L. S. (Leonard Southerden) Wood.

A book of English verse on infancy and childhood online

. (page 20 of 20)
Online LibraryL. S. (Leonard Southerden) WoodA book of English verse on infancy and childhood → online text (page 20 of 20)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


And in the frosty season, when the sun 89

Angels embrace us daily and obey 171

As from the house your mother sees 256

As Gilly flowers do but stay 22

As I in hoary winter's night 6

As I went up and he came down, my little six-year boy 276

As soon as I'm in bed at night 317

As thro' the land at eve we went 171

At length his lonely cot appears in view ..... 68

Aye at that time our days were but vew 127

Baby, see the flowers ! 222

Be it a weakness, it deserves some praise .... 60

' Be, rather than be call'd, a child of God ' . . . . 101

Because you sleep, my child, with breathing light . 23<5

Between our folding lips 211

358



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 359

PAGE

Between the dark and the daylight 151

Blest infant bud, whose blossom-life 39

Bright Dorothy, with eyes of blue 210

But borne, and like a short delight 21

But now you are mine, all mine 306

But that which most I wonder at, which most ... 44

But yesterday she played with childish things . . . 248

By saynt Mary, my lady 2

By the hand of a child I am led to the throne of the

King 284

Can I, who have for others oft compiled 15

Child ! do not throw this book about ! 286

Child, do you love the flower 288

Child of a day, thou knowest not 109

Child of my heart ! my sweet beloved First-born ! . 114

Child of the pure unclouded brow 219

Christians awake ! salute the happy morn .... 52

Christmas Eve, and twelve of the clock 228

Clear eyes of heaven's chosen hue 256

Clenched little hands like crumpled roses .... 305

Come, dear children, let us away 193

Come over, come over the deepening river .... 314

Come to me, O ye children ! 150

Come, we shepherds, whose blest sight 31

Dainty little maiden, whither would you wander . . 166

Dancing on the hill-tops 215

Dante saw the great white Bose 301

Darling shell, where hast thou been 106

Dear and great Angel, wouldst thou only leave . . 173

Dear Babe, that sleepest cradled by my side . . . 100

Dear child of mine, the wealth of whose warm hair . 249

Dear common flower, that grow'st beside the way . 180

Dear 'native brook ! wild streamlet of the West . . 99

Do not mind my crying, Papa, 1 am not crying for rain 204

Do ye hear the children weeping, O my brothers . . 141

Every day from morn to night 235

Fair maid, had I not heard thy baby cries . . . . 123

Fair seedtime had my soul, and I grew up .... 86

Farewell, thou child of my right hand, and joy . . 13

Father and mother, many a year 229

For in the warm blue summer weather 04

For you who can never be lost or dead 32]

