Lee M. (Lee Myron) Corless.

A family study - descendants of Jesse and Polly (Chase) Corless and David and Ann (Clark) Brooks : with connected families, Bailey, Charlton, Chase, Dexter, Harris, Hildreth, Luethe, Newell, Shain, Welch, Whaley, Woolley online

. (page 1 of 39)
Online LibraryLee M. (Lee Myron) CorlessA family study - descendants of Jesse and Polly (Chase) Corless and David and Ann (Clark) Brooks : with connected families, Bailey, Charlton, Chase, Dexter, Harris, Hildreth, Luethe, Newell, Shain, Welch, Whaley, Woolley → online text (page 1 of 39)
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A FAMILY STUDY



Descendants



and



David and Ann (Clark) Brooks



with
Connected Families



by



Lee and Mae Corless









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DATE MICROFILMED
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PROJECT and G. S.

ROLL # CALL #



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CORLESS BROOKS

and

RELATED FAMILIES



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The Genealogical Society of Utah would like

permission to preserve your publication on microfilm

and make it available to our branch libraries. If you

agree, please complete this card and return it to us.

I authorize the Genealogical Society of Utah to

microfilm my publication and to use the film

in its library system.



Title of publication



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Signature,



Date i^ :y-^ » d^






/>d^^^,^ /^rm9Mr-r7^«fe^



141 d Printed in USA



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2 K




Lee M. Corless



A FAMILY STUDY

Descendants
of

Jesse and Polly (Chase) Corless

and

David and Ann (Clark) Brooks

with
Connected Families



Bailey
Charlton
Chase
Dexter



6\i'>i



Harris
Hildreth
Luethe
Newell

by



Shain
Welch
Whaley
Woolley



0^ Lee and Mae Corless

Published by the Authors/ 1980

GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF
LATTER-DAY SAINTS



Copyright © 1980 by Lee M. Corless and Mae E. Corless

All Rights Reserved

Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 79-90219



Printed by Harlo Press, 50 Victor, Detroit, Michigan 48203



All

y9



Dedicated

to

THE DESCENDANTS

of the

FAMILIES

recorded here-in



"To forget one's ancestors is to be a brook
without a source, a tree without a root."

— Old Chinese Proverb

"Even the palest ink is more reliable than
the most retentive memory."

— Old Chinese Proverb

"He that publishes a book runs a very
great hazard, since nothing can be more
impossible than to compose one that may
secure the approbation of every reader."

— Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra





CONTENTS


Introduction


Guide for using the Book


Abbreviations


Parti




Chapter I


Jesse & Polly (Chase) Corless


II


Philander


III


Hiram


IV


Laura


V


David


VI


Bradford


VII


Jesse, Jr.


VIII


Polly


Part II




Chapter I


David & Ann (Clark) Brooks


II


Susannah and Eunice


III


Nathan


IV


Jonathan


V


Israel


VI


Abigail


VII


Sarah


VIII


Benjamin


Part III


Related Families


Chapter I


Bailey ,


II


Charlton


III


Chase


IV


Dexter


V


Harris


VI


Hildreth


VII


Luethe


VIII


Newell


IX


Shain


X


Welch


XI


Whaley


XII


Woolley



Page
13
15
16

17
22
47
96
97
99
134
140

141

144
147
149
203
204
205
207

263
271
285
289
305
311
315
321
334
339
357
371

Early Years in Branch County, Michigan 390

Early Years in Elgin County, Ontario 393

INDEX 397



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We are indebted to many people for their contributions
to this work, far too many to single out; we would be
remiss, however, in not mentioning the following:

Alta (Corless) Stroh (born in 1858) who gave us our
first bit of information about Jesse and Polly Corless and
thereby arousing our interest.

Helene (Brooks) Green for inspiration, guidance and
much data. She well remembers discussions with "Uncle
Nate" Brooks (born in 1839) who enjoyed reminiscing
about the family in the days of his youth in Elgin County,
Ontario.

