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LAUGH NOR SMILE NOT, LITTLE FRIEND,
NOR THE FIRST TALE READ TO END,
TILL YOUR NAME BELOW IS SHOWN,
AND THE BOOK'S YOUR VERY OWN.







^







University of California Berkeley

Gift of
Mrs. James C. Keesling, Jr



Tales of Laughter



McCLURE'S LIBRARY
OF CHILDREN'S CLASSICS

EDITED BY KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN
AND NORA ARCHIBALD SMITH



GOLDEN NUMBERS

A BOOK OF VEBSE FOB
YOUTH

THE POSY RING

A BOOK OF VEBSE FOB
CHILDBEN

PINAFORE PALACE

A BOOK OF BHYMES FOB
THE NUBSEBY

Library of Fairy Literature
THE FAIRY RING

MAGIC CASEMENTS

A SECOND FAIBY BOOK



OTHEB VOLUMES TO FOLLOW



Send to the publishers for Complete Descriptive Catalogue



TALES OF LAUGHTER

A THIRD FAIRY BOOK

EDITED BY

KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN

AND

NORA ARCHIBALD SMITH




NEW YORK

THE McCLURE COMPANY
MCMVIII



Copyright, 1908, by The McClure Company



PUBLISHERS' NOTE

The McClure Company wish to make acknowledgment of
their indebtedness to the following publishers:

G. P. Putnam's Sons, for permission to use " The Greedy
Cat," " Father Bruin in the Corner? " The Pancake" " The
Death of Chanticleer" "Reynard Wants to Taste Horse
Flesh" " Bruin and Reynard Partners" " Pork and Honey"
and "Slip Root: Catch Reynard's Foot" from Tales from
the Fjeld; " The Most Frugal of Men," " The Moon Cake"
" The Ladle that Fell from the Moon" " The Young Head
of the Family" and " The Dreadful Boar," from Chinese
Nights Entertainment.

The American Book Company, for permission to use " Lit-
tle Tuppen," from Fairy Stories and Fables.

Little, Brown & Company, for permission to use " The
Story of the Four Little Children who Went Round the
World" from Edward Lear's Nonsense Books.

F. A. Stokes Company, for permission to use " Little Black
Mingo," "The Lad and the Fox" "The Old Woman and
the Tramp" " The Cook and the Crested Hen" and " The
Old Woman and the Fish" from Fairy Tales from the
Swedish; " One's Own Children Always Prettiest" and " The
Princess whom Nobody Could Silence" from Fairy Tales
from the Far North.

F. Warne & Company, for permission to use " The Money
Box," " The Happy Family" and " It is Quite True" from
Hans 'Andersen's Fairy Tales.

J. B. Lippincott, for permission to use " Manabozho and
His Toe," from North American Indian Fairy Tales; " The
Three Wishes" "If Heaven Will It," and t( The Fox and



PUBLISHERS' NOTE

the Goose" from Spanish Fairy Tales; "Hans in Luck,"
" The Fox and the Cat" " The Fisherman and His Wife"
and " The Adventures of Chanticleer and Partlet" from
Grimm's Fairy Tales.

Charles Scribner's Sons, for permission to use " The Fox
and the Dove" " The Fox and the Hedgehog" " The Disap-
pointed Bear" and " Young Neverfull," from Russian Grand-
mother's Wonder Stories.

George Routledge & Sons, Ltd., for permission to use
t( The Flail which Came from the Clouds" "The Wren
and the Bear" " The Wolf and the Fox," " The Three Luck-
Children" " The Three Sluggards" " The Cat and the Mouse
in Partnership," " Old Sultan," " The Shreds" " The Fox
and the Horse," " The Seven Swabians," " The Giant and the
Tailor" and " The Little Shepherd Boy," from Grimm's
Household Stories.

Joseph McDonough, for permission to use "How the Sun,
the Moon and the Wind went out to Dinner," " Singh Rajah
and the Cunning Little Jackals" " The Blind Man, the Deaf
Man and the Donkey," " The Alligator and the Jackal" and
" The Selfish Sparrow and the Houseless Crows," from Old
Deccan Days.

