial statistics, — During the past year it is reported that
from two to three million feet of gum and poplar logs were rafted
out, valued at about $16,000. No other use of the river has been
reported.

The valley of Beech River is undeveloped, and in the vicinity of
the stream is largely uncultivated and covered with timber. The
amount of traffic that would use an improved river it is impossible
to predict, but it would unquestionably oe very small and out of all
proportion to the cost of any adequate improvement.

Improvements practicable. — Owing to the winding character of
this stream, its low banks, its narrowness and small low-water flow,
and its frequent shoals, it is not believed that it will ever be prac-
ticable to make it navigable for any considerable steamboat naviga-
tion at reasonable expense. Cleanng out snags and cutting over-
hanging trees in the portions affected by the backwater of the Ten-
nessee Kiver might be of some assistance, but the cost of this work
would be far in excess of the benefits to be received therefrom.

Recommendation. — In view of the foregoing I give it as my
opinion that the Beech River is not worthy of improvement by the
Federal Government at the present time.

Very respectfully, ^ Wm. W. Harts,

Major ^ Corps of Engineers.

Brig. Gen. A. Mackenzie,



Online LibraryKarl Baedeker (Firm)Norway, Sweden and Denmark : handbook for travellers → online text (page 1 of 62)