Deana (Corless) King who was of invaluable assistance
with the Corlesses of Branch County, Michigan.

Wilma Jeffries for her material on the early Brooks
and those who crossed the Mississippi, including their
descendants.

Ken and Laura Fitzpatrick who supplied information
and were our hosts and guides for numerous Elgin Coun-
ty, Ontario excursions.

Fred Lindsay for his vast knowledge of the pioneer
families of Elgin County.

Daniel and Edna Welch for their knowledge and
guidance in the "Thumb Area" of Michigan.

Amie (Campbell) Woolley for Campbell and Woolley
information.

Howard Woolley for extensive Woolley research.

Earl and Verna Smyth for Jesse Corless, Jr. informa-
tion.

James Lancaster for Bailey information.

11



Mary (Dexter) Cooper for Dexter and Whaley data.

E. Loraine (Stanton) Sales for Brooks family data, and
for many days spent in final typing and in proof reading;
her unlimited patience during weeks of work, can only be
appreciated by those experienced in such activity.

In addition our thanks to scores of people who gave
hours of time in discussion, search and the writing of hun-
dreds of letters to us.



12



INTRODUCTION

We consider this Boole to be our personal report to our
family, relatives and descendants, of our extensive study
of the family history. The project has been much greater
than anticipated, but worth all the effort, for our gains in
terms of family knowledge, friends acquired, history
learned and overall broadening of experience and view-
point, have been most gratifying.

We started to write about the Corless family but after
finding seven Brooks-Corless marriages it was obviously
desirable to include the Brooks. As the work progressed
we found twelve families who were related by two or more
marriages and we felt that they should be included to help
round out the picture and because of the strong interest
evidenced by them,

David Brooks was born circa 1750, and Jesse Corless
was born circa 1778.

The generations recorded here-in span the growth of
Canada and the United States from Nova Scotia and New
England to the Pacific Coast. Our forebears were part of
those courageous and hardy souls who made that expan-
sion possible; they were solid contributing citizens; we are
proud of them, and how proud they would be if they could
be aware of the many fields of activity in which today's
descendants are involved.

Numerous items presented here-in came verbally from
persons who passed on many years ago. Without this work
such information would be lost. For example a woman
that we had just met gave us a clue which resulted in our
finding the death date and burial information for one of

13



David Brooks grandaughters and the name, birthdate and
marriage of another grandaughter whose existence had
hither-to been unknown. The woman who provided the
clue died quite unexpectedly just three weeks later.

We have tried to make this interesting in addition to
being statistical, keeping in mind that our descendants of
two hundred years in the future will be as interested in our
lives, as we are in the lives of our predecessors who we
wish had bequeathed to us more records of their time.

We regret that time (and circumstances) have not per-
mitted further study in numerous areas. The failure of too
many persons to answer a letter of inquiry is regrettable.
At any rate we have obtained and recorded enough
material to be interesting and valuable, and hope that it
will encourage younger persons to carry on the work.

Our material sources include hundreds of interviews
in person and via telephone, correspondence with hun-
dreds of people, untold days spent in the careful perusal
of many records including Church, Census, birth, mar-
riage, death, land, wills, old newspapers, maps, genea-
logical books, Genealogical Society reports and complete
searches of cemeteries. The letters written, miles traveled
and days required to locate and study these sources was
something else.

We believe that every child is entitled to know about
his antecendents, and that it is the responsibility of his
parents to take necessary steps to ensure that such
knowledge is passed on.

Truth is stranger than fiction and a thousand fold
more difficult to find.

We have double and triple checked information when
ever possible, and have done our best to transfer all in-
formation obtained by ourselves and supplied by others,
into this Book correctly. As we are all only human, it is
possible that errors may be found; if so we beg your in-
dulgence.