A. L. Burt & Company, for permission to use " Gudbrand
on the Hillside " and " Nanny who Wouldn't Go to Supper,"
from Fairy Tales from the Far North.



[vi]



A LAUGHING SONG

When the greenwoods laugh with

the voice of joy,
And the dimpling stream runs

laughing by;
When the air does laugh with

our merry wit,
And the green hill laughs with

the noise of it;

When the meadows laugh with

lively green,
And the grasshopper laughs

in the merry scene;
When Mary and Susan and Emily
With their sweet round mouths

sing "Ha, ha, he!"

When the painted birds laugh

in the shade,
Where our table with cherries

and nuts is spread;
Come live and be merry and

join with me
To sing the sweet chorus

of "Ha, ha, he!"

WILLIAM BLAKE.



CONTENTS

PAGE

THB RATS AND THEIR SON-IN-LAW (French) 3

THE MOUSB AND THE SAUSAGE (French) 6

THE THREE WISHES (Spanish) 7

THE Fox AND THE GOOSE (Spanish) 10

IP HEAVEN WILL IT (Spanish) 12

THE BOOBY (Italian) 14

THE MONTHS (Italian) 20

THE STONE IN THE COCK'S HEAD (Italian) 25

THE Fox AND THE CAT (Cossack) 30

THE STRAW Ox (Cossack) 32

THE CAT, THE COCK, AND THE Fox (Cossack) 36

THE Fox AND THE DOVE (Russian) 39

THB Fox AND THE HEDGEHOG (Russian) 41

THE DISAPPOINTED BEAR (Russian) 43

YOUNG NEVERFULL (Russian) 45

HUDDEN AND DUDDEN AND DONALD O'NBARY (Celtic) 47

THE TAIL (Celtic) 54

JACK AND THE KING WHO WAS A GENTLEMAN (Celtic) 55

HANS IN LUCK (German) 62

THE FAMILY SERVANTS (German) 68

THE FLAIL WHICH CAME FROM THE CLOUDS (German) 69

THE SOLE'S MOUTH (German) 71

THE THREE BROTHERS (German) 72

THE WREN AND THE BEAR (German) 74

THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN (German) 77

THE Fox AND THE CAT (German) 81

THE GOLDEN KEY (German) 82

DOCTOR KNOW-ALL (German) 83

THE FAIR CATHERINE AND PIF-PAF POLTRIB (German) 86

THE WOLF AND THE Fox (German) 88

DISCREET HANS (German) 90

[ix]



CONTENTS

PAGE

KING THRUSH-BEARD (German) 93

THE THREE LUCK CHILDREN (German) 98

THE THREE SLUGGARDS (German) 101

THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE (German) 102

THE NOSE-TREE (German) in
THE ADVENTURES OF CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET (German) 118

THE GOLDEN GOOSE (German) 124

THE YOUNG GIANT (German) 129

THE SWEET SOUP (German) 137

SEVEN AT ONE BLOW (German) 138

THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP (German) 146

OLD SULTAN (German) 149

THE NAIL (German) 152

THE Fox AND THE HORSE (German) 153

THE GIANT AND THE TAILOR (German) 155

THE SPIDER AND THE FLEA (German) 157

THE LITTLE SHEPHERD BOY (German) 160

THE SEVEN SWABIANS (German) 162

THE SHREDS (German) 165

THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN KIDS (German) 166

THE ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER (German) 170

KING WREN (German) 172

WHY THE BEAR HAS A STUMPY TAIL (German) 176

THREE WAYS TO BUILD A HOUSE (German) 177

How TO TELL A TRUE PRINCESS (German) 182

THE FIVE SERVANTS (German) 184

THE HARE AND THE Fox (German) 191

THE STORY OF ZIRAC (Oriental) 193

JOHNNY-CAKE (English) 197

THE WEE, WEE MANNIE (Scottish) 200

SIR GAMMER VANS (English) 203

TOM TIT TOT (English) 205

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG (English) 211

THE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS (English) 215

THE THREE SILLIES (English) 218

THE CAT AND THE MOUSE (English) 222
HEREAFTERTHIS (English)
TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE (English)
THE MAGPIE'S NEST (English)
SCRAPEFOOT (English)