Four alders guard a bridge of planks 318

Four ducks on a pond . . 203

From Little down to Least, in due degree .... 83

From you, lanthe, little troubles pass 107

Go, prettie child, and beare this Flower 20



360 INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

God bless the master of this house 28

God who created me 264

Golden slumbers kiss your eyes 11

Good night, pretty sleepers of mine 221

Great passions I awake that must 277

Happy those early days, when I 37

Hark how they laugh, those children at their sport ! . 176

Have you ever been down to my countrce .... 326

He did but float a little way 26

He who could view the book of destiny 40

He who gives a child a treat 310

Here a little child I stand 21

Here freed from pain, secure from misery, lies . . . 57

Here in this leafy place 226

Here lies, to each her parents ruth 13

Here she lies, a pretty bud 21

Here sparrows build upon the trees 120

How like an Angel came I down : 42

How still the vast depths of this City's heart ! . . . 257

Hush ! my dear, lie still and slumber 51

I am not mad : this hair I tear is mine 8

I cannot choose but think upon the time .... 177

I cannot reach it ; and my striving eye 38

I care not, though it be 47

I fear to love thee, Sweet, because 270

1 have a name, a little name 144

' I have no name ' 62

I have seen A curious child 77

I keep six honest serving-men 284

I mind me in the days departed 146

I never see the newsboys run 309

I passed through the open gateway and under the

bending trees 250

I remember, I remember 125

I saw this day sweet flowers grow thick 313

I saw where in the shroud did lurk 104

I sing of a maiden 1

I thought it was the little bed 202

I was in Heaven one day when all the prayers . . . 212

I'd a dream to-night 132

' If I were dead, you'd sometimes say. Poor Child ! ' . 201

Immensity, cloister'd in thy dear womb 12

In a fair garden 214

In going to my naked bed 3

In my poor mind it is most sweet to muse .... 104

In praise of little children I will say . . . . . . 243

In quiet sleepe here lyes the deare remayne . ... 27

In Switzerland one idle day 323

In token that thou ahalt not fear 172

Inspire me, child, with visions fair Ill



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 361

PAGE

Is all the counsel that we two have shar'd .... 8

Is it a dream ? All yet, it seems 303

Is this a holy thing to see 60

It is a beauteous evening, calm and free 82

It is not growing like a tree 13

It was a day 314

It was a summer evening 102

It was her first sweet child, her heart's delight . . . 160

It was the schooner Hesperus 152

Ladies, where were your bright eyes glancing . . 282

Lamb of God, I look to Thee 54

Little Herdboy, sitting there 231

Little Jesus, wast Thou shy 2(57

Little maiden, fairy May 234

Little thing, ah, little mouse ' 286

Lonely, save for a few faint stars, the sky .... 285

Long life to thee, long virtue, long delight .... 281

Long night succeeds thy little day 112

Looking on a page where stood 224

Lords, knights and squires, the numerous band . . 48

Louisa serious grown and mild 106

Love, thou art absolute, sole Lord 33

Lover of children ! Fellow-heir with those .... 278

Loving she is, and tractable, though wild .... 72

Lully, lullay, thou little tiny child . 5

Man proposes, God in His time disposes 309

Marvels of sleep grown cold ! 186

May Margery of Lyntpn 212

Mother, your baby is silly ! she is so absurdly childish ! 276

My fairest child, I have no song to give you . . . 180

My first-born boy, whose beautiful dead face . . . 249

My heart leaps up when I behold ....... 96

My little Son, who look'd from thoughtful eyes . . 200

My lost William, thou in whom 118

My mother bore me in the southern wild C5

My mother ! when I learn'd that thou wast dead . . 57

My pretty, budding, breathing flower 135

My serious son ! I see thee look 108

My task it is to stand beneath the throne .... 231

My tea is nearly ready and the sun has left the sky . 252

My world was then like His that first 188

Now stained with dews, with cobwebs darkly hung . 08

' Nurse, let me draw the baby's veil aside ' . . . . 117

O Child ! O new-born denizen 140

O Christ of God ! whose life and death . . . . . 158

O faimst flow'r, no r.ooner blown but blasted . . . 29

O God, to Thee I yield 215



362 INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

O happy days of childhood, when 312

O, hush thee, my habie, thy sire was a knight ... 97

O sleep, my babe, hear not the rippling wave . . . 134

O tender dove, sweet circling in the blue 220

O thou most dear ! 273

O thou, whom, borne on fancy's eager wing .... 59

O thou ! whose fancies from afar are brought ... 76

O' zummer night, as day did gleam 131

O'er wayward childhood would'st thou hold firm rule 99

Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray 72

Oil, earlier shall the rosebuds blow 199

Oh, many a time have I, a five years' child .... 8C

Oh, say what is that tiling called light 50

Oh, what a kiss 280

Oil, what a wilderness were this sad world .... 121

Old creeping time, with silent tread 54

On a mournful day 241

On the wide lawn the snow lay deep 1 56

On the wide level of a mountain's head 101

Once in royal David's city 197

Once upon a time ! Ah, now the light is burning dimly 306

One summer evening (led by her) I found .... 88

One, the fairest of all rivers, loved 86

One year is past, with change and sorrow fraught . 122
Our doctor had called in another, I never had seen him