14



GUIDE FOR USING THIS BOOK

The material has been divided into three parts as in-
dicated on the Contents Page. The first Chapter in Parts I
and II, is devoted to the origin of the name, it's introduc-
tion to this Continent and the first family on which we
have information. Each of their children, in turn, is the
subject of a Chapter which includes the child and descen-
dants; information is presented in the eldest child se-
quence; it follows then that the youngest child and descen-
dants, appear in the latter portion of the Chapter. Each
principal name, in the paragraph devoted to it, is usually
followed by the name of the Corless or Brooks parent and
pertinent preceding lineage.

In Part III a Chapter is devoted to each of the more
closely connected families, and the material is presented in
much the same manner as indicated above.

Quotation marks about a name indicate the name by
which a person was best known.

The Index includes all names in the Book, and for the
Corless and Brooks lines the year of birth is given for con-
venience in locating the individual. In Part III the year of
birth is given for frequently used given names.

Given names are frequently a problem because the
records are normally indexed by the first name while many
persons are known by their middle name, or a nickname
which is some times not indicative. If difficulty is ex-
perienced in finding a name try different spellings, observe
middle names or initials, and lastly if the name of a parent
or child is known, look for that person.



15



ABBREVIATIONS



b. - born






dau - daughter




bu - buried






div - divorced




ca - circa






m. - married




Co - County






nr - near




d. - died






Twp. - Township


SAR


- Sons of the American Revolution




DAR


- Daughters of the American Revolution




Alabama


-


AL


Montana


MT


Alaska


-


AK


Nebraska


NE


Arizona


-


AZ


Nevada


NV


Arkansas


-


AR


New Hampshire


NH


California


-


CA


New Jersey


NJ


Colorado


-


CO


New Mexico


NM


Connecticut


-


CT


New York


NY


Delaware


-


DE


North Carolina


NC


Dist. of Columbia


DC


North Dakota


ND


Florida


-


FL


Ohio


OH


Georgia


-


GA


Oklahoma


OK


Hawaii


-


HI


Oregon


OR


Idaho


-


ID


Pennsylvania


PA


Illinois


-


IL


Rhode Island


RI


Indiana


-


IN


South Carolina


SC


Iowa


-


lA


South Dakota


SD


Kansas


-


KS


Tennessee


TN


Kentucky


-


KY


Texas


TX


Louisiana


-


LA


Utah


UT


Maine


-


ME


Vermont


VT


Mayrland


-


MD


Virginia


VA


Massachusetts


-


MA


Washington


WA


Michigan


-


MI


West Virginia


WV


Minnesota


-


MN


Wisconsin


WI


Mississippi


-


MS


Wyoming


WY


Missouri


Alberta


MO


- ALTA






British Columbia


- BC






Canada


L


- CAN






Manitoba


- MAN






Ontario


)


- ONT






Quebec




- QUE






Saskatchewan


- SASK





16



PART I 17



CHAPTER I



CORLESS



The origin of the surname Corless is shrouded in history
like so many others. A Reginald de Corlies was active at the
Siege of Jerusalem during the Second Crusade which occurred
during the period 1147 - 1188 A.D. Some of the Corlies family
emigrated from Belgium to England in the 17th Century because
of severe religious persecution which took place over an ex-
tended period of time. One of the more widely known events was
the Massacre of Bartholomew which started in Paris on August
24,15 72; an estimated 3000 Huguenots were slaughtered that
night and over 25,000 within the week in France. The Edict of
Nantes in 159 8, finally granted religious freedom for most of
the Huguenots; but was revoked in 1685.

The name in England has been variously spelled Corlies,
Corlass, Corliss and Corless.

An Irish author, Edward MacLysaght, has been reported as
saying that the surname Corless is an Anglicization of an
Irish Gaelic name; it comes from MacCathail, meaning son of
Cathail (Mighty in Battle) , and in modem times it also has
been derived from MacCaluis - son of Carluis (Charles) .