CONTENTS



PAGE



THE WISE MEN OF GOTHAM (English) 236

HENNY-PENNY (English) 241

A SON OF ADAM (English) 244

THE HAPPY FAMILY (H. C. Andersen) 246
THE BLIND MAN, THE DEAF MAN, AND THE DONKEY (Southern

India) 250

THE ALLIGATOR AND THE JACKAL (Southern India) 258

WHY THE FISH LAUGHED (Indian) 263
THE SELFISH SPARROW AND THE HOUSELESS CROWS (Southern

India) 269

THE LAMBIKIN (Indian) 271
THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE (Scandinavian) 274

THE GREEDY CAT (Scandinavian) 278

WELL DONE: ILL PAID (Scandinavian) 284

REYNARD AND CHANTICLEER (Scandinavian) 287

FATHER BRUIN IN THE CORNER (Scandinavian) 289

WHY THE SEA is SALT (Scandinavian) 291

GUDBRAND ON THE HILLSIDE (Scandinavian) 296

THE PANCAKE (Scandinavian) 301

THE DEATH OF CHANTICLEER (Scandinavian) 305

REYNARD WANTS TO TASTE HORSE-FLESH (Scandinavian) 309

BRUIN AND REYNARD PARTNERS (Scandinavian) 311

PORK AND HONEY (Scandinavian) 312

How REYNARD OUTWITTED BRUIN (Scandinavian) 314
NANNY WHO WOULDN'T Go HOME TO SUPPER (Scandinavian) 315

THE Box WITH SOMETHING PRETTY IN IT (Scandinavian) 321

THE FARMER AND THE TROLL (Scandinavian) 322

ONE'S OWN CHILDREN ALWAYS PRETTIEST (Scandinavian) 323
THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY COULD SILENCE (Scandinavian) 324

THE MONEY-BOX (H. C. Andersen) 328

THE DARNING-NEEDLE (H.C.Andersen) 331

MASTER OF ALL MASTERS (English) 335

BELLING THE CAT (English) 336

THE MAGPIE AND HER CHILDREN (English) 338

THE COCK, THE CUCKOO, AND THE BLACK-COCK (English) 339

THE RACE BETWEEN HARE AND HEDGEHOG (English) 340

BRUNO'S STORY (Lewis Carroll) 344

THE BLUEBOTTLE WHO WENT COURTING (English) 346

How Two BEETLES TOOK LODGINGS (English) 351

LITTLE TUPPEN (Scandinavian) 358

[xi]



The Rats and their Son-in-Law

rHERE once lived in Japan a rat and his wife, folk of
noble race, who had one beautiful daughter. They
were exceedingly proud of her charms, and dreamed,
as parents will, of the grand marriage she was sure to make
in time. Proud of his pure rodent blood, the father saw no
son-in-law more to be desired than a young rat of ancient
lineage, whose attentions to his daughter were very marked.
This match, however, brilliant as it was, seemed not to the
mother's taste. Like many people who think themselves made
out of special clay, she had a very poor opinion of her own
kind, and was ambitious for an alliance with the highest cir-
cles. Ad astro! (To the stars!) was her motto, she always
said, and really, when one has a daughter of incomparable
beauty, one may well hope for an equally incomparable
son-in-law.

" Address yourself to the sun at once, then," cried the im-
patient father one day ; " there is nothing above him, surely."

" Quite so ; I had already thought of it," she answered, " and
since you, too, are in sympathy with the idea, we will make our
call to-morrow."

So, on the following morning the proud father and the
haughty mother-rat went together to present their lovely
daughter to the orb of day.

" Lord Sun," said the mother, " let me present our only
daughter, who is so beautiful that there is nothing like her
in the whole world. Naturally we desire a son-in-law " as
wonderful as she, and, as you see, we have come to you
first of all."

" Really," said the sun, " I am extremely flattered by your
proposal, but you do me too much honor; there is some one






TALES OF LAUGHTER

greater than I ; it is the cloud. Look, if you do not believe."
. . . And at that moment the cloud arrived, and with one
waft of his folds extinguished the sun with all his golden rays.