before 166

OurJjcod in Heaven, from that holy place .... 209

Our little queen of dreams 325

Our plot is small, but sunny limes 244

Our revels now are ended 328

Out of the deep, my child, out of the deep .... 162

Overhead the tree-tops meet 175

Piping down the valleys wild 61

Queen Gulnaar sat on her ivory bed 291

Run, Shepherds, run where Bethl'licm blest appears . 15

Say, did his sisters wonder what could Joseph sec . 200

See, what a wonderful smile ! Does it mean . . . 304

See with what simplicity 35

Seest thou yon woodland child 116

She little promised much 12

She walks the lady of my delight 279

Since, Lord, to Thee 22

Sing to the Lord the children's hymn 139

Sirs, ye are old, and ye have seen perchance . . . 221

Sleepe, babie mine, Desire's nurse, Beautie, singeth . 4

Sleep, baby, sleep ! What ails my dear 16

Sleep breathes at last from out thee Ill

Sleep, little baby, I love thee 302



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 363

PAGE

Sleep, little Baby, sleep 216

Sleep, little birdie, sleep ! will she not sleep . . . . 164

Sleepi pretty one, O sleep, while I 24

Sleep, sleep, beauty bright 62

Smile, Baby, for thy Mother home is coming . . . 140

Snow on the high-pitched minster roof and spire . . 230

Soft little hands that stray and clutch 285

Something divine about an Infant seems 154

Sporting through the forest wide 126

Spring comes anew, and brings each little pledge . . 120

Still linger in our noon of time 155

Surprised by joy impatient as the Wind .... 83

Sweet and low 165

Sweet are thy dreams, thou happy, careless boy . . 312

Sweet be her dreams, the fair, the young ! . . . . 115

Sweet dreams, form a shade 63

Sweet Infancy 1 46

Tell me, Praise, and tell me, Love 198

Tell me, tell me, smiling child ........ 176

That way look, my Infant, lo 78

The baby new to earth and sky 162

The boy, where'er he turns 80

The budding branches spread their leaves .... 289

The garden wastes : the little child is grown . . . 282

The Lady Mary Villiers lies 23

The little hands that never sought 223

The more we live, more brief appear Ill

The purest soul that e'er was sent 23

The red room with the giant bed 254

The Roman Road runs straight and bare .... 228

The rose of England bloomed on Gertrude's cheek . 110

The sheep, before the pinching heaven 97

The snow had begun in the gloaming 181

The south-wind brings 337

The tempest past 248

The trio perfect : the man, the woman, and the babe 238

The tyrannous and bloody act is done 10

The vision of her girlhood glinted by 2u8

The World is ours till sunset 289

The zun'd a-zet back t'other night 131

Then as a nimble squirrel from the wood .... 19

There are some children in the field at play .... 293

There are some wishes that may start 107

There was a Boy : ye knew him well, ye cliffs ... 79

There was a child went forth every day 182

There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream . 90

There's no dew left on the daisies and clover . . . 185

These little limbs 41

These little shoes ! How proud she was of these ! .240

They dressed us up in black 287

They scarcely waked before they slept ..... 217



364 INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

This little vault, this narrow room 24

Thou dimpled Millicent, of merry guesses .... 241

Thou mak'st me jealous, Infant dear 115

Thou slcepest, but when wilt thou wake, fair child ? 119

Three years she grew in sun and shower 81

Thro' what new world, this happy hour 237

Thus oft amid those fits of vulgar joy 90

Thy little footsteps on the sands 119

Timely blossom, Infant fair 49

Tin-tinkle-tinkle-tinkle, went the bell 294

'Tis a pleasant thing to be free 258

'Tis bed-time ; say your hymn, and bid ' Good-night ' 219

'Tis ever thus. We only meet on earth 123

'Tis Paradise to look 39

To-day I saw your little Jan 233

To that green hill, the shepherds' haunt 207

'Twas bought in Bruges, the shop was poor .... 320

"Twos on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean 66

Unconscious child, fair pictured Phantasy ! . . . . 238

Under the glittering hollies Iseult stands . . . . . 190

Upon a time, among the folk who sought .... 246

Upon my lap my sovereign sits 10

We walked along, while bright and red 84

We wandered through the wooded vales 324

We were Two lads that thought there was no more

behind 7

Wee Willie Winkie rins through the town .... 172

Weep not, my Wanton ! smile upon my knee ... 5

What God gives and what we take 20

What I shall leave thee, none can tell 14

When children are playing alone on the green . . . 253

When first her Christmas watch to keep 247

When I see childhood on the threshold seize . . . 240

When I was naughty an' sent up to bed 317

When in the evenen the zun's a zinken 128

When Letty had scarce passed her third glad year . 159

When Love arose in heart and deed . . . " . . . 198

When my mother died I was very young .... 67

When the four quarters of the world shall rise . . . ICO

When the voices of children are heard on the green . 64

Where did you come from. Baby dear ? 203

' Where have I come from, where' did you pick me up ? '