A Book on the Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the
Revolution, states that the name Corless appears under the
form of Corliss, Calles, Caulest, Cauliss, Coless, Colis,
Curlis and Kellis; obviously these variations resulted prim-
arily from the fact that many of the soldiers did not know how
to read and write, and company clerks wrote the name the way
it sounded to them. The same person sometimes appears in the
book under more than one spelling, with the first name and
company being identical. Another variation reported in a 19th
century book, included Corlaes. In other words, you spell it
and it can be found.

At any rate our name is Corless and has been so for at
least 160 years. This name is fairly well known in Ireland
and England today.

THE FIRST CORLESS ON THE AMERICAN CONTINENT

The first Corless (or Corliss, both spellings are found in
print) that we found on record on this Continent was George,
son of Thomas, bom in Devonshire, England about 1617. He em-
igrated to New England in 16 39, settled in Newbury, Mass., and
moved to Haverhill where he remained. He married Joanna Davis,
Cct 26,1645, and they had seven daughters, and a son John.



18 PART I CH I

Their first child, Mary, gained much publicity for she was
with Hannah Dustin when they were captured by the Indians on
March 15,169 7. Three nights later the two women and a youth
rose on their captors, scalped ten of them and escaped. Later
the General Court in Boston voted awards for them. John had
four sons, but it does not appear that we are descendents of
any one of them.

A Jesse Corless (Corliss, both spellings are found in the
records) was killed at Bunker Hill but efforts to identify him
have been fruitless. Others of the Corless line served in the
Revolutionary War, but efforts to connect them to our Jesse
have been unsuccessful.

JESSE AND POLLY (CHASE) CORLESS

The earliest Corless of our lineage on which we have any in-
formation is Jesse, and the first location was in the area now
known as Madison County, NY. The parents, birth and marriage
dates and locations of Jesse and Polly remain a mystery in
spite of much time and effort spent by ourselves and by pro-
fessional genealogists working at our request. Tradition has
it that Jesse left home at the age of fourteen; and that Polly
had red hair and blue eyes.

The first bom of Jesse and Polly is believed to have been
Lyman, bom about 1798. The next three children were bom in
the period 1800 - 180A presumably in Madison County (Census
records indicate their birth place as the United States) while
the remaining children were bom in Quebec (according to
Census Records) during the period 1810 - 1815. Alta Corless
Stroh (b . 1858) believed that the family moved from Madison
County to Prescott County, Ontario, which is directly across
the Ottawa River from Argenteuil County , Quebec, where we now
believe they lived. Alta also said that their farm was divided
by a large river, however, it seems unlikely Chat a farm would
be divided by as large a river as the Ottawa (then known as
the Grand River) .

The family move to Canada might have been made for any num-
ber of reasons, they might not have liked their situation in
Madison County; Jesse may have lived in Canada for a time
during his younger years and liked it; they might have been
United Empire Loyalists and fled from the States because of
the extreme unpopularity of the Loyalists during and after the
Revolutionary War; they may have liked the English Govern-
ment's offer of free land, made to encourage immigration.

The birth of their third child, Hiram, was recorded in a
Bible (Published 1859, owned by Hiram) as having occurred on
March 7,1803 in Madison County, NY. We first saw the Bible in
the home of Hiram, grandson of Hiram, in Coldwater, Michigan
in 1934. In addition to the birth record, the Bible contained
dates for some of his children and dates of his two marriages;



PART I CH I 19

the entries were written in a fine Spencerian style.

Nothing is known of their life in New York or Canada. Life
was rugged at best, with the farms heavily wooded and general-
ly located along the rivers; there were no roads, the few
trails were only passable in favorable weather. History indi-
cates that the English government provided a limited number of
simple tools to immigrants.

Family legend indicated that Jesse fell, while getting into
or out of a boat to cross the river to go to another part of
his farm. He landed on the stump of a small sapling and died
as a result thereof. This would have been in 1816, as a state-
ment ascribed to Hiram, said that he "had been left an orphan
at the age of thirteen."