" Very well ; let us speak to the cloud, then," said the mother-
rat, not in the least disconcerted.

" Immensely honored, I am sure," replied the cloud in his
turn, " but you are again mistaken ; there is some one greater
than I ; it is the wind. You shall see."

At the same moment along came the wind, and with one
blow swept the cloud out of sight, after which, overturning
father, mother, and daughter, he tumbled with them, pell-mell,
at the foot of an old wall.

" Quick, quick," cried the mother-rat, struggling to her feet,
" and let us repeat our compliments to the wind."

" You'd better address yourself to the wall," growled the
wind roughly. You see very well he is greater than I, for he
stops me and makes me draw back."

No sooner had she heard these words than mother-rat faced
about and presented her daughter to the wall. Ah, but now
the fair rat-maiden imitated the wind; she drew back also.
He whom she really adored in her heart of hearts was the fas-
cinating young rat who had paid his court to her so well.
However, to please her mother, she had consented to wed the
sun, in spite of his blinding rays, or the cloud, in spite of his
sulky look, even the wind, in spite of his brusque manner ; but
an old, broken wall ! . . . No ! death would be better a thou-
sand times.

Fortunately the wall excused himself, like all the rest. " Cer-
tainly," he said, " I can stop the wind, who can sweep away
the cloud, who can cover up the sun, but there is some one
greater than I : it is the rat, who can pass through my body,
and can even, if he chooses, reduce me to powder with his
teeth. Believe me, you need seek no better son-in-law; greater
than the rat, there is nothing in the world."

" Do you hear that, wife, do you hear it?" cried father-rat
in triumph. " Didn't I always say so ? "

" Quite true ! you always did," returned the mother-rat in



TALES OF LAUGHTER

wonder, and suddenly glowed with pride in her ancient name

and lineage. ,

So they all three went home, very happy and conten id, an
on the morrow the lovely rat-maiden married her faithful rat-
lover.












The Mouse and the Sausage



X^vNCE upon a time a little mouse and a little sausage, who
i I loved each other like sisters, decided to live together,
\~J and made their arrangements in such a way that every
day one would go to walk in the fields, or make purchases in
town, while the other remained at home to keep the house.

One day, when the little sausage had prepared cabbage for
dinner, the little mouse, who had come back from town with a
fine appetite, enjoyed it so greatly that she exclaimed : " How
delicious the cabbage is to-day, my dear ! "

" Ah ! " answered the little sausage, " that is because I
popped myself into the pot while it was cooking."

On the next day, as it was her turn to prepare the meals,
the little mouse said to herself : " Now I will do as much for
my friend as she did for me; we will have lentils for dinner,
and I will jump into the pot while they are boiling," and she
let the action follow the word, without reflecting that a simple
sausage can do some things which are out of the reach of even
the wisest mouse.

When the sausage came home, she found the house lonely
and silent. She called again and again, " My little mouse !
Mouse of my heart ! " but no one answered. Then she went to
look at the lentils boiling on the stove, and, alas ! found within
the pot her good little friend, who had perished at the post
of duty.

Poor mousie, with the best intentions in the world, had
stayed too long at her cookery, and when she desired to climb
out of the pot, had no longer the strength to do so.

And the poor sausage could never be consoled ! That is why
to-day, when you put one in the pan or on the gridiron, you
will hear her weep and sigh, " M-my p-poor m-mouse ! Ah,
m-my p-poor m-mouse ! "

[6]



The Three Wishes

7i /f ANY years ago there was an old married man, who,

/\/j although poor, had worked very diligently all his
JL rJL life on his little piece of ground. One winter's
night, as this old man was seated with his wife in front of
their comfortable hearth in social chat, instead of giving thanks
to God for the benefits they enjoyed, they spent the time in
enumerating the good things possessed by their neighbors, and
in wishing that they belonged to them.

" Instead of my little hut, which is on bad soil, and only fit
to house a donkey in, I would like to have the farm of old
Polainas ! " exclaimed the old man.

" And I," added his wife, who was annoyed that he did not
aspire higher, " instead of that, would like to have our neigh-
bor's house, which is nearly new."