the baby asked its mother . . * 275

Where the pools are bright and deep 71

Where the thistle lifts a purple crown 268

Where were the pathways that your childhood knew ? 311

Where's the blind child, so admirably fair .... 70

Whilome in youthe, when flower'd my joyful spring . 3

Whither gazest, O my child ? 224

Who can tell what visions high 113



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 365

PAGE

Who with prayers has overtaken 237

Whoso hath seen young lads (to sport themselves) . 18

Why came I so untimely forth 28

Wise is the way of Nature, first to make 122

With lifted feet, hands still 264

With little red frock in the fire-light ..'.... 240

Ye distant spires, ye antique towers 55

Ye little household gods, that make 108

Years ago, in the land of my birth 265

Yes, I remember when the changeful earth .... 90

Yes ! looking back as early as I can 60

Yes, you may. let them creep about the rug .... 245
You go singing through my garden on little dancing

feet 322

You, O the piteous you ! '.'...'...... 270

Young Sophy leads a life without alloy 159

Your own fair youth, you care so little for it ... 280

Yourself in bed 319

Youth, that pursuest with such eager pace . . . . 161



GLASGOW : PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS
BY ROBERT MACI.EHOSE AND CO. I.TU.



THE GOLDEN TREASURY SERIES.

Pott 8vo. 35. 6d. net each.

THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF THE BEST SONGS AND LYRICAL
_ POEMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Selected and arranged,

with Notes, by FRANCIS TURNER PALGRAVE.
THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF THE BEST SONGS AND LYRICAL

POEMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Selected and arranged,

with Notes, by FRANCIS TURNER PALGRAVE. Second Series.
LYRIC LOVE : An Anthology. Edited by W. WATSON.
POET'S WALK : Chosen and arranged by MOWBRAY MORRIS.
LYRA HEROICA : Selected and arranged, with Notes, by W. E. HENLEY.
A BOOK OF ENGLISH VERSE ON INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD.
-" Chosen by L. S. WOOD.

THE CHILDREN'S GARLAND FROM THE BEST POETS. Selected

and arranged by COVENTRY PATMORE.
THE CHILDREN'S TREASURY OF LYRICAL POETRY. Arranged

by F. T. PALGRAVE.
* A BOOK OF GOLDEN THOUGHTS. By HENRY ATTWELL.

THE SUNDAY BOOK OF POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. Selected

and arranged by C. F. ALEXANDER.

GOLDEN TREASURY PSALTER. Student's Edition.
LA LYRE FRANCAISE. Selected and arranged by GUSTAVE MASSON.
BALLADEN UND ROMANZEN. The Golden Treasury of the Best

German Ballads and Romances. Selected and arranged by Dr.BucHHEiM.
DEUTSCHE LYRIK. The Golden Treasury of the Best German Lyrical

Poems. Selected and arranged, with Notes, by Dr. BUCHHEIM.
A LATIN ANTHOLOGY. By A. M. COOK.

r SELECTIONS FROM ADDISON. Edited by J. R. GREEN, M.A., LL.D.
AESCHYLUS. THE HOUSE OF ATREUS. Trans, by E. D. A.

" MORSHEAD, M.A.

,. AESCHYLUS. THE SUPPLIANT MAIDENS, ETC. Trans, by E. D.

A. MORSHEAD, M.A.
POEMS BY WILLIAM ALLINGHAM. Selected and arranged by HELEN

ALLINGHAM.

MATTHEW ARNOLD'S SELECTED POEMS.
BACON'S ESSAYS, AND COLOURS OF GOOD AND EVIL. With

Notes and Glossarial Index. By W. ALOIS WRIGHT, M.A.
SIR THOMAS BROWNE'S RELIGIO MEDICI; LETTER TO A

FRIEND, ETC., AND CHRISTIAN MORALS. Edited by W. A.

GREENHILL, M.D., Oxon.
SIR THOMAS BROWNE'S HYDRIOTAPHIA, AND THE GARDEN

OF CYRUS. Edited by W. A. GREENHILL, M.D., Oxon.
\f POETRY OF BYRON. Chosen and arranged by MATTHEW ARNOLD.
POEMS OF T. E. BROWN. Selected by H. F. B. and H. G. D.
POEMS OF THOMAS CAMPBELL. Selected and arranged by LEWIS

CAMPBELL.