Sometime after Jesse's death, Polly, with several children
to care for, married William Welch. Little is known about
William; some of the Welch descendants believe that he was an
Irish Catholic who fled to England, and later to Canada, to
escape persecution; that he married in England and took his
wife and children with him to Canada. No accounting has sur-
vived as to what happened to the wife and children. One won-
ders if this might have happened instead to his father, who
might also have been named William.

William and Polly's son Thomas, according to a brief biogra-
phy in a History of Sanilac County, Michigan, published in
188A, was bom on the Grand River, in Chatham Township, Argen-
teuil County, Quebec, on Feb 4,1819. William died in a lumber-
ing accident apparently about a year after his son's birth.
Again Polly (Mary) was left with a family to care for. We had
learned a long time ago that Edward Whaley, a grandson of
Polly, had said that his grandfather Captain Whaley, had marr-
ied the Widow Corless. After forty years of pondering that one,
we finally found, on a microfilm borrowed from a Quebec Lib-
rary, the following item in the records of the St. Andrews
Presbyterian Church of Argenteuil County, "Samuel Whaley of
Chatham, farmer and Mary Chase of the same place, widow were
married after proclamation of Banns, on 25 July 1821, Arch
Henderson, minister."

Happy Days! We now not only had the confirmation of this
third marriage but a specific location for Polly at one moment
in her life, and also the given name of Captain Whaley. The
question as to the use of the name Mary Chase, in the marriage
record was soon resolved by asking a professional genealogist
friend, who had done considerable work in the Argenteuil area.
She said that it was common practice for a widow to use her
maiden name for record of marriage.

The afore mentioned biography of Thomas Welch quoted him as
saying that he went with his parents to Upper Canada when he
was twelve years old. This would have been in 1831. Lloyd
Welch, of London, Ontario, a grandson of Thomas, said that
"as he remembered from things he heard in childhood, his fa-



20



Part I Ch I
JESSE and POLLY (CHASE) CORLESS



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PART I CH I 21

ther's family came to Elgin County by boat, landing in Port
Burwell, from Ireland." Port Burwell is one of the Elgin
County ports on Lake Erie.

It appears therefore that Polly, Samuel Whaley and the
younger children went to Elgin County to be near her daughter
and his son Peter, her older three sons, the Brooks families
and Chase relatives, all of whom had preceded her to that
area. Actually nothing is known about the final years and
death of Polly and Samuel. Fourth generation Corlesses that
we talked to in the 19 30s did not believe that Polly came to
Elgin, based apparently on the fact that they never heard of
it. Another thought was introduced years later when Daniel
Welch of Michigan, a great-grandson of Thomas Welch, told us
the following - "Polly's first husband was a man by the name
of Hoover, her second husband was a Welch, and her third hus-
band was a Corless." Daniel had no dates or other evidence to
support this version, and his study of our data quickly indi-
cated that this story had become twisted over the many years.
This idea started us off on an extensive search to find evid-
ence of the Hoover marriage, but none was found in records or
in talking to persons named Hoover in Elgin County, as they
know little about the early Hoovers in the area.

We hope that some day, some one may be able to find the
facts about Polly's last years. We believe that she must have
been an attractive and industrious woman to keep her children
together as well as she did after losing their father, and to
find other husbands to help raise those children.

Children of Polly and Jesse - Lyman, Phi lander, Hi ram, Laura,

David, Bradford, Jesse and Polly
Polly and William Welch - Thomas Welch

LYMAN CORLESS - son of Jesse Corless

b. ca 179 8, probably in Madison County, NY



Online LibraryLee M. (Lee Myron) CorlessA family study - descendants of Jesse and Polly (Chase) Corless and David and Ann (Clark) Brooks : with connected families, Bailey, Charlton, Chase, Dexter, Harris, Hildreth, Luethe, Newell, Shain, Welch, Whaley, Woolley → online text (page 1 of 39)