" And I," continued her husband, " instead of our old don-
key, which can scarcely carry an empty sack, would like to have
Polainas's mule ! "

" And I," exclaimed the wife, " would like to have such a
fat porker as our neighbor has to kill ! Some people seem only
to wish for a thing in order to get it. How I should like to
see my wishes accomplished ! "

Scarcely had she uttered these words, than they beheld a
most beautiful little woman standing in front of the fire. She
was so small that her height could not have been more than
eighteen inches, while she wore a crown like a queen's upon
her head. Her tunic and veil were almost transparent, and
seemed made of white smoke, while the sparks from the fire
crackled and jumped like fireworks about her, and sparkled
around her as glittering spangles.

In her hand she bore a little golden scepter, the end of
which was formed by a gleaming ruby.






TALES OF LAUGHTER

" I am the Fairy Fortunata," said she to them ; " I was
passing by here, and I have heard your complaints. I have so
much anxiety to accomplish your desires that I come to prom-
ise you the realization of three wishes: one to you," she said
to the wife ; " the other to you," to the husband, " and the
third must be mutual and agreeable to the desire of you both.
This last I will agree to in person to-morrow, when I will
return at this time ; and until then I leave you to think of what
it shall be."

When she had said these words, the beautiful fairy sprang
through the flames and disappeared in a cloud of smoke.

The delight of the worthy couple may be imagined, and the
number of wishes, numerous as suitors at the door of a min-
ister, which presented themselves to their minds. Their de-
sires were so many that, not knowing which to select, they
determined to defer the definite decision to the following day.
After having had all the night to think the matter over, they
began to discuss entirely different things, and in a little while
their conversation recurred to their wealthy neighbors.

" I was at their house to-day," said the husband ; " they were
making black puddings. Ah, such black puddings ! It would
have done you good to see them ! "

" I would like to have one of them here," replied the wife,
" to roast on the ashes for supper."

Scarcely had she uttered the words than there appeared
upon the ashes the most delicious-looking black pudding that
could possibly be imagined.

The woman remained staring at it with open mouth and eyes
starting out of her head. But her husband jumped up in
despair, and after striding up and down the room, tearing his
hair in desperation, said : " Through your gluttony, you greedy
woman, we have lost one of the wishes ! Good Heavens, what
a woman this is ! More stupid than a goose ! It makes me
desperate ; I detest you and the black pudding, too, and I wish
it were stuck on to your nose ! "

No sooner had he spoken than there was the black pudding
hanging from the place indicated !

[8]



TALES OF LAUGHTER

Then was the old man struck with horror and his wife with
desperation !

" You see what you have done, evil tongue! " exclaimed she,
as she made useless exertions to tear the appendage from her
nose ; " if I employed my wish badly, at least it was to my own
disadvantage, and not to the injury of any one else; but
the sin carries its punishment with it, for I will not have any
other wish, nor desire anything else than that the black pud-
ding be taken off my nose."

" Wife, for Heaven's sake ! What of the new house ? "

"Nothing!"

" Wife, for Heaven's sake, think of the farm ! "

" It does not matter."

" My dear, let us wish for a fortune, and then we will have
a golden case for the black pudding."

" I will not hear of it."

" Then you would have us left just as we were before? "

" That is all that I wish for."

And for all that the man could say, nothing could alter his
wife's determination, who grew more and more enraged with
her double nose, and could scarcely keep off the dog and the
cat, who both wished to make free with it.

When, on the following night, the fairy appeared and asked
them what was their last wish, they said to her : " We see how
blind and foolish it is of men to fancy that the realization of
their wishes will make them happy."

Nor is happiness in the accomplishment of our wishes, but
rather in the not having any. He is rich who possesses what
he wants ; but happy is he who wishes for nothing.



[9]



The Fox and the Goose

jj FOX and a goose were very great friends. The
J^i goose, which, as you know, is a very honest and
-Z - industrious bird, said to the fox:

" Friend fox, I have a little bit of property here, and if you
like to join with me, we will cultivate it between us."

" That would greatly please me," answered the fox.

" Then it will be necessary to till it together when the
season arrives," said the goose.