LETTERS OF WILLIAM COWPER. Edited, with Introduction, by
*- Rev. W. BENHAM, B.D., F.S.A.

SELECTIONS FROM COWPER'S POEMS. With an Introduction by

Mrs. OLIPHANT.

BALTHAZAR GRACIAN'S ART OF WORLDLY WISDOM. Trans-
lated by JOSEPH JACOBS.
SELECTED POEMS OF THOMAS HARDY.

MACMILLAN ANP CO., LTD., LONDON,



THE GOLDEN TREASURY SERIES- Con fJ.

Pott 8vo. 35. 6d. net each.

A TREASURY OF SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH VERSE.

Chosen and edited by H. J. MASSINGHAM.
HEINE'S LIEDER UNO GEDICHTE. Selected and edited, with an

Introduction and Notes, by Dr. C. A. BUCHHEIM.
HERRICK : SELECTIONS FROM THE LYRICAL POEMS. Arranged,

with Notes, by F. T. PALGRAVE.

HOLMES' AUTOCRAT OF THE BREAKFAST TABLE. With Intro-
duction by Sir LESLIE STEPHEN.

TOM BROWN'S SCHOOLDAYS. By THOMAS HUGHES.
POETICAL WORKS OF KEATS. Edited by F. T. PALGRAVE.
LAMB'S TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE. Edited by the Rev. A.

AINGER, M.A.
- WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. SELECTIONS FROM THE WRITINGS

OF. Arranged and edited by SIDNEY COLVIN.
LONDON LYRICS. By F. LOCKER-LAMPSON.
MOHAMMAD. THE SPEECHES AND TABLE TALK OF THE

PROPHET. Chosen and translated by STANLEY LANE POOLE.
SELECT POEMS OF CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI. Edited by W. M.

ROSSETTI.

THE CAVALIER AND HIS LADY. Selections from the Works of the

First Duke and Duchess of Newcastle.
RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM, the Astronomer-Poet of Persia.

Rendered into English Verse by EDWARD FITZGERALD.
EUPHRANOR, and other Miscellanies. By EDWARD FITZGERALD.
APHORISMS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF THOMAS

HENRY HUXLEY. Selected by HENRIETTA A. HUXLEY.
MARCUS AURELIUS ANTONINUS TO HIMSELF. An English Version

by Rev. Dr. GERALD HENRY RENDALL.
GOLDEN SAYINGS OF EPICTETUS. Translated and arranged by

HASTINGS CROSSLEY, M.A., Litt.D.
THE REPUBLIC OF PLATO. Translated into English, with Notes, by

J. LL. DAVIES, M.A., and D. J. VAUGHAN, M.A.
THE TRIAL AND DEATH OF SOCRATES. Being the Euthyphron,

Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Plato. Translated by F. J. CHURCH.
PHAEDRUS, LYSIS, AND PROTAGORAS OF PLATO. A New Trans-
lation by J. WRIGHT.

SHAKESPEARE'S SONGS AND SONNETS. Edited by F. T. PALGRAVE.
POEMS OF SHELLEY. Edited by STOPFORD A. BROOKE, M.A.
ESSAYS OF RICHARD STEELE. Edited by L. EDWARD STEELE.
LYRICAL POEMS. By ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON. Selected and annotated

by F. T. PALGRAVE.

THE PRINCESS. By ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON.
THE IDYLLS OF THE KING. By ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON.
IN MEMORIAM. By ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON.
THEOCRITUS, BION, AND MOSCHUS. Rendered into English Prose

by ANDREW LANG.

POEMS OF WORDSWORTH. Edited by MATTHEW ARNOLD.
A BOOK OF GOLDEN DEEDS OF ALL TIMES AND ALL

COUNTRIES. Gathered and narrated anew. By C. M. YONGE.
A BOOK OF WORTHIES. By C. M. YONGE.
THE STORY OF THE CHRISTIANS AND THE MOORS OF SPAIN. By

the Author of " The Heir of Redclyffe." Vignette by HOLMAN HUNT.

M ACM ILL AN AND CO., LTD., LONDON,





1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20

Online LibraryL. S. (Leonard Southerden) WoodA book of English verse on infancy and childhood → online text (page 20 of 20)