" Very well," replied the fox.

A little afterward, when they met, the goose said:

" It is time to sow the seed."

" That is your business," said the fox. " I have nothing to
do with that."

Some months passed, when the goose said to the fox :

" Friend, the grass is choking the wheat ; it is necessary to
weed the field."

" Very well," answered the fox, " you see to that ; it is not
my business."

A short time passed by, when the goose said to the fox :

" Friend, the wheat is ripe, and must be reaped."

" All right," replied the fox, " you attend to that ; it is not
my business."

Then the goose, for all her good nature, began to be dis-
trustful, and told her friend the greyhound what had passed.

The greyhound, who was very shrewd, saw at once that the
fox was going to play off one of his tricks upon the goose's
good nature, and said to her :

" Reap the wheat ; put it in the barn, and hide me in a sheaf
of corn, without leaving more than one eye uncovered, so that
I may see all that may happen."

[10]



i



TALES OF LAUGHTER

The goose did as the greyhound had said, and after a time
the fox arrived, and when he saw the barn filled with splendid
wheat already thrashed, he was very delighted, and, dancing

about, sang:

"Li6, H6,
The straw and wheat are mine!

Li6, lio,
The straw and wheat are mine!"

As he said this, he approached the sheaf in which the grey-
hound was concealed, and on seeing the eye among the straw,
cried :

"Ah, there's a grape!"

" But it is not ripe," replied the greyhound, as he leaped
out of his hiding place, and killed the fox.






If Heaven Will It



NCE upon a time a Galician was returning to his home
after having spent some time in Seville. When he was
close to his abode, he met some one who inquired where
he was going.

" To my native place," replied the Galician.

" If Heaven will it," answered the former.

" Whether Heaven will it or no/' added the Galician to him-
self, already seeing his village from afar, and being only sepa-
rated from its outskirts by a river.

Scarcely had he muttered the words ere he fell into the
water and was changed into a frog.

In this condition the poor man lived for three years, being
in continual danger from his spiteful foes, bad boys, leeches,
and storks. At the end of three years another Galician re-
turning home happened to pass by there, and a wayfarer chanc-
ing to ask him whither he was going, replied :

" To my native place."

" If Heaven will it," croaked a frog that poked its head up
out of the water.

And when it had said this, the frog, which was the
first Galician of the tale, suddenly found itself once more
a man.

He went on his way gayer than Easter, and having met with
another traveler, who asked him whither he went, he an-
swered him :

" To my own place, if Heaven will it ; to see my wife, if
Heaven will it; to see my children, if Heaven will it; to see
my cow, if Heaven will it; to sow my land, if Heaven will
it; so that I may get a good harvest from it, if Heaven
will it."

[12]



TALES OF LAUGHTER

And as he religiously added to everything, "If Heaven will
it," he was allowed to see his wishes accomplished. He found
his wife and children well; his cow became the mother of a
fine calf; he sowed his field, and reaped a good harvest, and
all because Heaven willed it.






The Booby



An ignorant man who associates with clever people has always been
more praised than a wise man who keeps the company of fools, for as
much profit and fame as a man gains from the former, so much
wealth and honor one may lose by the fault of the latter, and as
the proof of the pudding is in the eating, you will know from the story
that I am going to tell you whether my proposition is true.

rHERE was once a man who was as rich as the sea,
but as there never can be any perfect happiness in this
world, he had a son so idle and good-for-nothing that
he could not tell a carob from a cucumber. So, being unable
any longer to put up with his folly, he gave him a good handful
of crowns, and sent him to travel to the Levant, for he well
knew that seeing various countries and mixing with divers
people works genius, sharpens the judgment, and makes men
expert.

Moscione (for that was the name of the son) got on horse-
back and began his journey toward Venice, the arsenal of the
wonders of the world, to embark on board some vessel bound
for Cairo, and when he had traveled a good day's journey
he met with a person who was standing fixed at the foot of a
poplar, to whom he said : " What is your name, my lad, whence
are you, and what is your trade ? " And the lad replied : " My
name is Lightning, I am from Arrowland, and I can run like
the wind." " I should like to see a proof of it," said Moscione,



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